The Office of Medical Student Education (OMSE) oversees the curriculum for the MD program at Washington University School of Medicine.

Our mission is to cultivate the best environment in which medical education and instruction can flourish. To achieve this, our office:

  • Provides support to enhance the administrative, technical, and professional expertise of faculty and staff.
  • Provides the necessary resources to create a collaborative and amiable environment that allows students and faculty to excel in teaching and learning.
  • Monitors local and national environments to inform continuous development.
  • Continuously searches for new ways to strengthen and expand faculty and curriculum development programs and implement innovative teaching initiatives.

Visit online course listings to view offerings for M04 FYSelect.


M04 FYSelect 5009 Medical Spanish

Clinical. Learn basic medical Spanish terms to help when working with Spanish-speaking patients.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 500A Journal Club

Basic Science. This course is a journal club for WUSM I students led by WUSM II students. Thus, it will focus on teaching and learning from peers. The material covered will be completely dependent on student input and participation. We expect that over the course of the journal club, students will become more comfortable with reading primary literature and presenting a scientific "story" in an engaging and coherent way. Each week, 1-2 students will be expected to prepare a presentation and lead the discussion about a paper of their choice published in a peer-reviewed journal. The goal of the discussion will be to provide a brief overview of the field, introduce the experimental system and any new experimental techniques, discuss the scientific rationale, and discuss the experiments presented. Students not presenting will be expected to review the selected paper and prepare for the discussion by reading any background material selected by the presenter. The first class meeting will have an example presentation given by WUSM II students. We will also discuss guidelines for paper selection.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 500C Developmental Biology and Disease

Basic Science. Explores connections between basic research in developmental biology and disease. Students are expected to make a presentation based on current literature in the field and participate in class discussions.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 500E Simulations in Respiratory Physiology

Basic Science. The four two-hour sessions will invite students to apply respiratory physiology and pathophysiology to understand a variety of pulmonary conditions. The selective will consist of "laboratory" sessions where students apply their understanding of respiratory physiology to solve a variety of simulated pulmonary abnormalities. These interactive sessions will be conducted at the Wood Simulation Center and include scenarios that introduce students to airway management, oxygen therapy, blood gas interpretation and mechanical ventilation.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 500F Improving Healthcare

Clinical. The American health care system is staggeringly inefficient. Despite investing nearly 20 percent of our GDP, the United States ranks dead last in key health outcomes in a recent study of 17 high-income countries. Further, preventable medical errors are conservatively the sixth leading cause of death nationwide. Hospital care is opaque and leaves many patients unengaged and dissatisfied with their treatment. The purpose of this selective is to equip the students with a set of tools to analyze and improve health care delivery. Drawing on the experiences of high reliability industries like aviation and manufacturing, we will examine the different factors affecting the quality of care and lessons we can apply to eliminate preventable errors and infections. Further, students will learn and practice different methodologies for process improvement. We will cover making care transparent and ways to better involve families in care. Topics covered include systems and workflow design, health IT, human factors, culture of safety and standardized communication strategies. Students will also attend one morbidity and mortality conference offered by departments in the hospital as part of this selective.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5011 Advanced Medical Spanish I

Clinical. This course is the first in a series of two selective courses for first-year medical students designed to prepare students with advanced or native Spanish proficiency to be certified bilingual providers. Content parallels that of the first-year Practice of Medicine course. Although signing up for one of the two courses is permitted, the courses are designed to be taken together and are a prerequisite for receiving mention of special achievement in medical Spanish in the fourth-year dean's letter to residency programs. The first course (fall 2017 - sessions I, II) falls under the "clinical" category and the second course (spring 2018 - sessions III, IV) falls under the "humanities" category. At the end of the fall and spring selective sequence (and after completing M2 year), students should be prepared to take a certification exam for bilingual providers, such as the Kaiser Clinical Cultural and Linguistic Assessment. The fall course will emphasize using Spanish vocabulary and phrases to carry out a history and physical examination. Students will also learn about effective cross-cultural communication and sensitivity, although the spring selective will cover cultural issues in more depth. In addition, student progress will be assessed by two standardized patient (SP) sessions during this selective.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5013 Introduction to Emergency Medicine

Clinical. Over six sessions, we will review the physiology and clinical management of common emergencies: cardiovascular emergencies; trauma resuscitation and shock; environmental emergencies, such as high altitude cerebral edema and snake bites; pediatric emergencies; gynecological and urological emergencies; and toxicological emergencies. Each session will include a lecture followed by case studies that highlight critical aspects of a patient's history, physical examination, laboratory and radiological studies, as well as procedural intervention and pharmacological treatment. Group participation is encouraged.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5014 Advanced Medical Spanish II

Humanities. This course is the second in a series of two selective courses for first-year medical students designed to prepare students with advanced or native Spanish proficiency to be certified bilingual providers. Content parallels that of the first-year Practice of Medicine course. Although signing up for only one of the two courses is permitted, the courses are designed to be taken together and are a prerequisite for receiving mention of special achievement in medical Spanish in the fourth-year dean's letter to residency programs. The first course (fall 2017 - sessions I, II) falls under the "clinical" category and the second course (spring 2018 - sessions III, IV) falls under the "humanities" category. At the end of the fall and spring selective sequence (and after completing M2 year), students should be prepared to take a certification exam for bilingual providers such as the Kaiser Clinical Cultural and Linguistic Assessment. The spring course emphasizes effective cross-cultural communication and sensitivity. Students will also continue to review Spanish vocabulary and phrases for the history and physical examination, which will be taught primarily in the fall session. In addition, student progress will be assessed by two standardized patient (SP) sessions during this selective.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5016 Introduction to Emergency Medicine II

Clinical. This class is a second session on emergency medicine exploring topics not covered in the fall session. Although it would be beneficial to take the Introduction to Emergency Medicine I course offered in the fall, it is not a prerequisite for this class. Six sessions will review the physiology and clinical management of abdominal emergencies, ophthalmic emergencies, obstetric emergencies, endocrine emergencies, neurologic emergencies, such as stroke, renal and orthopedic emergencies, and environmental emergencies, such as lightning and hypothermia. Each session will include a lecture with case studies that highlight critical aspects of a patient's history, physical examination, laboratory and radiological studies, as well as procedural intervention and pharmacological treatment. Group participation is encouraged.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5017 Clinical Correlations in Neurosciences

Clinical. This selective consists of a self-directed learning opportunity to explore different neuroscience fields through shadowing neuroscience physicians in (adult or pediatric) neurology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, neuroradiology and neuropathology, +/- attending neuroscience conferences.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 520H Art and Medicine

Humanities. The intersections between art and medicine are numerous, and the study of one field is complementary to the other. The primary objective of this course is to explore visual learning and enhance observational skills of participants. Through several exercises, we will explore how we see, what we see, and how we interpret these images. We will examine how observation affects our diagnoses and how it influences interactions with patients. We will investigate how visual inspection is important in medical fields. St. Louis has several excellent collections, and sessions will meet at a selection of the following: the Saint Louis Art Museum, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, and the Pulitzer Arts Foundation.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 524H Major Religious Traditions and Health Care
Major Religious Traditions and Health Care is presented in such a way as to provide overviews of the World's Major Religious and how these belief systems may impact medical professionals and care plans for treatment. Students are provided an opportunity to dialog with leaders from various faith traditions as well as learn about how these faith traditions contribute to the ways in which people approach illness and injury. This course will provide resources to be used in future medical practices that will enable the integration of faith traditions to the care plan of patients and families.
Credit 10 units.


M04 FYSelect 528C Dealing with Terminal Illness and Death

Clinical. In this seminar we will examine such topics as: 1) psychological, social, and professional responses to terminal illness and death; 2) communicating bad news to patients and family members; 3) grief and bereavement; 4) palliative and hospice care and physician-assisted suicide. Teaching sessions will include a discussion with practitioners and/or patients and family members, and will rely heavily on student participation.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5302 Frontiers in Leukemia

Basic Science. Hematopoietic research is rapidly and in some cases dramatically changing the clinical management of patients with leukemia. Most notably, the development of Imatinib, a drug specifically designed to inhibit the bcr-abl oncogene, has fundamentally altered the way we treat patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and next-generation sequencing has changed the way we understand leukemia classification and evolution. The objective of this course is to introduce students to scientific investigation in the molecular basis of human leukemia. We will focus on how research is advancing our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of this group of diseases. Specific topics will include acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and the preleukemic syndromes, severe congenital neutropenia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 536B Introduction to Surgery

Clinical. This clinical selective offers an overview of surgical training and of various surgical specialties. Faculty members from the following surgical specialties participate: General Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oncologic Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Urologic Surgery, Vascular Surgery, and Acute/Critical Care Surgery. One session is led by WUSM surgery residents. One session is a basic suturing/knot-tying workshop. Most discussions include professionalism/ethics challenges associated with the specialty.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 536C Introduction to Anesthesiology

Clinical. This course aims to provide an introduction to anesthesiology appropriate for first-year students. The course will be taught through a combination of lectures, ICU shadowing, and simulation center exercises. The topics discussed will include the role of an anesthesiologist in the OR, ICU, and pain management service. Students will be taught the basic mechanisms of different types of anesthesia and why each is used clinically. Students will have the opportunity to apply that knowledge through exercises in the simulation center and through ICU shadowing. The course seeks to provide a comprehensive introduction to a career in anesthesiology and hopes to spark student interest. Summer research opportunities will be available for students in the course.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 537B Simulations in Cardiovascular Physiology

Basic Science. The five two-hour sessions will introduce students to basic and invasive hemodynamic monitoring including the measurement of cardiac output. The selective will be conducted in the Wood Simulation Center and consist of "laboratory" sessions where students will apply their understanding of cardiovascular physiology to solve a wide variety of hemodynamic abnormalities observed in the scenarios. Each session, we will use electromechanical mannequins to create scenarios that occur as a result of trauma, cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial ischemia, etc. These scenarios will be used to help students understand how injury and illnesses can lead to changes in preload, afterload, cardiac rhythm and contractility.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 538H Doctors on Film

Humanities. This course will explore the relevant social themes of films in which physicians and/or the medical profession are the main focus. There are countless portrayals of physicians in the cinema. There are also many films that deal extensively with various features of health care delivery. For good or for bad, viewers of these films outside our profession are strongly influenced by these portrayals. Common stereotypes are perpetuated — "If it's in the movies there must be some truth to it." Depictions of physicians and major medical themes have evolved with time and under the influence of social and scientific developments. The course will investigate these depictions and themes using a selection of films (from the classic era to more modern films) to provoke thought and discussion. Some discussion of film craft is also included. Emphasis is given to older movies, 1940s to 1970s. Those not interested in film craft or classic films should consider these latter points very carefully. The essence of this selective is the collective group experience of watching the movies and the discussion that follows. Some of the films are not readily available for rental or purchase, and lending of the VHS tapes or DVDs is not practical. For these reasons, attendance at five of the six sessions is required (all students must attend the introductory session).

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 541H Physician Writers: Introduction to Reflective Writing

Humanities. (This selective is offered twice; please indicate if you are signing up for the fall or spring session at the enrollment event. Students may only enroll in one session.) From Anton Chekov to Atul Gawande, Arthur Conan Doyle to Abraham Verghese, John Keats to Khaled Hosseini, physicians have a long and interesting history of writing. Historically most physician writers have produced works of poetry, philosophy or fiction. In the last 20 years a new type of physician writer has emerged in the genre of creative nonfiction. One form of creative nonfiction rapidly increasing in popularity, especially in medical schools, is called narrative medicine, and is thought to help students and physicians improve in everything from self-assessment to quality improvement and to reduce "compassion fatigue." In this course we will start with a look at the current world of physician writers, then move to learning about the world of narrative medicine. One way we will explore these topics is by in-class writing assignments that we share with one another.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 577A Diet and Nutrition: A Patient-Based Approach

Clinical. The goal of this course is to provide fundamental training in clinical nutrition to medical students to improve their understanding of current nutritional guidelines, how to communicate this information effectively to patients, and basic behavioral techniques to facilitate lifestyle change. Students will learn in interactive, hands-on, small groups about 1) current diets that are widely used including "fad" diets, 2) the pros and cons of contemporary diets that are followed and practical guidelines for teaching patients about dietary choices, 3) behavioral, clinical and social methods of managing obesity, 4) culturally appropriate diets for health benefits, 5) an evidence-based approach to dietary prescription for patients and 6) a practicum on the nutritional management of hospital inpatients. It is expected that by the conclusion of this course students will be familiar with current dietary practices including the use of "fad" diets, be able to use behavioral management techniques to help patients manage their body weight and metabolic problems such as diabetes, be able to provide practical advice on dietary choices in a nonoffensive manner, and know how to perform nutritional assessment and management of medical and surgical inpatients.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 577H Introduction to the History of Medicine

Humanities. This is a survey course on the history of medicine, concentrating on the contributions of some of the major figures in the historical development of medicine. The objectives will be to explain how medical science developed from antiquity to the 20th century. The figures to be discussed are as follows: Week I - Ancient Medicine: Hippocrates and Galen; Week II - The Beginnings of Modern Medicine: Andreas Vesalius and William Harvey; Week III - Great Developments in Internal Medicine: René Laennec and Ignac Semmelweis; Week IV - The Rise of Pathology: Giovanni Morgagni and Rudolf Virchow; Week V - The Development of Modern Surgery: The Discovery of General Anesthesia and Joseph Lister; Week VI - Medical Science in America: William S. Halsted, Helen Taussig and Alfred Blalock.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 579H Major Epidemics in the History of Medicine

Humanities. Points to be emphasized include the worldwide effects of such epidemics (bubonic plague), the discovery of vaccination and the ability to completely eradicate a major disease (small pox), the importance of insect vector diseases (such as malaria and yellow fever), as well as the emergence into the developed world of new insect-carried diseases (such as dengue fever and chikungunya), venereal disease, and epidemics of modern times (such as influenza and AIDS). Most of the diseases to be discussed are still prevalent, and patients suffering from these diseases will be seen and treated by the medical students during their medical career. Topics include: The Black Death: Bubonic Plague; Smallpox and Vaccination; Insect-Carried Diseases: Malaria and Yellow Fever; Tuberculosis and Syphilis; Modern Epidemics: Influenza and AIDS.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 580H The Healer's Art

Humanities. The Healer's Art combines seed talks and experiential exercises in a large group setting along with small group experiential exercises. The course engages students in a discovery model of community of inquiry focusing on the meaning of physicianhood and the practice of medicine. Faculty participates in the discovery model process on an equal footing with students as well as facilitating the process of the small groups. The course is designed to encourage medical students to trust the power of listening and presence to heal, formulate a personal, comfortable, and compassionate response to loss, experience the healing power of grief, recognize that who they are is as important to the healing relationship as what they know, recognize awe and mystery in the daily practice of medicine, explore the concept of calling, write a personal mission statement, and explore the personal meaning of physicianhood. The Healer's Art facilitates students in clarifying, strengthening and making a personal commitment to medicine as their life's work. Students also have the opportunity to explore their personal values, and commit to developing and preserving their personal values, such as service, harmlessness, compassion, altruism, self-care, equality, justice, respect and nurturing wholeness.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5842 Alternative Careers for MDs

Clinical. What does medical school prepare us for? At the surface and at a minimum, the curriculum teaches us how to diagnose and treat illness. Think a little more broadly though, and medical education teaches us how to assimilate information, think, and solve problems under incredible pressure. In fact, it prepares us for a wide array of cool career opportunities! This class is meant to expose students to some of these alternative, non-clinical careers that we might otherwise not consider. The course will bring in a total of 10 speakers with MDs that were hand-picked because of their interesting careers and enthusiasm. Speakers range from internationally renowned corporate leaders to entrepreneurs to a New York Times columnist/best-selling author. There will even be a personal injury lawyer! There will also be an opportunity for personalized feedback related to each student's goals. Alternative Careers for MDs is not about pushing anyone toward a non-clinical profession. Many physicians with alternative careers also continue working as clinicians. Instead, it's to prepare us to ask different questions when we're in the clinic, like questions about business opportunities, education, media, law and policy. It may influence students to jot down anecdotes that go into a future book. It is to plant these seeds of thought and possibilities early in students' educations because information is power, and one never knows when an opportunity will present itself.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5843 Pain Management

Clinical. Pain is the most common reason for patients presenting in both the primary care setting and to the hospital. In this rotation, students will get experience on how to evaluate a patient in pain both in regards to history and physical. They will learn the diagnostic tests and imaging needed to evaluate these patients. There will be exposure to the different multidisciplinary therapies and when to use them including medications, physical therapy, interventional procedures, and psychological therapies. The students will also learn the different areas of pain management including acute postoperative, chronic, pediatric, cancer-related, and palliative care. Proper use of opioid pain medication will also be reviewed.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 586H Health and Human Rights

Humanities. There is a strong belief among many physicians that our responsibilities extend beyond our individual patients to our communities, countries and even to our entire world. This humanities selective is an excellent forum for interested students to actively learn and discuss the impact of human rights violations on health. Topics include reproductive and pediatric health rights, communication issues and interactions with interpreters. Each meeting will consist of a brief presentation and a discussion on the topic. There will be a different presenter for each topic. Readings will be provided.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5875 Olin Grand Rounds

Clinical. The course provides an introduction to the current business issues facing the health care field. This course was first offered in 2006 and has become a popular course for undergraduates and MBAs. More medical students should take this class! The information is invaluable for any person pursuing a career in medicine or in the health care sector of business. This class focuses on the business of medicine with business case-study discussion, complemented with several clinical patient presentations. Topics covered usually include health care reform; health care systems comparisons from the United Kingdom to Germany, from France to Japan; the insurance industry; concierge medicine; department compensation distribution in practices and academic departments; analysis of walk-in clinics (e.g., Walgreens); medical malpractice: mental health care and cost to society; organ transplantation and the rationing of health care; marketing of pharmaceuticals, including research and development of AIDS drugs; care to the underserved; sickle cell anemia — a patient's perspective; management of Medicaid; the business of cosmetic surgery; private ophthalmology practice; and local biotech startups, to name a few. The final grade is based on four out of six case-study write-ups (done in groups), plus a group project presentation (usually partnering with a key company in the health care industry), plus the final exam which is a take home case-study write-up done individually. The rest of the grade pertains to participation and attendance. Medical students are all graded P/NP.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5878 Introduction to Clinical Neurosurgery

Clinical. The objective for this selective course is to expose students to the various fields of neurosurgery. Students attend Film/Case Management conferences and Grand Rounds. There are nine sessions for the semester: two case management conferences, two Grand Rounds and five discussions. Students (discussion leaders) are assigned to relevant literature to present. Discussion dates and discussion leaders are chosen at the introductory meeting. The course also exposes students to tools they can use in critical reading of medical literature. We supplement the course with a cadaver lab experience at the end of the selective.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 587N Introduction to Public Health in St. Louis

Clinical. The goal of this selective is to provide participants with the fundamental tools needed to assess, implement and evaluate community-based public health programs that address some of the leading health indicators in St. Louis. For this year's course, student coordinators have decided to focus on two unique public health concerns: corrections medicine and mental health. Completion of this course provides credit toward a Master of Public Health degree. Rather than a survey course on public health, this abbreviated course will serve as a primer on conducting public health research. We will spend one session on the history of public health, especially as it pertains to the St. Louis region, chronic disease epidemiology and the social determinants of health, and the behavioral and sociological factors contributing to youth violence. Two additional sessions will focus on corrections medicine and mental health. Each session will be followed by a site visit that will allow students to better understand the related topic and identify specific community needs. Using information collected at these visits, the final assignment will be a one-page proposal outlining a potential public health intervention. Upon completing this selective, students should have the skills and background to acquire information needed to apply public health principles for addressing public health issues in the St. Louis community.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 587S Introduction to Newborn Medicine

Clinical. The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction into neonatal medicine not otherwise offered in the first-year curriculum. Students will review embryology and functional organ system development and correlate normal physiology with pathologic conditions in newborn infants. Students will have the opportunity to work with clinical specialists, observe in both the delivery room and neonatal unit, and interview and follow patient families. The course is designed to allow students to discuss both the physiologic and psychosocial aspects of neonatal medicine as well as gain a better understanding of the collaborative nature of neonatal care.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 587T Sun Protection Outreach Teaching by Medical Students (SPOTS)

Clinical. Medical students will be trained to teach secondary school students about skin cancer and sun protection. The medical student will be taught how to identify basal cell, squamous cell, and melanoma skin cancers. They will learn the causes, risk factors, and treatment of skin cancer. Additionally, students will be trained in hands-on demonstrations of sun protection products and methods, learn alternatives to tanning, and learn to use a skin analyzer machine. Students will be taught strategies for reaching and teaching teens, and learn theories of behavioral science and communication in order to understand patients' motivations/behaviors and how to encourage them to change. Finally, students will teach a medical subject out in the community before their clinical year, and attend two evening (two hours each) training sessions to learn above. The 85-minute SPOTS program consists of teaching one 20-minute lecture on early detection of skin cancer showing a 14-minute video (local teens with melanoma telling their stories and a simple mole removal done by a Mohs surgeon); teaching a second 20-minute lecture on prevention and protection, giving out brochures, handouts and worksheets; helping the teens to use a skin analyzer machine, a prepared PowerPoint lecture with a written script will be given to each medical student. SPOTS medical student teachers will receive a SPOTS t-shirt (to wear as their uniform when teaching and then keep), and teach in pairs four times (may teach two times on the same trip). Medical students can teach SPOTS on a volunteer basis (non-elective, no credit) to add to their CV. Attending the training sessions is required. For more information, visit the SPOTS website.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 587U Saturday Neighborhood Clinic - A Lesson in Healthcare Management

Clinical. This course offers an introduction to health administration, policy and economics as they relate to medical care for the underserved. Using Washington University's student-run Saturday Neighborhood Health Clinic as a case study, students will learn how to run a free clinic, from daily clinic flow to patient follow-up to informed quality improvement; explore the landscape of health care services available to uninsured adults in the St. Louis area as well as the SNHC's relationship with these providers; and begin to unpack the structural and political complexities of health insurance. With this toolkit, students will assume responsibility for running the day-to-day operations of the SNHC. Participation in this selective entails full involvement in the SNHC organization. In addition to required course hours in the fall, students will be expected to coordinate Saturday and Wednesday clinics at least five times over the course of the full academic year and assist the current Board with ongoing projects. If students do not get a spot in the selective, they can still volunteer at the clinic and apply for a 2017-2018 Board position; however, they will not be able to coordinate at the clinic.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5886 Hands-On Autopsy

Clinical. This course will provide students with the chance to see and participate in an autopsy from beginning to end, including gross dissection, organ cutting with a pathology attending, and, if the students wish, microscopic evaluation of the organs. Although most medical students never see an autopsy, these students become residents who are expected to consent bereaved family members to this procedure. Witnessing an autopsy will help students understand the autopsy process and make them better prepared to answer questions about autopsy in the future. In addition to any clinical benefit students will receive for the future, participating in an autopsy after completion of the first-year gross anatomy course will allow students to see the correlation between an academic endeavor and its application in a medical setting. Do not misunderstand, though; autopsy is nothing like your gross anatomy course.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 588A Introduction to Interventional Radiology
Clinical. The selective course in vascular and interventional radiology is designed to introduce first-year medical students to the scope of clinical practice in VIR. The selector will better understand the indications, risks and benefits, and scope of interventions performed by the vascular and interventional radiology team.
Credit 10 units.


M04 FYSelect 588B Queer Theory: A Philosophical Approach to LGBTQ+ Health
Humanities. A discussion-based course that utilizes queer theory as a tool to critically investigate cultural normativities relating to sexuality, sex and gender. By understanding how queer theory developed as a field and applying fundamental concepts to the investigation of how individuals define their identities, this course aims to increase understanding of how LGBTQ+ health disparities arise in modern society. By exploring a theoretical perspective of queer approaches to sex, gender and intersectional identities, students will be better prepared to help ameliorate the disparity in the quality of care attributed to discrimination, prejudice, and lack of specific knowledge in healthcare settings, related to sexual orientation, gender identity, and sexual behavior.
Credit 10 units.


M04 FYSelect 588C Delivering Health Care to Underserved Patients in St. Louis
The goal of this course is to teach students about health care resources that underserved patients in St. Louis can realistically access. Students will have five in-class sessions to learn the structure and key players of the "St. Louis safety net," as well as two shadowing opportunities to observe the work that health care providers do with underserved patients. In-class sessions will include guest speakers representing different components of the "St. Louis safety net." Students will have an opportunity to work closely with the St. Louis Integrated Health Network (IHN), whose mission is to strive for quality, accessible, and affordable health care services for all residents of Metropolitan St. Louis, with an emphasis on the medically underserved and uninsured. The IHN is designed to address systemic barriers and create innovative solutions to the region's safety net health care system through programmatic and collaborative quality initiatives that are derived from its strategic plan.
Credit 10 units.


M04 FYSelect 588D Gun Violence as a Public Health Issue

Clinical. This course will cover the major aspects of gun violence as a public health issue, including: a background/review of significant policy and current data trends of gun violence in America and, in particular, in St. Louis; the relevance of firearm access and legislative efforts related to suicide and domestic violence; unintentional shootings involving children and the role of the primary care pediatrician in gun safety education; hospital violence intervention programs and community-based violence prevention programs, particularly within the St. Louis area; and current approaches to policy changes and the physician's role in advocacy for gun violence prevention. Each session will combine a panel of guest speakers and a discussion on assigned readings relevant to each topic, which may include research papers on gun violence, landmark cases and investigative media reports.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 588E Tackling Emerging Global Infectious Disease Problems
Clinical. Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases (IDs) pose major challenges to global health. The strategies used to prepare for, respond to, and mitigate against these threats are tiered, complex and coordinated. Common principles underlie the approach to all ID global health problems, yet there are also unique aspects associated with specific ID threats that must be addressed. This course will explore common principles and threat-specific strategies being used to tackle the global ID problems of Bioterrorism, Pandemic Influenza, Epidemic Arboviruses (e.g., Zika), Ebola Virus, and Antimicrobial Resistance. This course will be complementary to the Session II Selective "Major Epidemics in the History of Medicine." Students who take the Session II Selective may be interested in a deeper dive on how to address some of the problems introduced there; however, the Session II Selective will not be required to take the Session III Selective.
Credit 10 units.


M04 FYSelect 588H Music and Medicine

Humanities. Music and medicine reflect one another in several fascinating ways. During this selective, we will examine several facets of this interaction, including how illness is depicted in music, how diseases influenced famous musicians and their works, and the work-related injuries seen in Performing Arts Medicine. Fifteen students will participate in this highly interactive six-session course which will include lively discussions, listening sessions and demonstrations.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 5892 Science of Learning and Teaching in Medicine: Truths, Lies, Myths

Basic Science. Medical students constantly try to figure out what works and what doesn't as they look for the best ways to learn. This course will explore the scientific basis of learning in order to help students make sense of the learning demands that they face and give students tools to navigate them. In this five session course, we will discuss approaches to learning and teaching that are known to promote the effective acquisition, retention, integration, and mastery of learning. Through interactive, case-based discussion, we will explore the alignment — or sometimes, misalignment — between learning expectations and teaching methods used in the classroom and clinical environments. By the end of this course, students will be able to draw on the science of how learning works to develop actionable learning plans to guide personal and professional growth and serve as the foundation for becoming a lifelong, master learner.

Credit 10 units.


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M04 FYSelect 590H Medical Discovery and Progress from War

Humanities. As long as history has been recorded, human societies have physically attacked each other for various reasons. As destructive as wars have been, military history has played important roles in improving treatment of trauma, sanitation, drug development, and the understanding of many aspects of medical science. This selective will consider medicine from United States military and national history in the following areas: The Early Frontier, 1800-1850: William Beaumont, the first American medical researcher; The Civil War; the beginning of a national medical library; Scurvy and Naval Medicine; The Spanish-American War: Walter Reed and Yellow Fever; The First World War: Neurosurgery and Neurology of Cerebral Trauma; The Second World War: Antibiotics and Blood Transfusion; From Shell Shock to PTSD: The History of Psychotraumatology.

Credit 10 units.


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