The Master of Arts in Biology program helps students update and deepen their knowledge of the biomedical sciences, prepare for employment in related fields, and advance their professional standing — while obtaining a graduate science degree on a part-time basis through evening, weekend, and online courses.

Designed to be adaptable to each individual's unique background and goals, the program provides a flexible curriculum and close individual advising for each student. Students include science and health professionals, teachers, technicians, and individuals in biology-related businesses.

Students in this program have the option of choosing a concentration in neurobiology or plant biology for deeper, more focused study.

Contact:Ian Duncan
Phone:314-935-6719
Email:duncan@wustl.edu
Website:http://ucollege.wustl.edu/programs/graduate/masters-biology

Master of Arts in Biology

Students seeking the Master of Arts in Biology must satisfactorily complete 30 units of graduate course work in the biological sciences, including a required capstone experience of either:

  1. a 3-unit capstone course or
  2. a 6-unit master's thesis.

Students have considerable freedom in selecting courses that match their own interests. Students must have completed a minimum of 24 units in order to be eligible for a capstone experience. Students with appropriate backgrounds, interests, and academic qualifications may, with authorization, write a master's thesis based on original library or laboratory research.

All students admitted to the Master of Arts in Biology are required to take at least 50 percent of the 30 units of course work required (i.e., 15 units) to complete the degree on the Washington University campus.

Optional Concentrations for the AM in Biology

Optional concentrations require 12 units of course work as specified below. University College students who are admitted to the AM in Biology may select one of the optional concentrations noted below.

Neurobiology — the study of the structure and function of the nervous system, helps prepare students for careers in biomedical fields, including research and clinical practice in medicine, neuroscience, and cognitive science.

Required:

Bio 435Neurobiology3

Electives: Choose three

Bio 436The Neural Basis of Behavior3
Bio 4721The Biology of Membranes3
Bio 478Neuroscience: Sensory Systems3
Bio 4780Genes, Brains and Behavior3
Bio 485Synaptic Function and Plasticity in the Nervous System3

Plant Biology — the study of the structure, physiology, molecular genetics, and development of plants, helps prepare students for careers in the burgeoning plant biotechnology area.

Required:

Bio 452Introductory Plant Biology3

Electives: Choose three

Bio 417Plant Molecular Biology3
Bio 448Plant Physiology and Biochemistry3
Bio 4791Plant Anatomy: Form, Function, and Diversity3
Bio 490Plants, People, Culture3
Bio 523Plants and People2
Bio 527Molecular Biology of Plant-Pathogen Interactions3

Credit Transfer

A maximum of 6 credits of related and comparable graduate-level course work may be transferred from another university or from a related graduate program at Washington University with the approval of the program director. These must be graduate-level units not used to fulfill undergraduate degree requirements. Transfer credit may be granted only for authorized courses for which the student received a grade of B or higher.

Please note that the AM in Biology degree is a terminal graduate degree awarded on the basis of course work rather than research. Except in rare cases, it is not intended as preparation for a PhD degree. No more than 6 of the 30 credits may be earned in research courses. Those interested in graduate research or in earning a PhD should apply to the PhD programs offered by Washington University's Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences.

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for U29 Bio.


U29 Bio 500 Independent Study

An independent research project under the supervision of a member of the Biology faculty. Open only to students admitted to the graduate program in Biology. Approved proposal must be presented at the time of registration. For more information, contact the assistant dean for Graduate Programs at 314-935-6700.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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U29 Bio 501 Human Anatomy


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U29 Bio 5012 Human Anatomy and Development

Study of the human body primarily by dissection; extensive use of X-rays and CT scans. Emphasis on functional and clinical aspects of anatomy. Prerequisite: This course is restricted to first-year medical students. If space allows, a small number of graduate students may be permitted to take the course with permission of instructor. Same as L48 Anthro 502 and M05 AnatNeuro 501A.
Same as L41 Biol 501

Credit 6 units.


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U29 Bio 503 Directed Research

An independent research project under the supervision of a member of the Biology faculty. Approved proposal must be presented at the time of registration. This course is the first of a two-semester sequence. Students must complete U29 504 in order to receive credit for U29 503. Open only to students admitted to the graduate program in Biology.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 504 Master's Thesis

An independent research project under the supervision of a member of the Biology faculty. Approved proposal must be presented at the time of registration. Open only to students admitted to the graduate program in Biology. This course is the second in a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: U29 503.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 505 Case Studies in Conservation Medicine

Conservation Medicine is a transdisciplinary field that studies the inter-relationships between animal, human, and ecosystem health. In this course, we examine how ecological disturbances set up a cascade of responses in pathogens, vectors, and animal hosts, ultimately leading to the emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases in people; for example, Lyme disease, viral hemorrhagic fevers, Hanta virus pulmonary infection, malaria and yellow fever, HIV, SARS and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The first third of the course focuses on Conservation Medicine itself; environmental and biological health; disease transmission; and ecosystem changes that promote disease emergence. The remainder of the course focuses on instructor- and student-led case studies of select human disease outbreaks from the Conservation Medicine perspective. Grades for the course are based on class discussion participation, an oral case study presentation, and a term paper on a topic of student's choice.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5051 Foundations in Immunology

Designed for graduate students as an in-depth introduction to immunology. Topics: antibody structure and genetics, B cell recognition, T cell receptor, major histo-compatibility complex, T cell recognition, regulation of the immune response, immune mediators, humoral and cellular effector mechanisms. Prerequisite: introductory biochemistry and/or genetics helpful, permission of instructor.

Credit 4 units.


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U29 Bio 506 General Physiology

This graduate-level course examines the anatomy and physiology of the human body in a cohesive evolutionary context. For each system, we review the general anatomy and physiology, turning then to the molecular basis of function and dysfunction. An understanding of the various physiological systems synthesize in the context of evolutionary history. The lecture portion of this course will give a detailed overview of the physiology of all major human organ systems, including: neural, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive, urogenital, and immune systems. In each section, we apply this understanding to recent discoveries presented in primary scientific literature and current reviews.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5061 Cell Biology

Eukaryotic cell structure and function viewed from the perspective of modern cell biology. Lectures cover such topics as membrane transport, endocytosis and secretion, intracellular trafficking, hormones and signal transduction, extracellular matrix and tissue formation, cytoskeleton and motility, cell cycle, apoptosis, and the cellular basis of disease. Prerequisite: Bio 2970.
Same as L41 Biol 334

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM BU: SCI


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U29 Bio 5062 Central Questions in Cell Biology

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5063 Molecular Cell Biology

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5064 Introduction to Modern Technology of Electron Microscopy

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5065 Cell Biology of the Stress Response

Credit 2 units.


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U29 Bio 5066 Biostatistics for Research Workers

Consult department for details.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 507 Pharmacology

Biological basis of drug action: general pharmacology, cardiovascular, neuropharmacology.

Credit 4 units.


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U29 Bio 508 Pharmacology

Credit 4 units.


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U29 Bio 5083 Principles of Protein Chemistry


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U29 Bio 509 Chemistry for Biology Teachers

A strong connection exists between biology and chemistry. It is important to study the properties and interactions of chemicals within living organisms. This online course will emphasize those areas of contemporary biology that involve complex molecular structures and interactions that require knowledge of chemical and biochemical principles including bonding and molecular structure in important biological molecules, chemical reactions for biological processes such as respiration and photosynthesis, and cellular energy conversions. The course will consist of online tutorials with animations, facilitated online discussions, and the use of hands-on materials. Students will develop their knowledge by utilizing technological tools such as online molecular databases and molecular visualization software. The goal of the course is for teachers to explore topics with a global societal impact, such as pharmaceutical development, bioenergy sources, nutrition, the role of biomolecules in diseases and genetic testing.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 510 Principles of Toxicology

The basic concepts involved in toxicology such as dose response.


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U29 Bio 511 The Molecular and Biochemical Basis of Biological Warfare

This course will provide an introduction to pathogens and biological agents that have been used or could be used for military purposes. After a brief history of biological warfare the course will focus on the molecular mechanisms that biological warfare agents use to attack their hosts. Students will examine the molecular pathogenesis of likely bacterial agents (anthrax, plague, tularemia), viruses (WEE/VEE, Smallpox, and Maarbug/Ebola), biologically produced toxins (Bo-tox, ricin, SEB), and biological threat agents targeting agriculture and industry. A highlight of the course will be a class discussion of Biohazard, a defector's chronicle of the Soviet Union's bio-warfare program.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5122 Cell-Matrix Interactions

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5124 Cell Biology Journal Club

Credit 1 unit.


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U29 Bio 515 The Biology of Membranes

Biological membranes not only define cell and organelle boundaries but also control the substances that are allowed to enter or exit the cell or organelle. Biomembrane structures, including composition, determine functions. The goal of this class is to examine cell membrane structure, membrane components and their organization into domains, and functions. Cholesterol is an important membrane lipid that is linked to biomembranes structurally and functionally. Misregulation of synthesis or trafficking of lipids, including cholesterol, contributes to many human diseases. Students will learn historical background and recent advances in membrane biology, following the path taken by cholesterol and others.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 517 Plant Molecular Biology

This course addresses how plants function at the cellular and molecular level. Topics include genome organization and gene expression, cell cycle control, intracellular protein trafficking, reproduction, signal transduction, hormonal control of gene expression, plant-environment interactions, functional genomics, and genetic engineering. The entire course focuses on the current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying gene expression and regulation, emphasizing applications to biotechnology. Recent advancement in unraveling the molecular mechanisms of gene expression and regulation in non-plant systems also are discussed when appropriate. This course meets at Monsanto Chesterfield/Pfizer campus.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5172 Selected Topics in Immunology

This course is designed for students who have taken Bio 4241 Introductory Immunology in the fall. Interested students must have advance permission of the instructor before registration. In contrast to the lecture format of the fall course, this course consists of discussion of critical reviews and articles intended to illuminate classic theoretical insights in immunology, contemporary frontiers in the science, and areas of interest to individual students. The format of the course is that of group discussion led by designated students in rotation. Topics will be mutually selected by the instructor and the students. There will be an emphasis on the evaluation of primary data, of the methods used to elicit the data, and upon the validity of the interpretations made of such data. The intent is to move the student's understanding beyond the basic facts of a particular area of immunology and on toward an appreciation of what it takes to perform experiments in that area, what remains unsolved in that area, as well as what approaches are being used to attempt solution. Grading is dependent upon the following criteria (in rank order of weight): 1) critiques written by the students of each other's presentations/discussions; 2) instructor's critiques of each student's presentations/discussions; 3) instructor's evaluation of the critiques each student writes on the presentations/discussions of the other students; 4) instructor's evaluation of the level of contribution each student makes to the discursive format of the course. Prerequisites: 1) Enrollment in the Master of Arts program, 2) Bio 4241 Introductory Immunology, 3) advance permission of the instructor (enrollment limited due to the nature of this course — please contact instructor before registering).

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 521 Program Capstone I

This is a 1.5-credit course intended as an extension of the three 2-credit content courses completed in year one of the MS degree program in biology. The course will include applications of advanced-level life science content to the teachers' local biological setting. The course will also include applications of new content to teachers' classroom setting. The instructional format will be project-based and delivered using an online learning environment. Students will be expected to conduct action research on a topic relevant to life science learning in their classrooms. Admission in the course is contingent upon admission in the graduate program. Online, for Summer Institute Teachers only.

Credit 1.5 units.


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U29 Bio 5221 Molecular Basis of Microbial Pathogenesis

Discussion of current research on pathogenic micro-organisms and their virulence determinants. Emphasis on model systems that demonstrate the cellular and molecular basis of host-pathogen interactions. Prerequisite: Molecular Microbiology and Pathogenesis or permission of instructor.

Credit 2 units.


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U29 Bio 523 Plants and People

This course provides a rigorous introduction to plant sciences and biotechnology, including basic plant biology, photosynthesis, energy capture, and agriculture. The course will also cover such applied topics as genetically modified plants, conservation, plant-derived medicines, and food and nutrition in the developing world. Closed registration — for participants in the NSF Institute Master's in Biology program or by permission of the associate director of the Institute for School Partnership.

Credit 2 units.


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U29 Bio 5261 Molecular Mechanisms of Disease

Lectures and student presentations covering a wide range of topics including inflammation, microbial immunity, vaccines, immunodeficiences, neuroimmunology, autoimmunity, and lymphoid malignancies. Prerequisite: Foundations of Immunology or permission of instructor.

Credit 2 units.


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U29 Bio 527 Molecular Biology of Plant-Pathogen Interactions

This course will focus on the molecular interactions between plant pathogens and their hosts. The genetics and molecular dissection of plant defense pathways and pathogen virulence strategies will be explored. The molecular and biochemical interactions between plant pathogens and their hosts will be emphasized.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5285 Fundamentals of Mammalian Genetics

This course aims to provide both biologists and those with mathematical backgrounds with a basis in mammalian genetics. The course will include the following modules: nucleic acid biochemistry; gene and chromosome organization; introduction to human genetics; mutations and DNA repair; cancer genetics; genomic methodologies; biochemical genetics; murine genetics; epigenetics; neurodegenerative diseases; mitochondrial disorders; pharmacogenetics; introduction to human population genetics; applications of modern human genetics; introduction to web-based informatics tools for molecular genetics. One of the required courses in the Quantitative Human Statistical Genetics graduate program.
Same as L41 Biol 5285

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 529 Case Studies in Biology

A prerequisite to critical scientific thinking is seeking reliable knowledge. Many people are fooled by pseudoscientific claims in the popular press. Case study learning humanizes the study of biology and makes science relevant to current events. This course will use an online format to present biology-based case studies that will prompt teachers to make critical assessments of scientific information. Course methods will model and scaffold the development of both teachers' and students' skills in group learning, critical thinking, and research techniques. This is a course for NSF Institute fellows only.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 530 Molecular Biology of Eukaryotic Genes

In-depth analysis of the molecular biology of eukaryotic genes, their regulations, and their roles in specialized cellular systems and disease states. Gene therapy will also be covered. Prerequisites: U29-405 and 406. U29-437 is strongly recommended.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5319 Molecular Foundations of Medicine

This course will cover fundamental aspects of biochemistry and cell biology from a medical perspective. The course begins with a treatment of protein structure and the function of proteins in the cytoskeleton and cell motility. The principles of enzyme kinetics and regulation are then discussed, and basic pathways for the synthesis and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids are introduced. This leads in to a discussion of membrane structure and the function cellular organelles in biological processes including energy production, protein degradation, and protein trafficking. Prerequisite: two semesters of organic chemistry. Coursemaster approval is required. Please note: This course is given on the medical school schedule, so it begins 8 days before the graduate school schedule.
Same as L41 Biol 5319

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5323 Developmental Biology

Analysis of a selected set of key processes in development, such as pattern formation, cell-cell signaling, morphogenesis, etc. Focus on molecular approaches applied to important model systems, but framed in classical concepts. Prerequisite: Molecular Cell Biology (5063) and Nucleic Acids (548).

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 534 Introduction to Cell Biology

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5352 Developmental Biology

Anaylsis of a selected set of key processes in development, such as pattern formation, cell-cell signaling, morphogenesis, etc.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5392 Molecular Microbiology and Pathogenesis

First half focuses on prokaryotic physiology and genetics, with special attention to recent discoveries in gene regulation and protein processing. Second half devoted to microorganisms that cause disease, with emphasis on the molecular interactions between pathogen and host. Prerequisite: first semester core curriculum for Programs in Cell and Molecular Biology.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5393 Molecular Mechanisms of Disease

This course will examine various inherited and acquired human disorders at the molecular level. Our study will focus on diseases with certain genetic conditions such as AIDS, cancer, Alzheimer's, and diabetes with the aim of providing an appreciation of the complex nature of human diseases. Lectures will include background on cellular pathways involved in each disease as well as discussion of recent advances in biomedical research, therapeutics, and prevention.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 548 Nucleic Acids and Protein Biosynthesis


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U29 Bio 550 Medical Genetics

Human or medical genetics is one of the most rapidly advancing fields of science, and is now integral to all aspects of biomedical science. This course provides a unique perspective on function of the human body in health and disease from the genetics point of view. Beginning with a study of chromosomes and the disorders which result from their aberrations, the course aims to present the theoretical background necessary for a deeper understanding of the emerging impact of human genetics on biology. Examples of topics covered are chromosomal basis of heredity, autosomal and sex chromosomal abnormalities, cancer genetics. Throughout the course students will be introduced to the specific molecular and cytogenetic techniques that have revolutionized the study of human genetics.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 552 Human Genetics and Cytogenetics

Human or medical genetics is one of the most rapidly advancing fields of science and is now integral to all aspects of biomedical science. This course provides a genetic perspective on the function of the human body in health and disease. Beginning with a study of chromosomes and the disorders that result from their aberrations, the course presents the theoretical background necessary for a deeper understanding of the emerging impact of human genetics on biology. Topics includes chromosomal basis of heredity, autosomal and sex chromosomal abnormalities, and cancer genetics. Students will be introduced to the specific molecular and cytogenetic techniques that have revolutionized the study of human genetics.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5562 Principles of Neural Development

Embryonic development of the nervous system is a complex process. Recent advances in genetics, genomics, and proteomics have provided a more in-depth analysis of the processes underlying its development. Many structural neurological birth defects are caused by problems that occur during early CNS development. The major focus of this course will be to learn how the nervous system develops under both normal and abnormal conditions and what mechanisms control nervous system formation. Topics will include: how nerve cell progenitors divide, migrate, and begin to differentiate into specific types of nerve cells; what factors determine how these immature, developing neurons find their way and make appropriate synaptic connections with their targets; and the mechanisms for superfluous synapse formation and for elimination of neurons in programmed cell death. In addition we will also cover fetal and adult neuronal stem cells and their application in repair of damaged nervous systems.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5571 Cellular Neurobiology


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U29 Bio 560 Introduction to Bioinformatics of Genomes

The vast amount of DNA sequence data that has recently become available, and now accumulates at an astonishing rate, has created exciting new job opportunities for the application of informatics to biology. The bioinformatics of genomes uses computational methods to handle huge amounts of data and address critical biological issues such as how genes and proteins work. This emerging discipline is relevant to the broad spectrum of life sciences research, for both academic and commercial purposes. Some knowledge of gene biology will be necessary, as will learning simple Perl programming.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 563 Bio Applications of Biology to Global Health Issues

Knowledge of biological processes can contribute to the health of individuals and ecological systems. This course will explore the linkages between biological concepts in the high school curriculum and contemporary problems confronting the health of the human population. For example, the course will address biological concepts relating to issues such as: antibiotic resistant bacteria, avian flu virus, SARS, HIV, among others. This is a course for NSF Institute fellows only. This course is fully online.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 572 Seminar in Plant Biology


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U29 Bio 577 Program Capstone I

This is a 3-credit course intended as an extension of the three 2-credit content courses completed in year one of the MS degree program in biology. The course will include applications of advanced-level life science content to the teachers' local biological setting. The course will also include applications of new content to teachers' classroom setting. The instructional format will be project-based and delivered using an online learning environment. Students will be expected to conduct action research on a topic relevant to life science learning in their classrooms. Admission in the course is contingent upon admission in the graduate program. Online course.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5771 Program Capstone II

This is a 1.5-credit course intended as an extension of the three 2-credit content courses completed in year two of the MS degree program in biology. The course will include 1) applications of advanced-level life science content to the teachers' local biological setting, 2) applications of new content to teachers' classroom setting, and 3) implementation of a leadership project at the teachers' local setting. The instructional format will be project-based and delivered using an online learning environment. Students will be expected to conduct research on the implementation of their leadership plan. Admission in the course is contingent upon admission in the graduate program. For Summer Institute Teachers only.

Credit 1.5 units.


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U29 Bio 578 Chemistry for Biology Teachers

A strong connection exists between biology and chemistry. It is important to study the properties and interactions of chemicals within living organisms. This online course will emphasize those areas of contemporary biology that involve complex molecular structures and interactions that require knowledge of chemical and biochemical principles including bonding and molecular structure in important biological molecules, chemical reactions for biological processes such as respiration and photosynthesis and cellular energy conversions. The course will consist of online tutorials with animations, facilitated online discussions, and the use of hands-on materials. Students will develop their knowledge by utilizing technological tools such as online molecular databases and molecular visualization software. The goal of the course is for teachers to explore topics with a global societal impact, such as pharmaceutical development, bioenergy sources, nutrition, the role of biomolecules in diseases and genetic testing. For Summer Institute Teachers only. Online course. Admission to this course is open to those teachers in the NSF-funded teacher institute.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 579 Laboratory Investigations in Model Organisms

Many of the biological functions and structures in organisms are similar. However, specific structures/functions are more visible in some organisms than others. Because of this it is often easier to study a particular organism as a model of biological processes. Information gained through study of a model organism can then be generalized to other organisms. The purpose of this course is to introduce biology teachers to these organisms and to have them learn how to culture and care for them. Second, we will design and conduct experiments using these organisms with an end goal of designing classroom investigations the teachers can use with their students. This is an online course. Admission to this course is open to those teachers in the NSF-funded teacher institute.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 580 MA Capstone: Topics in the Biological Dimensions of Climate Change

Life and climate are intimately related. Today, human activities have stressed this relationship, posing serious risks for the near future. Accurately forecasting these risks relies on understanding how life and climate have changed together during Earth's history. This course provides an interdisciplinary investigation of Earth's major developments starting with the climatic conditions for life's origins. We will proceed chronologically through a series of topics covering metabolism, development, physiology, biogeography, and human origins along with their climatological causes and effects. For each topic, we discuss related physical, chemical, ecological, and evolutionary principles based on readings from both primary and popular scientific sources. The course culminates in a comprehensive biological evaluation of contemporary proposals to mitigate or adapt to human-caused climate change. At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to effectively discuss biological aspects of climate change and their implications for society.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 584 Biotechnology & Stem Cell Biology

Stem cell research and biotechnology has great promise for the future of regenerative medicine. Multiple reports have suggested that adult and embryonic stem cells may provide a virtually unlimited donor source for transplantation and tissue generation in vitro. This course will take students on a journey deep inside the stem cell and biotech revolution, revealing the modern scientific research behind the stem cells and cloning and will provide the understanding of the various molecular mechanisms, applications, and social implications associated with this controversial technology.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 589 Molecular Cell Biology

The ultimate goal of studying cell biology is to understand the chain of life from molecules through cells to tissues and organisms. This course focuses on understanding eukaryotic cell structure, how cells determine and maintain their functions, how major molecules within a cell affect the function of the cell, and how each cell works in a social context (cell-cell, and cell-matrix interaction). Students get to appreciate the magic machinery of life — for example, how a fertilized chicken egg determines which part becomes the head and which parts become the wings, how a cuttlefish changes skin color within seconds, how our eyes detect light, and how we can taste the sweetness of fish. Meanwhile, students also learn how molecular defects lead to human diseases such as hypercholestolemia, muscular dystrophy, infertility, and cancer. Throughout the course, students learn principles and methods of studying cellular events in the molecular level. By the end of the course, students shall have the ability to read and interpret scientific papers and even design their own experiments in the field of cell biology.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 590 Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenesis

This course is designed to specifically address mechanisms whereby microbes of three basic types — bacteria, viruses, and eukaryotic parasites — subvert the host immune response and cause disease. The class will therefore be subdivided into three sections studying each of these three types of organisms. This class will primarily focus on recent publications with a short lecture preceding each discussion.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 5911 Seminar in Biology and Biomedical Sciences


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U29 Bio 5925 Matter and Energy Transformations

Using the processes of photosynthesis and respiration as fundamental models, this course will examine energy transformations occurring within organisms and between communities of organisms and their abiotic environment. Topics will include the observations and measurement of energy transformation in living organisms and abiotic fuel cells; the effect of burning fossil fuels on the health of local environments and global warming; and, the effect of alternative fuel options on global environment and health. This is a course for NSF-Summer Institute fellows only.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 593 Endocrine Physiology

Biochemical, physiological, and regulatory properties of the mammalian endocrine system at the molecular, cellular, and systemic level with a focus on human physiology and development. Topics will explore endocrine cell signaling, molecular mechanisms of hormone action, homeostasis and feedback systems including neurendocrine integration of physiological processes, endocrine control of cardiovascular and calcium homeostasis, and select discussion of endocrine pathologies. In addition to class and textbook material there will be exposure to the primary research literature.

Credit 3 units.


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U29 Bio 595 Directed Research


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