This section presents financial information for the programs and degrees offered by the School of Medicine. Refer to the MD, Health Professions or Joint sections of this page for more financial information about individual programs, including:

Applied Health Behavior Research
Audiology and Communication Sciences
Biology and Biomedical Sciences
Biomedical Engineering
Biostatistics
Clinical Investigation
Genetic Epidemiology
Medicine
Occupational Therapy
Physical Therapy
Population Health Sciences
Public Health

Financial Assistance — Medical Students

The ability to finance a medical education at Washington University does not influence the student selection process. As all students accepted for admission have proven scholastic ability, financial assistance is awarded solely on the basis of documented financial need which cannot be met by student and family resources. Students who consider themselves financially independent of their parents must arrange for loans to replace the amount of support parents are analyzed to have the potential to contribute. The School of Medicine's Office of Financial Aid (Campus Box 8059) will assist students in making these arrangements.

In responding to the Admissions Committee's offer of admission, an accepted student may request financial aid application materials. The Financial Aid Office acknowledges the student's intent and provides instructions for completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Everyone applying for financial aid must complete a FAFSA and designate Washington University School of Medicine, School Code #G24620, as a recipient. Medical school financial aid application documents and detailed instructions will be made available after January 1.

The financial aid application materials solicit information about the applicant and parents, including a detailed description of resources and liabilities. If an applicant's parents are separated or divorced, the financial information is required from both biological parents (excluding income and assets of their spouse, if remarried). If the applicant is married, similar information is required of the spouse. The school expects the applicant to complete and submit the financial aid documents within two weeks from the date the applicant receives them. Official copies of both biological parents' individual U.S. income tax returns and the applicant's official IRS transcripts complete the data required for financial aid consideration.

While "permanent residents" of the United States are eligible for most federal financial aid programs, need-based financial aid from Washington University is only awarded if the applicant and both biological parents can provide official, audited documents with the same detailed information as provided on a U.S. income tax return. All information is held in strict confidence.

Financial aid awards are credited toward payment of tuition and fees. If there is an excess of funds on a student's account after tuition and other charges, the Registrar's Office will issue a refund check. The loan portion of an award will be funded through the resources of the School of Medicine or through the Federal Direct Loan program. Financial aid awards are made for a given academic year. Students may reapply for financial assistance in succeeding years if they remain in good academic and personal standing, and if there is continued financial need. Awards made to a student may vary from year to year, depending upon the student's needs and upon the availability of funds to the committee. Students are responsible for filing applications for renewal of awards in the spring of each year.

The committee holds that students receiving assistance have an obligation to notify the committee in writing if their financial situation changes, for example, through employment or receipt of a scholarship not anticipated at the time the application was submitted.

First- and second-year students are urged not to accept employment during the academic year. A number of fourth-year students find employment in hospitals within the Medical Center. The personnel office may provide assistance to students' spouses seeking employment.

Standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid Eligibility

When a student is enrolled in the curriculum of the MD program, the following policy applies regarding standards for Satisfactory Academic Performance (SAP).

Federal law and regulations require that all students receiving financial assistance from Federal Title IV funds maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). This policy presents the standards adopted by the Washington University School of Medicine and applies to all MD students.

Annually, at the end of each spring term, the School of Medicine at Washington University in St. Louis evaluates SAP. If a student is not maintaining progress, they will be notified by the Committee on Academic and Professional Evaluation of Students (CAPES) and the director of financial aid and will be ineligible, or "suspended," for federal aid for future terms unless they appeal their status and it is approved by CAPES and the director of financial aid.

In order to be compliant in maintaining SAP, and thus eligible for financial aid, students must be satisfactorily progressing toward their academic objectives. Federal regulations require the following measurements for determining SAP: time frame and quantitative/qualitative requirements.

Time frame requirement:

The maximum time frame of full-time enrollment for completion of each program is as follows:

  • Four-year MD program: 6 years
  • Five-year MD program: 7.5 years
  • MA/MD program: 7.5 years (or 9 years if a 2-year MA is pursued)

Periods of non-enrollment are not counted in the measurement of satisfactory academic progress but all periods of attendance, regardless of whether or not the student received Title IV aid, are counted.

This policy is applied in the context of each individual student's enrollment status in order to accommodate the student who does not enroll on a full-time basis. For example, if a student enrolls in a four-year program, the full-time student would meet the 150 percent maximum rule (as per Title IV guidelines) after six years of full-time enrollment, and the half-time student is expected to complete in twelve years. If a student vacillates between full-time and half-time enrollment, that student would have a maximum time frame between six and 12 years, and the maximum time frame for that student would be continuously adjusted.

If a student reaches a point where they cannot complete their program within the 150 percent maximum, the student becomes ineligible for aid.

Quantitative/qualitative requirement:

Academic requirements for the MD degree include the satisfactory completion of the curriculum designated by the faculty. The progress of each student working toward an MD degree is monitored carefully by the Committee on Academic and Professional Evaluation of Students (CAPES). Refer to the Assessing Academic Achievement section of this Bulletin for more information.

A student failing to meet the standards of satisfactory progress as determined by CAPES shall be placed on financial aid suspension. The student will be eligible for aid when they achieve SAP, or the student may appeal. Students who choose to appeal must state the reasons for failing to meet SAP (e.g., injury/illness of the student, death in the family or other special circumstance) and what has changed in the student's situation so that they can now make SAP. If the student successfully appeals, the student will be placed on financial aid probation and may receive financial assistance for one semester. At the conclusion of this period, the student must have achieved compliance with each standard or be progressing per their individual academic plan to receive additional aid. A student who does not achieve compliance with each standard by the conclusion of the probationary period is suspended from financial aid eligibility.

The Office of Student Financial Aid must notify a student of implementation of probationary status and/or suspension.

The director of Student Financial Aid shall have primary responsibility for enforcement of this policy. The Office of Student Financial Aid shall ascertain at the time of each disbursement of funds and prior to certification of a financial aid application that the student is in compliance with the policy.

Cost of Education

For the first-year class matriculant, tuition and estimated expenses for the 2017-18 academic year are listed below. Students who enter in 2017 will benefit from a tuition stabilization plan, which provides that their annual tuition of $63,230 will be constant for up to five consecutive years. The stabilized rate will expire five academic years after matriculation. Therefore, students whose medical education is interrupted for any reason for more than one year will be charged the rate of the class they rejoin. Appeals of this policy should be submitted in writing to the medical school registrar. The items listed below provide an estimate of the expenses for a single student in the 39-week first-year class. The total of these figures suggests a basic minimum budget of approximately $82,758. Allowances for entertainment, travel, clothing and other miscellaneous items must be added to this estimate.

Tuition (includes Student Health Services and Microscope Lending Plan): $63,230
Books, supplies: $700
Medical Instruments: $740
Housing and food: $13,228
Miscellaneous: $2,504
Travel and personal: $2356

Policy for International Students

The admission decision at Washington University School of Medicine is based on academic and personal merit and not on the ability of the student to pay the costs of education. However, individuals who are not citizens of the United States of America or who do not hold U.S. Permanent Resident Visa status, including DACA students, are not eligible for financial aid due to regulations covering many programs used by the school to fund financial assistance. Therefore, in order for the school to complete the required documents which are necessary for issuance of a visa, the student must document, by a date and in a manner designated by the school, that the necessary amount of funds, as established by the school, is available to pay the costs of education (tuition and living expenses) for the anticipated period of enrollment, normally four years. Documentation of the required amount of financial resources may be by a letter of credit or by deposit of funds in an escrow account with a bank designated by the school.

Refer to the Research page of this Bulletin for more information about Student Research Fellowships.

Awards and Prizes

At two annual events, Washington University School of Medicine publicly recognizes and rewards outstanding scholarship, research accomplishments and community service of individual students. In December, the Student Awards Luncheon acknowledges academic excellence earned during the first three years of study. As part of the festive commencement activities in May, graduates are recognized for meritorious research and clinical achievements accomplished during their medical school careers.

Morris Alex, MD Prize. Awarded each year to the medical student who is outstanding among their peers in the second-year Practice of Medicine course. The November 2016 recipient: Julia Berg.

Alpha Omega Alpha Book Prize. Awarded to a member of the graduating class who has performed outstandingly for the entire medical course. The May 2017 recipient: Andrew Daniel Linkugel.

American Academy of Neurology Medical Student Prize for Excellence in Neurology. Awarded to a member of the graduating class for excellence in clinical neurology and outstanding personal qualities of integrity, compassion and leadership. The May 2017 recipient: Brandon Blake Holmes.

American College of Physicians Michael M. Karl, MD Book Award. Presented annually to a member of the graduating class committed to a career in internal medicine, in recognition of highest achievement in the field of internal medicine. The May 2017 recipient: Stephen Ernest Fuest.

American College of Physicians Award for Excellence in Physical Diagnosis. Given to a student annually for outstanding performance in the second-year Practice of Medicine course. The November 2016 recipient: Jay Bowman-Kirigin.

American College of Physicians Clerkship Award. Established in 1992 to be awarded to a student completing the third year of study with meritorious achievement in the Internal Medicine Clinical Clerkship. The November 2016 recipient: Ethan Tobias.

American Medical Women's Association Glasgow-Rubin Memorial Award. Presented to the woman graduating first in her class.

American Medical Women's Association Glasgow-Rubin Memorial Achievement Citations. Presented to women medical students graduating in the top 10 percent of their class. The May 2017 recipients: Nicole Suzanne Benzoni, Lucy Bell Bollinger, Jordan Janae Cole, Lyndsey Dyan Cole, Taylor Elizabeth Geisman, Janice S. Kim, Vanessa Lynn Kronzer, Nehali Mahesh Mehta, Allison Page Schelble, Rose Dian Tang.

The Ruth Bebermeyer Award. Established in 2001 by the WUMCAA executive council to honor Ruth Bebermeyer for her many years of dedicated service to WUMCAA (1990-2000) and to the students of the School of Medicine. The award is given to "a student who has shown extraordinary kindness and sensitivity to the needs of others," whether those others be fellow students, patients or just people in general. The November 2016 recipient: Lyndsey Cole.

Alexander Berg Prize. Awarded to the student presenting the best results in research in molecular microbiology. The May 2017 recipient: Joseph Planer.

The James and Philip Brasington Memorial Prize. Awarded to a medical school student who has demonstrated excellent preclinical and clinical academic performance in psychiatry and who has the potential to make significant contributions to the field. The May 2017 recipient: Giuseppe Salvatore D'Amelio IV.

Jacques J. Bronfenbrenner Award. Provided by Dr. Bronfenbrenner's students in memory of his inspiration as a teacher and a scientist, and awarded to the member of the graduating class who, as judged by the Department of Medicine, has done the most outstanding work in infectious diseases or related fields. The May 2017 recipient: James Zou.

Dr. Richard S. Brookings and Robert Carter Medical School Prizes. Provided through a bequest of Robert S. Brookings to recognize academic and personal achievements, including but not limited to exemplary academic performance, leadership, community service and research.

The November 2016 Dr. Richard S. Brookings recipients: Lucy Bollinger, Vanessa Kronzer, and Allison Schelble. The May 2017 Dr. Richard S. Brookings recipient: Michael Joseph Slade.

The November 2016 Robert Carter recipients: Jordan Cole, Jordan Standlee, and James Vandenberg. The May 2017 Robert Carter recipient: Vanessa Lynn Kronzer.

Dr. Harvey Butcher Prize in Surgery. Awarded annually in memory of Dr. Harvey Butcher to the members of the graduating class who, as judged by the Department of Surgery, show the greatest promise for general surgery. The May 2017 recipient: Katherine Marie Holzem.

Kehar S. Chouke and George Gill Prize in Anatomy. Awarded annually to a first-year medical student who has demonstrated superior scholarship in Human Anatomy. The November 2016 recipient: Nirbhay Jain.

Class of 2001 Award. Established by the Class of 2001 as its gift to the medical school. Awards are to be given to third-year medical students in recognition of outstanding performance in the areas of community service and student group activities in the first two years of medical school. The November 2016 recipients: Mindy Guo and Rubabin Tooba.

Class of 2003 Award. Dedicated to the memory of three classmates who died in a car accident, and awarded to a first-year student recognized by peers as being selfless, exceptionally kind to others and dedicated to the highest standards in medicine, traits for which these classmates will be remembered. The November 2016 recipients: Gabriela Abrishamian-Garcia and Juan Deliz Gonzalez.

F. Sessions Cole Award in Pediatrics. The inaugural Cole award is presented to a senior medical student entering the field of pediatrics who exhibits honest and thoughtful patient care, who gives generously with their time, and who welcomes emerging technology. A masterful clinician who continually advocates for our smallest patients. The May 2017 recipient: Ashley Denise Osborne.

Carl F. and Gerty T. Cori Prize in Biochemistry. Awarded at the end of the first year to the class member who has demonstrated superior scholarship in biochemistry. The November 2016 recipient: William Padovano.

Edmund V. Cowdry Prize in Histology. Established in 1969 to honor Dr. Cowdry; awarded to a medical student in the first-year class who has performed meritoriously in microscopic anatomy. The November 2016 recipient: William Padovano.

Antoinette Frances Dames Award in Cell Biology and Physiology. Awarded annually to members of the first-year class who have demonstrated superior scholarship in these fields. The November 2016 recipient: Nirbhay Jain.

Elisabeth L. Demonchaux Prize in Pediatrics. Established in 1985, the prize is awarded annually to a graduating student who has done outstanding work in pediatrics. The May 2017 recipient: Lucy Bell Bollinger.

Steven Dresler Prize. Awarded to a graduating student who has demonstrated a commitment to promoting social good, civil rights and civil liberties through social action and volunteerism. The November 2016 recipient: Jorge Zarate Rodriguez.

Dr. William Ellis Award. Established in 1990 by Dr. Ellis and awarded to a senior student in recognition of meritorious research in ophthalmology. The May 2017 recipient: Jennifer Marie Enright.

The Endocrine Society Medical Student Achievement Award. Recognizing a graduating medical student who has shown special achievement and interest in the general field of endocrinology. The May 2017 recipient: Abraham Segura.

The Family Health Foundation of Missouri Scholarship Award. Awarded to the top graduating student entering the specialty of family medicine.

George F. Gill Prize in Pediatrics. Awarded to a member of the graduating class who has demonstrated superior scholarship in pediatrics. The May 2017 recipient: Ellen Merrick Schill.

Alfred Goldman Book Prize in Diseases of the Chest. Created in 1972 as an annual award to be given to a student selected by the faculty for outstanding clinical work or research in diseases of the chest or pulmonary physiology. The May 2017 recipient: Janice S. Kim.

Max and Evelyn Grand Prize. Established in 1985 by Dr. M. Gilbert Grand, the prize is awarded annually to a member of the graduating class for excellence in ophthalmic research or clinical ophthalmology. The May 2017 recipient: Jennifer Marie Enright.

Peter Halstead Hudgens Award. Established by Dr. Richard W. Hudgens in memory of his son, this award recognizes a graduating student for excellence in research and clinical psychiatry. The May 2017 recipient: Timothy Otto Laumann.

R.R. Hannas Award for Excellence in Emergency Medicine. Offered annually by the Missouri Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians for exceptional performance in emergency medicine. The May 2016 recipient: Daniel Seth Greenstein.

Nathan Edward Hellman, MD, PhD, Memorial Award. Recognizes a second-year student selected through a vote of fellow classmates. The recipient is distinguished as a student with a strong track record of accomplishments and an interest in academic medicine, and whose humanism, collegiality, humor and compassion are an inspiration to members of the class. The November 2016 recipient: Kalyan Tripathy.

Herrmann Prize. Created by Dr. Paul Herrmann (MD '61) and his wife, Susan, to recognize a student who is considered a thoughtful and sensitive communicator in the clinical arena and whose listening and communication skills every patient hopes their physician will possess. The November 2016 recipient: Daniel Weisel.

Dr. John Esben Kirk Scholastic Award. Established in 1975 and awarded to a graduating student of high scholastic standing. The May 2017 recipient: Miriam Rose Ben Abdallah.

Rosalind Kornfeld Student Leadership Award. Presented to a woman or women in the graduating class who has or have demonstrated outstanding leadership in service to or advancement of women in the community. The May 2017 recipient: Miriam Rose Ben Abdallah.

Louis and Dorothy Kovitz Senior Prize in Surgery. Senior award in surgery recognizing members of the graduating class who have shown the most outstanding ability, zeal and interest in surgical problems. The May 2017 recipient: Martha Morris Orms McGilvray.

Wallace Leibner Award. Established in 1988 in memory of Dr. Leibner, the award is given to the member of the graduating class who has not only demonstrated excellence in diagnosis and therapeutics, but also an understanding of human nature and needs, and an active nurturing of both patient and family. The May 2017 recipient: Lyndsey Dyan Cole.

Irwin Levy Prize in Neurology and Neurological Surgery. Established in 1980 by friends of Dr. Levy as a tribute to his commitment to clinical teaching. Provides a prize for the student who presents the best performance in the neurology and neurological surgery clerkships. The November 2016 recipient: Matthew Brier.

Edward Massie Prize for Excellence in Cardiology. Awarded to the member of the graduating class, selected by the director of the Division of Cardiovascular Disease in the Department of Medicine, who has done the most outstanding clinical or basic research work in the field of cardiovascular disease. The May 2017 recipient: Stephen Ernest Fuest.

Howard A. McCordock Book Prize in Pathology. Awarded at the end of the second year to a member of that class for general excellence in pathology. The November 2016 recipient: Lauren Broestl Tang.

McGraw-Hill/Lange Medical Student Book Award. Awarded annually to medical students for high scholastic standing. The November 2016 recipients: Elizabeth Daniels and Andrew Linkugel.

Medical Center Alumni Scholarship Fund Prize. Given annually to students who have shown excellence in their work during the preceding year. The November 2016 recipient: Derek Schloemann.

Medical Fund Society Prize in Medicine. One prize awarded annually to a graduating student who has excelled in the study of internal medicine. The May 2017 recipient: Chetan Venkata Vakkalagadda.

Medical Fund Society Prize in Surgery. One prize awarded annually to a graduating student who has excelled in the study of surgery. The May 2017 recipient: Andrew Daniel Linkugel.

Merck Academic Excellence Award. Given to three graduating medical students for scholastic achievement in medical studies. The May 2017 recipients: Nicole Suzanne Benzoni, Nehali Mahesh Mehta, Brandon Louis Rogalski.

Missouri State Medical Association Award. Presented annually to honor School of Medicine graduates for outstanding achievement in the study of medicine. The May 2017 recipients: Taylor Elizabeth Geisman, Kenneth Dewey Macneal, Debra Wendy Yen.

The Missouri State Medical Association Student Scholarships. Awarded annually to first-year medical students who graduated from Missouri high schools in recognition of their high undergraduate academic achievement. The November 2016 recipients: Miriam Ben Abdallah, Kevin Cross, Brian Cusworth, Elizabeth Graesser, Harleen Grewal, Seth Howdeshell, Daniel Weisel, and Maeve Woeltje.

Dr. Helen E. Nash Academic Achievement Award. Given annually to a student who has exhibited to an unusual degree the qualities of industry, perseverance, determination and enthusiasm. The prize is given in honor of Dr. Helen Nash, a pediatrician noted in the St. Louis community for her commitment to excellence, tireless advocacy on behalf of children and endless enthusiasm for the field of medicine. The November 2016 recipient: Lindsay Burton.

The Dr. Philip Needleman Pharmacology Prize. Established by his family in 1989 to honor Dr. Needleman, who was chairman of the Department of Pharmacology from 1976-89. This annual award is given to a member of the graduating class for outstanding research in pharmacology. The May 2017 Recipient: Joseph Planer.

The Doctor James L. O'Leary Neuroscience Prize. Awarded annually to a student who demonstrates the best accomplishment in the Neuroscience course. The November 2016 recipient: Elizabeth Graesser and Nirbhay Jain.

The Roy R. Peterson Prize in Anatomy. Awarded for outstanding performance in the Human Anatomy course in recognition of Dr. Peterson's many contributions as a teacher in the School of Medicine. The November 2016 recipient: Alex Hanson.

The Richard and Mildred Poletsky Education Fund. Established in 1995 by the family of Mr. Richard Poletsky, an alumnus of Washington University. A prize is awarded annually to a professional student in the health sciences whose interest is in research on dementia and care of demented patients.

The Dr. Frank O. Richards Medical Student Scholarship Prizes. Provided by African-American alumni and friends of Washington University School of Medicine. The prizes embrace diversity efforts and are awarded in recognition of achievements in the first and second year of the curriculum. The November 2016 recipients: Elaine Otchere and Jorge Zarate Rodriguez.

Dr. Philip Rosenblatt Award in Pathology. Given to a senior medical student for distinguished performance during an elective in pathology or laboratory medicine. The May 2017 recipient: Lily Yili Zhang.

Dr. William A. Rubenstein Award in Medicine. Awarded to a fourth-year student who shows a serious interest in pursuing a career in internal medicine and who demonstrates the exceptional qualities of a gifted physician, including compassion, caring, and the pursuit of scientific knowledge. The November 2016 recipient: Taylor Geisman.

St. Louis Pediatric Society Senior Prize. Presented to the senior student showing the greatest promise in clinical pediatrics. The May 2017 recipient: Amanda Hart Reis.

David F. Silbert Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award. Established in memory of Dr. David Silbert, it is awarded to a teaching assistant in a medical school course in recognition of a commitment to teaching. The November 2016 recipient: Lindsey Steinberg.

John R. Smith Memorial Fund Award. Created in 1982, it is awarded to a medical student who has done meritorious clinical and/or research work in the Division of Cardiovascular Disease within the Department of Medicine. The May 2017 recipient: Michael Joseph Madigan Jr.

Dr. Margaret G. Smith Award. Given to a woman medical student for outstanding achievement in the first two years of medical school. The November 2016 recipient: Cynthia Wang.

Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Excellence in Emergency Medicine Award. Based on demonstrated excellence in the specialty of emergency medicine, it is awarded to a senior medical student at Commencement. The May 2017 recipient: James Thomas VandenBerg.

Samuel D. Soule Award in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Presented to a member of the fourth-year class for meritorious achievement in either basic or clinical investigation in obstetrics and gynecology. The May 2017 recipient: Allison Page Schelble.

Jessie L. Ternberg Award. Presented to a woman graduating from the School of Medicine who best exemplifies Dr. Ternberg's indomitable spirit of determination, perseverance and dedication to her patients. The November 2016 recipient: Jessica Holttum.

Washington University Internal Medicine Club Research Award. Awarded to the member of the graduating class who has done the most significant research in any area of internal medicine. The May 2017 recipient: Andrew Philip Jallouk.

Washington University Summer Research Prize. The award recognizes students for meritorious research in the Summer Research Fellowship Program at Washington University School of Medicine. The November 2016 recipients: Daniel Friedman and Nakul Shah.

Samson F. Wennerman Prize in Surgery. Donated by his wife, Zelda E. Wennerman, and awarded annually to the fourth-year student who has demonstrated promise in the field of surgery. The May 2017 recipient: Arith Ruth Selda Reyes.

Doris P. and Harry I. Wexler Fund. Established in 1998 by a bequest from Mrs. Wexler, the prize is awarded annually for research in multiple sclerosis and in alternate years research in eye disease. The May 2014 recipient: Cynthia Lee Montana.

The Park J. White, MD Prize. Created in 1992 in honor of the centennial of the birth of Dr. White, who was a distinguished pediatrician, social activist and pioneer teacher of medical ethics. He introduced the first course on medical ethics to students in 1927. The prize is awarded to students for outstanding performance in the ethics elective offered by the Program for the Humanities in Medicine. The May 2017 recipient: Daphne Ying Xiao.

Hugh M. Wilson Award in Radiology. Given annually to a graduating medical student in recognition of outstanding work in radiology-related subjects, either clinical or basic science. The May 2017 recipient: Matthew Frederick Glasser.

The Wynder Prize in Preventive Medicine. An annual prize established in 1994 and awarded to senior medical students who have done the best research in preventive medicine. The May 2017 recipient  Anita Nandkumar Chary and Austin James Wesevich.

James Henry Yalem Prize in Dermatology. Established by Charles Yalem in memory of his son and awarded annually to members of the fourth-year class for outstanding work in dermatology. The May 2017 recipient: Amy Zheng Xu.

Registration, Payments, and Withdrawal & Refunds Policy

The university billing system provides a central financial account against which most student expenses incurred at the university will be posted, including but not limited to tuition, housing charges, parking and library fines. This policy, when referring to tuition and other charges, includes any and all charges posted to this account.

All payments of tuition and other university charges are due and payable on the dates specified in the published calendars of the programs in the School of Medicine. Failure of a student to register when required, and pay tuition and other charges incurred on or before the date specified in the published calendar, may result in a late fee of $50 to be added to the amount due. The late fee may be imposed seven days after the due date if full payment has not been received. Tuition and other charges are usually payable twice a year, at the start of the academic year, and again at the middle of the academic year, as listed on the schedule on the academic calendar.

In addition to the $50 late fee, any payment due from the student and not paid by the specified date will accrue interest at the current market rate in effect on the first business day of the month in which the payment is due. This fee will be imposed on any accounts not paid in full within 30 days of the due date. Any amount not paid when due (plus accrued interest thereon) must be paid in full within three months of the due date to avoid potential suspension from classes, unless a deferred payment is approved by the registrar due to extenuating circumstances.

If a student fails to make payments within three months of the original due date, the school will not release the student's academic record, grade reports or transcript, pending settlement of the unpaid account. A student who has not satisfied all of their delinquent financial obligations to Washington University (tuition, university housing, parking, etc.) one month before the end of the academic year will not be allowed to progress to the next academic year, nor can they be issued a diploma.

Federal financial aid funds for the next academic year cannot be disbursed until all prior year balances are paid in full.

Students who rely on financial aid funds to meet their obligations should submit their applications for processing according to application deadlines published by the Office of Financial Aid. Deadlines allow for receipt of financial aid funds by payment due dates if applications are filed by the deadline. The Office of Student Financial Aid will assist students with loan applications and financial planning upon request.

A student who withdraws or takes a leave of absence from the school will receive a pro rata refund of tuition and appropriate fees. The refund will be based on the ratio of the class days enrolled (from the first day of classes to the termination date) to the total number of class days in the term for which tuition and fees were paid. It is understood that the date on which a student formally notifies the Registrar's Office in writing of the decision to withdraw or take a leave of absence from the School of Medicine shall be regarded as the termination date, with no retroactive clause to be accepted. A prospective date will be accepted, however. If tuition and fees were paid entirely or in part by financial aid from the school, the refund will be applied first to the total repayment of the accounts from which financial aid was drawn, with any remaining refund balance given to the student. Financial aid received in excess of the costs of tuition and fees must be refunded by the student to the school on the same pro rata basis as calculated for the tuition refund outlined above — per "Return of Title IV" federal guidelines. Any questions about these policies may be directed to either the Office of the Registrar or Financial Aid.

Merit-Based Scholarships

In 1978, the School of Medicine established a scholarship program that based selection on merit rather than financial need. As one of the first merit scholarship programs for medical students, the Distinguished Student Scholarship Program has recognized and rewarded academic excellence and personal achievement for 33 years. And, to honor outstanding alumni of Washington University, the Medical Center Alumni Association created in 1989 the Distinguished Alumni Scholarship Program. In 1998, the Barnes-Jewish Hospital Medical Staff Association committed to funding one full-tuition, four-year scholarship to a student in each entering class. Beginning with the 2002-2003 academic year, one additional "named" scholarship was made available through the generosity of a donor.

Most merit-based scholarships are awarded to students in the first-year class and are subject to annual renewal. Recipients of these scholarships are expected to maintain academic excellence. If a scholarship is not renewed, the student may file for financial aid from the school. For scholarship recipients who document financial need above the full-tuition scholarship, additional funds are available to provide support up to the total cost of education. Scholarship recipients may not concurrently participate in the school's Medical Scientist Training Program, the Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program, or the National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program.

Now known collectively as the Distinguished Scholars Program, its aim is to attract and enroll the most outstanding students in the School of Medicine, thus enriching the scholarly environment and broadening the scope of learning for all students. Scholarship recipients are selected on intelligence, character, personal accomplishments and goals, motivation for medicine, aptitude for science, leadership potential, communication skills and diversity of life experience. Scholarships awarded under this program include the Barnes-Jewish Hospital Scholars, Danforth Scholars in Medicine, Distinguished Alumni Scholars (DAS), Distinguished Faculty Scholars (DFS), and Distinguished Student Scholars (DSS).

Barnes-Jewish Hospital Medical Staff Association Scholarship

One full-tuition, four-year scholarship will be awarded to a student in each entering class beginning in 1999. Selection of the Barnes-Jewish Hospital Medical Staff Association Scholar is the same as for the Distinguished Student Scholarship.

Danforth Scholars in Medicine

Named in honor of William H. and Elizabeth Gray Danforth, the chancellor and first lady of the university from 1971 to 1995, the Danforth Scholars Program is a tribute to their legacy of exemplary leadership and service.

Distinguished Alumni Scholarships

Up to four full-tuition scholarships are awarded annually to members of the entering first-year class. The application procedure and selection process are the same as for the Distinguished Student Scholarships. Since 1989, Distinguished Alumni Scholarships have been named in honor of:

Leonard Bacharier, MD
Thomas Bailey, MD
Thomas Baranski, MD, PhD
Walter F. Benoist, MD
Leonard Berg, MD
Grace E. Bergner, MD
Laura Bierut, MD
Ellen F. Binder, MD
Stanley J. Birge, MD
Eugene M. Bricker, MD
Keith H. Bridwell, MD
Angela Brown, MD
Elmer B. Brown, MD
J. William Campbell, MD
David B. Clifford, MD
C. Robert Cloninger, MD
Jennifer W. Cole, MD
John N. Constantino, MD
Justin J. Cordonnier, MD
Michael Crowder, MD, PhD
Carlos Daughaday, MD
John D. Davidson, MD
Louis P. Dehner, MD
Brian Dieckgraefe, MD, PhD
Robert C. Drews, MD
Bradley Evanoff, MD, MPH
Ronald G. Evens, MD
Lewis C. Fischbein, MD
I.J. Flance, MD
James W. Fleshman, MD
James Forsen Jr., MD
Bernard T. Garfinkel, MD
Deborah J. Gersell, MD
Jerome J. Gilden, MD
Harvey S. Glazer, MD
David Goldring, MD
Sidney Goldring, MD
Samuel B. Guze, MD
Paul O. Hagemann, MD
Marc R. Hammerman, MD
Alexis F. Hartmann, MD
Alexis F. Hartmann Jr., MD
John C. Herweg, MD
Scott G. Hickman, MD
Richard W. Hudgens, MD
David Hunstad, MD
Robert S. Karsh, MD
John M. Kissane, MD
Ira J. Kodner, MD
Allan E. Kolker, MD
Stuart A. Kornfeld, MD
Lawrence M. Kotner Jr., MD
Nicholas T. Kouchoukos, MD
William M. Landau, MD
Timothy J. Ley, MD
Virgil Loeb, MD
Maurice Lonsway, MD
Robert H. Lund, MD
Alan P. Lyss, MD
Philip W. Majerus, MD
Mark J. Manary, MD
Paul R. Manske, MD
Gerald Medoff, MD
Paul A. Mennes, MD
J. Neal Middelkamp, MD
Benjamin Milder, MD
Barbara S. Monsees, MD
Carl V. Moore, MD
George E. Murphy, MD
David G. Mutch, MD
D. Michael Nelson, MD, PhD
Robert C. Packman, MD
Charles W. Parker, MD
Mary L. Parker, MD
Alan L. Pearlman, MD
M. Alan Permutt, MD
Frederick D. Peterson, MD
Gordon W. Philpott, MD
Gary A. Ratkin, MD
Edward H. Reinhard, MD
Fred C. Reynolds, MD
William J. Ross, MD
Will R. Ross, MD, MPH
Joseph F. Ruwitch Jr., MD
Llewellyn Sale Jr., MD
George Sato, MD
Bradley Schlaggar, MD, PhD
Mark E. Frisse, MD
Gustav Schonfeld, MD
Clay F. Semenkovich, MD
Hyman R. Senturia, MD
Donald Sessions, MD
Gary D. Shackelford, MD
Penelope G. Shackelford, MD
Larry Shapiro, MD
Bernard L. Shore, MD
Barry A. Siegel, MD
Emily L. Smith, MD
William F. Stenson, MD
Arnold W. Strauss, MD
Robert A. Swarm, MD
Steven L. Teitelbaum, MD
Jessie L. Ternberg, PhD, MD
Bradley T. Thach, MD
Mildred Trotter, PhD
Stanley Wald, MD
Stuart Weiss, MD
Alison J. Whelan, MD

Distinguished Alumni Scholarship Program honorees 2016-2017:

R. Mark Grady, MD '89
Judy C. Lieu, MD '92
Lisa M. Moscoso, MD/PhD '98, HS '02
Janice W. Semenkovich, MD '81

Distinguished Faculty Scholars

The Distinguished Faculty Scholar Program provides merit-based scholarships (up to full-tuition for four years) to students who demonstrate their commitment to bringing diverse people together and to enhancing service to disadvantaged groups.

These awards are for students who have:

  • Been recognized as scholars from groups that are historically underrepresented in medicine;
  • Challenged themselves and excelled academically;
  • Demonstrated leadership;
  • Engaged in or shown a commitment to community service;
  • Demonstrated their commitment to bringing diverse people together (for example, by having been involved in diversity initiatives in their schools or communities); and,
  • Demonstrated a commitment to serving historically underprivileged populations, and/or demonstrated achievement and determination in the face of personal challenges.

Distinguished Student Scholarships

Distinguished Student Scholarships are awarded annually (up to full-tuition for four years) to selected members of the entering first-year class based on meritorious academic and personal accomplishments. Final selection of scholarship recipients is made by a committee of the faculty based on demonstrated superior intellectual achievement as well as an assessment of the applicant's character, attitude, motivation and maturity.

Scholarship Funds

Grace Bergner Abrams Scholarship. Established in 1995 through the bequest of Dr. Grace Bergner Abrams, MD '43. Friends and patients also contributed to this endowed scholarship.

Helen M. Aff-Drum Scholarship Fund. Established in 1988 to provide scholarship support to financially deserving medical students.

Anderson Student Scholarship. Established through bequest in 2001 by Rolf L. Anderson, MD '62.

Franz and Harriet I. Arzt Student Loan. Established by the estate of Dr. and Mrs. Franz Arzt in 2013.

Isak and Breine Ascher Scholarship Fund. The late Dr. Eduard Ascher, MD, '42, established this scholarship through a trust to memorialize his parents, who were lost in the Holocaust during World War II. He chose Washington University School of Medicine because of their willingness to "give a chance" to an Austrian refugee.

Arthur I. Auer, MD 1956 and Marian D. Auer, NU 1955 Scholarship. Established in 2012 by Dr. and Mrs. Auer to provide scholarship assistance to worthy students.

Dr. William Monroe Baker Fund. Established in 1988 under the will of Miss Lola Braxton in memory of Dr. Baker to provide scholarship assistance to worthy students.

Barnes-Jewish Hospital Medical Staff Association Scholarship. Established in 1998 by the Barnes-Jewish Hospital Medical Staff Association to provide financial assistance to students based on academic excellence.

Floyd A. and Rita Sue Barnett Scholarship. Established in 1994 from a trust agreement (1989) of Floyd and Rita Sue Barnett for scholarships for students who are academically well-qualified and financially deserving.

Dr. Frederick Barry Scholarship. Established in 2009 through the estate of Dr. Frederick Barry for medical student education.

The Dr. Joseph A. and Helene H. Bauer Scholarship. Created in 1987 by Dr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Bauer to provide scholarship support to academically well-qualified and financially deserving medical students.

Edward Baumhardt Scholarship. Established in 2014 through the estate Dr. Edward Earl Baumhardt.

William L. Becker, MD Scholarships. Established in 2012 by Dr. William Becker, MD '87 and awarded based on financial need.

Albert G. Blanke Jr. Endowed Scholarship. Established by a generous gift in 1982, the fund provides scholarship assistance for deserving students in the School of Medicine.

Dr. John A. Bowers Scholarship Fund. Established through the estate of Dr. and Mrs. John Bowers. The scholarship is awarded based on need.

Warren Bowersox, MD Scholarship Fund. Established in 2005 by Mrs. Warren Bowersox in memory of her husband, who was a member of the MD class of 1943, to support scholarships.

Isabel Valle Brookings Scholarship. Established in 1957 by Isabel Valle Brookings (Mrs. Robert S.) for scholarships and loans in the School of Medicine.

The Seymour Brown, MD and Rose Tropp Brown Scholarship. Established by the estate of Dr. Seymour and Mrs. Rose Tropp Brown.

Jane Stewart and Robert S. Brua, MD Scholarship Fund. Established in 1996 through the generosity of Dr. Brua.

The Bruce Family Scholarship. Established in 2012 by Robert and Suzanne Bruce to commemorate three generations of physicians: Helen L. Bruce, MD; her son, Robert M. Bruce, MD; and her grandson, Carl T. Bruce, Washington University School of Medicine, Class of 2015.

Robert W. Butcher, MD Scholarship. Established in 2012 by an anonymous donor.

Ruth Elizabeth Calkins Scholarship Fund. Established by Dr. Delevan Calkins in honor of his granddaughter.

Dr. Richard Brookings and Mr. Robert Carter Medical School Scholarship. Established through a bequest of Robert S. Brookings.

Gilbert L. Chamberlain, MD Scholarship Fund. Created in 1971 by Dr. Gilbert L. Chamberlain to be used to aid worthy students in acquiring their medical education.

Cecil M. Charles – Nu Sigma Nu Medical Student Scholarship Fund. Established by the Nu Sigma Nu Medical Fraternity in memory of Dr. Charles.

Tien Hsin Cheng, MD Endowed Scholarship in Medicine. Established in 2007 by Dr. Tien Hsin Cheng, MD '76, for deserving medical students with financial need.

Dr. Kehar S. Chouke Loan. Established by the estate of Dr. Kehar Singh Chouké.

Class of 1945 Scholarship. Established by the alumni from the Class of 1945 in honor of their 45th reunion.

Class of 1954 Scholarship In Memory of Dan Nathans. Established in 2000 by the alumni from the Class of 1954 in memory of their classmate, Daniel Nathans, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1978. Members of the Nathans family also contributed to the establishment of the fund.

Class of 1956 Scholarship. Established in 1996 by members of the Class of 1956 in honor of their 40th reunion.

Class of 1959 50th Reunion Scholarship. Established in 2008 by members of the Class of 1959 in honor of their 50th reunion.

Class of 1960 Scholarship. Established in 2010 by the members of the Class of 1960 in honor of their 50th reunion.

Class of 1961 Scholarship. Established in 2001 by the members of the Class of 1961.

Class of 1964 Scholarship. Established in 1993 by the alumni from the Class of 1964 to support scholarships.

Class of 1968 Scholarship. Established in 1998 by the alumni from the Class of 1968 in honor of their 30th reunion to support student scholarships.

Class of 1969 Scholarship. Established in 1994 by members of the Class of 1969 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1970 Scholarship. Established in 1996 by members of the Class of 1970 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1971 Scholarship. Established in 1999 by members of the Class of 1971 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1972 Scholarship. Established in 1999 by members of the Class of 1972 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1973 Scholarship. Established in 2000 by members of the Class of 1973 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1974 Scholarship in Honor of Dr. Jonathan Mann. Established in 2002 by members of the Class of 1974 for their 25th reunion and to honor the memory of their classmate, Dr. Jonathan Mann, a pioneering AIDS researcher, who died in the Swissair Flight 111 accident in 1998.

Class of 1975 Scholarship. Established in 2000 by members of the Class of 1975 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1976 Scholarship. Established in 2000 by members of the Class of 1976 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1977 Scholarship. Established in 2002 by members of the Class of 1977 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1978 Scholarship. Established in 2002 by members of the Class of 1978 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1979 Scholarship. Established in 2003 by members of the Class of 1979 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1980 Scholarship. Established in 2004 by members of the Class of 1980 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1981 Scholarship. Established in 2005 by members of the Class of 1981 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1982 Scholarship. Established in 2006 by members of the Class of 1982 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1983 Scholarship. Established in 2007 by members of the Class of 1983 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1984 Scholarship. Established in 2008 by members of the Class of 1984 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Class of 1985 Scholarship. Established in 2016 by members of the Class of 1985.

Class of 1986 Scholarship. Established in 2011 by members of the Class of 1986 in honor of their 25th reunion.

Grace Strong Coburn Scholarship. Created in 1962 through the bequest of Mrs. Grace Strong Coburn for scholarships in the School of Medicine.

Jack W. Cole, MD Scholarship Fund. Established in 2002 by Mrs. Ruth Kraft Cole, in memory of her late husband, a 1944 graduate of WUSM, and to recognize Dr. Cole's deep appreciation for the education he received. Preference will be given to a student pursuing a career in academic medicine.

T. Griswold Comstock Scholarships. Established under the will of Marilla E. Comstock for students who would otherwise be unable to obtain a medical education.

Robert Emmet Connor Family Scholarship Fund. Established in 2010 by Dr. Robert Connor in appreciation for the medical education he received at Washington University.

Clark and Mildred Cox Scholarship for Women. Established in 1998 with a donation from the Clark Cox Trust.

Arpad Csapo, MD Memorial Scholarship Fund. Established in 1982 by Elise Csapo in memory of her husband, and by his friends and colleagues to provide assistance for students who have shown promise in fields relating to reproductive medicine.

William H. and Elizabeth Gray Danforth Scholars Program. Established in 1998 in honor of Chancellor Danforth's retirement. The Scholarship recipients must demonstrate outstanding academic promise and a record of community service that reflects Dr. Danforth's values and actions.

Harriet Arey and John D. Davidson Scholarship. Established in 2000 by Harriet Arey and John D. Davidson for scholarships in the School of Medicine.

Davie Family Endowed Scholarship. Established by Joseph Davie, MD '68, and his family to support scholarships for deserving medical students.

Paul H. and Ruth K. DeBruine Endowed Scholarship. Established in 1994 by Dr. and Mrs. Paul DeBruine in honor of his 35th medical school reunion to provide scholarship support to academically well-qualified and financially deserving medical students.

The Melvin DeHovitz Scholarship. Established by the estate of Mr. DeHovitz in honor of his mother, Jeanette DeHovitz.

Distinguished Alumni Scholarship. These scholarships are made available by generous donations from our alumni. The Washington University Medical Center Alumni Association Executive Council names the scholarships for alumni each year to honor their outstanding contributions and leadership.

Distinguished Faculty Scholarship. These scholarships are for students who have challenged themselves and excelled academically, demonstrated leadership, engaged in or shown a commitment to community service, demonstrated their commitment to bringing diverse people together, and enhanced service to disadvantaged groups. In addition, it links each of the scholarship recipients with a faculty mentor who has contributed to the diversity of the medical school.

Distinguished Student Scholarship. These scholarships are awarded to students who are selected primarily on the basis of merit (demonstrated superior intellectual and personal achievements, and an assessment of the applicant's character, attitude, motivation and maturity).

Dr. Charles Drabkin Scholarship. Created in 1964 to provide financial assistance to medical students.

Hazel B. Duncan Scholarship Fund. Established in 2003 through the bequest of Hazel B. Duncan, NU '26.

Eichner-Dominguez Family Scholarship. Established in 2005 by Lora Eichner, MD '93, to make it easier for students to attend medical school.

Dr. Howard Eisen and Dr. Judith Wolf Scholarship. Established in 2013 by Dr. Howard Eisen and Dr. Judith Wolf, who both completed their residencies at Washington University School of Medicine. Provides support to medical students based on need or merit.

Dr. and Mrs. Max Elliott Scholarship. Established in 2000 by Dr. Elliott, MD '64, to assist medical students.

Robert B. Fickel, DDS Scholarship Fund. Established by a 1941 graduate of Washington University School of Dental Medicine.

Carl Fisch Scholarship Fund. Created in memory of Dr. Fisch by his daughter, Marguerite F. Blackmer. Provides support to students who demonstrate financial need.

Flance Medical Scientist Traineeship. Established in honor of faculty member and alumnus I. Jerome Flance, MD '35 by the Harry Edison Foundation for support of a student in the Medical Scientist Training Program.

Ann Randolph Flipse, MD Scholarship in Medicine. Established in 2007 by Dr. Ann Randolph Flipse to support deserving medical students with a preference for students whose undergraduate degree was in English, history, philosophy, music, arts or a graduate degree in the humanities.

George F. Gill Scholarship in Pediatrics. Instituted in memory of a former clinical professor of pediatrics.

Helen H. Glaser Scholarship for Women Medical Students. Established in 1999 by Robert J. Glaser, MD, emeritus trustee and former faculty member, in memory of his wife, Helen H. Glaser, MD '47.

Anne T. and Carl Goetsch Scholarship. This fund was established in 2003 through the bequest of Dr. Anne T. Goetsch, MD '41, HS '44, and Dr. Carl Goetsch, HS '43, to support medical students.

Norman M. and Eleanor H. Gross Scholarship Fund. Established in 2001 through a bequest from Mr. Gross to provide financial assistance to qualified medical students.

Paul H. and Lila L. Guttman Scholarship Fund. Established in 1976 to provide financial assistance to qualified medical students.

Paul O. and Nancy P. Hagemann Scholarship Fund. Established by Dr. and Mrs. Hagemann to assist academically well-qualified students with documented financial need.

Donald R. and Mary N. Harkness Family Scholarship. Established in 2004 by Drs. Donald and Mary Harkness, both MD '58,  in memory of their daughter, Laurel, MD '86.

Lee B. and Virginia G. Harrison Scholarship. Established in 1996 for scholarships for students who intend to pursue a career in internal medicine or family practice. Dr. Harrison was a 1927 graduate of the School of Medicine.

Thomas James Hartford Jr. Scholarship. Established in 2008. Priority is given to a medical student who is considering a career in health administration.

Harvielle-Bailey Scholarship for Medicine or Surgery. Established in 1970 under the will of Miss Isabel Bailey Harvielle as a memorial to Dr. Charles Poplin Harvielle and Dr. Steele Bailey Jr., alumni of the school.

Ronald C. and Nell W. Hertel Endowed Scholarship for the School of Medicine. Established in 1995 and endowed in 2005 in memory of Mrs. Nell Hertel to provide financial aid to medical students.

Raymond F. Holden Jr. and Gertrude K. Holden Scholarship. Established in 2009 by the Estate of Dr. Raymond F. Holden Jr., MD '33, to provide scholarship support to medical students.

Allan O. and Doris M. Holtzman Scholarship. Established by Dr. David and Mrs. Tracy Holtzman in honor of Dr. Holtzman's parents.

Donald J. Horsh Scholarship. Established in 1985 to honor Dr. Donald J. Horsh, former associate professor and deputy director for the Health Administration Program. Provides support to medical students.

Dr. and Mrs. Charles Y. (Yueh-Gin Gung) Hu Scholarship. Established in 2002 to provide a scholarship to medical students.

Dr. Grace Huse Memorial Fund. Provides scholarship awards for deserving Washington University medical students.

Justan Icks Scholarship. Established in 2008 by anonymous donor to support students with high academic achievement.

Jackson Johnson Scholarship. Provided through a bequest in 1930 from Jackson Johnson.

Dr. Lorraine A. Johnsrud Scholarship. Established in 1983 as a memorial to Lorraine from her classmates, friends and family to assist deserving medical students in the funding of their medical expenses.

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation – Medical Century Club Scholarship Endowment. Following the foundation's generous gift in 1980 for medical student scholarships, the Medical Century Club accepted the challenge to raise new scholarship funds to match an additional gift from the foundation.

Jay and Ronnie Kaiser Endowed Scholarship. Established in 2004 by Dr. Jay Kaiser, MD '72, and Mrs. Ronnie Kaiser in appreciation of the financial aid Dr. Kaiser received as a student and to provide support for medical students.

George D. Kettelkamp Scholarship. Established in 1969 by Mrs. Kettelkamp in memory of her husband, an alumnus of the School of Medicine.

M. Kenton King, MD Scholarship. Created by the Executive Faculty to honor Dr. King at the time of his retirement in 1989 as dean of the School of Medicine after having served in that position for 25 years.

Saulo Klahr Endowed Scholarship. Established in 2010 by Mrs. M. Carol Klahr in memory of her husband, Dr. Saulo Klahr, a WUSM professor of kidney disease for 46 years, to provide scholarship support to medical students.

Ira J. Kodner Scholarship. Established in 2014 to honor Dr. Ira Kodner, MD, professor emeritus of surgery.

Albert F. Koetter, MD Scholarship Fund. Established in 1978 by Mrs. Stella Koetter Darrow in memory of her father, an alumnus and former faculty member of the School of Medicine.

Nicholas T.  Kouchoukos, MD '61 and Judith B. Kouchoukos Scholarship. Established in 2011 by Dr. Nicholas T. and Mrs. Judith B. Kouchoukos, to provide scholarship support to medical students.

Helen Hoerr Kurtz Endowed Scholarship in the School of Medicine. Established by the estate of Mrs. Helen Hoerr Kurtz.

Anne L. Lehmann Scholarship Fund. Established in 1983 to grant continued scholarship support to medical students.

Life Insurance Medical Scholarship Fund. Created in 1972 from residual funds in the Life Insurance Medical Research Fund. Scholarship support is now awarded to students in the MD degree program.

Maude L. Lindsey Memorial Scholarships. Created in 1976 to assist students in the School of Medicine.

John R. Lionberger Jr. Medical Scholarship Endowment Fund. Created in 1982 by Dr. John R. Lionberger to be used to aid worthy students in acquiring their medical education.

E.A. Marquard Memorial Student Scholarship. Established in 1994 from the E. Alfred Marquard Memorial Student Loan Fund to provide scholarships for deserving medical students.

Alma Mavis Scholarship. Created in 1988 under the will of Alma Mavis to assist students intending to practice family medicine.

Eliza McMillan Scholarship. Provides assistance to young women in any of several schools of the university to secure an education.

Medical Alumni Scholarship Fund. Awarded on the basis of academic achievement and financial need.

Edith and Martin Meltzer Scholarship. Established in 2004 by the Meltzer Family Foundation to honor Dr. Gerald Meltzer's (MD '63) parents, who established the foundation.

Dr. Charles Miller Jr. and Florence Noland Miller Scholarship. Established in 2014 to support medical students.

Roy B. and Viola R. Miller Memorial Fund. Created in 1963 through the bequest of Roy B. Miller to provide scholarships for medical students.

The Warren S. and Dorothy J. Miller Scholarship Fund. Established in 1982 through the bequest of Dorothy J. Miller to provide scholarships for any students engaged in studies leading to the degree of Doctor of Medicine.

Joseph J. and Ernesta G. Mira Scholarship Fund. Established in 1988 by Dr. and Mrs. Mira to provide assistance to students from the Alton, Illinois, area. Available to others when there are no students from the Alton/Madison County area.

George and Elizabeth Ann Neilson Scholarship. Established by the estate of George and Elizabeth Neilson.

David and Janine Nelson Scholarship in Medicine. Established in 2011 by Dr. David Nelson, a 1963 graduate of Washington University School of Medicine, and his wife, Janine.

Nancy S. Newlin, MD and Henry H. Newlin, JD Scholarship Fund. Established by Dr. Newlin and her late husband.

Norland Endowed Scholarship. Established in 2015 by Dr. Charles C. Norland, a 1959 graduate of Washington University School of Medicine, and Mrs. Dorothy Norland.

Mr. and Mrs. Spencer T. Olin Fellowships for Women. Provides for annual financial support to female graduates of an undergraduate institution in the United States in any of several disciplines. Application deadline is February 1.

Spencer T. and Ann W. Olin Medical Fellowships. Created in an effort to help fill the continuing shortage of physicians who pursue careers in biomedical research, the awards are primarily for students in the Medical Scientist Training Program.

Dr. Roy W. Osterkamp Memorial Scholarship Fund. Established in 2003 by Mrs. Linda Osterkamp Desloge and Mrs. Lila Osterkamp Haberberger, in memory of their father, Dr. Roy W. Osterkamp, DE '36. Preference will be given to a student pursuing a career in a medical field related to dental medicine, such as maxillo-facial surgery. If no student shares this interest, it will be awarded based on need.

F. Thomas Ott (MD '65) and Mary Miller Ott (MSN '68) Scholarship. Established in 2010 by Dr. F. Thomas and Mrs. Mary Miller Ott to provide scholarship support to medical students.

Dr. Sidney F. (Class of '29) and Dora K. Pakula Scholarship. Established in 2001 by Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence C. Pakula in memory of Dr. Pakula's parents to support student scholarships.

Mary Langston Parker Scholarship. Established in 2014 by The Parker Family  to honor Dr. Mary Langston Parker, MD '53, professor emerita of preventive medicine and past director of Student Health Services.

William B. Parker Scholarship. Established in 1976 by the School of Medicine in honor of William B. Parker's 51 years of service.

The Robert W. and Elise Hampton Parsons Scholarship Fund. Established in 2014 by Dr. Robert W. Parsons, MD '54, to support medical students.

William A. Peck, MD Scholars in Medicine. Established in 2002 to recognize Dr. Peck's 14 years of service to the Medical Center and Washington University community. University trustees, faculty, staff, alumni and friends honored Dr. Peck with gifts to this scholarship.

Peterson Group Scholarship. Established in 2014 by Peterson Group to provide financial support to medical students.

Philpott Family Scholarship. Established in 1995 by the Philpott family to provide support for medical students with financial need and excellent academic achievement.

Pi Beta Phi – Charles Ruggieri Scholarship Fund. Established in 1985 by the Washington University alumni of the Pi Beta Phi medical fraternity to honor Charles Ruggieri and to assist deserving medical students enrolled in Washington University School of Medicine with the funding of their medical education.

The Virginia Keck, George M. (MD '32) and George K. (MD '64) Powell Medical Student Scholarship Fund. Established in 1984 by Mrs. George M. Powell in grateful appreciation for the medical education provided to her husband and son by Washington University School of Medicine, which so positively affected the lives of the Powell families.

Henry and Louise Reller Scholarship. To be given to medical students in the name of the parents of Louise Reller.

Gennaro Resta Scholarship. Established in 2014 by Dr. Regina M. Resta (Class of 1985) and Dr. Michael A. Kolodziej (Class of 1984) to honor Dr. Resta's father.

Lyman K. Richardson, MD Scholarship Fund. Established in 1993 by Mrs. Ellen Richardson to provide scholarship support to medical students.

John E. Rittmann Scholarship. Established in 2015 by Dr. John E. Rittman, a 1962 graduate of Washington University School of Medicine.

Samuel Jennings Roberts Scholarship Fund. Created to provide scholarships for any students engaged in study leading to the degree of Doctor of Medicine.

Robert Allen Roblee Scholarship Fund. Established in 1948 through a gift of Mrs. Joseph H. Roblee for students in the School of Medicine.

Thomas W. and Elizabeth J. Rucker Scholarship Fund. Created in 1956 through the bequest of Eugenia I. Rucker, in memory of her mother and father.

J. Max Rukes Scholarship Fund. Established in 1987, the fund provides scholarship support to deserving medical school students, with a preference for those who are interested in endocrinology.

Joseph H. Scharf Scholarship Fund. Provided in 1949 through the bequest of Dr. Joseph H. Scharf.

Robert G. and Maxine W. Scheibe Scholarship. Established in 1999 by Robert G. Scheibe, a 1960 Washington University graduate who also received his medical degree here in 1964 and his wife, Maxine, who is a 1966 graduate of the Washington University School of Nursing.

William H. and Ella M. Schewe Scholarship. Established to provide financial assistance to worthy students in the medical school.

Dr. David Schlessinger Endowed Scholarship. Created in 2006 by Dr. Dan Longo in honor of his mentor, Dr. Schlessinger, who was a professor of molecular microbiology, professor of genetics and professor of microbiology at Washington University School of Medicine.

Dr. Gustav and Mrs. Miriam Schonfeld Scholarship. Established in 2010 by Dr. Gustav and Mrs. Miriam Schonfeld to support medical students. Dr. Schonfeld, MD '60, was past chair of the Department of Internal Medicine and physician-in-chief at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Edna Schrick, MD Scholarship Fund. Established in 1992 by Dr. Schrick to provide scholarship support.

Mordecai E. Schwartz Endowed Scholarship. Established in 2006 by Dr. Mary R. Schwartz, Dr. David Cech and Alexander I. Schwartz in memory of their father, who was committed to the training of future physicians.

Edward L. Schweich Scholarship. Established in 2010 by Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Schweich, in memory of Edward L. Schweich, for medical student scholarship support.

Senior Merit Scholarship. Established by an anonymous alumnus of the School of Medicine, it provides a scholarship to a senior student who has earned a distinguished record of academic and personal achievements during the first three years in the medical school.

Charlie W. Shaeffer Jr. Endowed Scholarship Fund. Established in 2008 by Charlie Shaeffer (MD '64) and his wife, Claire, for medical students, based on academic merit and/or financial need.

Dr. John B. Shapleigh Scholarship Fund. Established in 1926 through the bequest of Dr. John B. Shapleigh and supplemented by contributions from Mrs. Shapleigh and Miss Margaret Shapleigh.

Alexander Balridge Shaw Scholarship Fund. Created in 1958 through the bequest of Roy A. Shaw in memory of his father, Dr. Alexander Balridge Shaw.

William T. Shearer and Lynn Des Prez Diversity Scholarship. Created by William T. Shearer, MD '70, and his wife, Lynn Des Prez. Scholarships are awarded with a preference for under-represented students.

Dr. Edward Hiroshi Shigeoka Scholarship Fund. Created in 1988 by Dorothy F. Shigeoka in memory of her husband, Dr. Edward Hiroshi Shigeoka, to help disadvantaged and deserving students pursue their careers in medicine.

Ernie Simms Scholarship Fund. Founded in 1984 by friends, colleagues and former students of Professor Simms in recognition of his contributions to scholarly research and teaching in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology.

Dr. and Mrs. Vergil N. Slee Endowed Scholarship Fund. Established in 2012 through a bequest from 1941 graduate of the School of Medicine, Dr. Vergil N. Slee, and his wife.

Stanley B. Smith, MD Scholarship. Established in 2001 in memory of Samuel and Dora Smith, Dr. Smith's parents, to support student scholarships.

Dr. Dwight H. Stone Scholarship. Established by Mr. Dwayne Stone in honor of his brother, Dr. Dwight H. Stone, a 1959 graduate of the School of Medicine.

Beulah B. Strickling Scholarship Fund. Established in 1960 with a bequest from Mrs. Beulah B. Strickling.

Marleah Hammond Strominger Scholarship. Established in 1971 by Donald Strominger, MD, and supported by family and friends of Marleah Hammond Strominger. The recipient shall be a motivated student with need for financial assistance.

Mary and Ernst Stuehrk Scholarship Fund. Established in 1987 to assist medical students with documented financial need.

Edwin H. and Virginia M. Terrill Scholarship Fund. Established in 1964 with the bequest of Dr. Edwin H. Terrill, an alumnus.

Betty L. Thompson Scholarship Endowment. Established in 2001 by Anthony Thompson, in honor of his mother, Betty.

Mildred Trotter Scholarship Fund. For students with documented financial need, the fund was established in 1979 by Dr. and Mrs. Paul Guttman, and supplemented by former students of Dr. Trotter, as a tribute to her many years of teaching in the Department of Anatomy.

Hiromu Tsuchiya Scholarship Fund. Created to provide scholarships in the School of Medicine.

Tuholske-Jonas-Tuholske Medical Scholarship Fund. Established in 1974 by Rose T. Jonas in memory of her father, husband and brother. The recipient shall be a senior student preparing to enter the field of surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, or internal medicine.

Cornelia Van Prooyen, MD Scholarship Fund. Established in 1987, the fund provides scholarship support and other financial assistance to female medical students.

George S. and Aspasia N. Vellios Scholarship. Established by Frank Vellios, MD '46, in honor of his parents. Scholarships are awarded to deserving medical students with financial need.

Louis H. Waltke and Marie Waltke Memorial Fund for Medical Education. Created in 1984 to provide scholarships and fellowships at the School of Medicine.

Dr. Robert A. Weiss Scholarship. Established by Dr. and Mrs. Robert Weiss.

George and Irene Wolf Medical Scholarship Fund. Established by the donors to benefit students in the School of Medicine.

Pamela F. Gallin Yablon, MD Scholarship. Established in 2008 by Dr. Pamela F. Gallin Yablon and Mr. Leonard H. Yablon to support medical students.

Dr. Mitchell and Elaine Yanow Scholarship Fund. Established in 2002 by the children of Dr. and Mrs. Yanow to honor the memory of their parents and to provide support for deserving medical students.

George Zografakis Memorial Scholarship Fund. Created by the family and friends of Dr. Zografakis, a distinguished faculty member in the Department of Surgery.

Loan Funds

Auer-Rosenfeld Memorial Loan Fund. Established by Mrs. Elizabeth Auer to be used for educational loans to students.

Dr. John C. Boetto Loan Fund. Established in 1993 by a bequest from Mrs. Josephine D. Boetto as a memorial to her son to provide loans for deserving medical students.

Otto W. Brandhorst Loan Fund. Created in 1985 by the estate of Fern Crawford. This fund supports loans to students in the School of Medicine.

Dr. Harold A. Budke Loan. Established in 1998 to provide financial assistance to needy and deserving medical students.

Harold A. Budke, MD, Loan Fund II. Established in 2001 with a bequest from the estate of Etta Elise Wedemeyer to provide loans to needy and deserving female students who will practice family medicine, internal medicine or obstetrics-gynecology medicine.

Class of 1947 Loan Fund. Established in 1996 by members of the class of 1947 in honor of their 50th reunion.

Jess K. Goldberg Memorial Loan Fund by Ophelia H. Kooden and Violet G. Sachs. Created in 1970 to provide zero-interest loans for medical students in memory of the donors' brother who passed away while attending medical school.

Health Professions Student Loan Fund. Established by federal legislation for medical students with a demonstrated financial need. Loans are available for long terms at favorable rates.

William Randolph Hearst Medical Scholars Loan Fund. In 1989, the Hearst Foundation provided funding for a new and innovative loan program which provides interest-free loans to students in their last year of study.

Ursula Hecker Loan Fund. Established in 1967 by a bequest from Ursula Lee Hecker for the use and benefit of worthy, deserving and needy medical students.

Kathy E. Holden Loan Fund. Established by Mrs. Roland Holden and the Roland and Ruby Holden Foundation in honor of her granddaughter, Kathy E. Holden, and in recognition of W. Edwin Dodson, MD, to support loans to deserving medical students.

Horncrest Foundation — School of Medicine Loan Fund. In 1982, the trustees of the Horncrest Foundation approved a proposal on behalf of the School of Medicine to match up to a generous annual cap for five-year loan funds solicited by the school. The campaign was extremely successful and now provides loan funds to students with documented financial need.

W.K. Kellogg Foundation Loan Fund. Provides financial assistance to medical students in need of such aid.

Gustel and Edith H. Kiewitt Scholarship Loan Fund. Provides loan funds for medical students.

Medical Scholars Loan Program. Established in 1985 by members of the William Greenleaf Eliot Society, this fund provides an interest-free source of long-term student loans. Annual contributions from alumni and friends support this perpetual and growing resource upon which current and future medical students will draw.

George W. Merck Memorial Loan Fund. Established in 1959 by The Merck Company Foundation, the original purpose of the loan was modified in 1983 to provide loans to graduating students which would help bridge the transition from student to resident physician.

Edward F. Musgrave Loan Fund. Established in 1981 by Mrs. Jeannette L. Musgrave. The fund supports medical student loans.

Dr. Lloyd L. Penn and Goldie H. Penn Student Loan. Dr. Penn, MD '33, established the fund in 1977 to aid well-qualified and deserving students.

Perkins Student Loan. A federal program (formerly National Direct Student Loan) to provide loans to students with financial need. Permits repayment over an extended period at a favorable interest rate.

Dr. William C. and Elva Pratt Loan Fund. Established in 1982 for medical students with demonstrated financial need.

G.H. Reinhardt Memorial Scholarship Loan Fund. Established in 1947 through the bequest of G.H. Reinhardt.

Aline Rixman Loan Fund. Created in 1940 by William Rixman in memory of his wife, the fund is used to alleviate unexpected financial emergencies of medical students.

James L. and Dorothy Rouner Loan Fund. Established in 1997 by Dr. James and Mrs. Dorothy Rouner to be used for medical students pursuing a career in primary care–general internal medicine.

Caroline O. Schlesinger Loan Fund. Established in 1969 to provide financial support for medical students.

School of Medicine Student Loan Fund. Established to make loans to students with documented financial needs.

Washington University Medical Center Alumni Association Loan Fund. Provides emergency loans to medical students.

The Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Loan Fund. Established in 1993 by Mrs. Edith L. Wolff to provide loans to students with demonstrated financial need who are in their final year of study for the Doctor of Medicine degree.

The following policy applies to students pursing graduate/professional training in the following programs:

Applied Health Behavior Research | Audiology and Communication Sciences | Biology and Biomedical Sciences | Biomedical Engineering | Biostatistics | Clinical Investigation | Doctor of Philosophy | Genetic Epidemiology | Occupational Therapy | Physical Therapy | Population Health Sciences | Public Health

General Information

Registration, Payments, and Withdrawal & Refunds Policy

The university billing system provides a central financial account against which most student expenses incurred at the university will be posted, including but not limited to tuition, housing charges, parking and library fines. This policy, when referring to tuition and other charges, includes any and all charges posted to this account.

All payments of tuition and other university charges are due and payable on the dates specified in the published calendars of the programs in the School of Medicine. Failure of a student to register when required, and pay tuition and other charges incurred on or before the date specified in the published calendar, may result in a late fee of $50 to be added to the amount due. The late fee may be imposed seven days after the due date if full payment has not been received. Tuition and other charges are usually payable twice a year, at the start of the academic year, and again at the middle of the academic year, as listed on the schedule on the academic calendar.

In addition to the $50 late fee, any payment due from the student and not paid by the specified date will accrue interest at the current market rate in effect on the first business day of the month in which the payment is due. This fee will be imposed on any accounts not paid in full within 30 days of the due date. Any amount not paid when due (plus accrued interest thereon) must be paid in full within three months of the due date to avoid potential suspension from classes, unless a deferred payment is approved by the registrar due to extenuating circumstances.

If a student fails to make payments within three months of the original due date, the school will not release the student's academic record, grade reports or transcript, pending settlement of the unpaid account. A student who has not satisfied all of their delinquent financial obligations to Washington University (tuition, university housing, parking, etc.) one month before the end of the academic year will not be allowed to progress to the next academic year, nor can they be issued a diploma.

Federal financial aid funds for the next academic year cannot be disbursed until all prior year balances are paid in full.

Students who rely on financial aid funds to meet their obligations should submit their applications for processing according to application deadlines published by the Office of Financial Aid. Deadlines allow for receipt of financial aid funds by payment due dates if applications are filed by the deadline. The Office of Student Financial Aid will assist students with loan applications and financial planning upon request.

A student who withdraws or takes a leave of absence from the school will receive a pro rata refund of tuition and appropriate fees. The refund will be based on the ratio of the class days enrolled (from the first day of classes to the termination date) to the total number of class days in the term for which tuition and fees were paid. It is understood that the date on which a student formally notifies the Registrar's Office in writing of the decision to withdraw or take a leave of absence from the School of Medicine shall be regarded as the termination date, with no retroactive clause to be accepted. A prospective date will be accepted, however. If tuition and fees were paid entirely or in part by financial aid from the school, the refund will be applied first to the total repayment of the accounts from which financial aid was drawn, with any remaining refund balance given to the student. Financial aid received in excess of the costs of tuition and fees must be refunded by the student to the school on the same pro rata basis as calculated for the tuition refund outlined above — per "Return of Title IV" federal guidelines. Any questions about these policies may be directed to either the Office of the Registrar or Financial Aid.

Standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid Eligibility

Note (for non-MD students): Students enrolled in other School of Medicine degree programs should refer to the policies of their primary program (Applied Health Behavior Research, Audiology and Communication Sciences, Biostatistics, Clinical Investigation, Genetic Epidemiology, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Population Health Sciences).

Program Information

Applied Health Behavior

The Applied Health Behavior programs follow the standard tuition rate for graduate programs offered through the School of Medicine, which increases incrementally each year. Additional information may be obtained by contacting the program manager.

Audiology and Communication Sciences

For more information about the Audiology and Communication Sciences program, including tuition and fees, please visit the Audiology and Communication Sciences website.

Biological and Biomedical Sciences

Students admitted to the graduate programs are guaranteed full stipend and tuition support contingent upon satisfactory performance. The stipend for the 2017-18 academic year will be $30,000 annually. Tuition remission is provided to all students, and life, disability and health care also is provided by the Medical Center Student Health Service. The division provides support for its PhD students from several sources, including federally funded training grants provided by the National Institutes of Health.

Biomedical Engineering

For more information about the Biomedical Engineering program, including tuition and fees, please visit the Engineering & Applied Science Bulletin.

Biostatistics

For tuition information, please visit our website, contact the program manager at 314-362-1384, send an email, or write to:

MSIBS Program
Division of Biostatistics
CB 8067
660 S. Euclid Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63110-1093
Fax: 314-362-2693

Clinical Investigation

MSCI programs follow the standard tuition rate for graduate programs offered through the School of Medicine, which increases incrementally each year. MSCI courses are eligible for the Washington University Human Resources Tuition Assistance Program for qualifying staff and faculty. Visit the CRTC website for additional tuition information.

Doctor of Philosophy

For more information about the Doctor of Philosophy program, including tuition and fees, please visit the Graduate School website.

Genetic Epidemiology

For tuition information, please visit our website, contact the program manager at 314-362-1384, send an email, or write to:

MSIBS Program
Division of Biostatistics
CB 8067
660 S. Euclid Ave.
St. Louis, MO 63110-1093
Fax: 314-362-2693

Occupational Therapy

Tuition and fieldwork fees (MSOT, full-time) per semester: $15,692 for first five semesters, $7,845 per semester for last two semesters while on fieldwork.

Tuition and fieldwork fees (OTD, full-time): $15,692 per semester first four semesters, $16,199 per semester last three academic semesters, and $7,845 for each semester student is on clinical fieldwork or the doctoral experiential component.

Part-time tuition: $1,265 per credit

Physical Therapy

Professional DPT curriculum: $19,193 per semester
Doctoral curriculum: $27,825 per semester

Population Health Sciences

For more information about the Population Health Sciences program, including tuition and fees, please visit the Population Health Sciences website.

Public Health 

For more information about the Public Health program, including tuition and fees, please visit the Graduate School website.

General Information

Registration, Payments, and Withdrawal & Refunds Policy

The university billing system provides a central financial account against which most student expenses incurred at the university will be posted, including but not limited to tuition, housing charges, parking and library fines. This policy, when referring to tuition and other charges, includes any and all charges posted to this account.

All payments of tuition and other university charges are due and payable on the dates specified in the published calendars of the programs in the School of Medicine. Failure of a student to register when required, and pay tuition and other charges incurred on or before the date specified in the published calendar, may result in a late fee of $50 to be added to the amount due. The late fee may be imposed seven days after the due date if full payment has not been received. Tuition and other charges are usually payable twice a year, at the start of the academic year, and again at the middle of the academic year, as listed on the schedule on the academic calendar.

In addition to the $50 late fee, any payment due from the student and not paid by the specified date will accrue interest at the current market rate in effect on the first business day of the month in which the payment is due. This fee may be imposed on any accounts not paid in full within 30 days of the due date. Any amount not paid when due (plus accrued interest thereon) must be paid in full within three months of the due date to avoid potential suspension from classes, unless a deferred payment is approved by the registrar due to extenuating circumstances.

If a student fails to make payments within three months of the original due date, the school will not release the student's academic record, grade reports or transcript, pending settlement of the unpaid account. A student who has not satisfied all of their delinquent financial obligations to Washington University (tuition, university housing, parking, etc.) one month before the end of the academic year will not be allowed to progress to the next academic year, nor can they be issued a diploma.

Federal financial aid funds for the next academic year cannot be disbursed until all prior year balances are paid in full.

Students who rely on financial aid funds to meet their obligations should submit their applications for processing according to application deadlines published by the Office of Financial Aid. Deadlines allow for receipt of financial aid funds by payment due dates if applications are filed by the deadline. The Office of Student Financial Aid will assist students with loan applications and financial planning upon request.

A student who withdraws or takes a leave of absence from the school will receive a pro rata refund of tuition and appropriate fees. The refund will be based on the ratio of the class days enrolled (from the first day of classes to the termination date) to the total number of class days in the term for which tuition and fees were paid. It is understood that the date on which a student formally notifies the Registrar's Office in writing of the decision to withdraw or take a leave of absence from the School of Medicine shall be regarded as the termination date, with no retroactive clause to be accepted. A prospective date will be accepted, however. If tuition and fees were paid entirely or in part by financial aid from the school, the refund will be applied first to the total repayment of the accounts from which financial aid was drawn, with any remaining refund balance given to the student. Financial aid received in excess of the costs of tuition and fees must be refunded by the student to the school on the same pro rata basis as calculated for the tuition refund outlined above — per "Return of Title IV" federal guidelines. Any questions about these policies may be directed to either the Office of the Registrar or Financial Aid.

Program Information

Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy: MD/PhD (MSTP)

All MSTP students in the program receive financial support in the form of stipends (currently $30,000 per year), health coverage, disability and life insurance, and full tuition remission for both the MD and PhD phases of training.

Doctor of Medicine and Master of Science in Clinical Investigation: MD/MSCI

MSCI programs follow the standard tuition rate for graduate programs offered through the School of Medicine, which increases incrementally each year. MSCI courses are eligible for the Washington University Human Resources Tuition Assistance Program for qualifying staff and faculty. Visit the CRTC website for additional tuition information.

For information about tuition for the Medicine program, please visit the MD section of this page.

Doctor of Medicine and Master of Population Health Sciences: MD/MPHS

For more information about the Population Health Sciences program, including tuition and fees, please visit the Master of Population Health Sciences website.

For information about tuition for the Medicine program, please visit the MD section of this page.

Doctor of Medicine and Master of Public Health: MD/MPH

For more information about the MD/MPH program, including tuition and fees, please visit the Brown School Bulletin.

For information about tuition for the Medicine program, please visit the MD section of this page.

Doctor of Medicine and Master of Arts: MD/MA

Fellowship stipends and other support are available through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (basic science research), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (GI, hepatology, endocrinology, nutrition, nephrology and hematology research), and the Clinical Research Training Center – Predoctoral Program (clinical research). Students unable to qualify for one of these awards may also apply for institutional funding. Funding amounts may vary, and some of these sources have deadlines in early January. Please contact the MD/MA program administrator at 314-362-7190 or visit the website for details.

For information about tuition for the Medicine program, please visit the MD section of this page.