The Department of Classics is committed to the threefold study of Greco-Roman antiquity via the languages and literatures, the history, and the art and architectural remains. The Master of Arts in Classics is ideal preparation either for PhD work or for a career in secondary teaching, and has a strong placement record in both areas. The Doctor of Philosophy program prepares candidates primarily for careers in research and university teaching, although the department will also help them explore alternative careers. Both programs provide rigorous instruction in Greek and Latin languages and literatures, exposure to the subfields of Classics, opportunities to cultivate special fields of research, and teaching experience in departmental courses.

While both graduate programs are built around preparation in the core fields of Classics, opportunities exist for collaboration with numerous other departments and programs. PhD candidates have the option to pursue one of several special interdisciplinary tracks: Ancient History, Ancient Performance, Ancient Music, and Ancient Philosophy. Washington University also possesses several special collections of interest to the Classics researcher: the John Max Wulfing Coin Collection, an internationally recognized resource that can be applied to studies in numismatics, history, economics and art; a small collection of papyri housed in Olin Library; and a departmental archive of epigraphical and papyrological materials.

Contact:Zoe Stamatopoulou
Phone:314-935-5123
Email:classics@wustl.edu
Website:https://classics.artsci.wustl.edu

AM in Classics

Candidates may obtain an AM degree in Classics by completing 36 graduate units of credit, completing a reading list, and taking a series of examinations. Students planning to continue in the Classics department's PhD program must also write a master's thesis. Others may choose to complete the AM with or without a thesis.

Courses: 36 units, including:

Specific required courses: 6 units

Classics 502 Research and Publication on the Greco-Roman World (3 units) - a proseminar on materials and methods of the profession

Classics 510 Comparative Greek and Latin Grammar (3 units) (offered every two years, alternating with Classics 502)

Other course requirements: 24 units (for AM with thesis)

All units must be at the 400 level or above.

At least 6 units in Greek (L09) (one or more options is offered every semester)

At least 6 units in Latin (L10) (one or more options is offered every semester)

Most remaining courses will be in Greek, Latin and Classics. With the guidance of the director of graduate studies, students may take 3 course units outside of the Classics department.

Research Credits: 6 units

The master's thesis counts for 6 units. Any student opting not to write a thesis will fulfill these units with additional courses.

Modern Language Competence

German, French or Italian; the requirement may be fulfilled by courses or examination.

Program Exams

Greek and Latin Sight Reading
Greek Reading List
Latin Reading List

Students not planning to go on to a PhD program in Classics may opt to take the Reading List exam in one language (Greek or Latin) only. Those who pursue this option must still complete at least 6 units in the other language at the 400 level. The examination will require the student to demonstrate competence in translation and interpretation, as well as knowledge of the relevant scholarship.

Teaching

While there is no teaching requirement for the AM, most students in the program have the opportunity to pursue mentored teaching experiences in undergraduate courses and to take the department's course on Classics pedagogy for graduate students.

PhD in Classics

The Classics PhD requires 72 graduate units of courses and research in combination. Up to 24 of these units may be transferred from an outside AM program in Classics, at the discretion of the Graduate Committee. (Requirements listed below include requirements for the AM in Classics at Washington University.) All units must be at the 400 level or above. With the guidance of the director of graduate studies, students may take up to 12 units outside the Classics department to enhance their graduate study. Every PhD candidate also completes a teaching requirement through assignments as Assistant to Instructor and Instructor of Record.

Courses: 54 units, including:

Specific required courses: 9 units

Classics 502 Research and Publication on the Greco-Roman World (3 units) - a proseminar on materials, methods, and professional issues in Classics

Classics 505 Seminar in Classics Pedagogy for Graduate Students (3 units) (to be offered every two or three years)

Classics 510 Comparative Greek and Latin Grammar (3 units) (offered every two years, alternating with Classics 502)

Other course requirements: 27 units

At least 12 units in Greek (L09) (one or more options is offered every semester)

At least 12 units in Latin (L10) (one or more options is offered every semester)

At least 3 units in ancient history (at least one course will be offered every two years)

Elective courses: 18 units

Includes courses for individual tracks, optional independent studies in preparation for exams, and other courses, to be chosen after consultation with the director of graduate studies.

Research Credits: 18 units

Master's thesis: 6 units
Dissertation credits: 12 units

Program Exams

Greek and Latin Sight Reading
Greek Reading List
Latin Reading List
Comprehensive Exam
Special Field Exam

Teaching

8 semesters of mentored teaching experiences, including at least two courses as Instructor of Record. 

Modern Language Competence

German and French, or German and Italian; the requirement may be fulfilled by courses or examination in each case.

Dissertation Requirements

Dissertation prospectus
Dissertation colloquium
Dissertation
Dissertation defense