Bulletin

Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC)

Air Force ROTC — Aerospace Studies

Professor

Michael R. Hargis
Col., U.S.A.F.

Military Aerospace Science. Our Core Values: Integrity First, Service Before Self, Excellence In All We Do. Air Force operations are currently conducted in the technologically demanding environments of air, space and cyberspace.

AFROTC is a four-year officer development program, producing the leaders of tomorrow’s Air Force. The program’s purpose is to train and develop outstanding college students to earn commissions as U.S. Air Force Officers. Numerous Washington University students have participated in Air Force ROTC and gone on to distinguish themselves as Air Force aviators, engineers, physicians and astronauts.

In AFROTC, Washington University students have the opportunity to be challenged within a unique leadership environment, with the potential to earn a commission as a second lieutenant. Participation in Air Force ROTC is available to freshmen and possibly sophomore Washington University students and will not obligate a student to serve in the U.S. Air Force. 

Air Force ROTC attracts the very best and brightest college students. The categorization of officer candidates within Air Force ROTC is based upon competitive selection criteria.

For more information, contact the AFROTC Detachment 207 in St. Louis at  314/977-8227 or www.slu.edu/organizations/afrotc; or 1-888-4-AFROTC or www.afrotc.com.

For AFROTC scholarship information, see the Scholarship page of this Bulletin.

Army ROTC

Military Science. Army ROTC is a program that develops leadership, management and training skills regardless of your career plans. Those who successfully complete the program will earn a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army, Army Reserve or Army National Guard.

All students are eligible to participate in Army ROTC courses. Introductory courses are available in which you will develop confidence, self-esteem and motivation. The intent is to develop and refine your leadership traits and skills to ensure success. Instruction also includes the role of the military in national defense strategy. Once you accept a scholarship or enter the advanced courses (300 and 400 levels), you incur a military obligation. Military Science course work taken in the Army ROTC program does not count toward the A.B. degree in the College of Arts & Sciences. For more information, write the Military Science Department, Washington University in St. Louis, 700 Rosedale Ave., Suite 1120, St. Louis, MO 63112, or call 314/935-5521, or visit the Washington University Army ROTC website at www.rotc.wustl.edu.

For Army ROTC scholarship information, see the Scholarship page of this Bulletin.

Courses

Air Force ROTC — Aerospace Studies

I02 MAIR 101. Foundations of the United States Air Force I
A survey course designed to introduce students to the U.S. Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, group leadership problems, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets, and it complements this course by providing students with followership experiences and prepares them for Field Training. Classroom activity, one hour per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 101 through MAIR 202) are basic courses designed to acquaint students with the U.S. Air Force and the opportunities available as an officer.
I02 MAIR 102. Foundations of the United States Air Force II
A survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, group leadership problems, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for Air Force ROTC cadets, and it complements this course by providing students with followership experiences and prepares them for field training. Classroom activity, one hour per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 101 through MAIR 202) are basic courses designed to acquaint students with the United States Air Force and the opportunities available as an officer.
I02 MAIR 201. Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power I
A survey course concerned with the beginnings of manned flight and the development of aerospace power in the United States, including the employment of air power in WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War and the peaceful employment of U.S. air power in civic actions, scientific missions and support of space exploration. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for Air Force ROTC cadets and it complements this course by providing cadets with their first opportunity for applied leadership experiences and prepares them for Field Training. Classroom activity, one hour per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 101 through MAIR 202) are basic courses designed to acquaint students with the United States Air Force and the opportunities available as an officer.
I02 MAIR 202. Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power II
A survey course concerned with the beginnings of manned flight and the development of aerospace power in the United States, including the employment of air power in WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War and the peaceful employment of U.S. air power in civic actions, scientific missions and support of space exploration. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for Air Force ROTC cadets and it complements this course by providing them with their first opportunity for applied leadership experiences and prepares them for Field Training. Classroom activity, one hour per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 101 through MAIR 202) are basic courses designed to acquaint cadets with the United States Air Force and the opportunities available as an officer.
I02 MAIR 301. Air Force Leadership Studies, Principles of Leadership and Management I
This course is a study in the anatomy of leadership, the need for quality and management leadership, the role of discipline in leadership situations and the variables affecting leadership. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts. Cadets deal with actual problems and complete projects associated with planning and managing the Leadership Laboratory. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving cadets opportunities to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Classroom activity, three hours per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 301 through MAIR 402) are advanced courses designed to improve communication and management skills required of Air Force officers.
I02 MAIR 302. Air Force Leadership Studies, Principles of Leadership and Management II
This course continues the study in the anatomy of leadership, the need for quality and management leadership, the role of discipline in leadership situations and the variables affecting leadership. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts. Cadets deal with actual problems and complete projects associated with planning and managing the Leadership Laboratory. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving cadets opportunities to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Classroom activity, three hours per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 301 through MAIR 402) are advanced courses designed to improve communication and management skills required of Air Force officers.
I02 MAIR 401. National Security Studies and Preparation for Active Duty I
Cadets learn about the role of the professional military leader in a democratic society; societal attitudes toward the armed forces; the requisites for maintaining adequate national defense structure; the impact of technological and international developments on strategic preparedness and the overall policy-making process; and military law. In addition, cadets study topics that prepare them for their first active-duty assignment as officers in the Air Force. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course. Leadership Laboratory provides advanced leadership experiences and gives cadets opportunities to develop and apply fundamental leadership and management skills while planning and conducting corps activities. Classroom activity three hours per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 301 through MAIR 402) are advanced courses designed to improve communication and management skills required of Air Force officers.
I02 MAIR 402. National Security Studies and Preparation for Active Duty II
Cadets learn about the role of the professional military leader in a democratic society; societal attitudes toward the armed forces; the requisites for maintaining adequate national defense structure; the impact of technological and international developments on strategic preparedness and the overall policy-making process; and military law. In addition, cadets study topics that prepare them for their first active-duty assignment as officers in the Air Force. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course. Leadership Laboratory provides advanced leadership experiences and gives cadets opportunities to develop and apply fundamental leadership and management skills while planning and conducting corps activities. Classroom activity three hours per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 301 through MAIR 402) are advanced courses designed to improve communication and management skills required of Air Force officers.

 

Army ROTC

I25 MILS 101C. Introduction to Army ROTC
Make your first new peer group at college one committed to performing well and enjoying the experience. Increase self-confidence through team study and activities in basic drill, physical fitness, rappelling, leadership reaction course, first aid, making presentations and basic marksmanship. Learn fundamental concepts of leadership in a profession in both classroom and outdoor laboratory environments. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall 303) to have 2 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.
I25 MILS 102C. Introduction to Leadership
Learn/apply principles of effective leading. Reinforce self-confidence through participation in physically and mentally challenging exercises with upper-division ROTC students. Develop communication skills to improve individual performance and group interaction. Relate organizational ethical values to the effectiveness of a leader. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall 303) to have 2 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.
I25 MILS 201C. Self/Team Development
Learn/apply ethics-based leadership skills that develop individual abilities and contribute to the building of effective teams of people. Develop skills in oral presentations, writing concisely, planning of events, coordination of group efforts, advanced first aid, land navigation and basic military tactics. Learn fundamentals of ROTC’s Leadership Development Program. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.
I25 MILS 202C. Individual/Team Military Tactics
Introduction to individual and team aspects of military tactics in small unit operations. Includes use of radio communications, making safety assessments, movement techniques, planning for team safety/security and methods of pre-execution checks. Practical exercises with upper-division ROTC students. Learn techniques for training others as an aspect of continued leadership development. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.
I25 MILS 301C. Leading Small Organizations I
Series of practical opportunities to lead small groups, receive personal assessments and encouragement, and lead again in situations of increasing complexity. Uses small-unit defensive tactics and opportunities to plan and conduct training for lower-division students, both to develop such skills and as vehicles for practicing leading. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.
I25 MILS 302C. Leading Small Organizations II
Continues methodology of Military Science 301C. Analyze tasks, prepare written or oral guidance for team members to accomplish tasks. Delegate tasks and supervise. Plan for and adapt to the unexpected in organizations under stress. Examine and apply lessons from leadership case studies. Examine importance of ethical decision making in setting a positive climate that enhances team performance. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.
I25 MILS 401C. Leadership Challenges and Goal-Setting
Plan, conduct and evaluate activities of the Army ROTC cadet organization. Articulate goals and put plans into action to attain them. Assess organizational cohesion and develop strategies to improve it. Develop confidence in skills to lead people and manage resources. Learn/apply various Army policies and programs in this effort. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.
I25 MILS 402C. Transition to Lieutenant
Continues the methodology from Military Science 401C. Identify and resolve ethical dilemmas. Refine counseling and motivating techniques. Examine aspects of tradition and law as it relates to leading as an officer in the Army. Prepare for a future as a successful Army lieutenant. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.

 

Seal of Washington University in St. Louis