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About Olin Business School

Students have many reasons to choose Olin Business School, starting with freshman entry, which allows them to begin studying business while considering other interests and career options. Not only does this build a strong business foundation, it often leads to the pursuit of double majors and minors, both inside Olin and with other Washington University schools. Olin School students take 40 percent of their classes outside the business school, giving them a chance to explore passions and create their own path.

The Olin Business School is a welcoming community where everyone values teamwork and collaboration in addition to personal achievement. Faculty members, well known for their thought leadership and dedication to teaching, genuinely care about student success in the program. It's the kind of place where students form lifelong relationships, both personal and professional.

Students will find many opportunities to apply what they've learned in class to real-world situations on campus, in St. Louis, and around the globe. These experiential learning opportunities — study abroad programs, practicums, internships, entrepreneurial studies and more — prepare students to compete in a constantly changing, global marketplace.

An Olin School undergraduate degree teaches students critical-thinking skills that enable them to solve the right problems and to make decisions quickly and confidently. It's an exceptional launching pad for success, whatever career path a student chooses to take after graduation.

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA)

Olin Business School offers a full-time Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) degree program of instruction. Undergraduate students at the Olin School may choose to major in one or two professional fields in business as part of their degrees. Our BSBA students enroll in business courses in their freshman year. The curriculum covers the core functional areas of business. At least one major course of study in a field of business and at least 40 percent of the course work must be in nonbusiness fields — from fine arts to science — allowing students to pursue individual careers and ensuring a well-rounded educational experience.

Majors

BSBAs are offered the option to focus their studies in a specific field of business. While a business student is not required to declare a business major, almost all our business students earn at least one professional major. A student may pursue one or two majors from the list below:

  • Accounting
  • Economics and Strategy
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Finance
  • Health Care Management
  • Leadership and Strategic Management
  • Marketing
  • Operations and Supply Chain Management

Specific requirements for each major can be found on the Majors page.

Combined Majors

Business students have the option to major in more than one field of study. BSBA students can earn a total of two majors either both in business or one in business and one outside of the Olin School. For example, a student could earn a BSBA degree with a major in finance and a major in English literature from the College of Arts & Sciences. Students must complete the specific courses required for the second major, but they are not required to complete the general requirements for the second degree. Students should consult with their academic advisers for additional information. Upon completion, the student's transcript would show a BSBA degree along with the earned second major. A diploma is awarded for the degree, with reference to any major(s) on the official transcript.

Minors

Many departments and schools in the university offer minors. Business students also can pursue a minor outside of Olin Business School in any recognized academic discipline offered within the university by satisfactorily completing all the requirements for both the BSBA degree and the minor. Required courses for a minor outside of business may range from 15 to 27 units, depending on the specific regulations of the academic department. A business student who applies for a minor and completes all of the requirements will have the award of the minor noted on the official transcript. A student must be approved for admission to a minor program by the department offering the minor.

Business students typically may not minor in a business subject. However, BSBA students may choose our business of sports minor or the international business minor offered through the Olin Business School. Additional information is listed on the Minors page. 

Students from other schools of Washington University can read about business minors on the Minors page.

Combined Degrees

A student also can earn two undergraduate degrees simultaneously — a BSBA degree and another undergraduate degree offered at the university. The student must be admitted to the other degree-granting program, and he or she must meet specific degree requirements for both schools. Typically, this option requires additional time to complete all requirements. For example, if a student combines a business degree with a degree from the College of Arts & Sciences, the student must complete a minimum of 150 units between the two disciplines. Of the 150 units, at least 90 units must be from the College of Arts & Sciences and at least 54.5 units from Olin Business School. Some courses may be used to satisfy both degree requirements simultaneously. Because requirements for a second degree vary from discipline to discipline, students should talk with their primary adviser to plan their program.

Joint Undergraduate and Business Master's Degrees

Master of Business Administration (MBA)

A special five-year program combining an undergraduate degree with the Master of Business Administration degree is available to a select number of undergraduates. Often referred to as the 3+2 program, it combines three years of undergraduate study and two years of MBA study for completion of both degrees in five years. Joint programs include: the AB/MBA degrees offered with the College of Arts & Sciences, the BS/MBA degrees offered with the School of Engineering & Applied Science, and the BSBA/MBA degrees offered through Olin Business School.

Admission to the 3+2 program is extremely competitive. The student must have a superior academic record, an outstanding performance on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE) and substantive summer internship experience in a related field.

Students apply during the winter of their junior year and begin the full-time MBA program in the fall semester. They must complete at least 90 units of undergraduate course work before entering Olin's MBA program and then complete an additional 66 units of graduate-level courses. Students should consult their academic adviser during their sophomore year regarding specific degree requirements. If a student's undergraduate major is in the School of Engineering & Applied Science or the College of Arts & Sciences, up to 15 units of remaining undergraduate courses will apply toward the 66 units required in the MBA program. If a student's undergraduate major is in Olin Business School, up to 6 units of remaining undergraduate course work will apply toward the 66 units required in the MBA program. Visit the MBA website page on joint degrees for more information, including additional requirements for Arts & Sciences candidates.

In addition, an MBA student can earn a second graduate degree concurrently in one of the following disciplines:

  • Master of Architecture (MBA/MArch), Master of Urban Design (MBA/MUD)
  • Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering (MBA/MS-BME)
  • Master of Arts in East Asian Studies (MBA/MA)
  • Juris Doctorate (MBA/JD)
  • Master of Social Work (MBA/MSW)
  • Master of Public Health (MBA/MPH)
  • Master of Engineering in Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering (MBA/MEng–EECE)

To apply contact the Graduate Programs Office in Knight Hall, Room 310, or send an email to mba@olin.wustl.edu.

Specialized Master's Programs

A specialized master's degree is highly concentrated and singular in focus, providing intensive education in one business discipline. Olin Business School offers a variety of specialized master's programs. Visit http://olin.wustl.edu/SMP for details. Further information is available in the Graduate Programs Office in Knight Hall, Room 310, or by emailing the programs using the contact information below.

If students are interested in pursuing a specialized master's degree, it is recommended that they contact the Graduate Programs Office in advance to discuss the BSBA/SMP. Combined Program General Principles and Guidelines as follows:

  1. Only students who have attained senior status in their undergraduate studies (as measured by degree credit hours earned) will be allowed to register for graduate-level courses. There are two paths to securing approval for these registrations.
    1. Students accepted to an SMP program, working with their SMP adviser, will select and register for the relevant and approved courses together.
    2. Senior undergraduate students who are endorsed by the BSBA program as having a hardship or undue burden in completing their BSBA requirements may be granted special permission to register for a course(s). Registrations will be approved by the Graduate Programs Office according to an established procedure.
  2. Undergraduate students should apply to an SMP program during their junior year (as defined by credit hours) in order to allow sufficient lead time for an admissions decision and for academic planning.
  3. Undergraduate students will be limited to taking a maximum of 18 graduate credit hours during their senior year while still officially coded as an undergraduate student.
  4. Students will enroll for at least one full-time semester (fall, spring or summer) coded and registered as a graduate student.
  5. Tuition for the graduate semester will be applied at the full-time graduate program rate for the specific degree program the student is pursuing.
  6. If the student needs additional course work beyond the immersive graduate semester, they will be charged the full-time or part-time graduate tuition rate — whichever applies based on the number of credit hours.

For students at Washington University, the GMAT/GRE requirement and $100 application fee are waived.

Master of Accounting (MACC)

Whether a person's career interests lie in public or corporate accounting, consulting or financial services, the Olin School's Master of Accounting (MACC) program will prepare him/her for an exciting and challenging future. This program requires 33 graduate-level credit units in addition to the course work requirements for an undergraduate degree. Course work is included to help meet eligibility requirements to sit for the CPA exam in states with the "150-hour rule." It is expected that students will have completed Intermediate Financial Accounting before beginning the program.

Visit the MACC website or email maccinfo@wustl.edu.

Master of Science in Customer Analytics (MSCA)

The MSCA program will provide a student with the tools to become an analytics-driven business manager, well-versed to guide firms in the emerging era of big data and data-driven decision-making. Washington University's Olin Business School, School of Engineering, and the College of Arts & Sciences have partnered with business technology industry leader IBM to create a curriculum that will help a student formulate and implement analytics-driven approaches to marketing.

Completion of the degree requires a minimum of 30.5 credits of graduate-level (500-level) structured course work, in addition to the course requirements for an undergraduate degree. MEC 5200 and one-day courses in SPSS programming and R programming are taught in August and are required as foundations courses. A student must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0. Applicants to the MSCA program should have taken at least two courses in calculus or equivalent course work and one course in statistics.

Visit the MSCA website or email mscainfo@wustl.edu.

Master of Science in Finance (MSF)

Graduates of the Olin School's Master of Science in Finance (MSF) develop highly targeted skills by selecting the curriculum track best suited to their career aspirations. These rigorous and comprehensive graduate programs offer in-depth training in securities research, asset management, derivative pricing, fixed income and corporate finance for students pursuing specialized finance careers:

  • The Corporate Finance and Investments track requires 30.5 graduate-level credit units in addition to the course requirements for an undergraduate degree. It prepares students for careers in asset management, sales and trading, industry finance and consulting.
  • The Quantitative Finance track requires 39 graduate-level credit units in addition to the course requirements for an undergraduate degree. It prepares students for careers in credit risk analysis, derivative pricing, risk management modeling and financial software development.
  • The Accelerated MSF track requires 30 graduate-level credit units in addition to the course requirements for an undergraduate degree. The program format allows students to begin their degree during the summer following their junior year of undergraduate study and complete the degree during the summer upon graduation from their undergraduate program of study. Courses focus on investment theory and practice.

Applicants to the MSF program must have taken microeconomics, statistics and calculus.

Visit the MSF website or email msfinanceinfo@wustl.edu.

Global Master of Finance Program (GMF)

To meet demand for graduates with global financial expertise, Olin Business School offers programs that feature study at the campuses of prestigious international universities.

  • Master of Science in Applied Finance degree from Singapore Management University (SMU) and MS in Finance from Washington University. Students take classes in four sessions: a summer at Olin Business School, two academic semesters at SMU, and a final summer at Olin.
  • Global MBA degree from Yonsei University (YSB) and MS in Finance degree from Washington University. Students take courses in five sessions: a summer at Olin Business School; fall, winter, and spring academic semesters at YSB; and a final summer at Olin.
  • Certificate in innovation and entrepreneurship from IDC Herzliya (IDC) and MS in Finance degree from Washington University. Students take classes in three sessions: a summer at Olin Business School, fall academic semester at IDC, and an extended spring academic semester at Olin.

Applicants to the Global Master of Finance Dual Degree program should have taken microeconomics, statistics and calculus.

Visit the GMF website or email globalfinance@wustl.edu.

Master of Science in Supply Chain Management (MS/SCM)

Exceptional management of the production and delivery of a firm's products and services — its supply chain — is essential. The Master of Science in Supply Chain Management degree equips graduates to stand out in this challenging and critically important career field. This program provides students with comprehensive preparation in all areas relevant to sophisticated management of a company's supply chain, whether the company is engaged in manufacturing or in the delivery of complex services.

Completion of the degree requires a minimum of 36 graduate-level credit hours in addition to the course requirements for an undergraduate degree.

Visit the MSSCM website or email msscminfo@wustl.edu.

Special Opportunities

Center for Experiential Learning

The Center for Experiential Learning (CEL) is an educational center located in the Olin Business School. The CEL is focused on creating innovative learning opportunities with meaningful impact in the business and nonprofit communities. Visit http://olin.wustl.edu/cel for more information. Courses available to undergraduate students include:

  • The CEL Practicum engages students in real-world, team-based consulting projects. Through a semester-long experience, students apply and enhance their critical thinking skills though work with business leaders in organizations ranging from start-ups to Fortune 500 companies.
  • Taylor Community Consulting Program (TCCP) connects students with agencies in the local nonprofit sector for a six-week consulting project. Through team-based, applied learning projects, students enable positive change in the St. Louis community.
  • CEL Entrepreneurial Consulting Team (CELect) delivers impact to the St. Louis start-up community in a semester-long experience. Through a partnership with the T-Rex Incubator, students work with local entrepreneurs, applying their critical thinking skills to early-stage business challenges in marketing, resource management and strategy.

Entrepreneurship

Olin School offers both a major and minor in entrepreneurship, a business plan course known as the Hatchery, and the CEL Entrepreneurial Consulting Team (described above). There are also many university-wide resources including the Skandalaris Center for Interdisciplinary Innovation and Entrepreneurial Studies. Read about entrepreneurship opportunities on the BSBA website.

Independent Study

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member is available on a selective basis. The purpose of independent study is to provide an opportunity for students to pursue subject matter beyond the specific course offerings found in the Olin School. Projects may be done for 1 to 6 units, but normally no more than 3 units will be granted in any one semester. For more information, please refer to the Olin School's Undergraduate Student Handbook.

Students may apply a maximum of 6 units of independent study in business and 6 units outside of the Olin School toward the 120-unit degree requirement.

Internship for Credit Opportunities

Olin Business School freshmen and sophomores who have a summer internship can enroll in MGT 450A for academic credit. This online course is designed to deepen a student's overall learning gained from an internship. Students enroll in this 1.5-credit course on a Pass/Fail basis. While this course will be listed on a student's academic transcript, it will not count toward the 120 units needed for graduation.

Olin Business School juniors or seniors who have completed the core requirement and one advanced elective in the appropriate major field may apply to receive credit for internship experience. Students must work under the direction of a faculty member to complete an academic paper/project. The Internship Petition Form must be submitted to the student's academic adviser by the end of the second week of the academic semester. A maximum of 6 units of internship course work may be applied toward the BSBA degree.

Management Communication Center

Olin students benefit from free, personalized coaching and practice opportunities with communication consultants that complement a range of required and elective communication courses. Consultants help students expand their ability to craft succinct, precise communications. Students develop strategies through coaching, rehearsals, web-based information, and critique sessions. Located in Simon Hall, the Center includes private consultation rooms, computer kiosks and a boardroom with an LCD screen, laptop and recording equipment. Visit http://olin.wustl.edu/mcc for more information.

Study Abroad

A business student has the opportunity to participate in various study abroad programs. Students may choose to (1) apply to one of the Olin School's International Internship Programs, (2) apply to participate in a semester study abroad program, or (3) apply to participate in one of the study abroad programs sponsored by the Office of International and Area Studies in the College of Arts & Sciences. Detailed information is available at http://sa.wustl.edu or in the BSBA Programs office.

International Internship Programs

Our International Internship Programs offer students the opportunity to combine classroom learning with an internship in Herzliya/Tel Aviv, Germany, London, Sydney or Paris. Students earn 15 units of academic credit in any of these programs by completing:

  • A total of 15 units of academic credit in business or language/cultural studies.
  • Full-time internship placement of approximately 10-12 weeks (in Herzliya/Tel Aviv, London, Paris, Sydney or Germany) for credit.
  • A significant research project in conjunction with the internship experience.
  • European Study Tour for programs in Europe, and Colloquium/Study Tour Series for programs outside of Europe, for credit.

The International Internship Programs are open to all Olin Business School juniors and seniors who have completed the equivalent of five semesters of course work (75 units) and the specific prerequisites for the particular program of study. Second majors in business also may be eligible to apply. There is a minimum GPA requirement of 3.0 in the student's overall course work and 3.0 in the student's professional course work. Eligibility requirements are subject to change.

Other Study Abroad Opportunities through Olin Business School

Olin Business School students may participate in study abroad programs at Chinese University of Hong Kong or Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in Hong Kong; Bocconi University in Milan, Italy; the University of Melbourne in Australia; ESCP Business School in Paris, France; Carlos III University of Madrid, Spain; Singapore Management University in Singapore; WHU in Vallendar, Germany; FGV in São Paulo, Brazil, or Fudan University in Shanghai, China. Students may participate in any of these programs and take course work that allows them to continue their studies toward their Olin School degree without interruption.

The Olin School also offers several summer programs lasting from two to eight weeks for 3 to 6 credits. Visit http://sa.wustl.edu for more information.

Israel Summer Business Academy (ISBA)

Olin Business School students may participate in the Israel Summer Business Academy (ISBA), administered by Washington University in St. Louis but open to students from all institutions. This unique opportunity, open to undergraduate students of all faiths and beliefs, allows students to study and immerse themselves in the Israeli business environment. Students will learn about entrepreneurship, innovation, and start-up consulting through course work, speakers, company visits, and consulting while earning 6 units of academic credit. ISBA is a collaboration between Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis and the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) in Herzliya, Israel. This program offers a chance for students from all kinds of backgrounds to learn firsthand about business in Israel, a country that has built itself around entrepreneurship. For more information please visit http://sa.wustl.edu.

Undergraduate Teaching Assistantships

In this challenging program, outstanding students are chosen to assist various professors with their course development work or research efforts. Students may conduct library research, perform computer programming, develop new learning materials for class, assist other students with their writing skills, or tutor in various areas of the curriculum.

Participation in the Undergraduate Teaching Assistantship (UTA) program is voluntary and may begin as early as the first year. As a participant, students are paid the going rate for student assistants. UTA experience also impresses company recruiters.

Academic Support Services

Academic Advising

Olin Business School provides students with expert academic advising and support. BSBA Student Services has nine academic advisers who serve as professional advisers to all undergraduate students on procedural matters, course planning, registration and other academic matters.

The Olin School Peer Ambassadors

In this program, undergraduate business students who are familiar with the university and with the Olin School's programs and policies help incoming students make a smooth transition to the university by providing informal peer advising services throughout their first year here.

Weston Career Center

To provide students with personalized career planning and job search services, Olin Business School operates its own career center in Knight and Bauer Halls. The Weston Career Center (WCC) delivers a variety of career management programs and services to Olin Business School students pursuing their BSBA, MBA, Master of Accounting, MS Customer Analytics, MS Supply Chain Management and MS Finance degrees. Services include: one-on-one advising and consultation with a functional career specialist, workshops and professional development seminars, company information sessions, mock interviews, self-assessments, résumé and cover letter writing, and networking — all the tools needed for an effective job search.

On-campus interviews take place in the Knight and Bauer Hall Interview Suite or Danforth Center throughout the academic year. Business students are encouraged to meet with the center's staff early in the school year to discuss career and professional goals. The WCC also maintains an extension office in Simon Hall for quick questions and technical support. For more information, visit http://olincareers.wustl.edu, or contact the Weston Career Center by phone at (314) 935-5950 or e-mail at wcc@olin.wustl.edu.

Phone:(314) 935-6315
E-mail:bsba@olin.wustl.edu
Departmental website:http://olin.wustl.edu

Majors for BSBA Degree Candidates

In addition to the 42.5 core professional units (listed on the Degree Requirements page of this Bulletin), a BSBA degree candidate must complete at least 17.5 professional elective units. Students may apply these professional electives toward a specific professional major. Majors in the business curriculum are offered as an option to focus their studies in a specific field of business. All major courses must be taken in residence. Course work from an approved Washington University study abroad program will count as in-residence work. However, only one course per major may be taken through a study abroad experience.

Students may select a major from the following disciplines:

The Major in Accounting

Total units required: 15

  • Accounting Core: 6 units

ACCT 3610 Intermediate Financial Accounting Theory I

ACCT 3620 Intermediate Financial Accounting II

  • Accounting Elective Choices: 9 units
ACCT 464Auditing3
ACCT 466Financial Statement Analysis3
ACCT 467Income Tax Fundamentals3
ACCT 4680Advanced Financial Accounting Problems3

The Major in Economics and Strategy

Total units required: 12

  • Economics and Strategy Core: 12 units
MEC 370Game Theory for Business3
MEC 400KResearch Analysis in Industry3
MEC 470Market Competition and Value Appropriation3
MEC 471Empirical Techniques for Industry Analysis3

The Major in Entrepreneurship

Total units required: 15

Entrepreneurship Core: 6 units

MGT 421Introduction to Entrepreneurship3
MGT 424Business Planning for New Enterprises (The Hatchery)3

Entrepreneurship Electives: 9 units (must select 3 units from each category)

  • Industry Elective Choices: (at least 3 units required)
CSE 131Computer Science I3
Econ 335Money and Banking3
FIN 549HSpecial Topics: Real Estate Finance1.5
INTL 320Business, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Israel3
MEC 460Economics of Entertainment3
MGT 320Olin Grand Rounds: The Business and Practice of Medicine3
MGT 380Business Strategy3
MGT 440Sports Management1.5
MGT 500TSocial Entrepreneurship3
MKT 465Retail Management3
  • Experiential Elective Choices: (at least 3 units required)
MGT 450CVenture Consulting3
MGT 501MANAGEMENT CENTER PRACTICUM (if an entrepreneurial project)3
MGT 520Taylor Community Consulting Project1.5
MGT 550XCEL Entrepreneur Consulting Team3
  • Skills Elective Choices: (at least 3 units required)
ACCT 466Financial Statement Analysis3
ARCH 376Design Thinking for Science, Engineering, Business and the Liberal Arts1
CSE 104Web Development3
CSE 330SRapid Prototype Development and Creative Programming3
MEC 370Game Theory for Business3
MEC 380Competitive Industry Analysis3
MEC 470Market Competition and Value Appropriation3
MGT 301Legal Environment of Business Management3
MKT 378Marketing Research3
MKT 400FBrand Management3
MKT 478New Product Management3
OB 461Negotiation3

The Major in Finance

Total units required: 12

Finance Core: 9 units

FIN 441Investments3
FIN 448Advanced Financial Management3
FIN 451Options, Futures and Derivative Securities3

 Finance Elective Choices: 3 units

FIN 400GFinancial Markets and Instruments3
FIN 400IMergers and Acquisitions1.5
FIN 428Investments Praxis3
FIN 443International Finance3
FIN 447Information, Intermediation and Financial Markets3
FIN 470AResearch Methods in Finance3

The Major in Health Care Management

Total units required: 15

Health Care Management Core: 12 units

MGT 320Olin Grand Rounds: The Business and Practice of Medicine3
MGT 321Health Economics and Policy3
MGT 322Health Care Management3
MGT 420Research in Health Care Management3

Health Care Management Elective Choices: 3 units

Anthro 260Topics in Health and Community1
Anthro 3283Introduction to Global Health3
Anthro 333Culture and Health3
Anthro 3621Anthropology of Human Birth3
Anthro 3626Adventures in Nosology: The Nature and Meaning of Disease3
Anthro 3875Pharmaceutical Personhood3
Anthro 4134The AIDS Epidemic: Inequalities, Ethnography and Ethics3
Anthro 4883The Political Economy of Health3
Biol 224Infectious Diseases: Past, Present and Future2
Biol 2651MedPrep Program — Experience in Life Sciences1
Biol 2652Pediatric Emergency Medicine Research Associates Program: Experiences in Life Sciences3
Biol 3183History of Genetics in the 20th Century3
Biol 348Emerging Infectious Diseases2
Biol 472Behavioral Ecology4
WGSS 316Contemporary Women's Health3
WGSS 343Understanding the Evidence: Provocative Topics of Contemporary Women's Health and Reproduction3

The Major in Leadership and Strategic Management

Total units required: 12 units

Leadership Group A Elective Choices: (at least 3 units from Group A required)

MGT 450VDefining Moments: Lessons in Leadership and Character From the Top1.5
OB 400CWomen in Leadership1.5
OB 400DThinking Creatively and Leading Creative Teams1.5
OB 461Negotiation3
OB 462Leadership in Organizations3

Leadership Group B Elective Choices: (at least 3 units from Group B required)

MEC 380Competitive Industry Analysis3
MGT 380Business Strategy3
MGT 450RBusiness and Government: Understanding and Influencing the Regulatory Environment1.5
MGT 460GCritical Thinking and Complex Problem Solving for Business1.5
MGT 460HCorporate and Global Strategy3

Leadership Group C Elective Choices: (recommended for HR/HR Consulting)

HRM 325APersonnel/Human Resources Management3
MEC 391Economics of Human Resource Management3

The Major in Marketing

Total units required: 12

Marketing Core: 3 units

MKT 378Marketing Research3

Marketing Electives: 9 units

  • Group A Marketing Elective Choices: (at least 6 units from Group A required)
MKT 377Consumer Behavior3
MKT 400FBrand Management3
MKT 400GDigital Marketing and Customer Analytics3
MKT 470EPricing Strategies3
MKT 478New Product Management3
MKT 480Marketing Strategy3
  • Group B Marketing Elective Choices:
MKT 465Retail Management3
MKT 477International Marketing3
or MKT 477S International Marketing Sydney

The Major in Operations and Supply Chain Management

Total units required: 12 units

Group A OSCM Elective Choices (at least 6 units from Group A required)

OSCM 400CAnalytics for Operational Excellence3
OSCM 400DSupply Chain Management3
OSCM 458Operations Planning and Control3

Group B OSCM Elective Choices

MEC 380Competitive Industry Analysis3
MGT 380Business Strategy3
MGT 460HCorporate and Global Strategy3
MKT 378Marketing Research3
MKT 465Retail Management3

Class of 2019 Degree Requirements:

For a comprehensive view of our degree program, please review the requirements on our website.

Academic Options for Non-BSBA Degree Students

A student in another undergraduate division of the university may choose to complete a second major or a minor in a business discipline.

Second Majors

Any non-BSBA degree student may earn a second major in a specific major discipline offered through Olin Business School. This opportunity allows students to combine their academic interests between two schools. If students wish to pursue a second major in business, they are required to follow the degree requirements for their primary school/major along with a set of core business requirements and 12–15 units of professional electives.

Core Business Requirements:

ACCT 2610Principles of Financial Accounting3
ACCT 2620Principles of Managerial Accounting3
Math 132Calculus II3
MGT 100Individual in a Managerial Environment3
or MGT 380 Business Strategy
or MEC 380 Competitive Industry Analysis
MEC 290Microeconomics3
or Econ 4011 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
MEC 292Global Economy3
or Econ 1021 Introduction to Macroeconomics
QBA 120Managerial Statistics I *3
QBA 121Managerial Statistics II3
or Econ 413 Introduction to Econometrics
or Math 439 Linear Statistical Models
Total units24

*Second majors may substitute Math 2200, Math 3200, ESE 326 or Pol Sci 363 for QBA 120.

Students may select a second major from the following disciplines:

Regulations:

  1. Second majors are required to complete a minimum of 24 business units through Olin School. 
  2. All courses for any business major must be taken for a grade.
  3. An overall 2.0 average must be achieved in course work taken as part of the business major.
  4. All major courses must be taken in residence. Course work from an approved Washington University study abroad program will be considered as satisfying this residency policy. However, only one course per major may be taken through a study abroad experience. 
  5. Students may not count one course toward two majors.
  6. University College courses will not count toward any business major.
  7. AP credit for Math 2200 will not serve as a substitute for our QBA 120 requirement. All second majors must complete QBA 120.
  8. Students must declare their second major online through Webstac by the end of their junior year. A second major will not be awarded to a student unless proper declaration is made.

Non-BSBA degree students may choose to pursue one major from the areas below:

The Second Major in Accounting

Total units required: 15

Accounting Core: 6 units

ACCT 3610 Intermediate Financial Accounting Theory I

ACCT 3620 Intermediate Financial Accounting II

Accounting Elective Choices: 9 units

ACCT 464Auditing3
ACCT 466Financial Statement Analysis3
ACCT 467Income Tax Fundamentals3
ACCT 4680Advanced Financial Accounting Problems3

The Second Major in Economics and Strategy

Total units required: 12

Economics & Strategy Core: 12 units

MEC 370Game Theory for Business3
MEC 400KResearch Analysis in Industry3
MEC 470Market Competition and Value Appropriation3
MEC 471Empirical Techniques for Industry Analysis3

The Second Major in Entrepreneurship

Total units required: 12

Entrepreneurship Core: 6 units

MGT 421Introduction to Entrepreneurship3
MGT 424Business Planning for New Enterprises (The Hatchery)3

Entrepreneurship Electives: Choose at least one course from two of the three following tracks for a total of 6 elective units.

  • Industry Elective Choices: 
CSE 131Computer Science I3
Econ 335Money and Banking3
FIN 340Capital Markets and Financial Management3
INTL 320Business, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Israel3
MEC 460Economics of Entertainment3
MGT 320Olin Grand Rounds: The Business and Practice of Medicine3
MGT 380Business Strategy3
MGT 440Sports Management1.5
MKT 370Principles of Marketing3
MKT 465Retail Management3
  • Experiential Elective Choices: 
MGT 450CVenture Consulting3
MGT 550XCEL Entrepreneur Consulting Team3
  • Skills Elective Choices: 
ACCT 466Financial Statement Analysis3
ARCH 376Design Thinking for Science, Engineering, Business and the Liberal Arts1
CSE 104Web Development3
CSE 330SRapid Prototype Development and Creative Programming3
MEC 370Game Theory for Business3
MEC 380Competitive Industry Analysis3
MEC 470Market Competition and Value Appropriation3
MGT 301Legal Environment of Business Management3
MKT 378Marketing Research3
MKT 400FBrand Management3
MKT 478New Product Management3
OB 461Negotiation3

The Second Major in Finance

Total units required: 15

Finance Core: 12 units

FIN 340Capital Markets and Financial Management3
FIN 441Investments3
FIN 448Advanced Financial Management3
FIN 451Options, Futures and Derivative Securities3

 Finance Elective Choices: 3 units

FIN 400GFinancial Markets and Instruments3
FIN 400IMergers and Acquisitions1.5
FIN 428Investments Praxis3
FIN 443International Finance3
FIN 447Information, Intermediation and Financial Markets3
FIN 470AResearch Methods in Finance3

The Second Major in Health Care Management

Total units required: 15

Health Care Management Core: 12 units

MGT 320Olin Grand Rounds: The Business and Practice of Medicine3
MGT 321Health Economics and Policy3
MGT 322Health Care Management3
MGT 420Research in Health Care Management3

Health Care Management Elective Choices: 3 units

Anthro 260Topics in Health and Community1
Anthro 3283Introduction to Global Health3
Anthro 333Culture and Health3
Anthro 3621Anthropology of Human Birth3
Anthro 3626Adventures in Nosology: The Nature and Meaning of Disease3
Anthro 3875Pharmaceutical Personhood3
Anthro 4134The AIDS Epidemic: Inequalities, Ethnography and Ethics3
Anthro 4883The Political Economy of Health3
Biol 224Infectious Diseases: Past, Present and Future2
Biol 2651MedPrep Program — Experience in Life Sciences1
Biol 2652Pediatric Emergency Medicine Research Associates Program: Experiences in Life Sciences3
Biol 3183History of Genetics in the 20th Century3
Biol 348Emerging Infectious Diseases2
Biol 472Behavioral Ecology4
WGSS 316Contemporary Women's Health3
WGSS 343Understanding the Evidence: Provocative Topics of Contemporary Women's Health and Reproduction3

The Second Major in Leadership and Strategic Management

Total units required: 15

Leadership Core Requirement: 3 units

OB 360Organization Behavior Within the Firm3

Leadership Electives: 12 units

  • Leadership Group A Elective Choices: (choose at least 3 units from Group A)
MGT 450VDefining Moments: Lessons in Leadership and Character From the Top1.5
OB 400CWomen in Leadership1.5
OB 400DThinking Creatively and Leading Creative Teams1.5
OB 461Negotiation3
OB 462Leadership in Organizations3
  • Leadership Group B Elective Choices: (choose at least 3 units from Group B)
MEC 380Competitive Industry Analysis3
MGT 380Business Strategy3
MGT 450RBusiness and Government: Understanding and Influencing the Regulatory Environment1.5
MGT 460GCritical Thinking and Complex Problem Solving for Business1.5
MGT 460HCorporate and Global Strategy3
  • Group C Leadership Elective Choices:​ (recommended for HR/HR Consulting)
HRM 325APersonnel/Human Resources Management3
MEC 391Economics of Human Resource Management3

The Second Major in Marketing

Total units required: 15

Marketing Core: 6 units

MKT 370Principles of Marketing3
MKT 378Marketing Research3

Marketing Electives: 9 units

  • Group A Elective Choices: (at least 6 units from Group A required)
MKT 377Consumer Behavior3
MKT 400FBrand Management3
MKT 400GDigital Marketing and Customer Analytics3
MKT 470EPricing Strategies3
MKT 478New Product Management3
MKT 480Marketing Strategy3
  • Group B Elective Choices:
MKT 465Retail Management3
MKT 477International Marketing3
or MKT 477S International Marketing Sydney

The Second Major in Operations and Supply Chain Management

Total units required: 15 units

OSCM Core: 6 units

QBA 200AAnalytics and Modeling for Business Decisions3
OSCM 356Operations Management3

OSCM Electives: 9 units minimum with at least 6 units from Group A

  • OSCM Group A Elective Choices: (at least 6 units required)
OSCM 400CAnalytics for Operational Excellence3
OSCM 400DSupply Chain Management3
OSCM 458Operations Planning and Control3
  • OSCM Group B Elective Choices:
MEC 380Competitive Industry Analysis3
MGT 380Business Strategy3
MGT 460HCorporate and Global Strategy3
MKT 378Marketing Research3
MKT 465Retail Management3

Minors for Non-BSBA Degree Candidates

Non-BSBA degree students are eligible to pursue a minor in one of the specific fields of business listed below:

*Any undergraduate day division student (which includes BSBA students) can earn the business of sports or the international business minor as part of their undergraduate degree.    

Prerequisites for the Business Minor:

The following prerequisites are required for all minors:

Math 132 Calculus II 

Math 2200 Elementary Probability and Statistics or
Math 3200 Elementary to Intermediate Statistics and Data Analysis or
ESE 326 Probability and Statistics for Engineering or
Pol Sci 363 Quantitative Political Methodology or
QBA 120 Managerial Statistics I*

Econ 1011 Introduction to Microeconomics or MEC 290 Microeconomics**

QBA 121 is also a prerequisite for minors in marketing, finance, and general business.

ACCT 2610 is a prerequisite for the OSCM minor.

*AP Credit for Math 2200 will satisfy this prerequisite. This exemption applies only to non-BSBA students earning a business minor.

**Managerial economics minors and strategy minors must take MEC 290 as Econ 1011 is not a prerequisite for MEC 370.

The Minor in Accounting

Total units required: 15

Required courses: Five courses including:

ACCT 2610Principles of Financial Accounting3
ACCT 2620Principles of Managerial Accounting3
ACCT 3610Intermediate Financial Accounting Theory I3

Plus two chosen from the following:

ACCT 3620Intermediate Financial Accounting II3
ACCT 464Auditing3
ACCT 466Financial Statement Analysis3
ACCT 467Income Tax Fundamentals3
ACCT 4680Advanced Financial Accounting Problems3

The Minor in Business Economics

Total units required: 15

Required courses: Five courses including:

MEC 290Microeconomics3
MEC 370Game Theory for Business3
MEC 400KResearch Analysis in Industry3
MEC 470Market Competition and Value Appropriation3
MEC 471Empirical Techniques for Industry Analysis3

The Minor in the Business of Sports

Total required units: 15

Required courses: Five courses including:

MGT 100Individual in a Managerial Environment3
MGT 440Sports Management1.5
MGT 460FContemporary Issues in Sports Business1.5
MGT 450GThe Business of Sports3
MKT 370Principles of Marketing3

Electives:  At least 3 credits from the following:

FIN 448Advanced Financial Management3
MEC 460Economics of Entertainment3
MEC 471Empirical Techniques for Industry Analysis3
MKT 378Marketing Research3
MKT 400FBrand Management3

For a non-BSBA student minoring in the business of sports, 15 additional units would be required to earn two business minors, as double counting is not allowed.

For a BSBA minoring in the business of sports:

  • Student may not double count more than one course (3 units) toward his or her business major.
  • Student must take QBA 120 since AP credit for Math 2200 is not a substitute for QBA 120.

The Minor in Entrepreneurship

Total units required: 15

Required courses Five courses including:

ACCT 2610Principles of Financial Accounting3
MGT 100Individual in a Managerial Environment3
MGT 301Legal Environment of Business Management3
MGT 421Introduction to Entrepreneurship3
MGT 424Business Planning for New Enterprises (The Hatchery)3

The Minor in Finance

Total units required: 15

Required courses: Five courses including:

ACCT 2610Principles of Financial Accounting3
FIN 340Capital Markets and Financial Management3
FIN 441Investments3
FIN 448Advanced Financial Management3

 Plus a 3-credit Finance elective.

The Minor in General Business

Total units required: 15

Required courses: Five courses including:

ACCT 2610Principles of Financial Accounting3

Choose one course from the following:

MEC 380Competitive Industry Analysis3
MGT 380Business Strategy3

Choose three courses from the following options:

MKT 370Principles of Marketing3
FIN 340Capital Markets and Financial Management3
OSCM 356Operations Management3
HRM 320AManaging People in Organizations3
or OB 360 Organization Behavior Within the Firm

The Minor in Health Care Management

Total units required: 15

Required courses: Five courses including:

MGT 100Individual in a Managerial Environment3
MGT 320Olin Grand Rounds: The Business and Practice of Medicine3
MGT 321Health Economics and Policy3
MGT 322Health Care Management3
MGT 420Research in Health Care Management3

The Minor in International Business

Total units required: 15

Required courses: Five courses including:

MGT 100Individual in a Managerial Environment3
MGT 308Introduction to International Business3
A course taken on an approved immersive overseas experience

Elective course choices: at least 3 units from the following:

FIN 400GFinancial Markets and Instruments3
FIN 443International Finance3
INTL 320Business, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Israel3
MGT 405SInternational Business Environment — Sydney3
MGT 418International Business: A Euro Perspective3
MGT 450CVenture Consulting3
MGT 460HCorporate and Global Strategy3
MKT 477International Marketing3
or MKT 477S International Marketing Sydney

Interdisciplinary Elective: at least 3 units with course approval from the Director of International Programs

 For a BSBA minoring in international business:

  • Student may not double count more than one course (3 units) toward his or her business major.
  • Student must take QBA 120 since AP credit for Math 2200 is not a substitute for QBA 120.

The Minor in Leadership

Total units required: 15

Required courses: Five courses including:

MGT 100Individual in a Managerial Environment3
OB 360Organization Behavior Within the Firm3
OB 461Negotiation3
OB 462Leadership in Organizations3

Plus 3 units from the following:

HRM 320AManaging People in Organizations3
MGT 201Management Communication3
MGT 450VDefining Moments: Lessons in Leadership and Character From the Top1.5
OB 400CWomen in Leadership1.5
OB 400DThinking Creatively and Leading Creative Teams1.5

The Minor in Marketing

Total units required: 15

Required courses: Five courses including:

MKT 370Principles of Marketing3
MKT 378Marketing Research3

Plus three courses chosen from the following:

MKT 377Consumer Behavior3
MKT 400FBrand Management3
MKT 400GDigital Marketing and Customer Analytics3
MKT 465Retail Management3
MKT 470EPricing Strategies3
MKT 477International Marketing3
or MKT 477S International Marketing Sydney
MKT 478New Product Management3
MKT 480Marketing Strategy3

The Minor in Operations and Supply Chain Management

Total units required: 15

Required courses: Five courses including:

QBA 121Managerial Statistics II3
QBA 200AAnalytics and Modeling for Business Decisions3
OSCM 356Operations Management3

OSCM Electives: at least two courses from the following:

OSCM 400CAnalytics for Operational Excellence3
OSCM 400DSupply Chain Management3
OSCM 458Operations Planning and Control3

The Minor in Strategy

Total units required: 15

Required courses: Three courses including:

MGT 100Individual in a Managerial Environment3
MGT 380Business Strategy3
MEC 380Competitive Industry Analysis3

Strategy Electives: at least two courses from the following:

MGT 450RBusiness and Government: Understanding and Influencing the Regulatory Environment1.5
MGT 460GCritical Thinking and Complex Problem Solving for Business1.5
MGT 460HCorporate and Global Strategy3
OB 462Leadership in Organizations3

Fulfilling the Business Minor

All non-BSBA students pursuing any business minor must:

  • declare their minor online through Webstac no later than the end of their sixth semester;
  • satisfy all prerequisites;
  • take all five required courses at Olin Business School. It is preferred that prerequisites be completed at Washington University. Courses taken in University College or at another university do not satisfy any of the five required courses;
  • take all five required courses for grades, i.e., no pass/fail;
  • achieve no less than a 2.0 GPA average in all business minor course work;
  • receive permission from their academic adviser and the Olin Business School to declare a second business minor.

Courses include:


Accounting

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for B50 ACCT.


B50 ACCT 2610 Principles of Financial Accounting

Provides an overview of the financial accounting reporting process, with a primary focus on the analysis of economic events and their effect on the major financial statements (balance sheet, income statement and statement of cash flows). Prerequisite: second semester freshman standing.

Credit 3 units.


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B50 ACCT 2620 Principles of Managerial Accounting

Emphasis on the accumulation and analysis of data for internal decision makers. Introduces the vocabulary and mechanics of managerial accounting and accounting techniques used by internal managers in planning, directing, controlling and decision-making activities within their organizations. Prerequisite: ACCT 2610.

Credit 3 units.


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B50 ACCT 3610 Intermediate Financial Accounting Theory I

The first of a two-course sequence in corporate financial reporting. Examines the environment of financial accounting, the standards-setting process and the conceptual framework that underlies financial accounting in the United States. Topics: review accounting basics, events and transactions that impact financial statements, comprehension of corporate financial reports, and examination of political and economic factors influencing accounting policy. Prerequisite: ACCT 2610.

Credit 3 units.


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B50 ACCT 3620 Intermediate Financial Accounting II

Continuation of ACCT 3610. Focus on the accounting and reporting of various stakeholders' claims against the corporate entity. Claims of shareholders, long-term creditors, employees and governmental bodies are examined. An in-depth understanding of applicable generally accepted accounting principles is developed by examining the strengths and weaknesses of these principles and alternative accounting practices. Prerequisite: ACCT 3610.

Credit 3 units.


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B50 ACCT 464 Auditing

This course deals with the professional service industry of auditing. The auditing industry provides the service of objectively obtaining, evaluating, and communicating evidence regarding managerial assertions about economic events. Specifically, auditing ascertains the degree of correspondence between managerial assertions and established criteria. The course is organized around the basic categories of: (1) the economic role of external corporate auditing in securities markets, (2) the composition of the firms in the auditing industry, (3) the regulatory environment of auditing, (4) litigation issues facing the accounting/auditing industry, and (5) the requirements for conducting audits. Topics included in the last area include a consideration of the scope and application of Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) and the general technology of auditing which are some general auditing topics typically covered on the CPA exam. Grading is based on homework, a group-based project, and two exams. Prerequisite: ACCT 3620.
Same as B60 564

Credit 3 units.


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B50 ACCT 466 Financial Statement Analysis

Designed to enhance students' understanding of the process of evaluating financial statement information. Requires a basic familiarity with financial accounting and the assumptions underlying measurements reported in financial statements, an understanding of the economic and regulatory forces underlying corporate disclosure of financial statement information and their effects on financial statement information, and familiarity with data sources and analytical tools to extract and evaluate this data. Objectives are to develop familiarity with this type of analysis and to gain an appreciation for its limitations. Topics: profitability and risk analysis, credit risk models, forecasting and valuation. Prerequisite: ACCT 3610.

Credit 3 units.


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B50 ACCT 467 Income Tax Fundamentals

This course provides an introduction to federal income taxation with primary emphasis on the tax implications of business transactions. The objectives of the course are to develop a basic understanding of federal income tax laws and to provide a framework for integrating income tax planning into the decision-making process. The course is of value to all students who need to recognize the important tax consequences of many common business transactions and is not intended solely for accounting majors or those students interested in becoming tax specialists. Prerequisite: ACCT 2610.
Same as B60 567

Credit 3 units.


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B50 ACCT 4680 Advanced Financial Accounting Problems

Examination of the nature and financial reporting aspects of various business transactions: corporate acquisitions, mergers and the formation of other strategic alliances. Topics: accounting for business combinations and consolidations, joint ventures and foreign currency translation, accounting and financial reporting issues facing government entities. Prerequisite: ACCT 3620.

Credit 3 units.


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Finance

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for B52 FIN. For B62 FIN, please see the course listed below.


B52 FIN 340 Capital Markets and Financial Management

Students learn how the decisions of a company affect shareholder value and what decisions can increase it. To understand the perspectives of shareholders, we study basic principles of investing: time value of money, valuation of debt and equity securities, discounted cash flow as a foundation for stock prices, the impact of diversification and leverage on portfolio risk, the relationship between risk and expected return in securities markets, and capital market efficiency. We use these principles to analyze capital investment decisions by estimating cash flows and discounting them at the appropriate cost of capital. We also study how shareholder value is affected by a firm's financing decisions, such as the choice of using debt or equity capital. Prerequisites: Math 132, ACCT 2610, MEC 290 or Econ 1011, and completion or concurrent enrollment in QBA 121.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B52 FIN 343 Personal Finance

Examines issues underlying decision making regarding personal investments. Topics: present value concepts, financial markets and instruments, portfolio theory, bond and equity valuations, mutual funds, mortgages, taxes and personal financial planning. Intended for nonbusiness students who are not second majors in Finance. Students may not receive credit for both this course and FIN 340. BSBA students may take this course but it will not count toward their degree requirements. Prerequisite: junior standing.

Credit 3 units.


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B52 FIN 400I Mergers and Acquisitions

This course focuses on identifying ways to increase firm value through mergers and acquisitions (M&A) and corporate restructurings. We survey the drivers of success (and failure) in M&A transactions and develop skills in the design and evaluation of such transactions. Specific topics we address in the course are the valuation of companies, the motivations underlying mergers, structuring of transactions, deal tactics and strategy, leveraged buyouts, corporate restructuring though divestitures, spin-offs, carve-outs and acquisitions of private firms. We also delve into issues of law, accounting and tax and how they affect the outcome of M&A transactions. Why is M&A an important component of any corporate finance professional toolset? It lays the foundation for effective work in a wide range of fields including corporate development, investment banking, consulting and strategy advising senior management. The presentations, class discussions, case analyses and readings are designed to help students master these important career skills. Prerequisites: FIN 340 and FIN 448.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B52 FIN 428 Investments Praxis

Students serve as managers of a portfolio, the Investment Praxis Fund, which is owned by the university. Students analyze investment opportunities in various industries and present recommendations to the class for possible purchases or sales of stocks, consistent with the style and objectives of the fund. Valuation tools, financial statement analysis and investment techniques are emphasized as part of a thorough analysis. The course focus is on developing and implementing investment ideas. Prerequisites: FIN 441, and FIN 448 or FIN 451.

Credit 3 units.


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B52 FIN 441 Investments

Introduces the theory and practice of investments from the point of view of an investment/portfolio manager. We begin with a review of asset classes, financial history and preferences for risk. Next, we have a brief review of statistics and finance, and we review matrix algebra. We then apply these tools to examine the trade-off between risk and return and to develop and implement Modern Portfolio Theory. The major topics covered include the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), Markowitz optimization, performance evaluation, market efficiency, and Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT). The last portion of the course is devoted to fixed income securities including interest rates, bond valuation and bond immunization. Prerequisites: FIN 340, QBA 120, QBA 121, Math 132, and either MEC 290 or Econ 1011, and completion or concurrent enrollment QBA 200A.

Credit 3 units.


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B52 FIN 443 International Finance

Provides a framework for making financial decisions in an international context. Topics include: relevant features of financial markets and instruments (such as foreign exchange, currency futures and options, swaps); exchange rates; corporate risk management; international investing and capital budgeting issues. Prerequisites: FIN 340 and FIN 448.

Credit 3 units. BU: IS


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B52 FIN 447 Information, Intermediation and Financial Markets

Examines the organization and function of financial markets from the corporate perspective with an emphasis on investment banking activities. Topics: design, issuance and trading of corporate securities, risk management and corporate control transactions. Develop familiarization with current practices while building a conceptual framework for understanding and anticipating change in the institutions that make up the financial markets. Prerequisites: FIN 340 and FIN 451 are required. FIN 441 and FIN 448 recommended.

Credit 3 units.


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B52 FIN 448 Advanced Financial Management

Advanced study of corporate financial management. A major focus is the relationship between the internal decisions of the corporation and the valuation of the firm in the capital market. Topics: capital budgeting systems, capital structure, debt policy, cash and working capital management, short- and long-term financial planning. Prerequisite: FIN 340 and completion or concurrent enrollment QBA 200A.

Credit 3 units.


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B52 FIN 451 Options, Futures and Derivative Securities

Examines the theory and practical application of derivative securities such as futures, options and swaps. Central to the theory of derivative security pricing is arbitrage and payoff replication. In practice, derivative securities provide a principal route to manage and, in particular, hedge financial risk. Futures, options and swaps on different types of underlying assets are examined with emphasis on pricing and application. Prerequisite: FIN 340.

Credit 3 units.


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B52 FIN 470A Research Methods in Finance

The course is designed to prepare students for independent research in finance by exploring methods and techniques in a manner that allows the students to implement them correctly and efficiently. The curriculum emphasizes practical applications of empirical methods used in financial research and how to implement them. Students in the course learn empirical methods in corporate finance and asset pricing; obtain basic knowledge and familiarity of the databases used in common finance research; get exposure to recent research in finance which applies the methods covered; and learn how to implement the methods covered using relevant programming languages.
Same as FIN 560A

Credit 3 units.


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B62 FIN 549H Special Topics: Real Estate Finance
This course provides a broad introduction to real estate finance and investments. Topics include both equity and debt. We begin with an overview of real estate markets in the United States. On the equity side students are introduced to the fundamentals of real estate financial analysis, including pro forma analysis and cash flow models, and elements of mortgage financing and taxation. Ownership structures, including individual, corporate, partnerships and REITS also are covered. On the debt side, we examine a number of financing tools in the context of the evolution of the secondary mortgage market, both residential and commercial. Those wishing to pursue more advanced topics in real estate finance could follow this course with Fixed Income and Mortgage-Backed Securities.
Credit 1.5 units.


Human Resources Management

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for B56 HRM.


B56 HRM 320A Managing People in Organizations

Managerial and behavioral concepts as applied to the management and supervision of people in organizational settings. Emphasis is placed on integrating insights from organizational behavior and the behavioral sciences with traditional and current concepts and practices of management and the managerial process. Case method of instruction is used for applications of concepts and development of decision-making skills. Prerequisite: junior standing.

Credit 3 units.


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B56 HRM 325A Personnel/Human Resources Management

Emphasis on development of attitudes and skills of managers and supervisors in solving human problems and in building and maintaining effective employer-employee relations. Major topic areas include: selection and placement, training, and compensation. Other topics include legal aspects of employment policies, labor relations, and other aspects of human resources management. Prerequisite: junior standing.

Credit 3 units.


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International Business

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for B99 INTL.


B99 INTL 300A Planning for International Learning

A mini-B course required of all students participating in Olin semester abroad programs that focuses on planning, assessment, the theory of global competency, cross-cultural communication skills, the structure of a research paper, and other pre-departure information that enhance the student learning experience while abroad. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Credit 1 unit.


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B99 INTL 300B Applying International Experiences

A mini-B course required of all students who participated in an Olin semester abroad program that includes a research symposium to showcase work from abroad, and which focuses on reentry issues, post-program assessment, how to articulate transferable skills, and other post-departure information that allow returnees to translate their abroad experiences into the working world. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Credit 0.5 units.


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B99 INTL 320 Business, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Israel

Israel is an innovation and entrepreneurial hub with more listings on the NASDAQ than any country other than the U.S., more patents per capita and more entrepreneurial events occurring in Israel in both the commercial and social arena than anywhere else in the world. Students learn about the Israeli economy, different industries, Israeli culture and politics along with the critical business challenges and opportunities that face Israel. This course includes a required immersion to Israel during spring break and contains an additional lab fee for the immersion.

Credit 3 units.


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B99 INTL 420 Business Research Internship

This is the capstone course for overseas internship programs where students learn to apply rigorous statistical and analytical approaches to research questions in business, but not limited to questions relating to marketing, management, finance and economics, operations and policy. Students identify a research topic and present this topic to faculty supervisors for approval. The goal is to capitalize on the practical knowledge gained while interning abroad and apply that to a research question in the area in which a student is interning. Students are required to review the current literature on their topic, formulate their own research questions, identify potential data sources they can use to address these questions, and make recommendations to add to the body of knowledge on their chosen subject. Prerequisite: admission to one of Olin's International Internship Programs.

Credit variable, maximum 12 units.


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Management

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for B53 MGT. For B63 MGT, please see the courses listed below.


B53 MGT 100 Individual in a Managerial Environment

An introduction to the foundations of business. The course covers four major themes: (1) how markets work; (2) motivating and managing people; (3) business strategy and firm performance; (4) ethics and corporate social responsibility. In the fall semester, MGT 100 is only open to incoming freshmen, and students must be concurrently enrolled in MGT 150A. Spring semester enrollments are open to any freshman and sophomore.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B53 MGT 150A Foundations of Business

Provides first-semester business students with an introduction to each of the functional areas of business as well as the entrepreneurial function. As they work to design their own enterprise, students build skills in teamwork, communication, critical thinking, and an understanding of the complex interplay of business functions. Prerequisites: In the fall semester, MGT 150A is only open to incoming business freshmen, and students must be concurrently enrolled in MGT 100.

Credit 2 units.


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B53 MGT 200A Business Fundamentals and Professional Competencies for Non-Business Students

This course is intended to help successfully position arts and sciences, engineering, and design majors for careers in organizations such as nonprofits, entrepreneurial ventures, and corporations, among others. Students learn key technical and professional skills that are valued and often required by employers. Topics addressed include working in teams, data-driven decision making, financial and business analysis, concepts for organizational strategy, professional communication, and career strategies. The course uses a combination of lectures, exercises, projects and cases to introduce participants to these topics. The class is designed for Washington University undergraduates in Arts & Sciences, Engineering, and Design and Visual Arts who are preparing for internships or jobs. Recommended for sophomores and juniors. Business students cannot receive credit.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 201 Management Communication

Managers who write and speak effectively excel in business leadership. Persuasive and authentic communication is not only useful in advancing a business career; business employers also consider communication skills to be the most important attribute in people they hire. Effective communication involves more than mastering technical writing and presentation skills. Successful communicators use critical thinking to assess business scenarios and the audience who will hear or read a message; they craft communication in order to attain targeted results. This course gives students the opportunity to become more polished communicators as they work toward the following goals: applying rhetorical principles to management communication; using critical thinking to analyze the audience, the organizational environment and problems before choosing communication strategies; implementing principles of plain language and effective design; collaborating with colleagues to create effective group projects; representing a company or product in a "crisis communication" press conference. Priority for enrollment is given to BSBA students. CBTL course.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 260 Building Your Career Foundation — Techniques & Strategies

MGT 260 is designed to introduce students to topics integral to their career development. The course takes an integrated approach with each session building on the previous class material. Lectures and class activities look at the career planning process through discussions on self exploration and assessment, industry/company/job research, writing strong resumes and other business communication, networking, interviewing skills and techniques for getting internships and jobs. Expected enrollment is fall of sophomore year. This is a requirement for all BSBA degree students.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 301 Legal Environment of Business Management

Surveys the various areas of law that make up the legal environment of business. Develops a basic understanding of law as it relates to business, with traditional emphasis on private law and business transactions. This study of the micro law of business reviews the detailed substantive rules in the areas of contracts, sales, product liability, agency, corporations and partnership. In addition, a summary review of contemporary legal problems such as insider trading, discrimination in employment, sexual harassment and ethics may be discussed, if time permits. Case studies are analyzed in order to give the student an understanding of how various laws apply to actual situations. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 308 Introduction to International Business

Focus on the aspects of management of a business enterprise that are necessary to compete in the global marketplace. The course begins with a survey of the environmental context in which international companies operate (economic systems and cultural factors). This is followed by a review of International Trade Theory and Economics. This forms a basis for concentration in the second half of the course on strategies and structure for global operations. The course deals with the situations in Europe, Japan, Latin America and China through case studies and discussion of current topics and their relation to the fundamental aspects of global business management. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. BU: IS


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B53 MGT 320 Olin Grand Rounds: The Business and Practice of Medicine

Grand rounds in medical schools are a forum for presenting new and challenging clinical problems and cases. The goal of Olin Grand Rounds is to focus on the challenges and solutions facing the business of medicine. The course therefore provides an introduction to the current issues facing the health care sector that integrates management tools and clinical knowledge. The objective is to provide students new insights into how modern management tools can be combined with scientific and clinical knowledge to manage health care organizations more efficiently and practice medicine more effectively.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B53 MGT 321 Health Economics and Policy

The basic tenets of health economics are covered. This course places a unique emphasis on incorporating materials from three broad source categories: textbook elements, "lay" press and media, and academic journal publications with the aim to foster application of rigorous, critical thought to media presentations of health care economics and policy issues.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B53 MGT 322 Health Care Management

The goal of the course is to develop facility in applying basic tenets of general management to actual situations and dilemmas that might be faced by health care managers, consultants, financiers, investors, innovators or providers in the course of their work. Issues addressed include but are not limited to financial issues, management challenges and conduct of operations. The first phase covers the basic background on the structure and financing of the health care industry to include very brief reviews of critical topics such as insurance and government-provided health care. A few basic frameworks are then developed for students to apply to course topics moving forward, such as cost/benefit analysis and evaluation of risk. The remainder of the course involves critical analyses of health care cases involving varied subjects and management challenges. Sessions emphasize student-led discussions.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B53 MGT 380 Business Strategy

This course adopts the perspective of the general manager — an individual charged with developing and implementing the long-term strategy of a business. The course develops basic tools and concepts in strategy formulation, including competitive advantage, value creation and capture, industry analysis, capability assessment, and competitive positioning. The course is designed to develop students' skills in both analyzing observed strategies and in formulating and implementing new ones. A key feature of the course is a business simulation in which student teams interactively formulate and execute strategy for a simulated firm. Prerequisite: MEC 290.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B53 MGT 402 Ethical Issues in Managerial Decision Making

Focuses on ethical issues in management and surveys a number of ethical standards or levels by which managers make decisions involving most functional areas of business. Course emphasis on class discussion of cases and problem situations which confront managers and for which ethical dimensions are a significant part of the business choices. Prerequisite: senior standing.
Same as MGT 502

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 405S International Business Environment — Sydney

The aim of this course is to internalize and develop multicultural competency applied within personal, organizational and business contexts. Reaching this goal includes developing personal awareness, understanding of important concepts and developing multicultural skills. The ability to recognize and overcome common pitfalls that prevent people from operating effectively within, and actually benefiting from, multicultural contexts are explored. Prerequisite: admission to the Sydney Internship Program.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 405T Australian Study Tour

Individual and team research, writing, presentation and participation in Olin's Australian Study Tour. Includes required attendance and expected professional contributions to all corporate and government visits and briefings and other required individual and group activities. Prerequisite: admission to the Sydney Internship Program.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 418 International Business: A Euro Perspective

Examines the economic and institutional setting of Europe from a general business perspective. The economic and political structures of major countries are studied. The role of the European Economic Community examined as well as that of some major international organizations such as GATT and OECD. The primary emphasis is with countries of western Europe. Other topics: theory of customs, unions, monetary and economic integration, and multicountry policy integration. Opportunities for and problems of doing business in Europe examined from both an overall strategic perspective and from the perspective of the different functional areas.

Credit 3 units. BU: IS


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B53 MGT 420 Research in Health Care Management

This is the capstone course for the Health Management major where students learn to apply rigorous statistical and analytical approaches to research questions in health services, but not limited to questions relating to management, finance and economics, operations and policy. Faculty identify several available research project options and present these options in class. The goal is to capitalize on the strength of the university medical school and affiliated medical centers, in addition to capitalizing on existing relationships between Olin and health care firms to identify the student research projects. Students also are encouraged to formulate their own research questions and to identify potential data sources they could use to address these questions, if they so desire. Students work in teams of 3-4, using the approach developed for the Practicum and Hatchery courses.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 421 Introduction to Entrepreneurship

Through case studies, frequent guest speakers and the professor's own experience, the real world of entrepreneurship is brought into the classroom to provide a context for students to learn the fundamentals of founding, operating and exiting a start-up business. Students learn new perspectives that teach them to think like an entrepreneur. Those who are interested in the general study of entrepreneurship, those who want to be entrepreneurs, and those who would like to leverage entrepreneurial principles in other career paths are all good candidates for the course. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing in any school or college.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B53 MGT 424 Business Planning for New Enterprises (The Hatchery)

In this course, student teams pursue their own business idea or support outside entrepreneurs by researching, writing and pitching business plans for new commercial or social ventures. Enrolled students can recruit a team to work on their own business idea, or they can join a team working on another's idea. Outside entrepreneurs and scientific researchers wishing to recruit student teams must apply in advance to be considered for student selection. Most of the work is done outside the classroom with the support of mentors, advisers and the instructor. Classes are held once per week for the first half of the semester. Workshops and rehearsals are required in the second part of the term. Students make final presentations to a panel of outside judges including venture capitalists, angel investors, entrepreneurs and people involved with early stage ventures. Prerequisites: Introduction to Entrepreneurship (MGT 421 or MGT 521), Social Entrepreneurship (MGT 500T or S50 5060) or permission of the instructor. CBTL course.
Same as MGT 524

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 440 Sports Management

This course examines business and management issues involved in the sports industry. This industry is very diverse, ranging from global sports events (such as the Olympic Games, Work Cup Soccer, etc.) to major national competitions (such as the National Football League, Major League Baseball, etc.). Engaged in this industry are many different players, including franchises, governing leagues, sponsors, media, stadium owners, government, fans, and so forth. This course takes a practical look at the world of sports management and administration, with an eye on extracting key lessons for corporate management and administration.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 450A Internship in Business

This is an online course designed to deepen the overall learning students gain from an internship. By completing structured assignments that relate to both the work completed during the internship and to elements of the broad-based Olin Business School curriculum, the value of the internship is markedly increased for both students and employers. Internship in Business is a 1.5-credit Pass/Fail course for business school undergraduates. The course, credit, and pass/fail grading are transcript notations, but the hours earned for MGT 450A do not count toward the 120 hours minimum needed for graduation. Prior to enrolling in this course, the student must consult with and get approval from the Weston Career Center (WCC) to ensure the internship meets certain requirements. Questions? Contact the Weston Career Center at (314) 935-5950 or wccbsba@olin.wustl.edu.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 450C Venture Consulting

Students who complete the course gain a deep understanding of the issues of both operational management and investment management of start-up firms. Students learn of the fundamental strategies and tactics employed by private equity and venture capital firms as well as aid in the development of business strategies for the companies in which they invest. Additionally, students learn how to take into account the macroeconomic, political, and cultural issues that affect start-up businesses that are both operating internationally and raising capital internationally. Furthermore, students learn of the subtleties in the complex relationship between the investment firm and the entrepreneur and will understand both their shared and disparate motivations and objectives. Students who complete the course develop competency in the research and writing of professional consulting reports and gain a more sophisticated understanding of both venture capital and entrepreneurship management and strategy. Students will better understand the interpersonal dynamics between the relevant stakeholders, become proficient in the terminology of private equity investing, and learn how to create structure to unstructured problems thus improving their ability for critical thinking. Participants are given the opportunity to apply their efforts beyond their basic functional business skills and toward issues of relationship management and strategy. Prerequisites: MBA core and Introduction to Entrepreneurship.
Same as MGT 550T

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 450D Honors Thesis I: Research and Analysis

The Olin BSBA Honors Thesis challenges motivated students to move beyond traditional course work and apply critical thinking skills to an academic business thesis. Senior BSBA degree students in good standing with a cumulative grade point average of 3.70 or higher have the opportunity to develop an intensive research project, which extends far beyond the limits of the material in a single course during a single semester. In the two-semester honors thesis sequence, research and analysis are the foci of the first semester and, upon successful progress, the student writes, presents and defends the research in the subsequent semester. Prerequisites: senior standing and faculty permission.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 450E Honors Thesis II: Writing and Presentation

The Olin BSBA Honors Thesis challenges motivated students to move beyond traditional course work and apply critical thinking skills to an academic business thesis. Senior BSBA degree students in good standing with a cumulative grade point average of 3.70 or higher have the opportunity to develop an intensive research project, which extends far beyond the limits of the material in a single course during a single semester. In the two-semester honors thesis sequence, research and analysis are the foci of the first semester and, upon successful progress, the student writes, presents and defends the research in the subsequent semester. Prerequisite: MGT 450D.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 450G The Business of Sports

This course provides an overview of the major aspects of the sports business industry, including but not limited to (1) the primary revenues and expenditures of pro and college sports (2) collective bargaining agreements (3) sports media rights (4) facility financing (5) sports sponsorships and athlete endorsements (6) the role sports commissions play within communites and (7) current events impacting the growth and evoluation of the sports business industry.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 450I International Internship in Business

The online course deepens the overall learning a student gains from an international internship. By completing structured assignments that relate to both the work completed during the internship and to elements of the broad-based Olin business curriculum, the value of the internship increases markedly — for student and employers. Prerequisite: admission to one of Olin's International Internship Programs.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 450L Ethics and Integrity in Law and Business

This course examines complex ethical issues in contemporary business operations and decisions. Students learn to recognize ethical implications of business issues and develop models and decision techniques useful to analyzing and resolving problems.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 450R Business and Government: Understanding and Influencing the Regulatory Environment

The United States as well as many of the world's governments has entered a new episode with respect to the interaction of business and government. Now, more than ever, government regulations are attempting to spur job growth and the economy on one hand, but also is intruding into many aspects of business and the markets on the other hand. Business students must not only understand the shifting business government landscape, but also how to engage government officials and legislators to help shape policies that affect their firms and industries. In this introductory course, student learn from business and government leaders how to interact with and affect the processes of regulation.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 450T Strategy and Social Responsibility

In the modern world, large corporations have come to dominate many parts of economic life. Managers in large corporations face a challenging set of trade-offs about (1) how to balance value creation for present and future generations and (2) how to coordinate the distribution of this value among shareholders, customers, suppliers, employees and the communities in which they operate. The supremacy of shareholders among these constituencies has led some groups to fear that they will be exploited when shareholders' interests conflict with their own. In this course, we examine different perspectives on the role of corporate self-interest, changing social values, NGOs and government regulation in addressing this apparent conflict. In particular, the course examines how pro-social business practices affect the relationships between for-profit corporations and customers, employees, suppliers, investors, regulators and non-governmental organizations. We explore how these practices can be integrated into a firm's operating strategy, and how they can be employed to enhance a firm's competitive position. Prerequisites: MGT 100 and MEC 290 or permission of instructor.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 450V Defining Moments: Lessons in Leadership and Character From the Top

Most successful leaders can point to a handful of "defining moments" in their careers — key choice points that defined the trajectory of their character, their career, and/or their company. How can aspiring business leaders prepare themselves to face these defining moments with insight and integrity? How do leaders achieve business performance without sacrificing character or integrity? This course examines these questions by learning from notable leaders who exemplify both business excellence and personal character. Top executives from leading companies sit down with us to talk about their defining moments and to engage with us in considering these questions. These conversations are supplemented with contemporary cases and readings on leadership and character. Prerequisite: senior standing or juniors with permission of instructor.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 450Z European Study Tour

Individual and team research, writing, presentation and participation in Olin's European Study Tour (EST), including Mock Parliament. Includes required attendance and expected professional contributions to all EST corporate and government visits and briefings and other EST individual and group activities.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 460F Contemporary Issues in Sports Business

This course involves a series of class sessions each organized around a particular sports management topic and jointly taught by the instructor and a different guest speaker (or speakers) each week. Each session includes a mini-case or real-time business example facing the sports management professionals at that time. Overarching objective is to provide students with contemporary and experiential opportunities in the sports business industry. Prerequisite: MGT 450G The Business of Sports.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 460G Critical Thinking and Complex Problem Solving for Business

The course introduces students to rigorous techniques for critical and strategic thinking, problem formulation and problem solving, advancing their ability to provide valuable advice to organizations and preparing them for management consulting company interviews by exploring methods to engage in case analysis, various cognitive biases that can emerge as a problem is being formulated and analyzed, such as the use of inappropriate analogies, confirmation bias, self-serving bias, conflation of correlation and causation, etc.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B53 MGT 460H Corporate and Global Strategy

Business-level strategy involves a firm's choices regarding how to compete in a particular single industry or market. Corporate strategy, on the other hand, involves choices about which sets of different industries or markets to compete in, and how to do so. It also involves choices about which kinds of activities to undertake within the firm, and which to organize through contracts or alliances with other firms. Global strategy is a particular type of corporate strategy that involves choices about which geographic regions or national markets to compete in and how.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 490 Honors Seminar I

The first of a two-course honors seminar. Students have the opportunity to investigate current issues in business using an interdisciplinary approach to their research. Seminar content varies from year to year. Prerequisites: senior standing and faculty invitation.

Credit 3 units.


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B53 MGT 491 Honors Seminar II

The second of a two-course honors seminar. Students have the opportunity to investigate current issues in business utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to their research. Seminar content varies from year to year. Prerequisite: MGT 490.

Credit 3 units.


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B63 MGT 500T Social Entrepreneurship
Registration for this course is done administratively. Students will be put on waitlist and enrollment will be processed once division distribution is determined. The course is designed for students who are interested in understanding the field of social entrepreneurship. It studies the entrepreneurial concepts and practices that are integral to successful innovation. This course emphasizes the social and policy context of venture development and the unique role of evaluation in this growing field. Even if a student is not interested in starting a venture of his or her own, understanding the entrepreneurial process will enhance productivity for other programs and organizations. All students are encouraged to enroll. Prerequisite for SW students: S15-5038.
Same as S50 5060
Credit 3 units.      EN: S


B63 MGT 501 Management Center Practicum
Students work in four-person teams on consulting projects, applying insights from their course work to real-world business problems under faculty supervision. Each student is expected to spend about 150 hours on the project. Grades are based on the quality of the final written and oral reports, as determined by the faculty supervisor. Students are paid a small gratuity, with the amount dependent on the quality of the work. Students are only eligible to participate in 1 Practicum Course per semester, if selected. Prerequisites: Students must apply for Practicum projects. Students are notified when projects are available.
Credit 3 units.     EN: S


B63 MGT 520 Taylor Community Consulting Project
This course is designed to provide business assistance and expertise to St. Louis area non-profit agencies. Applications available in the Center for Experiential Learning, Simon Hall, Room 100. Open to MBA students, upper-level BSBA students, and MSW students. CBTL course.
Credit 1.5 units.


B63 MGT 550X CEL Entrepreneur Consulting Team
Early stage companies provide a unique environment for students to make a meaningful impact on the future trajectory of a growing organization. CELect is an experiential learning course that matches teams of Washington University students with St. Louis area start-up ventures to perform defined management consulting projects. In addition to the required day-long orientation and concluding sessions taught at the T-REX incubator downtown, students work directly with the professor and with their client company on a consistent, but variable, schedule depending on the project needs over the course of the semester. In addition to being embedded on a project for an early stage company, students have the opportunity to engage with other entrepreneurship support organizations such as local accelerators, venture capital firms, and incubators. Law Students: Prerequisite/corequisite: Corporations. This course is cross-listed with the Business School, B63-550X, and is co-taught by Profs. Clifford Holekamp and Hillary Sale. Grading for Law Students is modified pass/fail: HP (3.94), P, LP (2.98), F (2.50). Interested students should apply/register by adding their names to the waitlist in WebSTAC, and then sending their resumes to Prof. Sale (c/o Beth Mott, emott@wulaw.wustl.edu). They will be notified soon as to whether they got in or not. Once accepted, students may not drop this class. Enrollment is limited. CBTL course.
Credit 3 units.


Managerial Economics

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for B54 MEC.


B54 MEC 290 Microeconomics

Provides a rigorous analysis of the behavior of consumers and firms in competitive and monopoly markets; oligopoly markets are introduced. Consumer topics include preferences and utility, budget constraints, consumer optimal choice and demand curves. Firm topics include technology, cost minimization and profit maximization. The course concludes with price determination in monopoly and competitive markets, and an introduction to oligopoly and game theory. The focus of the course is on microeconomics as a decision making tool for consumers and managers. Prerequisite: Math 131.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B54 MEC 292 Global Economy

Introduces the fundamentals of international economic analysis. Provides an economic foundation to the analysis of business decisions and strategies in the global setting. Topics include: introduction to the global economy; comparative advantage as the basis for international trade and sources of comparative advantage; economies of scale and imperfect competition as the basis for international trade; tariffs and other instruments of trade policy; political, legal and institutional factors influencing international trade; balance of payments; exchange rates and the foreign exchange market; international capital flows; national competitive advantage and industrial policies; global economic competition and business strategy. Prerequisites: QBA 120; and MEC 290 or Econ 1011.

Credit 3 units. BU: IS EN: S


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B54 MEC 370 Game Theory for Business

Provides students with a methodological framework to analyze strategic business situations. Building on a background in microeconomics and statistics, this course includes such topics as the following: modeling strategic problems, games with sequential moves, games with simultaneous moves, strategies and the derivation of strategic forms, general classes of games, uncertainty and information, strategy and voting, auctions, bargaining. Prerequisite: MEC 290.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B54 MEC 380 Competitive Industry Analysis

Uses economics and game theory to analyze strategy and industry dynamics. Focus is split between evaluating the competitive environment within industries and developing competitive strategies that are responsive to specific competitive forces facing individual firms. Topics typically covered include models of price and quantity competition, barriers to entry, commitment strategies and credible threats, product differentiation, vertical integration, research and development, and patenting strategies. Prerequisite: MEC 290.

Credit 3 units.


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B54 MEC 391 Economics of Human Resource Management

Key to a firm's success is whether it can develop a firm organization and a human resource management system that reinforce the firm's strategic position. This course covers topics in managing work forces and organizations that are of fundamental importance to all managers, and teaches how organizational design and human resource policies interact with the firm's market strategy and production environment. We look at how management can motivate executive and employee performance, screen and attract appropriate workers, and improve the way information is processed and decisions are made within organizations. This course combines economic analysis with case discussions to address topics including hiring policy, turnover, training, variable pay, promotions, evaluation, job design, teams, worker empowerment, hierarchy, and organizational structure like centralization and decentralization. Prerequisite: MEC 290.

Credit 3 units.


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B54 MEC 400K Research Analysis in Industry

Research Analysis in Industry builds on the materials taught in MEC 370 (Game Theory for Business), MEC 470 (Market Competition and Value Appropriation), and MEC 471 (Empirical Techniques for Industry Analysis), integrating them with methods of industry analysis used in practice and applying them to companies. Prerequisite: MEC 370, MEC 470 and MEC 471.

Credit 3 units.


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B54 MEC 460 Economics of Entertainment

This course focuses on the unusual economics of the entertainment industry and the associated management challenges. The sessions cover the basic economics of entertainment, then focus specifically on the music and movie industries, plus one other that varies from year to year. Classes consist of lecture and discussion, as well as speakers from the relevant industries. The primary student deliverable is a twenty minute documentary-style production in which student teams present findings of their research into specific industries within the broader industries studied in class, e.g., rock, classical or rap within music, blockbusters within music, etc. Prerequisite: MEC 290 or Econ 4011.

Credit 3 units.


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B54 MEC 470 Market Competition and Value Appropriation

Provides students with frameworks and capabilities for making intelligent decisions in evolving markets. Course begins with general game theory concepts, which form the basis for two main topics: models of competition in markets and value appropriation. Students learn the basic framework and apply it in the context of a detailed industry study. Specific topics may include firm interactions in stable and evolving market environments, industry life cycles, the evolution of new product markets, and strategic decision-making in developing markets. Prerequisite: MEC 370.

Credit 3 units.


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B54 MEC 471 Empirical Techniques for Industry Analysis

Students learn how to use data to answer a wide variety of questions regarding the incentives and behavior that generate market activity. We emphasize inference about the strategic decisions of firms and consumers. Students are introduced to new statistical and econometric tools by examining the application of these tools to current research in economics. Among the topics considered are the empirical implications of: strategic bidding in auctions, price discrimination and dispersion, differences across products, and the internal organization of firms. Prerequisite: MEC 470.

Credit 3 units.


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Marketing

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for B55 MKT.


B55 MKT 370 Principles of Marketing

Marketing is the window to the customer, making the function a critical component of any successful organization. Through a mixture of lectures, case discussions and classroom exercises, this course gives students an overview of the best theories and practices in marketing management today. Specific topics include: how to segment the customer base and choose target markets, how to create perceived value both from an economic and psychological perspective, how to differentiate a product or service from a competitor's offering, how to build and maintain a strong brand, and how to employ different marketing tools such as advertising, pricing, product design, service and location. The class also provides students with some basic tools for evaluating the financial impact of marketing activities. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and MEC 290 or Econ 1011 or MGT 100.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B55 MKT 377 Consumer Behavior

Psychological, sociological and social psychological principles as they apply to consumer response to product offerings, media communications, personal influence and other environmental factors. Consumer buying behavior is analyzed from theoretical, empirical and applied perspectives. Current applications of concepts employed by marketers are discussed in the context of both consumer and industrial marketing situations. Prerequisite: MKT 370.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B55 MKT 378 Marketing Research

The four P's of marketing are product, place, price and promotion. Using these decision variables, firms seek to maximize profits. Making these decisions requires market information. Marketing research is the process of actively collecting, assimilating, and analyzing market information to support management decision making. Teaches the nuts and bolts of market research. Prerequisites: MKT 370, QBA 120 and QBA 121 or concurrent enrollment in QBA 121.

Credit 3 units.


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B55 MKT 400F Brand Management

A brand is a promise, and this promise is often the most valuable asset of a firm. In this class, students examine the creation and building of brand equity to create long-term profit for the firm. The class examines what we know about brand management and brand theory from years of rigorous scientific research in the area. While learning the foundations of brand management, students develop the skills needed to create a meaningful brand, position a brand, develop brand names and logos, promote a brand, leverage brand equity, extend a brand, and communicate brand meaning via traditional and social media. Students learn some of the day-to-day skills performed by brand managers and interact with brand managers via guest speakers from top branding firms. Prerequisite: MKT 370.

Credit 3 units.


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B55 MKT 400G Digital Marketing and Customer Analytics

The aim of this course is to provide a rigorous and comprehensive introduction to technology and methods of conducting marketing activities online and analyzing the data that inform and result from those activities. Prerequisite: MKT 370.

Credit 3 units.


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B55 MKT 465 Retail Management

Explores the fundamental factors that are critical to the success of most retailers; merchandising, store design and display, personal selling, advertising and promotion, pricing and location. A wide variety of retailers — department stores, specialty stores, wholesale clubs, direct marketers, franchisers, food retailers, discounters and others — are studied. Through case methodology, the role that managers play in problem solving and development of strategies are studied. Topics include: positioning for success; retailing organizations; retail economics; pricing strategy; and entrepreneurial retailing. Prerequisite: MKT 370.

Credit 3 units.


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B55 MKT 470E Pricing Strategies

This course equips students with the concepts, techniques, and latest thinking on assessing and formulating pricing strategies. Through lectures, in-class discussions, case studies, group project/presentations, and pricing simulation games, students learn to use the fundamental analytical tools, theories and conceptual frameworks to formulate proactive pricing strategies improving the firm's profitability. Topics of discussion include incremental contribution analysis, EVC analysis, segmentation and price customization, competitive pricing strategy, pricing innovative products, price promotion, psychological/behavioral issues in pricing, dynamic pricing, pricing and market making on the Internet, and pricing of digital products and services. Prerequisite: MKT 370.

Credit 3 units.


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B55 MKT 477 International Marketing

Addresses three fundamental decisions confronting a company whose operations extend beyond the domestic market: (1) choosing which foreign markets to penetrate; (2) determining the mode of market entry; and (3) devising the international marketing plan. Topics include: global marketing planning; environmental and cultural influences on international marketing decisions; organizational and control issues in international marketing decisions; global marketing intelligence; foreign risk and feasibility studies; and issues of ethics in other countries. Prerequisite: MKT 370.

Credit 3 units. BU: IS EN: S


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B55 MKT 477S International Marketing Sydney

Many companies, large and small, prepare a business environmental analysis for each country in which they do business. The analysis assesses the (consumer, industrial or organizational) demand in a particular country for merchandise like the company markets as well as the company's ability and willingness to supply that merchandise to that country. Students prepare a marketing environmental analysis for some merchandise (either a new or existing service or product) of their choice from a company of their choice in Australia. Prerequisites: MKT 370 and admission to the Sydney Internship Program.

Credit 3 units. BU: IS


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B55 MKT 478 New Product Management

In a rapidly changing business environment where product life cycles are shortening and competition is intensifying, creating new products has become the most significant and most risky activity within a firm. This course aims to develop an understanding of the "state of the art" strategies, processes and methods used in developing new products. This course focuses on key new product issues including generation and assessment of ideas, value creation in competitive markets, the impact of disruptive technologies on mainstream industries, the diffusion of innovative new products and services, business model innovation, marketing mix (4P's) decisions for new products, concept and market testing, first mover dis/advantage, and expanding the product portfolio. This is a case-based course, where students participate in a dynamic and interactive group environment to develop the capacity to use the information learned to make informed new product decisions. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in MKT 473.

Credit 3 units.


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B55 MKT 480 Marketing Strategy

Successful business plans are dependent on well-defined and carefully crafted marketing strategies. In this course, students explore the interconnections between business strategy and marketing strategy through a series of lectures, case discussions, and participation in an online marketing simulation exercise. The course also places heavy emphasis on the discussion of topical marketing issues faced by companies in the current environment. Students are required to read the relevant business press and bring real world issues into the class for brainstorming and interactive discussion. Through this process, students become astute observers of the strategic trends in marketing across a variety of industries. Prerequisite: MKT 370.

Credit 3 units.


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Operations and Supply Chain Management

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for B58 OSCM.


B58 OSCM 356 Operations Management

Introduces a variety of common operations issues that are frequently dealt with in both manufacturing and service industries and that affect other functions of the business. Specific topics include: process design and control; quality; waiting line models; inventory systems; and supply chain management. Prerequisites: ACCT 2610, MEC 290 and completion or concurrent enrollment in OSCM 230.

Credit 3 units.


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B58 OSCM 400C Analytics for Operational Excellence

This course provides advanced modeling and analytic tools to analyze operational processes, identify key drivers for business performance, and prescribe action plans to improve operational excellence. The emphasis is on modeling tools that are widely used in diverse industries and functional areas, including operations, finance and marketing. Applications include service capacity planning, advertising planning, revenue management, portfolio optimization, corporate risk management, environmental policy modeling, among others. Prerequisite: OSCM 356.

Credit 3 units.


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B58 OSCM 400D Supply Chain Management

A supply chain is a network of all firms and relationships that get a product to market, including the original acquisition of raw materials, production of the item at a manufacturing facility, distribution to a retailer, sale of the finished item to the customer, and any installation, repair, or service activities that follow the sale. How to effectively manage the supply chain is a central issue for all levels of management, regardless of industry. More demanding customers, the Internet and digital technology, growing competitive pressures, and globalization create new opportunities and challenges on how supply chains should be configured and managed. Many innovations and new business models have emerged, arising from application of information technology and reconfiguration of the supply chain network. Prerequisite: OSCM 356.

Credit 3 units.


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B58 OSCM 458 Operations Planning and Control

Examines the concepts and techniques essential for effective operations planning and control in various manufacturing and service organizations. The course builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in core operations management and quantitative method courses, and covers key topics including inventory management, linear and nonlinear programming, aggregate planning, Markov chain models. The course introduces students to the major trade-offs and issues in operations planning and control, as well as important tools and techniques available for helping operations managers to make analysis and decisions. Prerequisite: OSCM 356.

Credit 3 units.


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Organizational Behavior

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for B66 OB.


B66 OB 360 Organization Behavior Within the Firm

Provides a toolbox of analytical and interpersonal skills that are necessary to be an effective manager. Learn how these skills can have a significant impact on profitability. Objectives: (1) understanding research conclusions through explaining the dimensions of individual differences and how they impact motivation, job satisfaction and ultimately organizational effectiveness; explaining group dynamics and how they determine effectiveness; identifying organizational implications of research; evaluating organizational structure and job design; evaluating organizational culture and identifying methods of culture management; and identifying the steps and roadblocks in the process of organizational change; (2) developing management skills by writing effective reports to senior management that analyze individual, group and organizational effectiveness in actual organizations; and applying your understanding of individual, group and organizational dynamics to improve your team's effectiveness on group projects. Prerequisite: MGT 100 or sophomore standing.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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B66 OB 400C Women in Leadership

In this course we take a multifaceted approach to learning about women and leadership to better prepare students to lead in organizations. To do this we learn from notable leaders who share their experiences and advice with the class. These conversations are supplemented with cases and readings of women leaders pulled from a range of organizations as well as a review the current state of empirical evidence about the status of women as leaders. Finally, there is time to engage in deep reflection about what students expect from their careers, as well as a chance to consider the pathways they must take to become effective and inclusive leaders in increasingly diverse organizations.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B66 OB 400D Thinking Creatively and Leading Creative Teams

This course is designed for students who want to improve their ability to develop creative solutions to tough business problems and to be able to inspire creativity in others. In a world of rapid change and increasing complexity, existing approaches simply won't do it anymore — at least not for long. Thus, the ability not only to update and refresh existing products and services but also to generate ideas for new-to-the world offerings becomes indispensable. Students who have mastered the skills of creative thinking and doing and can foster those skills in others are therefore in a position to add tremendous value to their firms and, ultimately, to society. This course is designed to help students understand and begin to master those skills. Prerequisite: OB 360.

Credit 1.5 units.


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B66 OB 461 Negotiation

Skillful negotiation is an important aspect of management. Designed to improve a student's skills in analyzing and conducting negotiations in a variety of settings. Topics include two-party bargaining, multiparty bargaining, arbitration and coalition formation. Prerequisite: OB 360.

Credit 3 units.


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B66 OB 462 Leadership in Organizations

This course is designed to fulfill three broad objectives for students. The first is to provide a useful overview of the primary leadership perspectives, focusing on how each framework links individual leadership to organizational outcomes. The second objective involves students in self-assessment of strengths and weaknesses in relation to the abilities and skills that are predictive of leadership effectiveness. Third, the course is designed to enable participants to articulate an effective strategic plan for individual leadership development. Course topics include perspectives on individual leadership effectiveness, leadership and motivation, developing subordinates, leading groups and teams, leading the resolution of conflict, and leading organizational change. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit 3 units.


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Quantitative Business Analysis

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B59 QBA 120 Managerial Statistics I

The first of a two-course sequence in business applications of statistics, focused on descriptive statistics, probability and distributions, inferential statistics, and linear regression. Approximately the first quarter of the course is about descriptive statistics and applications of covariance. The second quarter is devoted to probability: basic rules, conditional probabilities, Bayes' theorem, expected values, and probability distributions. This work is followed by an introduction to sampling distributions and inferential statistics. Confidence intervals and hypothesis testing are introduced to make inferences about parameters. The last one-fourth of the course focuses on simple linear regression. Throughout the course, functions, data analysis, VBA, and solver features of Excel are introduced. Prerequisite: completion or concurrent enrollment in Math 132.

Credit 3 units.


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B59 QBA 121 Managerial Statistics II

The second of a two-course sequence in business applications of statistics, focused on forecasting. The course is devoted to the use of linear regression models in business, and ways to deal with problems of collinearity, outliers, non-linear relationships, and heteroscedasticity. Advanced topics, including time series regression and logistic models, are covered as time permits. There are quizzes and group projects in addition to a midterm and final. Prerequisites: QBA 120 or approved equivalent; Math 132; and MEC 290 or Econ 1011.

Credit 3 units.


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B59 QBA 200A Analytics and Modeling for Business Decisions
Help students become effective problem solvers, smart consumers of data and, finally, intelligent business decision makers in various management situations. The course utilizes a structured problem-solving approach heavily relying on data for defining the problem, uncovering useful relationships between critical variables and outcomes, defining measures for evaluating alternatives, modeling all underlying conceptual relationships and constraining resources, and proposing via rigorous search process of exploration and exploitation "best fitting and robust" solutions for the given environment and its underlying uncertainties. Prerequisite: QBA 121.
Credit 3 units.