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The Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design cultivates the designer's identity as a leader: as both an expressive individual and a socially responsible citizen. Our programs emphasize the physicality of design through regard to site, purpose, material, technique and meaning. Our commitment to the ethical practice of architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design spans disciplines, contending cultural theories and the range of representational media.

The Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design provides an intimate environment for learning, with individualized attention in the design studios, and correspondingly small lectures and seminars. The independent character of a student's abilities is demonstrated and tested in the final semester through the Degree Project, in which students work individually with faculty tutors and critics. The graduate school also has a strong teaching and research assistant program, with approximately one out of every four students engaged in this work.

Contact Information

Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design
Campus Box 1079
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, MO 63130-4899
314-935-6227
Website: http://samfoxschool.wustl.edu/archprograms
Email: wuarch@wustl.edu
http://samfoxschool.wustl.edu/gradarch_contact

Below are listings for course levels 500 and above. For available 300- and 400-level courses, please visit our website.

A46 ARCH: Architecture

A48 LAND: Landscape Architecture

A49 MUD: Urban Design


Architecture

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for A46 ARCH.


A46 ARCH 501A Designing With Words

Writing is a creative act; a means by which designers craft the story of their vision with words. Writing is also a critical act; a way of thinking that refines and sculpts our ideas, sharpening and shaping the depth and clarity of the design process. And yet, writing at times can feel treacherous. We can frequently feel as if we are stumbling over words or even swimming up a river against them. How do we transform words into another way of designing? How do we put writing at our own command? This course will help to develop writing skills as another tool for the designer by addressing how we use writing in our own field, particularly in portfolios, presentations and research. We will practice techniques to make writing meaningful as a critical and creative practice so that words are not barriers or add-ons, but a colorful complement to creative vision. This course will be geared toward supporting students at all writing levels, particularly students writing in English as a second language.

Credit 3 units. Arch: HT


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A46 ARCH 5080 Community Arts and Social Practice: An Introduction

This seminar brings together several different disciplines and methodologies to look at the practice of the arts in the context of community. The seminar combines hands-on work and observation, theoretical analysis and reflection, and specific proposals. For our case studies, we concentrate on several programs and places currently existing or developing in the St. Louis region. We discuss both ends and means, and systems of evaluation that draw on, among other things, art, architecture, social work and community development.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 5081 Introduction to Urban Planning for Community Building

This course will cover the theory and practice of how we move toward social objectives through the built environment. We will discuss why we seek communities that are diverse, active, identifiable, lively — both socially and economically — and are learning environments. We will review how planning, design and zoning tools can move us closer to these policy outcomes. This will involve learning about "placemaking" — through patterns like Planned Neighborhood Developments, Transit Oriented Developments, Main Streets, and so on. Social reforms that are embodied in the built environment, such as affordable housing, economic development, active lives, and public safety will be considered. We will attempt to work out practical applications of some of these ideas for the St. Louis O'Fallon neighborhood, with which the instructors and others at Washington University have an ongoing relationship. This course is listed jointly by the George Warren Brown School of Social Work and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts.
Same as S60 SWCD 5081

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 511 Architectural Design V

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Arch 419 or equivalent. Twelve hours of studio work a week.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 511B Architectural Design V (Buenos Aires)

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Arch 419 or equivalent. Twelve hours of studio work a week.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 511H Architectural Design V (Berlin)

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Arch 419 or equivalent. Twelve hours of studio work a week.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 512 Architectural Design VI

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Arch 511. Twelve hours of studio work a week.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 512B Architectural Design VI (Buenos Aires)

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Arch 511. Twelve hours of studio work a week.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 512H Architectural Design VI (Berlin)

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Arch 511. Twelve hours of studio work a week.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 520 Shifting from Lines to Surfaces/Virtual to Empirical

Digital Media Design: Introduction to Exploring Digital and CAD/CAM Technology. This is a course in computing theory and techniques on 2-dimensional digital software and advanced 3-dimensional modeling software. Weekly demonstrations on software operations and individual projects are developed. This course bridges the gap between 2-D computational tools that define lines and the 3-D tools that develop complex surfaces. These surfaces explore the possibilities of creating and articulating the nonlinear geometries manipulated on the digital environment. The final project consists of 2-dimensional drawings, digital models and physical models produced by advanced CAD/CAM technology. By employing alternative techniques and emerging technologies of manufacturing, new forms of objects and perceptions redefine multiple design processes.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 521H Topics in Advanced Architectural Computing: Performative Skins

Course participants will explore the materiality and environmental suitability of skins, and will be encouraged to find the answers to questions about their topological performance in the context of dynamic environments and in the reality of their anthropospheric state of existence. Building Performance Analysis will facilitate the morphing of architectural design through various phases of environmental simulations: insolation, light, wind and acoustics, for the purpose of creating a digitally altered tectonic that is most suitable of in situ conditions. Prerequisites for the class are an advanced knowledge of various digital modeling techniques and a basic understanding of sustainable design principles. An attempt will be made to establish a direct link between analytical results obtained with Ecotect and various applications supporting Smart Geometry (Generative components).

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 521M Surface of Affect/Effect

This course is a digital design and fabrication seminar that introduces the notion of architecture affecting human senses as well as the effects generated by the architectural entity. The affective ability will focus on tactility since it is the sense perceived by the entire body and opticality due to the visual nature of architecture. Both affect and effect focus on the surface as a plane of contact between people and their architectural environment. The class will develop digital modeling techniques that will lead to the development of physical prototypes that explore dynamic conditions responding to environmental variables that continually modify the visual and tactile boundary of the surface as division between a person and the exterior environment. In particular the class will develop surfaces that explore physical movement, implied movement and perceived movement. The course will involve readings and discussion along with the production of digital and physical prototypes.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 524E Ordinance: Territorial Rules & Urban Administration

What is the link between rules and form? What is the relationship between form and politics? This course will essay an administrative history of the built environment, taking as its starting point the rules, codes, ordinances, laws and guidelines that shape the landscape. We will turn a critical yet curious eye toward historic and contemporary case studies that shape or are shaped by a robust regulatory framework — from the French Forest Ordinance of 1669 to the work of MVRDV and contemporaries. We will examine both the built results and the theories and philosophies of design by which they are animated. In the arc of our readings we will seek to link our territorial, urban and architectural understanding with broader historical and economic moments. In addition to carrying out readings, discussions and analyses, students will work toward Ordonnance, a collective publication that will historicize and diagram this administrative impulse.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 524F Critical Spatial Practice: Art / Architecture / Landscape / Urbanism

Critical Spatial Practice reads the history of art, architecture, landscape and urbanism across the grain in an effort to tease out latent affinities and to heighten meaningful antagonisms. In particular, this class takes a critical look at the ways in which creative practice has situated itself in relation to politics, power, society and space, while maintaining a certain autonomy from each of these registers. Themes such as: historic and collective memory; empire and war; publics and counterpublics; city and countryside; institutions and the everyday; will all be central tropes as we ask questions of what, exactly, provokes one to make. Each of these disciplines shares a certain projective and critical orientation to the world — but what is it that makes their methods so distinct? What might we learn from knowledge of these differences? Where do shared passions break down? As critical practitioners, we look to make sense of the world — while our search for meaning may take radically different forms. Throughout the term, we will be focusing on a range of projects, movements, artists/practitioners and groups that take seriously the situatedness of their work. We will cover practices that might fall under more recognized categories, such as: performance, land art, ecology, social practice, everyday urbanism, pedagogy, curation and installation. We will interrogate the modes of production as well as modes of distribution that creative practitioners work within and against. We will look at the history of artists and designers engaging the built and natural worlds in ways that exceed the disciplinary frameworks of their time. From the Dada excursions to the Situationist Derives, from the urban representation of the CIAM grille to the urban choreography of Daniel Buren, and from the Romantic geography of Humboldt to the displaced geography of the Atlas Group. Throughout, we will be reading foundational texts — theoretical, historical and methodological — that help situate these projects and movements within their contemporary milieu. By focusing on the context of these practices, this course has its eye on the many conceptual elisions and canonical lacunas that emerge in disciplinary-specific histories from the early 20th century to the present — while also operating as a retroactive genealogy of the aspirations of the Sam Fox School. Weekly meetings will be structured around an organizing theme with related readings, screenings and viewings. Each class will consist of a short lecture by the instructor framing the topic, a student presentation weaving a network of thought around a single specific work/project, and subsequent discussion. Final projects will critically engage the themes of the course as students produce a publication, installation, video or performance that takes a position.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 525K LAND Arch URB: landscapearchitectureurbanism

New Disciplinary Dynamics: Blurs and Exchanges. Over the past decade, the various professions engaged in the construction of the built environment have been investigating (both in theory and practice) a specific and deliberate blurring, hybridization and expansion of the traditional semantic and historical categories of landscape, architecture and urbanism in an attempt to confront changing situations, environments and cultures. Across geographical and cultural boundaries, the proliferation of projects (speculative and built) and essays appearing in recent years makes this phenomenon more than a passing trend or the product of individual reflection. Architecture, for example, as a conventional discipline with its own tasks, internal logic, and modus operandi has become so heterogeneous that it can no longer adequately authenticate its products from within the limits of its historical category. The same holds true of the allied fields of landscape and urbanism. Strict disciplinary boundaries are no longer capable of attending to the complexity of contemporary demands produced by mobility, density, de-urbanization, hybrid programs, changing uses, and ecological concerns. The contemporary world forcibly imposes the need for greater flexibility and indeterminacy and for new techniques of practice that are anticipatory, receptive to change, and capable of opening an aperture to the future. This course will explore these disciplinary slippages and hybrid contacts between until-now distinct categories through essays and built or speculative works. Fulfills History/Theory elective. Fulfills Urban Issues elective.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 525L The Architecture of Le Corbusier

A seminar course examining the works of Le Corbusier (1889-1965), one of the most important architects of the modern era whose works continue to exercise enormous influence on contemporary architecture. The seminar will explore Le Corbusier's entire career, including both built works, such as the Monastery of La Tourette, and unbuilt projects, such as the Venice Hospital. Students will analyze and present 20 selected architectural works dating from 1920 to 1965. Introductory lectures by the professor, followed by two student presentations in each class, and each team of two students will be required to present two buildings (one earlier work and one later work). Analytical methods employed in the student presentations in the course will cover the full range of contextual, cultural, material, constructive and experiential attributes of buildings, and students will employ the graphic analysis standards developed by the professor. Individual research papers, as well as hard copies and CDs of the two in-class presentations will be due at the end of the semester. Students will be credited in the professor's book, Le Corbusier. Fulfills Master of Architecture History and Theory elective distribution requirement. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 527M Louis L. Kahn and Contemporary Architecture: Comparative Critical Analyses of Built Works

A graduate seminar employing comparative critical analyses to explore 10 works of the American architect Louis Kahn (1901-1974) and works by 10 contemporary architects who have been influenced in some way by the works of Kahn, selected from a list including Steven Holl, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien, Peter Zumthor, Herman Hertzberger, Grafton Architects, Brad Cloepfil/Allied Works, Wiel Arets, Stanley Saitowitz, Thomas Phifer and Nieto Sobejano. Kahn was one of the most influential of the "second generation" of Modern architects, and this course will explore the architectural ordering principles structuring his work, how these were often derived from Kahn's perceptions regarding the works of his predecessors, and the manner in which these ordering principles have been employed by contemporary architects. Analytical methods employed in the course will cover that full range of contextual, cultural, material, constructive and experiential attributes of buildings, with particular emphasis on Kahn's focus on the manner in which the spaces of a building are ordered by the patterns of occupation and the poetics of use, as well as the poetics of construction, or the way in which a building is built, and of what materials it is made, and how all these combine to construct the experience of those who inhabit it. Following introductory lectures by the faculty, each of the subsequent 10 class meetings will consist of a presentation of a selected pair of buildings, one by Kahn and one by a contemporary architect, to be presented by teams of two students. Each student team will present two buildings, one by Kahn and one by a contemporary architect; one presentation in the first half of the semester, and one presentation in the second half of the semester. Students will be evaluated on both the quality of their team presentations, and on the quality of their participation in the class discussions accompanying each presentation. Summary papers and CDs of the PowerPoint presentations will be due at the end of the semester. Maximum enrollment: 20 students. Fulfills History and Theory elective distribution requirement.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 527N Design at an Impasse: The Experience of Lina Bo Bardi

This seminar will address timely conceptual and practical issues about architecture by studying the design and theoretical works of Italian-born Brazilian architect, Lina Bo Bardi (1914-1992). As one of the very few prominent women architects in the 20th century, she articulated many important questions that remain open in contemporary architecture. Her work ranged from editorial to curatorial projects, from furniture to urban design, and from new buildings to restoration and adaptive reuse projects. The title of this course refers to a posthumous book she organized in the later years of her life, in which she addressed the dilemmas of designing in a world in which basic human needs and shared social values are often at odds with the pervasiveness of individualism, images and commodities in a globalized Western culture. The seminar will be divided in three modes: lectures, individual research, and an exhibition project. Lectures will focus on a comprehensive approach to her life, work and ideas. Individual research will focus on analyzing specific works organized by categories with access to both secondary and primary sources. The results of the research will be incorporated into a curatorial project for a pilot exhibition investigating the significance of her legacy to contemporary architects and designers. Fulfills History/Theory elective requirement.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 527T The Architecture of Steven Holl, 1974-2014

A seminar course examining the works of Steven Holl (1947-), one of the most important architects practicing today. During his 40-year career, 1974-2014, Holl's ordering principles and designs have exercised considerable influence over contemporary developments in architecture around the world. Today Holl is rightly considered the greatest of the third generation of American modern architects, following the first generation of Louis Sullivan, and the second generation of Louis Kahn, architects whose work has served as both a source of inspiration and a standard for Holl's work. In addition to teaching continuously at Columbia University since 1981, where he developed innovative design studio projects, Holl also co-founded in 1976 the influential critical journal Pamphlet Architecture. The course will be structured on the five sections of the proposed book, and will examine important early works such as the Hybrid Building at Seaside, the American Library in Berlin, and the five Edge of the City proposals; mid-career works such as the Housing at Fukuoka, the Stretto House in Dallas, the Chapel of St. Ignatius in Seattle, the Kiasma Museum in Helsinki, and Higgins Hall at Pratt Institute; and later works such as the School of Art at the University of Iowa, the Nelson-Atkins Museum addition in Kansas City, the Linked Hybrid in Beijing, and the Horizontal Skyscraper at Shenzhen. Analytical methods employed in the student presentations in the course will cover the full range of contextual, cultural, material, constructive and experiential attributes of buildings, with particular emphasis on the manner in which the spaces of a building are ordered by the patterns of occupation and "the poetics of use," as well as "the poetics of construction," or the way in which a building is built, and of what materials it is made, and how all these combine to construct the experience of those who inhabit it. Students will employ the graphic analysis standards developed by the professor. Following introductory lectures by the professor, each of the subsequent 10 class meetings will consist of two student presentations of building analyses, and each team of two students will be required to present two buildings: one work from early in the career to be presented in the first half of the semester, and one work from later in the career to be presented in the second half of the semester. Students will be evaluated on both the quality of their team presentations and on the quality of their individual participation in the class discussions accompanying each presentation. Individual research papers, as well as hard copies and CDs of the two in-class presentations, will be due at the end of the semester. As an integral part of the course, the professor will lead an "optional" field trip to the School of Art at the University of Iowa; this field trip will take place on a weekend. Fulfills History/Theory elective requirement.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 528M Architectural Association, 1971-1990: Texts, Buildings and Drawings

This seminar will examine the convergence of curatorial, publishing and professional practices at the Architectural Association (AA) in London under the chairmanship of Alvin Boyarsky. Through a focused study of the international network of AA notables in the 1970s and 80s — Zaha Hadid, OMA/Rem Koolhaas, Bernard Tschumi, Daniel Libeskind, Peter Eisenman, John Hajduk, Peter Cook, Robin Evans and others — the seminar will establish a broader relationship between architectural theory and practice. The course will integrate a set of primary theoretical texts with a selection of AA publications, illuminating the relationship between architecture and theories of image production, collection and dissemination. Course requirements include weekly reading summaries, discussions, in-class presentations and a research paper. Open to graduate and upper-level undergraduate students. Fulfills History/Theory elective requirement.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 529E Cellular Transformations

Throughout history, design has always played an important role in technological development; however, within the context of modernity, contemporary design has seen its limits since the urgency of environmental and sustainable issues has inflicted a great impact in our lives. There is a shift in design process, not only to invent new materials, but to reorganize and transform the materials that currently exist in our world. The Cellular Transformations research is a project that hybrids organic and synthetic interfaces by developing a cohesive materialism where both biological and artificial enhancements are produced. The Cellular Transformations research explores the process of cells attaching to substrates and scaffolds by promoting organic tissue growth. The infrastructural scaffolds and manipulation of the structural experiments impact the surface heterogeneity that could be articulated for maximum control within a design process. Our goal is to invent new formations of substrates and scaffolding techniques that allow cells to fabricate their own natural matrix and structural integrity by holding their own mechanical loads. This course will enroll students from architecture, biology and mechanical engineering to develop a collaborative research laboratory for experimenting with cellular growth techniques. The course will be working from the Architecture School's Digital Fabrication Lab and Biology's Cellular Incubator Lab. There will visits and lectures from the faculty of Washington University's Medical and Engineering Schools throughout the semester.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 529F New Vision: Designing for New Tools

This course is a research project between the School of Architecture and the Computer Science Department at Washington University in St. Louis. The course starts with lectures on fundamentals of architectural perception with spatial context and Computer Vision based 3-D modeling methods. We will introduce state-of-the-art imaging applications on tablets and PCs, and explain the underlying technologies. The final project/research is to develop digital models and translations of an un-built architectural project through experimental visual tools that will alter 3-D modeling with Computer Vision as aids. This interdisciplinary course offering will have a potential to significantly broaden the interests and knowledge of our students in both departments, and create new research and education opportunities at an interesting intersection of two different fields.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 538A Technology Transfer

The course explores design, manufacturing and production strategies employed for the development of technology in industries typically outside of the architectural domain. The performance characteristics of these technologies are considered as they relate to desired impact, technical theory and process. The course investigates the role of computation in design and production through an analysis of industry techniques related to computer modeling, performance analysis, CAD/CAM, rapid prototyping and robotics. The class explores recent developments in the automotive, aerospace and shipbuilding industries, among others, for this research. In addition to analysis, students are asked to develop and critique postulations related to the appropriate engagement of these technologies, design methodologies, and production techniques in the making of architecture. Students are asked to participate in discussions regarding their findings, write a report, and make a formal presentation of their work.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 538C Advanced Building Systems

The capstone course in the technology sequence. The course is comprised of a series of lectures related to technical theory, an analysis of technical precedent and an integration exercise. The lectures focus on structure and enclosure systems, active and passive climate control systems, natural and artificial lighting systems, mechanical and electrical services for buildings. During the first half of the course, students conduct the analysis of technical precedent in architecture exercise. Technical precedents will be analyzed relative to their performance characteristics and their relationship to other technologies in the building. During the second half of the semester, students conduct an integration exercise. Students will identify with the help of the instructor, a schematic design suitable for development. Technical systems will be selected based on architectural issues, performance characteristics and systems integration. Prerequisites: Students should complete Structures I & II, Environmental Systems I & II, and Building Systems before enrolling in Advanced Building Systems. Students who do not meet the prerequisites must receive the permission of the Graduate Chair in order to enroll.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 540B Advanced Building Systems (Buenos Aires)

The capstone course in the technology sequence. The course is comprised of a series of lectures related to technical theory, an analysis of technical precedent and an integration exercise. The lectures focus on structure and enclosure systems, active and passive climate control systems, natural and artificial lighting systems, mechanical and electrical services for buildings. During the first half of the course, students conduct the analysis of technical precedent in architecture exercise. Technical precedents will be analyzed relative to their performance characteristics and their relationship to other technologies in the building. During the second half of the semester, students conduct an integration exercise. Students will identify with the help of the instructor, a schematic design suitable for development. Technical systems will be selected based on architectural issues, performance characteristics and systems integration. Prerequisites: Students should complete Structures I & II, Environmental Systems I & II, and Building Systems before enrolling in Advanced Building Systems. Students who do not meet the prerequisites must receive the permission of the Graduate Chair in order to enroll.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 552D Contested Edge: River - City Couplings

This seminar will investigate the contested edge between the Mississippi River and the adjacent occupied land — between development and commerce based on our human needs and desires, and a river indifferent to our presence. Over 100 years ago, Twain warned us about the futility of our attempts to control the volatile Mississippi River: "Ten thousand River Commissions cannot tame that lawless stream, cannot curb or confine it, cannot say to it, Go here or Go there, and make it obey." For reasons of river navigation, irrigation, hydropower and flood protection, the river has been dammed, straightened, deepened and segregated from its natural floodplain. These massive engineering feats have caused severe and perhaps irreparable ecological damage by upsetting natural flooding cycles, disrupting flows, draining wetlands and inundating habitats. The results, while temporarily beneficial to some communities, are the progressive intensification of floods and the destruction of riparian zones. Traditional static infrastructures will continue to play a necessary role but cannot adequately handle increased floods and droughts resulting from global warming and our own intransigence. Rather than continually building harder and higher to protect communities from high waters, knowing from experience that the wild Mississippi will continually topple our efforts, this seminar will explore gentler, smoother transitions between land and water, city and river. Looking toward a more resilient condition, we will explore this ecological crisis as an opportunity for constructing a more livable, coupled, edge as a continuum between river and settlement — one requiring us to bend, accommodate, refrain, and think more creatively and strategically. The work of the seminar will be to create both a River Manual and to initiate an interactive web repository of data, strategies, maps, history, river city coupling examples, focused on the Mississippi River at the St. Louis region. Students will contribute with research, mapping, graphic design and web construction.

Credit 3 units. Arch: HT


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A46 ARCH 555C The Observer & The Observed

This seminar is intended to put students in contact with the urban and architectural culture or cultures in South America. The discovery and observation of the many local ways of doing and thinking will take place through observation of the urban landscape and the appreciation of concrete works by local architects. Activities will be focused on critical observation of the urban context and architecture, including the development of graphic exploration instruments and techniques. The relation between the observer and the observed will be intensified through graphic exploration. In this way, the seminar will purposefully avoid published written criticism as a way to approach the cases and bodies of work to be studied. This will be in order to construct a vision more closely attached to the practice of design and the confrontation with concrete design issues and less "contaminated" by pre-established historical or theoretical interpretation. The choice of case studies coincides with the array of buildings to be visited in field trips in Buenos Aires, Brazil and Uruguay. Buildings and practices to be "observed" will represent different scales, different degrees of intervention and the construction of different landscapes. The seminar is based in three class settings: site visits, professor and guest lectures, and in-class presentations and discussion. Rather than a cold, systematized, technical instruction on graphics, the development of personal observation/drawing tools and techniques is stressed. This includes sketching on the site and redrawing assignments based on personal sketches.

Credit 1 unit.


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A46 ARCH 562D Community Development I

Not-for-profit organizations are a major force in the development of urban areas. These groups range from neighborhood-based Community Development Corporations (CDC) to the St. Louis Alliance of Community Organizations (SLACO) and other governmental and private funding agencies and foundations. Housing, small business opportunities, job centers, transitional housing, neighborhood development, homeless shelters, and other types of projects are generally the concern of these corporations. It is the intent of this course to examine the role of not-for-profit corporations and the other players in the development of projects where not-for-profits played a significant role either as organizer, owner or developer. Representatives of various organizations, governmental agencies and foundations describing their institutional, legal and ethical roles in the projects make presentations throughout the semester. The case studies of specific projects are presented by teams at the end of the semester and a report is filed as part of an archive on urban and community development. The question that we ask is: How does community development occur using not-for-profit corporations? Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students; however, Master of Urban Design students are given preference. Fulfills Urban Issues elective requirement.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 563D Reconsidering the Margin: Places of Meeting, Spaces of Transformation

The financial crisis of 2008 and subsequent recession exposed the frailty of conventional modes of practice. The freezing of credit markets set off a contraction of increasingly bureaucratized creative fields such as architecture and fine arts and led to massive layoffs and underemployment. This extreme disruption coincides with an ongoing governmental disengagement from social assistance. The combination of the surplus of talent left by immobilized corporate practice and the vacuum created by a retreating government presents an opportunity to reconsider practice for a new generation in a way that engages a broader set of issues and problems. The seminar builds upon existing relationships and a body of previous engagement in the Pagedale community while laying the ground work for new action. This seminar challenges traditional modes and focuses of creative effort to arrive at a radical new form for creative practice. By challenging common assumptions and using creative production to confront the challenges facing residents and decision-makers, the course seeks to break down physical and disciplinary boundaries to achieve a radical new production. The seminar will include the following: examination of entrenched assumptions by students and community members through reading and discussion; involvement in the community, including volunteer work and civic participation; research into pressing issues that will culminate in a creative project; and dissemination of information to both classmates and the community as a whole. This course is open to disciplines outside of architecture. Students in Art and Social Work are encouraged to register. The course will meet periodically in the community. This course fulfills the Urban Issues or MUD Track elective requirement.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A46 ARCH 563E Urban Theory & Cities in Latin America

This course proposes to explore the relationship between urban theories and the spatial construction of the city by using a number of Latin American cities as case studies. Some of the theories that will be examined here have been proposed as a way of reading and explaining the form, structure and functioning of existing cities. Others have been put forward as models for the planning of new ones. In one way or another, all of these urban theories have influenced and shaped the form and structure of our current cities and our ability to conceptualize them. The urban theories and cases reviewed will span from the colonial city to the contemporary metropolis and urban region. The disciplines from which this course will draw upon will include urban planning, architecture, geography, urban sociology and anthropology. The scope of this course is intentionally broad and diverse as it aims to reflect the multitude of factors that are involved in urban phenomena. Some of the themes that will be examined include: the Spanish and Portuguese Colonial City; planned cities in the 19th century (the case of La Plata); modernization in Latin America; modernism and planned cities in the 20th century (the case of Brasilia); the "favelas" in Brasil and "villas miseria" in Argentina; postmodernism and globalization in urban studies; urban fragmentation in the contemporary metropolis (using the cases of São Paulo and Buenos Aires), and the debate on the sustainable urban form. The aim of this course is to provide a forum in which to discuss general theories and issues in urban thought, using primarily the cases of the cities that students will visit and experience first-hand over the course of the program. This course fulfills the Urban Issues elective requirement.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAUI


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A46 ARCH 564A Urban Development Seminar

Project-based research and discussions focus on the legal policy, social and architectural issues affecting the redevelopment of St. Louis and suburban areas such as Darst Webbe, Westminster Place, Clayton, and prototypical redevelopment of public housing projects of Carr Square, Darst Webbe and Vaughn into tenant ownership and market-rate housing neighborhoods. Topics include public policy issues affecting development, the availability and types of housing, transportation linkages, business, zoning issues, social and historical precursors. Through interaction with community leaders, teams of students from each discipline prepare a design proposal for an actual problem in the St. Louis area. This seminar is an interdisciplinary effort taught by faculty members of Washington University School of Architecture and the St. Louis University School of Law, Social Work and Department of Public Policy Studies. Prerequisite: 400 level and above. Limit 8 students. Fulfills Urban Issues elective for MArch degree. CBTL course.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A46 ARCH 564K European/Contemporary/Urban Public Spaces

The aim of this seminar is to describe and understand contemporary urban public space in Europe from the late 20th century to the present, as well as to anticipate possible future developments. The seminar will examine this complex subject by investigating the following complementary topics: historical considerations of elements of public space generation; the continually evolving definition of public space; possible boundaries between urban, non-urban and landscape; scale and other parameters (density, urban fabric); physical and geometrical magnitudes of urban public space; social and political parameters; and other non-apparent/non-physical conditions. Barcelona, Amsterdam and Berlin will be used as examples of cities able to produce celebrated qualified and diverse public spaces. In addition, a series of 12 relevant case studies will be examined. The possibility of mutual interactions with American cities will be considered, using St. Louis as a reference. The educational objectives of the course are to provide some tools and basic knowledge to understand, analyze and propose a contemporary public space. We will learn how to distill the various elements that compose "urbanity," and to recognize the interactions between them. Fulfills Urban Issues elective requirement.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A46 ARCH 565D Advanced Seminar in Urban Sustainability I

This seminar will investigate contemporary theories and methods of sustainable urbanism. Cities are increasingly the means through which a sustainable future for the anthropocene era is constructed. Within the sustainable urbanism paradigm, cities are understood as complex self-organizing open systems responding to socially constructed processes, conflicting values, natural resource limitations, extreme natural phenomena, man-made hazards, climate change and competing economic interests that inform urban change, design and development. Consideration will be given to the history, definition and reasoning for the urban sustainability paradigm; the theoretical constructs of sustainability, resiliency, adaptation and regeneration for post-carbon cities; the methods of analysis and measurement for urban sustainability; and the design of cities for livability, social inclusion, environmental performance, cultural diversity and economic equity. The course fulfills an Urban Design and Urban Issues elective for MUD, MArch & MLA degrees.
Same as A49 MUD 765D

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A46 ARCH 566A Informal Cities: the Future of Global Urbanism

This seminar researches the morphology & the morphogenesis of the Informal City as it evolves to be an integral phenomenon of global urbanism, and the corresponding economic, social, architectural and urban theory. Today, one billion people live in informal cities (36 percent of the world's population) and this is expected to grow another one billion over the next 30 years. As it is currently evolving, the informal city is an urban phenomenon set up within the planned city's territory and increasingly an integral part of it — often comprising up to 75 percent of the city and one of the elements of urban morphology that shapes city design. Thus, it is no longer possible to accept a concept of the informal city that centered on negative parameters (ghettos/slums/poverty/crime, etc.), but there is a need to find sustainable spatial solutions to integrate these settlements into the “formal” urban/architectural tissue leading to the dissolution of urban and symbolic boundaries between the “informal” areas and “formal” districts. To this end, the course reviews various architecture and urban strategies and projects of informal urbanism in Asia, Africa and South America supported with an optional field trip to South America favelas/barrios in order to define a place of action for architects and urbanists in the informal city. The course fulfills the Urban Issue elective requirement for the MArch degree. Undergraduate enrollment is allowed by arrangement with the instructor.
Same as A49 MUD 566A

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A46 ARCH 568F House and Home: Habits and Habitation

House and Home are broad categories of thought that have multiple meanings. The words encompass not only terms of building, belonging and place, but also terms of order, action and affection. The house has also been the site of conception and invention for the architectural projects of many significant modern master architects. In many contemporary practices, house and home have retained many ideas of these masters. However, many practices have simultaneously probed new meanings that investigate the relationship between habits and habitation with investigations of gender, sexuality and political order. This course fulfills the History/Theory elective requirement.

Credit 3 units. Arch: HT


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A46 ARCH 571A Landscape History II: Prehistory to 1850

Current work in landscape architecture draws from a wider range of references than conventional landscape gardening, engaging the deeper roots of urban design, planning and infrastructure in order to create spaces that fully integrate with and inform the surrounding context. Accordingly, this course broadens the field of historical inquiry, taking in topics ranging from cultural understandings of space to the design of sacred sites, military installations and water systems. The survey begins with prehistoric settlements and ends with the dawn of professionalized landscape design in the 19th century. Students will work through class discussion and writing projects to trace the cultural currents linking the first endeavors in land-making to today's practice.
Same as A48 LAND 571

Credit 3 units. Arch: HT


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A46 ARCH 573B Alternative Modes of Professional Practice

This course endeavors to reconsider the approach, means and delivery methods — the modes if you will — of architecture and its construction. Beginning with an overview of traditional project delivery, the course will serve as a foundation for future research by investigating, interviewing and compiling known methods of emerging practice trends and critical speculation of unproven types. The second stage will include reaching-out and bringing-forth a cross-section of experts and individuals spearheading similar strategies around the United States.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 573C Material / Practice

The seminar will provide each student a heightened understanding of material translation and detailing strategies that amplify conceptual design intent and that is sympathetic to the needs of professional practice. Content will endeavor to examine, at an advanced level, the intersections of design strategies with modes of professional practice. The semester will begin with an investigation of emerging practice trends; researching impacts on collaboration models, design approach, delivery methods and construction. The course will then shift to analysis and translation of conceptual design thought through to material, performative and experiential realization. Critical speculation of the underlying modes of practice and project delivery will parallel the analysis. The semester will conclude with material and detailing discourse in support of each student's studio work. Seminar dialogue will examine the overlap of practice and project delivery through the lens of design-thinking in lieu of the traditional lens of risk management. Where possible the course will bring forth experts from leading practices around the United States.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 574B Principles of the Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) Process

Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) is the use of multidisciplinary performance assessing models of the design/construct/own-operate process to support a variety of objectives. Intended for students who wish to explore the optimization potential of the VDC process, this course investigates VDC as managers/leaders in the Built Environment. The course focuses on developing models of integrating all perspectives: Design (architects/engineers/consultants), Construction (managers, contractors, subcontractors), Business (develop, own, operate) to overcome the technological and institutional changes and challenges of implementing VDC. Students will develop and implement fair-minded critical-thinking problem-solving techniques to advance contemporary decisions to improve virtual collaboration while reducing fragmentation and interoperability.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 579 Ecological Economics

This course is designed to give students an appropriate graduate-level understanding of the fundamental assumptions, the conceptual novelties, and the distinctive tools of analysis that comprise the emerging discipline of ecological economics, and to explore the role this new paradigm is playing in the movement toward a sustainable society. Standard economics — the neoclassical model — sees the economy as the whole that contains all other values; nature has value because some people will pay to experience it or to enjoy its services. Ecological economics reverses that relationship by acknowledging the environment, not the economy, as the containing whole. This it does through its grounding in the laws of energy — the laws that model the behavior of both natural and built systems. (While matter can be recycled, energy can't. No machine can take its own exhaust outputs as fresh inputs; no animal can survive by eating its own excrement.) Fulfills Urban Issues elective requirement. Fulfills MUD Track elective requirement.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 580 Design Thinking: Research and Design Methods

Covers the fundamentals of project planning, proposal writing and alternative research and design methods. This course is a prerequisite for Design Project (Arch 616). Grade of B- or better required in preceding two studios.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 601 Theories & Methods of Historical Research

What is architectural history? This is an advanced reading, writing and discussion seminar intended to better prepare students for research in the history and theory of architecture and urbanism. It is based on the premise that since contemporary design practices are not only data-driven, neutral and ahistorical, the ways that designers' conceptualize their work can benefit from a historically-informed understanding of how various approaches to architectural history have emerged over time. It seeks to consider how architecture and architectural history have been understood in the past, and how the development of the discipline informs contemporary research in architectural history by examining how recent and contemporary historians of the built environment do their work. This course fulfills the History/Theory elective requirement.

Credit 3 units. Arch: HT


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A46 ARCH 611 Architectural Design VII

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Arch 512. Twelve hours of studio work a week.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 611B Architectural Design VII (Buenos Aires)

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Arch 512. Twelve hours of studio work a week.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 611H Architectural Design VII (Berlin)

Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Arch 512. Twelve hours of studio work a week.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 616 Degree Project

Independently initiated design and research projects based on Design Thinking (Arch 580) Proposal to fulfill final requirements for degree award. Prerequisite: Design Thinking (Arch 580).

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 623B History of Urban Design

Examines the history of urban design, with an emphasis on the period 1890 to the present. Major topics include the urbanism of the Spanish Laws of the Indies; the development of the row house and the urban square; the park, parkway and suburban planning of Frederick Law Olmsted and others; the urban planning ideas of Camillo Sitte, Ebenezer Howard, Otto Wagner, Antonio Sant’Elia, Eric Mendelssohn, Tony Garnier, Le Corbusier, the Soviet urbanists and disurbanists, CIAM (Congräs Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne), Team 10, Aldo Rossi, Venturi and Scott-Brown, the Situationists and New Urbanism; and various other approaches to be determined.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 646 Professional Practice I

Develops awareness and understanding of architectural practice including the relation of the profession to society as well as the organization, management and documentation of the process of providing professional services. Covers the areas of (1) project process and economics, (2) business practice and management, and (3) laws and regulations. Prerequisite: 500-level studio placement or above.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 648F Project Design Realization: From Concept to Construction

Advanced study of professional practice topics focusing particularly on project management, construction documents production, and construction phase services and responsibilities of the architect. Students will select a project which they have produced previously in design studio and will create construction documents for this project. Likewise, the individual projects will be used to discuss project management processes and construction administration. This is not a technology course, but rather focuses on concepts and systems used by the architectural profession to describe architectural designs for the purpose of bidding the project and creating a legally binding document on behalf of architectural clients.

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 652H Metropolitan Development: What’s in a Plan?

This course explores pluralist, pragmatic and progressive planning strategies for American urbanism. It provides students with an introduction to the design and planning of American cities in the context of this country’s democratic tradition, its multicultural society and the particular morphology of its urban areas. Contemporary American cities have urbanized in unprecedented and distinctive ways that suggest the creation of a unique urban culture, despite the seeming globalization of urban trends or the apparent universalization of urban forms. Identifying the role design can play in this culture requires a lucid appraisal of the context in which metropolitan development takes place. Four study modules introduce basic issues in planning law, real estate finance, urban economics and environmental planning through lectures and research projects, as well the presentation of Metropolitan St. Louis development case studies by professional and political leaders.
Same as A49 MUD 652H

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAUI, UI


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A46 ARCH 656 Metropolitan Urbanism

The seminar course investigates the morphology and morphogenesis of the contemporary America metropolitan urban landscape. The investigation attempts to define and understand the changing pattern, form and use of the metropolitan transect from the central city to the rural fringe. The objective of the course is to understand the indeterminate complexity and richness of morphological layering and traces in the urban landscape as a basis for critical practice. Required for MUD students. Fulfills Urban Issues elective requirement.
Same as A49 MUD 656

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAUI, UI


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A46 ARCH 664 Historic Preservation/Urban Design

This class explores the history and current practice of historic preservation in the United States and relates them to local issues of contextual architecture, sustainable development, cultural tourism, and urban design. Emphasis is placed on the practical knowledge needed to participate professionally in historic preservation: how to evaluate the associative and architectural significance of a property or district, how to provide legal protection and redevelopment incentives for historic resources, how to appropriately restore, rehabilitate, adapt, and add to historic buildings, and how to incorporate historic preservation into the sometimes contentious framework of community planning. The course focuses on readings, student discussion, and case studies that draw extensively on real preservation situations in the region, including trips to the innovative Cupples Warehouse and Bohemian Hill projects, the endangered Old North St. Louis neighborhood, and a charrette in the Central West End.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, HT, UI


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A46 ARCH 711 Elements of Urban Design

The first of a three-semester sequence of design studios for students in the Master of Urban Design program.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 714 Metropolitan Urban Design

The third in a three-semester sequence of design studios for students in the Master of Urban Design program. This is a summer studio held in an urban location away from St. Louis.

Credit 6 units.


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A46 ARCH 761 Thesis Research

Credit 3 units.


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A46 ARCH 762 Thesis

Credit 6 units.


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Landscape Architecture

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for A48 LAND.


A48 LAND 501 Landscape Architecture Design Studio III

This studio investigates the planning and design of a post-industrial site in Saint Louis city, through reclamation strategies and an understanding of the site's ecological, historical and cultural underpinnings. Students will propose a design that addresses both the specificity of site and the larger environment through conceptual and analytical research. Examination of program, infrastructure, natural processes and reclamation will lead to a generative process to shape the landscape at multiple scales — from urban context to site concepts to personal experience.

Credit 6 units.


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A48 LAND 520 Landscape Representation II: Digital Tools

In the second course of the MLA representation series, students will be introduced to digital landscape illustration with a focus on representation of the phenomenological. This course will explore hybrid representation combining hand-drawing and digital techniques, diagramming as dynamic process (using tools such as Adobe After Effects), landscape entourage techniques, and their implementation within traditional architectural drawings, such as plan, section, elevation and perspective. Focus will be placed on exquisite craft, intelligent methods of creation and clarity of conveyance. Open to all graduate and undergraduate students interested in representing site and landscape, with the permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units.


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A48 LAND 521A Visualizing Ecological Processes

This course focuses on building skills in 3-D modeling, animation and simulation to add 4-D (time) processes into analysis, experimentation and presentation. Following the introduction and basic skills preparation, the course will focus on aspects important to creating animations and illustrations that depict landscape environments and dynamic processes. Projects will explore graphics techniques from various visual arts industries in order to expand the repertoire of skills. Techniques incorporating 3ds Max, After Effects, ArcGIS, Photoshop and/or Illustrator will be examined to illustrate chronological, phenomenological, experiential and conceptual ideas in design. Course projects will focus on development of narrative and emphasize the art of storytelling as they pertain to representation and illustration of design intent. Fulfills Digital elective requirement. Prerequisite: A48.520 or equivalent course(s) approved by instructor.

Credit 3 units.


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A48 LAND 524E Ordinance: Territorial Rules & Urban Administration

What is the link between rules and form? What is the relationship between form and politics? This course will essay an administrative history of the built environment, taking as its starting point the rules, codes, ordinances, laws and guidelines that shape the landscape. We will turn a critical yet curious eye toward historic and contemporary case studies that shape or are shaped by a robust regulatory framework — from the French Forest Ordinance of 1669 to the work of MVRDV and contemporaries. We will examine both the built results and the theories and philosophies of design by which they are animated. In the arc of our readings we will seek to link our territorial, urban and architectural understanding with broader historical and economic moments. In addition to carrying out readings, discussions and analyses, students will work toward Ordonnance, a collective publication that will historicize and diagram this administrative impulse.
Same as A46 ARCH 524E

Credit 3 units.


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A48 LAND 524F Critical Spatial Practice: Art / Architecture / Landscape / Urbanism

Critical Spatial Practice reads the history of art, architecture, landscape and urbanism across the grain — in an effort to tease out latent affinities and to heighten meaningful antagonisms. In particular, this class takes a critical look at the ways in which creative practice has situated itself in relation to politics, power, society and space, while maintaining a certain autonomy from each of these registers. Themes such as: historic and collective memory; empire and war; publics and counterpublics; city and countryside; institutions and the everyday; will all be central tropes as we ask questions of what, exactly, provokes one to make. Each of these disciplines shares a certain projective and critical orientation to the world — but what is it that makes their methods so distinct? What might we learn from knowledge of these differences? Where do shared passions break down? As critical practitioners, we look to make sense of the world — while our search for meaning may take radically different forms. Throughout the term, we will be focusing on a range of projects, movements, artists/practitioners and groups that take seriously the situatedness of their work. We will cover practices that might fall under more recognized categories, such as: performance, land art, ecology, social practice, everyday urbanism, pedagogy, curation and installation. We will interrogate the modes of production as well as modes of distribution that creative practitioners work within and against. We will look at the history of artists and designers engaging the built and natural worlds in ways that exceed the disciplinary frameworks of their time. From the Dada excursions to the Situationist Derives, from the urban representation of the CIAM grille to the urban choreography of Daniel Buren, and from the Romantic geography of Humboldt to the displaced geography of the Atlas Group. Throughout, we will be reading foundational texts — theoretical, historical and methodological — that help situate these projects and movements within their contemporary milieu. By focusing on the context of these practices, this course has its eye on the many conceptual elisions and canonical lacunas that emerge in disciplinary-specific histories from the early 20th century to the present — while also operating as a retroactive genealogy of the aspirations of the Sam Fox School. Weekly meetings will be structured around an organizing theme with related readings, screenings and viewings. Each class will consist of a short lecture by the instructor framing the topic, a student presentation weaving a network of thought around a single specific work/project, and subsequent discussion. Final projects will critically engage the themes of the course as students produce a publication, installation, video or performance that takes a position.
Same as A46 ARCH 524F

Credit 3 units.


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A48 LAND 530A Special Topics: American Cultural Landscapes

Whether we are designing buildings, landscapes or neighborhoods, we are working on a cultural landscape — a place built from customs, memories, histories and associations as much as visual design itself. This course provides an overview of American cultural landscapes and their alteration, through readings, visual art, site visits and field surveys. Symbolic, utilitarian, architectural, scenographic or personal meanings will be explored alongside site histories. Throughout the semester, the course will interrogate the concept of vernacular landscapes, more broadly defined as landscapes of everyday life. From roadsides to homesteads to tourist attractions to landfills to urban neighborhoods, vernacular landscapes define the image of America to large extent. Readings will unpack the contingencies between design, economics, cultural politics, agriculture, consumption and technology that inscribe culture across the land. Course work will be informed by the work of geographers, historians, writers, preservationists, filmmakers and visual artists. J.B. Jackson and Lucy Lippard's theories about the cultural uses of land will be anchors. Along the way, course readings and experiences (including fieldwork) will make stops along the way to examine local landscapes including a radioactive landfill, the neighborhoods of Detroit, the "wild" west, Appalachian terrain, the Mississippi River, the Sunset Strip, the Buffalo Bayou in Houston and more. The course will pose a taxonomy of the types of cultural landscapes while presenting various methods for decoding, recording, interpreting, preserving and altering these places.

Credit 3 units.


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A48 LAND 541A Plants & Environment

Students will learn to identify plants found in the natural communities and built environments of Missouri and the Midwest, both exotic and native, in order to form a base palette of landscape plants for the region. In addition to learning the plants' spatial characteristics, students will gain a basic understanding of the biological factors and horticultural practices influencing plant growth. While addressing the roles of individual species and selections, plants are also examined as parts of an interdependent community. The final goal will be to assess, and begin to practice, the appropriate use of plants in landscape design.

Credit 1.5 units.


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A48 LAND 541B Grading + Landform

This introductory course in earthwork and grading combines the study of historical and contemporary landforms in designed landscapes and artworks with the technical aspects of surveying, contours, formulas, drainage and graphic representation. Students will gain a basic understanding of three-dimensional form, contour manipulation, the concept of drainage, and the relationship between planting and landform. The observation, measuring and experience of landform in case studies will demonstrate how topography shapes our perception and use of space.

Credit 1.5 units.


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A48 LAND 542A GIS for Site Design

This course module will introduce GIS mapping software and its application to methods used in site planning and design. The focus of this half-semester course is to understand the potential of GIS to visualize, analyze and utilize complex data. Students will learn techniques and tools in ArcGIS software, and explore how these can be applied to projects specific to individual sites. This course will introduce new skills and analytical complexity while building upon previously learned representation techniques. MLA students have priority.

Credit 1.5 units.


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A48 LAND 542B Planting Design

The Planting Design module builds upon the Plants and Environment class, applying and expanding the vocabulary of plant material to understand the definition and construction of landscapes. Students will gain an awareness of planting typologies and strategies through function (micro-climate control, water consumption, hardiness) and perception (shade, color, density, texture). A series of design exercises will inform strategic plants specification in order to suit, define or reinvent landscape typologies — from parks and gardens to green roofs and restorative landscapes. Conceptual thinking and an understanding of management and sustainability are emphasized. The maximum enrollment for this course will be 12. MLA students have priority.

Credit 1.5 units.


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A48 LAND 551A Landscape Ecology

Effective and sustainable design requires knowledge of the unique combination of systems, processes and organisms that define specific regions, as well as the basic principles governing ecosystems. Applied ecology and design must also consider the role of human cultural interactions in shaping these systems. This course provides a broad understanding of ecological concepts focused through the genesis, character and cultural relationships of contemporary ecosystems. Students will learn to use concepts of ecology, conservation biology, evolutionary theory, and natural and cultural history to determine the factors and system constraints influencing the design of landscapes. The course focuses on local ecosystems: their origins, composition, process regimes, and historic and contemporary cultural interactions. Through this immersion in local landscapes and habitats, students will gain an understanding of biological systems and ecological concepts, and acquire the tools to inform ecologically relevant and sustainable design anywhere in the world. The class incorporates lectures, guest presentations, field trips, and extensive readings and class discussions, along with assignments combining research and analysis in a design context. The maximum enrollment for this course will be 12. MLA students have priority.

Credit 3 units.


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A48 LAND 560 Introduction to Arboriculture

Trees play a significant role in the overall ecosystem of our planet. They function both globally as well as microscopically. By better understanding the anatomy, physiology, growth habits and needs of trees, we can make more informed decisions as designers. There are finite, quantifiable aspects to how a tree develops, yet there are also environmental and human factors that can disturb or interrupt normal functions and patterns. It is the charge of the designer to delve into the science of trees in order to better inform our design solutions and make appropriate sustainable choices.

Credit 3 units.


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A48 LAND 560A Trees, Soils, & Systems: Introduction to Aboriculture

Trees play a significant role in the overall ecosystem of our planet. They function both globally as well as microscopically. There are finite, quantifiable aspects to how a tree develops, yet there are also environmental and human factors that can disturb or interrupt normal functions and patterns. It is the charge of the designer to delve into the science of trees in order to better inform our design solutions and make appropriate sustainable choices. The course objectives are to make the student familiar with the anatomy of trees, to understand soils and their effects on trees and vice versa, to increase their abilities to identify trees, especially during the winter months, to understand the business of how trees are managed, whether it be growing, maintenance or specification of appropriate local nursery stock and to gather knowledge of trees and their relationship in our sustainable environment. Each class will have an informal lecture component that will present the latest in technologies of arboriculture practices. The class readings and assignments will correspond with the lecture topics and a subsequent discussion will follow or be intertwined into the lecture presentation itself. The application of the information will be in clear, concise weekly exercises. There will be several field trips to the Missouri Botanical Garden, a trip to Forest Park to look at the varied tree habitats and what worked and what is not working, as well as a trip to a local tree nursery.

Credit 3 units.


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A48 LAND 571 Landscape History II: Prehistory to 1850

Current work in landscape architecture draws from a wider range of references than conventional landscape gardening, engaging the deeper roots of urban design, planning and infrastructure in order to create spaces that fully integrate with and inform the surrounding context. Accordingly, this course broadens the field of historical inquiry, taking in topics ranging from cultural understandings of space to the design of sacred sites, military installations and water systems. The survey begins with prehistoric settlements and ends with the dawn of professionalized landscape design in the 19th century. Students will work through class discussion and writing projects to trace the cultural currents linking the first endeavors in land-making to today's practice.

Credit 3 units. Arch: HT


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A48 LAND 574A Modern and Contemporary Landscape Architecture

This course examines significant theories and discourses in modern landscape architecture that have informed contemporary modes of practice. Organized around specific topics and lenses (such as site, ecology, art and sustainability), the course aims to provide a number of critical perspectives on the relevance of landscape architecture as a cultural practice. Readings and discussions will supplement lectures to trace back contemporary ideas to the late 19th and early 20th centuries. We will look at how broader transformations in social, environmental, economic and technological realms have affected discourse in landscape. To this end, students will be introduced to definitions that distinguish between landscape as a medium, landscape as an ideology, and landscape as a profession. Through weekly reviews of seminal projects and built works, we will examine significant styles, movements and design principles in landscape architecture. The course incorporates field trips and presentations by visitors, as well as applied research. It is open to both undergraduate and graduate students in the disciplines of landscape architecture, urban design and architecture. Priority is given to MLA students and undergraduate landscape architecture minors. Can count as a History/Theory elective.

Credit 3 units. Arch: HT


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A48 LAND 575 Research in the Landscape: Methods and Practices

This course is intended to cultivate the research methods essential to practice and study in the landscape today. As the culmination of the landscape history/theory sequence, we will build on prior curricular study and experience in research to create coherent frameworks for the theory and practice of research. In such a way, we will form an overview of the varied ways by which useful information can be derived from existing sources in order to advance the design and study of landscapes. Students will engage and practice a variety of research activities including archival research, textual and visual interpretation, on-site environmental analysis, and social survey. Working with a high degree of independence and initiative, students will engage scholarly works both as objects of critical reflection and as potential models for their own explorations. Though open to all design students, this course will optimize prior experience with ecology, GIS, and the discipline of landscape architecture.

Credit 3 units.


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A48 LAND 601 Landscape Architecture Design Studio V

Credit 6 units.


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A48 LAND 602 Landscape Architecture Design Studio VI

Credit 6 units.


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A48 LAND 645 Professional Practice for Landscape Architecture: Business, Practice and Management

Advanced study of professional practice topics focusing on firm management and project management for landscape architecture projects. Firm-related topics include starting a practice, financial management, legal structures, marketing, staffing, professional ethics and risk management. Project-related topics include fee negotiation, project structures and participants, scheduling, use of contracts and management documents, and construction document systems. Course activities include project site visits and visits to local firms with landscape architecture design services.

Credit 3 units.


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Urban Design

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for A49 MUD.


A49 MUD 5078 Developing Sustainable Urban Communities

Across the country, there is a drive to develop high-quality, economically and racially diverse, vibrant and sustainable urban communities. St. Louis is no exception to this trend. For reasons of sustainability, poverty alleviation and city building, community leaders and public officials in St. Louis are working to develop neighborhoods and communities that incorporate these factors. Developing Sustainable Urban Communities is a project-based course for graduate students and advanced undergraduates which asks interdisciplinary groups of students to contribute solutions to substantively and politically challenging place-based urban redevelopment challenges in St. Louis. Students will work in small teams to develop their projects over the course of the semester through research, dialogue with a team of interdisciplinary faculty, examination of relevant case studies, and engagement with client organizations in the community. Course participants will choose one of three semester-long projects, the subject of which will be developed by course instructors and client organizations in advance of the semester. The course will meet both on-campus and at various community sites. For MSW Program SED Concentration students, this course fulfills the SED concentration Practice Methods requirement. Enrollment is limited to 24 students with prior course work in community development, urban design or related fields. Preference is given to graduate architecture and social work students; other students will be admitted by permission of the instructors. Upon registering in the course, please send a brief statement (1-2 paragraphs) about your interest in the course and previous course work or experience that has prepared you for participation. Statements should be emailed to ljenks@wustl.edu. CBTL course.
Same as S60 SWCD 5078

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI


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A49 MUD 5079 Community Development & American Cities


Same as S20 SWHS 5079

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A49 MUD 525K LAND ARCH URB: LandscapeArchitectureUrbanism

New Disciplinary Dynamics: Blurs and Exchanges. Over the past decade, the various professions engaged in the construction of the built environment have been investigating (both in theory and practice) a specific and deliberate blurring, hybridization and expansion of the traditional semantic and historical categories of landscape, architecture and urbanism in an attempt to confront changing situations, environments and cultures. Across geographical and cultural boundaries, the proliferation of projects (speculative and built) and essays appearing in recent years makes this phenomenon more than a passing trend or the product of individual reflection. Architecture, for example, as a conventional discipline with its own tasks, internal logic and modus operandi has become so heterogeneous that it can no longer adequately authenticate its products from within the limits of its historical category. The same holds true of the allied fields of landscape and urbanism. Strict disciplinary boundaries are no longer capable of attending to the complexity of contemporary demands produced by mobility, density, de-urbanization, hybrid programs, changing uses, and ecological concerns. The contemporary world forcibly imposes the need for greater flexibility and indeterminacy and for new techniques of practice that are anticipatory, receptive to change, and capable of opening an aperture to the future. This course will explore these disciplinary slippages and hybrid contacts between until now distinct categories through essays and built or speculative works. Fulfills History/Theory elective. Fulfills Urban Issues elective.
Same as A46 ARCH 525K

Credit 3 units.


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A49 MUD 562H Informal Cities Workshop: Designing Urbanity: Collective Housing in Emergent Cities

This seminar will research the morphology & the morphogenesis of the Informal City as it evolves to be an integral phenomenon of global urbanism, and the corresponding economic, social, architectural and urban theory. Today, one billion people live in informal cities (36 percent of the world's population), and this is expected to grow another one billion over the next 30 years. As it is currently evolving, the informal city is an urban phenomenon set up within the planned city's territory and increasingly an integral part of it — often comprising up to 75 percent of the city and one of the elements of urban morphology that shapes city design. Thus, it is no longer possible to accept a concept of the informal city that centered on negative parameters (ghettos/slums/poverty/crime, etc.), but there is a need to find sustainable spatial solutions to integrate these settlements into the "formal" urban/architectural tissue leading to the dissolution of urban and symbolic boundaries between the "informal" areas and "formal" districts. To this end, the course will review various architecture and urban strategies and projects of informal urbanism in Asia, Africa and South America supported with a field trip to help further understand and define a place of action for architects and urbanists in the informal city. The completion of both the Informal Cities (fall semester, 1 unit) and the Lively City (spring semester, 2 units) masterclasses may fulfill the Urban Issues elective requirement for the MArch degree.

Credit 1 unit.


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A49 MUD 563D Reconsidering the Margin: Places of Meeting, Spaces of Transformation


Same as A46 ARCH 563D

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A49 MUD 564A Urban Development Seminar

Project-based research and discussions focus on the legal policy, social and architectural issues affecting the redevelopment of St. Louis and suburban areas such as Darst Webbe, Clayton, Westminster Place and prototypical redevelopment of public housing projects of Carr Square, Darst Webbe and Vaughn into tenant ownership and market rate housing neighborhoods. Topics include public policy issues affecting development, the availability and types of housing, transportation linkages, business, zoning issues, social and historical precursors. Through interaction with community leaders, teams of students from each discipline prepare a design proposal for an actual problem in the St. Louis area. This seminar is an interdisciplinary effort taught by faculty members of Washington University School of Architecture and the St. Louis University School of Law, Social Work and Department of Public Policy Studies. Prerequisite: 400 level and above. Limit 8 students. Fulfills Urban Issues elective for MArch degree. CBTL course.
Same as A46 ARCH 564A

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A49 MUD 564K European/Contemporary/Urban Public Spaces

The seminar will attempt the description and the understanding of how the construction of the contemporary public urban space occurs in Europe from late 20th century to the present. The seminar will also include a glimpse of the possible future developments. The seminar will proceed in a multilayered field with the following complementary entries: historical considerations of public space generation clues; the constantly updated definition of public space; the diffused limits between urban, non-urban and landscape; scale and other parameters (density, urban fabric); physical and geometrical magnitudes of urban public space; social and political parameters; other non-apparent / non-physical conditions; Barcelona (among others) as a model able to produce celebrated qualified and diverse public spaces; a sequence of 12 relevant case studies; a possible chance of mutual effects with American cities using St Louis as reference.
Same as A46 ARCH 564K

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A49 MUD 565D Advanced Seminar in Urban Sustainability I

This seminar will investigate contemporary theories and methods of sustainable urbanism. Cities are increasingly the means through which a sustainable future for the anthropocene era is constructed. Within the sustainable urbanism paradigm cities are understood as complex self-organizing open systems responding to socially constructed processes, conflicting values, natural resource limitations, extreme natural phenomena, man-made hazards, climate change and competing economic interests that inform urban change, design and development. Consideration will be given to the history, definition and reasoning for the urban sustainability paradigm; the theoretical constructs of sustainability, resiliency, adaptation and regeneration for post-carbon cities; the methods of analysis and measurement for urban sustainability; and the design of cities for livability, social inclusion, environmental performance, cultural diversity and economic equity. The course fulfills an Urban Design and Urban Issues elective for MUD, MArch & MLA degrees.
Same as A49 MUD 765D

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A49 MUD 566A Informal Cities: The Future of Global Urbanism

This seminar will research the morphology & the morphogenesis of the Informal City as it evolves to be an integral phenomenon of global urbanism, and the corresponding economic, social, architectural and urban theory. Today, one billion people live in informal cities (36 percent of the world's population) and this is expected to grow another one billion over the next 30 years. As it is currently evolving, the informal city is an urban phenomenon set up within the planned city's territory and increasingly an integral part of it — often comprising up to 75 percent of the city and one of the elements of urban morphology that shapes city design. Thus, it is no longer possible to accept a concept of the informal city that centered on negative parameters (ghettos/slums/poverty/crime, etc.), but there is a need to find sustainable spatial solutions to integrate these settlements into the "formal" urban/architectural tissue leading to the dissolution of urban and symbolic boundaries between the "informal" areas and "formal" districts. To this end, the course will review various architecture and urban strategies and projects of informal urbanism in Asia, Africa and South America supported with an optional field trip to South America favelas/barrios in order to define a place of action for architects and urbanists in the informal city. The course fulfills the Urban Issue elective requirement for the MArch degree. Undergraduate enrollment is allowed by arrangement with the instructor.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A49 MUD 574A Modern and Contemporary Landscape Architecture


Same as A48 LAND 574A

Credit 3 units. Arch: HT


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A49 MUD 579 Ecological Economics

This course is designed to give students an appropriate graduate-level understanding of the fundamental assumptions, the conceptual novelties, and the distinctive tools of analysis that comprise the emerging discipline of ecological economics, and to explore the role this new paradigm is playing in the movement toward a sustainable society. Standard economics — the neoclassical model — sees the economy as the whole that contains all other values; nature has value because some people will pay to experience it or to enjoy its services. Ecological economics reverses that relationship by acknowledging the environment, not the economy, as the containing whole. This it does through its grounding in the laws of energy — the laws that model the behavior of both natural and built systems. (While matter can be recycled, energy can't. No machine can take its own exhaust outputs as fresh inputs; no animal can survive by eating its own excrement.) Fulfills Urban Issues elective requirement. Fulfills MUD Track elective requirement.
Same as A46 ARCH 579

Credit 3 units.


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A49 MUD 652H Metropolitan Development: What's in a Plan?

This course explores pluralist, pragmatic and progressive planning strategies for American urbanism. It will provide students with an introduction to the design and planning of American cities in the context of this country's democratic tradition, its multicultural society, and the particular morphology of its urban areas. Contemporary American cities have urbanized in unprecedented and distinctive ways that suggest the creation of a unique urban culture, despite the seeming globalization of urban trends, or the apparent universalization of urban forms. Identifying the role design can play in this culture requires a lucid appraisal of the context in which metropolitan development takes place. Four study modules will introduce basic issues in planning law, real estate finance, urban economics and environmental planning through lectures and research projects, as well the presentation of Metropolitan St. Louis development case studies by professional and political leaders.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAUI, UI


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A49 MUD 656 Metropolitan Urbanism

The seminar course will investigate the morphology and morphogenesis of the contemporary America metropolitan urban landscape. The investigation will attempt to define and understand the changing pattern, form and use of the metropolitan transect from the central city to the rural fringe. The objective of the course is to understand the indeterminate complexity and richness of morphological layering and traces in the urban landscape as a basis for critical practice. Required for MUD students. Fulfills Urban Issues elective requirement.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAUI, UI


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A49 MUD 658 Metropolitan Sustainability

This seminar will investigate contemporary theory and practice of the design and development of sustainable regions, cities, communities, infrastructures and landscapes. By 2050 three-quarters of the world's population will be living in cities, and with cities being the world's largest consumer of resources and a focus of climate change impact, it will be the design of cities that frame the essential theory and practice of sustainability. Consideration will be given to the definition and reasons for the sustainability paradigm; conceptual frameworks for urban sustainability; indicators & measures of sustainability; different sustainability functional categories (water, air, food, energy, transportation, social capital, equity, development patterns & density, etc.); and various approaches to urban sustainability including Regenerative Urbanism, Healthy Cities, Ecological Urbanism, Eco-Urbanity, Resilient Cities, Smart Cities, LEED ND, the Natural Step, ICLEI and ZED Cities. The maximum enrollment for this course will be 12. MUD students and urban design minors have priority.

Credit 3 units.


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A49 MUD 664 Historic Preservation/Urban Design

This class will explore the history and current practice of historic preservation in the United States and will relate them to local issues of contextual architecture, sustainable development, cultural tourism and urban design. Emphasis will be placed on the practical knowledge needed to participate professionally in historic preservation: how to evaluate the associative and architectural significance of a property or district, how to provide legal protection and redevelopment incentives for historic resources, how to appropriately restore, rehabilitate, adapt and add to historic buildings, and how to incorporate historic preservation into the sometimes contentious framework of community planning. The course will focus on readings, student discussion and case studies that draw extensively on real preservation situations in the region including trips to the innovative Cupples Warehouse and Bohemian Hill projects, the endangered Old North St. Louis neighborhood and a charrette in the Central West End.
Same as A46 ARCH 664

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, HT, UI


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A49 MUD 701 Theories & Methods of Historical Research

What is architectural history? This is an advanced reading, writing and discussion seminar intended to better prepare students for research in the history and theory of architecture and urbanism. It is based on the premise that since contemporary design practices are not only data-driven, neutral and ahistorical, the ways that designers' conceptualize their work can benefit from a historically-informed understanding of how various approaches to architectural history have emerged over time. It seeks to consider how architecture and architectural history have been understood in the past, and how the development of the discipline informs contemporary research in architectural history by examining how recent and contemporary historians of the built environment do their work. This course fulfills the History/Theory elective requirement.
Same as A46 ARCH 601

Credit 3 units. Arch: HT


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A49 MUD 711 Elements of Urban Design

The first in a three-semester sequence of design studios for students in the Master of Urban Design program.

Credit 6 units.


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A49 MUD 713 Metropolitan Design Elements

The second in a three-semester sequence of design studios for students in the Master of Urban Design program.

Credit 6 units.


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A49 MUD 765D Advanced Seminar in Urban Sustainability I

This seminar will investigate contemporary theories and methods of sustainable urbanism. Cities are increasingly the means through which a sustainable future for the anthropocene era is constructed. Within the sustainable urbanism paradigm cities are understood as complex self-organizing open systems responding to socially constructed processes, conflicting values, natural resource limitations, extreme natural phenomena, man-made hazards, climate change and competing economic interests that inform urban change, design and development. Consideration will be given to the history, definition and reasoning for the urban sustainability paradigm; the theoretical constructs of sustainability, resiliency, adaptation and regeneration for post-carbon cities; the methods of analysis and measurement for urban sustainability; and the design of cities for livability, social inclusion, environmental performance, cultural diversity and economic equity. The course fulfills an Urban Design and Urban Issues elective for MUD, MArch & MLA degrees.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


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A49 MUD 781 Directed Readings in Sustainable Urbanism I

This is a special topics course intended for graduate students to read, research and critique key contemporary texts that examine the relationship between sustainability, cities and the design disciplines. The course content is personalized to the individual student's background and interest, and is intended to broaden the student's disciplinary knowledge base in sustainable urbanism. This is a required course for students in the Doctor of Sustainable Urbanism program. Students in the Master of Urban Design, Master of Science in Architectural Studies, and Master of Science in Architectural Design degree programs may enroll with the permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD


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