Anthropology offers the opportunity to study human existence in the present and the past and to explore how and why humans vary in their behaviors, cultures and biology. Students choose to study anthropology because they want to understand some of the most intriguing and troubling issues faced by modern society: the origin and meaning of ethnic and gender differences; the role of institutions in social, political and economic life; learned vs. innate behavior; the similarities and differences among human societies; and the meaning of religion, community and family.

The Department of Anthropology offers courses in the four subfields of anthropology: archaeology, biological anthropology, sociocultural anthropology and linguistics.

The faculty in the anthropology department are active in research around the world and bring a diversity of experiences to their teaching.

  • Faculty research expertise in archaeology includes the origins of food production; the cultures of prehistoric North, Central and South America; African and Central Asian prehistory; environmental archaeology; geographic information systems (GIS).
  • Biological anthropology faculty focus on the evolution of humans and on the ecology, behavior and evolution of nonhuman primates.
  • Sociocultural faculty conduct research on a wide range of topics, including states, societies and beliefs; political ecology, demography, fertility and population; sociolinguistics; medical anthropology and public health; bodies, gender and sexuality; science and technology, mind and cognition; and religion and politics.
Contact:Kirsten Jacobsen
Phone:314-935-7770
Email:kjacobsen@wustl.edu
Website:http://anthropology.artsci.wustl.edu

The Major in Anthropology

  • Students should register under the L48 code for any courses that will count toward the major or minor.
  • Courses taken pass/fail and courses in which a student earned less than a C- do not fulfill the major or minor requirements.
  • Anthropology courses taken in University College (U69) can be counted toward the major or minor. Required courses and courses listed as electives for the Global Health and Environment (GHE) track that are offered in University College can be counted toward the GHE track major or minor. Online courses through University College do not count toward the major or minor.

Total units required: 34 units

  • Required courses: 10 units
Anthro 150AIntroduction to Human Evolution3
Anthro 160BIntroduction to Cultural Anthropology3
Anthro 190BIntroduction to Archaeology3
Anthro 397Proseminar: Issues and Research in Anthropology1
Total Units10
  • Elective courses: 24 advanced units (300-level or higher) of which 9 units must be at the 400 level.

Optional Anthropology Major Track: Global Health and Environment

Anthropology majors may choose an optional track within the major called Global Health and Environment if the students' interests lie primarily within this area of anthropology. The Global Health and Environment major track provides strong training for professional and graduate study. Students enrolled in the Global Health and Environment track must complete the anthropology major required courses and the Global Health and Environment required and elective courses as outlined below.

Total units required: 34 units

  • Required courses: 16 units

Departmental requirements: 10 units

Anthro 150AIntroduction to Human Evolution3
Anthro 160BIntroduction to Cultural Anthropology3
Anthro 190BIntroduction to Archaeology3
Anthro 397Proseminar: Issues and Research in Anthropology1
Total Units10

Global Health and Environment Track requirements: 6 units

Anthro 3283Introduction to Global Health3
Anthro 361Culture and Environment3
  • Elective courses: 18 advanced units (300-level or higher) of which 9 units must be at the 400 level — taken from the approved list of GHE electives (available on our website).

Students may petition to have up to 6 study abroad credits count toward the electives in the GHE major track. Students should contact Alyse Kuhlman, study abroad coordinator for the anthropology department, to discuss the requirements for study abroad credit.

Students also must petition to count a thesis course (either Anthro 4951 or Anthro 4961), independent study course (either Anthro 490 or Anthro 491), or internship (Anthro 300) toward the major. Please contact Kirsten Jacobsen for a petition form.

Additional Information

Internships: Anthropology majors can gain pre-professional experience by taking part in supervised internships in businesses, cultural institutions and community agencies. Students must have department approval for an internship and must work with an anthropology faculty sponsor during the fall or spring semesters.

Research: Many anthropology courses include research components and final projects. Majors also can take part in research and gain credit through approved independent study with faculty who have ongoing research projects. Research opportunities in anthropology labs include projects in archaeology, paleoethnobotany, geoarchaeology, zooarchaeology, genetic studies, GIS, human osteology, human ecology and primate studies.

Senior Honors: Students who wish to conduct a research project for Latin Honors and who have the minimum GPA of 3.65 and the approval of a faculty adviser may be enrolled in the honors program. Latin Honors involves both demonstration of acquired knowledge (based in part on GPA) and a report on an original research project. Two courses, Anthro 4951 and Anthro 4961, are available to allow students to receive credit for the extra research involved in the honors thesis. Students may count one of these courses toward their 400-level course requirement for the major.

Study Abroad: The department recognizes and accepts courses from a number of semester or year abroad programs. Specific information on study abroad policies is available on the anthropology department website or by consultation with the study abroad coordinator.

Transfer Credit: Students who wish to transfer credits from other institutions, including those abroad, must have approval from the curriculum coordinator.

The Minor in Anthropology

  • Students should register under the L48 code for any courses that will count toward the major or minor.
  • Courses taken pass/fail and courses in which a student earned less than a C- do not fulfill the major or minor requirements.
  • Anthropology courses taken in University College (U69) can be counted toward the major or minor. Required courses and courses listed as electives for the Global Health and Environment (GHE) track that are offered in University College can be counted toward the GHE track major or minor. Online courses through University College do not count toward the major or minor.

Total units required: 18 units

  • Required courses: 6 units

Minimally, two of the following three courses; recommended that all three be taken:

Anthro 150AIntroduction to Human Evolution3
Anthro 160BIntroduction to Cultural Anthropology3
Anthro 190BIntroduction to Archaeology3
  • Elective courses: 12 additional units, at least 9 of which must be at the 300 level or higher.

Optional Anthropology Minor Track: Global Health and Environment

Anthropology minors may choose an optional track called Global Health and Environment if the student's interests lie primarily within this area of anthropology. The Global Health and Environment minor track provides a solid foundation for those who might be interested in professional and graduate study but who do not choose to major in anthropology. Students enrolled in the Global Health and Environment minor track must complete the anthropology minor requirements listed below as well as elective courses as outlined.

Total units required: 18 units

  • Required courses: 9 units

Departmental requirement: 3 units

Any 100-level introductory anthropology course from the following list:

Anthro 150AIntroduction to Human Evolution3
Anthro 160BIntroduction to Cultural Anthropology3
Anthro 190BIntroduction to Archaeology3

 Global Health and Environment Track requirement: 6 units

Anthro 3283Introduction to Global Health3
Anthro 361Culture and Environment3
  • Elective courses: 9 units taken from the approved list of GHE electives (available on our website).

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for L48 Anthro.


L48 Anthro 130 Freshman Seminar: The Ritual Landscape of Cahokia: Perspectives on the Politics of Religion and Chiefly Power

The purpose of this class is to engage and challenge freshman students in an open discussion about the prehistoric Mississippian community of Cahokia. The focus of this course is two-fold. The first is to study the way in which the archaeological evidence has been interpreted. The second is to examine other perspectives on Cahokia, especially from the Native American descendants who consecrated this landscape nearly a millennium ago. An underlying tenet of this seminar in understanding Cahokia also can be achieved through the traditions and literature of Native Americans. In the end we want to understand the basis for Cahokia's organization as a prehistoric Native American community, and the role that ritual and religion played in the rather dramatic and dynamic history of this community and the surrounding region.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: HUM


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L48 Anthro 132 Freshman Seminar: Past Tense, Future Imperfect: The Rise and Fall of Societies and Global Civilization

The past history of humanity is littered with the stories of societies whose peoples experienced prosperity and fluorescence followed by decline and catastrophe. In the present, an age of information and rapid change, public intellectuals offer broad and detailed visions of what took place in the past, what is happening now, and what the trends suggest for the future. This course looks at the efforts of two prominent public intellectuals, economist Lester Brown and geographer Jared Diamond. In this course we look at Brown's work in its latest incarnation, Plan B 4.0. We discuss this in light of current events. We then look at Jared Diamond's book Collapse, How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed and critical response to that book by experts. The professor includes a personal perspective as an archaeologist working with the ancient Maya civilization. The Maya are famous for the ninth-century AD collapse of their Classic civilization. The readings provide the basis for discussion of the challenges we face in understanding the life histories of societies and discerning what we can conclude about the future from their experiences.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 141 Medicine and Society

This course provides the basic foundation in medical anthropology and cultural anthropology for students enrolled in the Medicine and Society Program. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the central themes and theoretical approaches employed by medical anthropologists to study health and illness in cross-cultural perspective. Topical areas include analyses of disease, illness and sickness at micro and macro levels; impact of personal and interpersonal factors on health; health effects of social, political and economic factors; relationship of anthropology to biological and social science approaches; ecology of health and development; and cross-cultural health studies of language, gender and race/ethnicity. Note: Content for this course overlaps with and replaces Anthro 160 for students enrolled in the Medicine and Society Program. Open only to students enrolled in the Medicine and Society Program. CET course.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 142 Medicine and Society

This course is the required second-semester sequence of the introduction to medical anthropology and cultural anthropology for students enrolled in the Medicine and Society Program. The course builds upon material introduced in Anthro 141 and provides greater ethnographic context for the cross-cultural study of health and illness. Topical areas include analyses of disease, illness and sickness at micro and macro levels; impact of personal and interpersonal factors on health; health effects of social, political and economic factors; relationship of anthropology to biological and social sciences approaches; ecology of health and development; and cross-cultural health studies of language, gender and race/ethnicity. CET course.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 150A Introduction to Human Evolution

A survey of the fossil evidence for human evolution. The course includes discussion of the genetics of human variation and evolution, the study of living non-human primates, and the fossil record and its interpretation. An evolutionary perspective is used in an attempt to understand modern humans from the naturalistic point of view.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Arch: NSM Art: NSM BU: SCI


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L48 Anthro 160B Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA, HUM EN: S UColl: NW


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L48 Anthro 161 Gender, Youth, and Global Health

Through in-depth case studies, this course provides an introduction to gender-specific issues in the context of childhood and adolescence, poverty, and global health. Students will learn to identify how gender and gender differences affect conditions of life in the areas of reproductive health, nutrition, conflict, access to health care, and the social determinants of health, especially for young people. Students will learn to analyze health conditions and disparities in relation to both the micro dynamics of local worlds and the macro dynamics of large-scale social forces in the postcolonial global field. Additionally, they will come to understand the current challenges that global health practitioners and institutions confront in achieving gender equity and the current efforts toward closing the gap. These learning objectives will be achieved using lectures, but also discussions-based sessions and Skype-based interactions with NGOs and experts who are currently working in the field.
Same as I50 InterD 160

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC, SD EN: S


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L48 Anthro 170D Introduction to Linguistics

Language is one of the fundamental capacities of the human species, and there are many interesting and meaningful ways in which it can be studied. This course explores the core components of linguistic theory: speech sounds (phonetics and phonology), word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), and meaning (semantics). It also provides an overview of interdisciplinary ideas and research on how language is acquired and processed, its relation to the mind-brain and to society, and the question of whether the essential properties of language can be replicated outside the human mind (specifically, in chimpanzees or computer programs).
Same as L44 Ling 170D

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA, HUM EN: S


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L48 Anthro 174 Medicine East and West: Comparing Health Care in the U.S. and China

This course provides a foundational introduction to comparative health studies by examining the health care systems of the United States and China. Using the tools and interpretive frameworks of the field of medical anthropology, students in this course are exposed to a broad range of topics dealing with health and health care in Eastern and Western contexts. These include the study of medical pluralism, meaning of illness, health care financing, preventive care, political-economic perspectives, and sociobehavioral perspectives on health and wellness. Students taking this class are prepared to understand and address ongoing health care concerns affecting U.S. and Chinese society.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA, IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 190B Introduction to Archaeology

Archaeology plays a critical and unique role in understanding the human past. Through study of the methods and theories of archaeology, and a survey of important firsts in the human past, this course introduces students to the way archaeologists use material culture to reconstruct and understand human behavior. Chronologically ordered case studies from around the globe are used to look at social, ecological and cultural issues facing humans from the earliest times to the present. Students gain practice reconstructing the past through hands-on participation in two one-hour labs focusing on lithics and animal bones. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to think critically about how the past is presented and why, and the importance of the past as it relates to the present and future.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 212 Archaeological Fantasies and Hoaxes

American popular culture is saturated with pseudoscientific and fictionalized accounts of archaeological discoveries and interpretations. How can students of the past distinguish between fraud, fantasy, hype and valid archaeological research? What potential merit do films, TV-oriented documentaries and historical fiction offer? What role has racism played in attempts to deny indigenous peoples credit for their past achievements? This course looks at the popular culture of archaeology, providing tolls for critical evaluation as well as lifetime enjoyment of the field as it is frequently sold to both the informed and the unwary public. Anthropology majors and nonmajors are all welcome, as are sophomores and motivated first-year students who have not yet declared majors.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 2151 Language, Culture and Society

This course explores the relationships between linguistic practice and other social and cultural processes. Among the topics discussed are language and social identity, language and thought, language and gender, multilingualism and language shift as well as the connections between language and the identity of ethnically or nationally defined communities. The course format alternates between "classic" theoretical readings and ethnographic case studies on the interplay between linguistic practice and ideology as well as cultural and social processes.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L48 Anthro 227 Topics in Native-American Culture: The Native-American Experience

The topic of this course varies from semester to semester. Please refer to Course Listings for a description of the current offering.
Same as L98 AMCS 227

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 260 Topics in Health and Community

A survey of current topics in community health and medicine, with an emphasis upon social science approaches to issues affecting medicine and medical care in contemporary U.S. society. Issues include ethical debates in health care delivery, social stratification and health, access to health services, and factors affecting community wellness at local, national, and global levels. Presented as a weekly series of topical presentations by community health experts from the St. Louis area. Required for students enrolled in the Medicine and Society Program, and also open to other interested students.

Credit 1 unit.


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L48 Anthro 261 Migrations in Past and Present: an Introduction to Migration Studies

The course, grounded in a multidisciplinary approach, provides an introduction to the study of migration, featuring significant mass movements in the past 150 years and crucial concepts of historical and theoretical analyses of the movement of people. Course units explore continuities, trends and shifts in human migration and migration policy and how they affect individual immigrants' lives. A variety of sources, such as oral history, films, novels, legal documents and scholarly secondary analysis help students to consider different perspectives on internal and international migrations, from the individual migrant to civil society, from political regulation to economic consideration. Throughout the course, students deepen their understanding of migration as a result of social transformation, force or individual choice. We study concepts of the nation-state and citizenship, the political economy of migration, gender, sexuality and migration, and notions of identity and social inclusion more generally to build a sound critique of contemporary discourses on immigration.
Same as L97 IAS 260

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L48 Anthro 2653 Health Care Challenges in Modern China

As the most populous country in the world, China has many challenges regarding medicine, health and health care delivery. In this course several major health care challenges facing China are explored. Students have the opportunity to learn not just from published research and class discussion but also from the perspectives of those who spend their lives studying the social, political, and cultural dynamics of these issues as well as those who devote their careers to the practice of health care in China. Must be enrolled in the study abroad program at Fudan University in Shanghai, China.

Credit 1 unit. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 290 Independent Study

Designed to give undergraduates research experience in the various subdisciplines of Anthropology. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: consent of the faculty member under whom the research will be done.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 300 Internships in Anthropology

Anthropology majors may acquire professional experience outside the classroom by participating in a faculty-sponsored internship. Before work begins, the student and faculty sponsor must agree on a final written project, which is then approved by the Anthropology Academic Coordinator. Students are evaluated by the faculty sponsor on the basis of the written project and input from the internship supervisor. Course may be taken only one time. Prerequisites: 9 hours of anthropology and permission of department.

Credit 3 units.


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L48 Anthro 302B Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East

This course introduces the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of the Middle East. The emphasis is on historical and ethnological relationships, social and political structure, religious pluralism and contemporary youth issues. We explore the lived experiences of the peoples in the modern nation-states of Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Israel, the Palestinian Territories, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and the countries of the Arabian Peninsula, Iraq and Iran. We access this material through short stories, poetry, biographies, essays, videos, blogs and political and anthropological reports.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L48 Anthro 3036 Migration and Modernity: Human Mobility, Identity and State Formation — Russian/Soviet/post-Soviet Context

This class introduces students to a broad history of 19th- and 20th-century Russia and the Soviet Union alongside problems of migration. In this class, students will be introduced to the historical, social, and political dimensions of migration within, to, and from the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and its successor states. We will look at the intersection of the movement of people with long-term economic, social and political transformations, but also pay attention to crucial events and phenomena of Soviet history that set large-scale migrations in motion. Course materials will, for instance, address mass movements related to modernization and internal colonization, analyze the role of revolutionary change and warfare for forced displacement, and study the implications of geopolitical changes in the aftermath of the breakdown of the USSR for human rights discourses. Alongside the historically grounded overview, the class explores concepts of citizenship, diaspora, nationality policy, gender specific experiences of migration, and the ethics and political economy of migration politics, thereby highlighting how current trends in Russian society are indicative of broader discourses on difference and social transformation.
Same as L97 IAS 384

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L48 Anthro 305 Anthropology of India

An introduction to the societies and cultures of India through its social margins. Our approach will leverage scholarship from many fields, highlighting the strengths and limitations of singular-discipline analyses and universalized histories. Ethnographic narratives will be woven into historical accounts of major cultural shifts. Students will learn to evaluate and apply multivocal perspectives on larger global issues that have transformed India since the end of colonization, including demographic, economic, social, cultural, political, and religious change. Topics will include population and life expectancy, civil society, social-moral relationships, caste and communalism, youth and consumerism, the new urban middle class, environment and health, tourism, public and religious cultures, social activism, politics and law.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3051 Anthropology of Tibet and the Himalayas

This course is an anthropological and historical examination of Tibetan societies inhabiting the Tibetan Plateau and the highlands of Nepal. In addition to providing basic ethnographic descriptions of Tibetan societies, the course explores the changing nature of relations between Tibet and China, and between Tibet and the West. Guiding concepts include adaptation (both social and ecological), the politics of ethnicity and identity, and processes of culture change.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3055 Contemporary Chinese Culture and Society

This course provides an introduction to emerging trends in Chinese culture and society. We explore processes of change and continuity in the People's Republic, examining the complexity of social issues and the dynamics of cultural unity and diversity. While we focus on the post-Mao reform era (1978 to the present), we consider how contemporary developments draw upon the legacies of the Maoist revolution as well as the pre-socialist past. The course provides an overview of anthropological approaches to the study of contemporary China, introducing students to key concepts, theories and frameworks integral to the analysis of Chinese culture and society. Readings, lectures and discussions highlight not only macro-level processes of social change and continuity but also the everyday experiences of individuals involved in these processes. We pay particular attention to issues of family life, institutional culture, migration, religion, ethnicity, gender, consumption and globalization.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3056 Material Culture in Modern China

In this course, we will explore change and continuity from late imperial to postsocialist China through an analysis of everyday material culture. Drawing upon material objects, historical texts, ethnographic studies and films, we will investigate values, beliefs and attitudes toward the material world in modern Chinese life. Readings, lectures and discussions will focus on how political, ethnic, regional, religious, and gender identities have been constructed and shaped by the use and production of material artifacts ranging from household goods and tomb objects to built forms and bodily dispositions. Case studies include foot-binding, opium use, fashion, tea culture, fast food consumption, sports and nation building, contemporary art markets, the privatization of housing, and worker discipline in transnational factories.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 306B Africa: Peoples and Cultures

An anthropological survey of Africa from the classic ethnographies to contemporary studies of development. Emphasis on the numerous social and economic changes African peoples have experienced from precolonial times to the present.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: HUM, IS


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L48 Anthro 307A Human Variation

A survey of human biological diversity, considering its adaptive and taxonomic significance from the perspective of origins and distribution of traits and adaptation. Prerequisite: Anthro 150A or introductory biology.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS, SD, QA A&S IQ: NSM, AN, SD Arch: NSM Art: NSM BU: SCI


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L48 Anthro 3092 Indigenous Peoples and Movements in Latin America

This course focuses on the contemporary lives and political struggles of Indigenous Peoples in Latin America, with specific focus on Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. Through course lectures, ethnographic texts, and four in-depth case studies, we explore how the politics of Indigeneity articulate with political and economic processes including (neo)colonialism, global capitalism, state transformation and social movement struggle. Themes include: demands for territory and autonomy; environmentalism and natural resource exploitation; gender and economic inequality; race, racism and political violence; language and education; and the complexities of building multicultural or "plurinational" democracies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L48 Anthro 3093 Anthropology of Modern Latin America

A survey of current issues in the anthropological study of culture, politics and change across contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. Topics include machismo and feminismo, the drug war, race and mestizaje, yuppies and revolutionaries, ethnic movements, pop culture, violence, multinational business, and the cultural politics of U.S.–Latin American relations. Attention is given to the ways that anthropology is used to uderstand complex cultural and social processes in a region thoroughly shaped by globalization.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3095 The Incas and Their Ancestors: The Archaeology of the Ancient Andes

From the hyper-arid desert of the Pacific Coast to the high-montain plateaus of the Andes more than 12,000 feet above sea level to the lush forested Amazonian lowlands, Western South America presents one of the most diverse natural and cultural environments in the world and one of the few places were social complexity first developed. Beginning with the earliest human occupations in the region more than 12,000 years ago, this course examines how domestication, urbanization, the rise of early states, and major technological inventions changed life in the Andes from small village societies to the largest territorial polity of the Americas — the Inca Empire. Students will become familiar with the major debates in the field of Andean archaeology. Together, we will examine archaeological evidence (architecture, art, ceramics, metals, textiles, plant and animal remains, etc.) from context of everyday life (households, food production, craft production) to the rituals and ceremonies (offerings, tombs) that took place in domestic and public spaces. We will also touch on the role of Andean archaeology in the context of national politics and heritage sustainability.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 310C Ancient Civilizations of the New World

An examination of the Inca empire in Peru, and the Maya and Aztec empires in Mexico, through the inquiry into the roots, development, form and evolutionary history of pre-Colombian civilization in each region from its earliest times to the rise of the classic kingdoms. Examples of respective artistic accomplishments are presented and discussed.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: SSC BU: HUM


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L48 Anthro 3122 From Country to Heavy Metal: Ancient Civilizations of the Old World

This course will explore the archaeology of Europe, the Near East and Central Asia from approximately 10,000 years ago to classical times (ending before Ancient Greece). This prehistoric epoch saw major developments among various civilizations of the Old World, such as the introduction of agriculture, animal domestication, the growth of cities, and technological developments such as pottery, metallurgy and horse-riding. A major focus will be the trajectory of cultural innovations of regional populations through time, and the complexity of their social, political and ritual practices. We will also investigate the variation in human adaptive strategies to various environmental and social contexts, from hunter/gatherers to early Neolithic farmers, to the interactions between nomadic populations and larger scale, urban societies in the Bronze and Iron Ages.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 314B First Americans: Prehistory of North America

The predecessors of the Eskimo, Northwest Coast Indians, Pueblo mound builders and other North American Indians. Concentrates on deductions from archaeological data for cultural development.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3151 Evolution of the Human Diet

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: SCI EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3154 Indian Barbie, Asian Tigers and IT Dreams: Politics of Globalization and Development in South Asia

This course will explore how South Asia is at the heart of current debates about globalization, development, empire, gender, sexuality and ethnic identity. We'll raise questions like: What has lead to sex trafficking in Nepal? Can information technology solve India's social problems and unemployment? What is biopiracy, and how are South Asian activists challenging the global corporatization of world food and water supplies? Readings, films and discussions will take us to countries like Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and India.
Same as L97 IAS 315

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3156 Topics in Chinese Social Development at Fudan

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3158 South Asian Religious Traditions

The Indian subcontinent is home to Hindu, Islamic, Buddhist, Jain, and Sikh traditions, among others. In this course we explore several traditions that are vital to life in India, Pakistan and beyond. We first encounter each tradition through narrative, with the support of visual media. We then explore how contemporary adherents make these traditions meaningful for themselves — in their everyday lives, in their struggles for social change, and in their political statements and contestations. Students will have the opportunity for creative projects or individual research.
Same as L23 Re St 312

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H UColl: NW


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L48 Anthro 3182 Ancient Africa: Social Mosaics and Environmental Challenges

This class introduces students to the basics of the archaeological record of humans in Africa from 3.6 million years ago to 1000 years ago. The first third of the course focuses on early humans, the origins of meat eating, expansion of diet and cuisine, technical and cultural responses to changing environments. The second section of the course emphasizes African rock art, socioeconomic variability among hunter-gatherers, the origins of African pastoralism, mobile responses to climate change and African contributions to world food supply including domestication of sorghum, also coffee. The last third of the course is devoted to the complex urban societies of ancient Africa, Egypt, Axum, Great Zimbabwe and Jenne Jeno. Course format is lecture and discussion. There are two mid-terms and students are expected to participate in interactive stone tool use, rock art creation and discussion of ethnographic and archaeological data on pastoral decision-making in times of drought and war and of issues surrounding the purchase of African antiquities and conservation of cultural heritage.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3201 Gender, Culture and Madness

This course explores the relationships among gender constructs, cultural values and definitions of mental health and illness. Understandings of the proper roles, sensibilities, emotions and dispositions of women and men are often culturally and morally loaded as indicators of the "proper" selves permitted in a given context. Across cultures, then, gender often becomes an expressive idiom for the relative health of the self. Gender identities or presentations that run counter to these conventions are frequently identified as disordered and in need of fixing. In this course, we take up these issues through three fundamental themes: the social and cultural (re)production of gendered bodies and dispositions; the normalization of these productions and the subsequent location of "madness" in divergent or dissonant experiences of embodiment; and the situation of discourses of "madness" within debates of resistance and conformity, selfhood and agency.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: BA, ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3202 Anthropological Perspectives on Women's Health

The principle goal of this course is to explore the health issues/risks women face around the world. In order to achieve this goal, we will take a life cycle approach beginning with the birth of female babies through adolescence, adulthood, and finally through the aging process. Our perspective will be biocultural, defined as the synergistic interaction between biology and culture. By comparing a diversity of health experiences across cultures, we can carefully examine the ways in which culture constructs perceptions of health and effective delivery of health care. Students will finish the term with a clearer understanding of the biology of life cycle changes, how health inequalities are generated and perpetuated, and how to make more informed decisions about their own health choices. Prerequisite: Anthro 160 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3206 Global Gender Issues

This course compares the life experiences of women and men in societies throughout the world. We discuss the evidence regarding the universal subordination of women, and examine explanations that propose to situate women's and men's personality attributes, roles and responsibilities in the biological or cultural domains. In general, through readings, films and lectures, the class provides a cross-cultural perspective on ideas regarding gender and how gendered meanings, practices and performances serve as structuring principles in society.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA, IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3215 Food, Culture, and Power

What should I eat today? This seemingly simple question transects the fields of health, environmental studies, economics, history, anthropology, religion, and many others. The foods we eat, the way we get them, the way we produce them, and the way in which we eat them speak volumes about our beliefs, our technology, our understanding of how the world works, and our ability to function within it. That is, food is an excellent way to explore culture. No actions are more deserving of critical attention than those that we do regularly, without much critical thought, and most of us eat at least two or three times a day. In this class we explore how this food came to be here, why we like it, and what that says about us. This class is reading and discussion heavy, with a midterm paper based on the readings and a final paper based on a topic of the students' choosing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3255 Urban Anthropology

This course examines the many ways that people around the world make urban life meaningful. We will focus on the intersections among anthropology, urban studies, social theory and human geography to explore the theoretical, social, and methodological approaches to understanding the culture(s) created in cities. Drawing on ethnographic case studies from cities around the world, we will explore issues pertaining to race and ethnicity, gender, youth, poverty, diversity and "super-diversity," gentrification, urbanization, and illusions and realities of modernity.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3261 Inequality, Hierarchy and Difference

This course examines systems of inequality in a variety of world regions and includes analysis of their causes and effects. Economic class, gender, ethnicity and race are among the types of social stratification discussed. Topics might include environmental racism, occupational segregation, political movements, and debates over the differential impact of new technologies such as biotechnology and reproductive technologies on minority populations.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH, IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3271 Becoming Human: Archaeology of Human Origins

Humanity, before the advent of agriculture and cities, evolved a series of behaviors that enabled them to survive as hunter-gatherers in diverse environments with complex cultural systems. These behaviors included hunting, control of fire, shelters and clothing, elaborate tools of diverse materials, burials, jewelry and representational art. These characteristics emerged over more than 2 million years of the Pleistocene across several species of humans, to coalesce into what we would recognize as modern human foragers 30,000 years ago. This course traces that emergence of what it means to be human, through the Paleolithic archeological record in its context of past environments and past human forms.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3283 Introduction to Global Health

This course provides a general introduction to the field of public health. It examines the philosophy, history, organization, functions, activities and results of public health research and practice. Case studies include infectious and chronic diseases, mental health, maternal and reproductive health, food safety and nutrition, environmental health, and global public health. Students are encouraged to look at health issues from a systemic and population level perspective, and to think critically about health systems and problems, especially health disparities and health care delivery to diverse populations. No background in anthropology or public health is required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3284 Public Health Research and Practice

In-depth exploration of current theory and methods involved in public health research and practical applications. Emphasis on fundamentals of epidemiology, which forms the scientific rationale for public health assessment, assurance and policy development. Survey of current public health practice and research areas including biological foundations of public health, social and behavioral interventions, maternal-child health and environmental health. Relationships among public health, medicine, nursing, social work and related disciplines.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3293 Religion and Society

We take a broad and practice-oriented view of "religion," including uttering spells, sacrificing to a god, healing through spirit possession, as well as praying and reciting scripture. We consider religious practices in small-scale societies as well as those characteristic of forms of Judaism, Islam, Christianity and other broadly based religions. We give special attention to the ways religions shape politics, law, war, as well as everyday life in modern societies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3295 Secular and Religious: A Global History

Recent years have seen a dramatic rethinking of the past in nearly every corner of the world as scholars revisit fundamental questions about the importance of religion for individuals, societies and politics. Is religion as a personal orientation in decline? Is Europe becoming more secular? Is secularism a European invention? Many scholars now argue that "religion" is a European term that doesn't apply in Asian societies. This course brings together cutting-edge historical scholarship on Europe and Asia in pursuit of a truly global understanding. Countries covered vary but may include Britain, France, Turkey, China, Japan, India and Pakistan.
Same as L22 History 3921

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L48 Anthro 330 Experimental Archaeology

Experiments are an extremely important part of the scientific process. Although archaeology is often treated as an historical science, the nature of the material record does provide an opportunity to use experimentation as an important way of interpreting what we excavate. The class works with the most tangible materials recovered from archaeological contexts, that is, stone and pottery. After reviewing the history of experimentation in archaeological investigations, we turn to the material record. This is followed in our initial weeks of setting up the experiments and how they are used to compare with available data sets derived from archaeological contexts. As part of the class we take several field trips to areas where materials exist in a natural setting. Each class member selects a specific material for the focus of their experiments. In the end students produce several experiments using different materials, document their experiments in written reports, and finally present their results to the class for discussion and evaluation.

Credit 3 units. Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 3304 Bones to Behavior: Undergraduate Research in the Lab and at the Zoo

We undertake zooarchaeological study of equid skeletons in the zooarchaeology laboratory at Washington University, and in collaboration with the Saint Louis Zoo, participate in a behavioral study of the courtship and breeding behavior of the ancestor of the domestic donkey — the African wild ass. The research questions that we focus on are how the biology and behavior of the African wild ass influenced the domestication of the donkey by prehistoric African herders or ancient Egyptians and how the behavior of the African wild ass continues to affect prospects for conservation of this highly endangered animal. During the first half of the semester, we meet once a week for 2.5 hours in the zooarchaeology laboratory. In the second half of the semester, we no longer meet in the lab, and each student spends two mornings of their choice per week at the Saint Louis Zoo conducting observations of the wild ass. Students may choose two days that fit their schedule. Saturdays and Sundays are included as choices of days. Permission of instructor is required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM BU: BA


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L48 Anthro 3305 Bones to Behavior II

In this class, students undertake zooarchaeological research on skeletal material in the zooarchaeology laboratory at Washington University and/or preparation of animal skeletons for comparative study and, in collaboration with the Saint Louis Zoo, participate in behavioral studies of the ancestor of the donkey — the African wild ass. Collections housed in the zooarchaeological laboratory for study include ancient food-remains from African sites. These collections bear on questions regarding cultural and climate change in the Horn of Africa 2,000 to 12,000 years ago and include animals ranging from African antelopes to domestic camels. During the first half of the semester, students meet once a week for 2.5 hours in the zooarchaeological laboratory. In the second half of the semester, we meet twice a week in the laboratory or at the zoo. Location depends on projects selected for study. Permission of instructor is required. May be repeated for credit.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3309 Anthropological Perspectives on Care

This course aims to provide an introductory survey of topics and approaches to the anthropology of care. It does so by drawing on a range of ethnographic, theoretical, and cross-disciplinary materials. This will allow us to think through and engage with care in its myriad forms, its presence and absence, its bureaucratization and management, its relation to kinship, relatedness, labor and government. In the first part of the course, we will explore theories of care as moral practice with a feminist lens. In the second part, we will engage this lens with ethnographic materials about care in diverse settings that also shed light on the political, economic, and lived realities of care. These ethnographic and sociological works include explorations of the circulation of care in moral economies and its monetization as paid labor, the politics and "antipolitics" of health care in institutional settings, and the role of care in kinship, household formations, and life course regimes across cultures.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD, SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 331 Culture and Identity: Urban Ethnography in St. Louis

Topics course focusing on instances of identity and culture within the American scope. Varies by semester, refer to Course Listings for description of current semester's offering.
Same as L98 AMCS 330D

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L48 Anthro 3310 Health, Healing and Ethics: Introduction to Medical Anthropology

A cross-cultural exploration of cultures and social organizations of medical systems, the global exportation of biomedicine, and ethical dilemmas associated with medical technologies and global disparities in health.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3312 Topics in Islam: Islam and Human Rights

Selected themes in the study of Islam and Islamic culture in social, historical, and political context. The specific area of emphasis will be determined by the instructor.
Same as L75 JINE 3622

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L48 Anthro 3313 Women and Islam

An anthropological study of the position of women in the contemporary Muslim world, with examples drawn primarily from the Middle East but also from Asia, Africa, Europe and the United States. Students examine ethnographic, historical and literary works, including those written by Muslim women. Topics having a major impact on the construction of gender include Islamic belief and ritual, modest dress (veiling), notions of marriage and the family, modernization, nationalism and the nation-state, politics and protest, legal reform, formal education, work, and Westernization. The course includes a visit to a St. Louis mosque, discussions with Muslim women, and films.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L48 Anthro 3322 Brave New Crops

This course introduces students to the major issues surrounding the development and use in genetically modified (GM) crops. Its focus is international, but with particular focus on the developing world. A variety of experts, available locally or through the internet, will contribute perspectives. The course also includes field trips. For further information, see artsci.wustl.edu/~anthro/courses/3322.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH


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L48 Anthro 333 Culture and Health

This course explores culture and health, with a focus on global health. Assigned readings explore cross-cultural perspectives on health, healing, and the body, as well as important concepts in medical anthropology. Through class discussions and close examination of ethnographies of health and illness, students develop an understanding of how cultural and political-economic forces articulate with the emerging field of global health.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L48 Anthro 3331 Anthropology of Clothing and Fashion

This course takes clothing as a starting point for examining broad themes in anthropology, including gender and sexuality, race and the body, history and colonialism. We look at the ritual significance of clothing and other practices of bodily adornment in traditional societies and the role of style in constituting contemporary social movements and identity categories. We investigate the globalization of the apparel industry, from production and circulation to marketing and branding, in order to understand the relationship between citizenship and consumption, labor and power in the global economy. The course encourages students to reflect on their relationship to the wider society and economy as producers and consumers of material culture through the lens of clothing and fashion.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3351 The Ancient Maya: Archaeology and History

This course focuses on the ancient Maya civilization because there are many exciting new breakthroughs in the study of the Maya. The Olmec civilization and the civilization of Teotihuacan in the Valley of Mexico are considered as they related to the rise and development of the Maya civilization. The ancient Maya were the only Pre-Columbian civilization to leave us a written record that we can use to understand their politics, religion and history. This course is about Maya ancient history and Maya glyphic texts, combined with the images of Maya life from their many forms of art. The combination of glyphic texts, art and archaeology now can provide a uniquely detailed reconstruction of ancient history in a New World civilization.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3354 Ancient Mesoamerica

Mesoamerica encompasses the Pre-Columbian complex societies of Mexico and upper Central America, including Guatemala, Belize, and parts of Honduras and El Salvador. It was an agrarian world of great and enduring cities, far-flung trade networks, transcendent religions, kingdoms and empires. This survey lecture course begins with the pioneering hunters and gatherers, reviews the establishment of farming communities and the first Olmec Formative states, the flowering of highland Mexican Classic Period Teotihuacan and other great cities like Tajin in Veracruz, the dynasties of the lowland Maya and summarizes with the Aztec Empire and the period of the Spanish Conquest. The course touches on the many and diverse other cultures that contributed to this vibrant world.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 336B Culture and Identity

Culture and diversity; cultural relativism and its contradictions; custom and habits; the construction and maintenance of norms; communication, symbol, sign and intersubjectivity; symbolic interaction; rhetoric and the definition of social situations; societal means of fabricating distinctions (e.g., race, tribe, ethnic group, nationality, sect group).

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA, ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3373 Law and Culture

We live in an age when social policy is increasingly displaced into the realm of law, when justice and equality are matters of courtroom debate rather than public discussion. Legal language has become a key resource in all kinds of struggles over livelihood and ways of life. In this course, we study the cultural dimensions of law and law's changing relationship to state power, the global economy, social movements and everyday life. We approach law as a system of rules, obligations and procedures, but also a cultural practice, moral regime and disciplinary technique. How are relationships between legal, political and economic realms structured and with what consequences? How does law provide tools for both social struggle and social control? What does anthropology contribute to research on these issues? In exploring these questions, we combine readings from classical legal anthropology with recent ethnographic work from around the globe.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3386 Language, Culture and Society

Although this is an introductory course, students who have taken Linguistics 170D Introduction to Linguistics benefit from knowledge of phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. The primary content of this course explores the relationship between linguistic practice and other social and cultural processes. Anthropological linguistics, including alternative approaches to fieldwork and data collection are introduced, along with various studies of language usage in social and cultural contexts that consider language and thought, language and identity, language and gender, as well as multilingualism and other forms of language contact. The ethnography of speaking and communication are central to this course, as is conversation analyses, which introduces a combination of qualitative and quantitative linguistic research methods.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3391 Economies as Cultural Systems

Many contemporary approaches to economics downplay or bracket the importance of culture in the workings of economic systems. In this class we focus on approaches to distribution and exchange in which culture and social institutions figure prominently, if not pre-eminently. We sample a diverse array of economies, from gift exchange to the ceremonial destruction of wealth, from Melanesia to Wall Street, in order to evaluate some of the assumptions that undergird market capitalism. These assumptions include the perception of market actors exclusively as calculative, maximizing individuals. Topics covered include the Industrial Revolution; utilitarianism; economic anthropology; the formal vs. substantivist debates; ethnography of finance; and Marxist sociology.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3414 Topics in Social Research at Fudan

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3432 Topics in Africa: Capitalism, Exchange and Inequality in Africa

This course explores issues of power and inequality related to exchange and the emergence of market economies in Africa. Case studies include examinations of cattle and bride wealth among pastoralists in Sudan, welfare policies in contemporary South Africa, and sex work in West Africa. In each of these cases there is a complex balance between the value placed on maintaining social relationships and accumulating private property. We investigate the implications of this balance for the production of local and international forms of inequality. The course also introduces students to key ideas in economic anthropology such as the formalist-substantivist debate, rational choice theory and neo-Marxist approaches to power and stratification. By the end of the course, students should be able to critically assess the value of these theories in understanding day-to-day economic activities in Africa. This class is a discussion-based seminar and in-class participation is highly encouraged. Students are graded on a series of analytical essays, a final paper and in-class participation.
Same as L90 AFAS 343

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3461 Native Americans at Westward Expansion

Issues precipitated by Euro-American contact, colonization and expansion between 1492 and 1810 across Eastern North America, the Plains and the Rocky Mountains. Impacts of exploration and settlement and responses by native peoples: epidemics; population loss; breakdown of Southeastern chiefdoms; resistance; relocation; and shifts in economic strategies. Perspectives and policies of Native Americans as well as Europeans and non-Indian Americans, including Lewis and Clark.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: HUM


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L48 Anthro 3472 Global Energy and the American Dream

This lecture course explores the historical, cultural and political relationship between America and global energy, focusing on oil, coal, natural gas, biofuels and alternatives. Through case studies at home and abroad, we examine how cultural, environmental, economic and geopolitical processes are entangled with changing patterns of energy-related resource extraction, production, distribution and use. America's changing position as global consumer and dreamer is linked to increasingly violent contests over energy abroad while our fuel-dependent dreams of boundless (oil) power give way to uncertainties and new possibilities of nation, nature and the future. Assuming that technology and markets alone will not save us, what might a culturally, politically and socially minded inquiry contribute to understanding the past and future of global energy and the American dream?

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH, IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3476 Archaeologies of Graffiti from Antiquity to the Present

The modern story of graffiti — revolving around social, economic, and political contexts such as bathroom stalls, subways and alleys steeped with urine and trash, decrepit buildings and train cars situated in less reputable areas of cities and towns — lead people to associate it with antisocial behaviors, dissent, and the vandalism of public and private property. However, some people consider graffiti as a legitimate form of art, communication, and a somewhat anonymous expression of current social climates. The disparity between these two perspectives has provided a great deal to study for social scientists. However, a consideration of graffiti's simple definition — words or drawings etched or painted on some surface in a public place — lead us to recognize that feats of graffiti originate way before the inner-city movements of the 1970s. In this class we will draw upon a range of studies from archaeology, anthropology, sociology, art, and history to broadly explore the creation and meaning of graffiti from antiquity to the present. Our goal is to learn how to examine the form, function, and context of graffiti across cultures and through time, with regard to the circumstances of its creation. In doing so, we aspire to better understand what lies behind the human urge to leave a mark. Prerequisite: Introduction to Archaeology.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 347B Ancient Mound Builders of the Mississippi Valley

Study of the peoples in North America who built mounds and other earthen structures beginning more than 4000 years ago; why they erected earthworks; what the structures were used for; how they varied through time and across space; and what significance they had to members of society.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD Art: SSC BU: BA


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L48 Anthro 3541 Anthropological and Sociological Study of Muslim Societies

This course introduces students to anthropological and sociological scholarship on Muslim societies. Attention will be given to the broad theoretical and methodological issues which orient such scholarship. These issues include the nature of Muslim religious and cultural traditions, the nature of modernization and rationalization in Muslim societies, and the nature of sociopolitical relations between "Islam" and the "West." The course explores the preceding issues through a series of ethnographic and historical case studies, with a special focus on Muslim communities in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and Europe. Case studies address a range of specific topics, including religious knowledge and authority, capitalism and economic modernization, religion and politics, gender and sexuality, as well as migration and globalization.
Same as L75 JINE 354

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3542 Anthropology of Change: Practicing Applied and Public Anthropology

In this course, students will learn how to use anthropology and ethnographic methods as tools for provoking change. The legitimacy of this "fifth-field" of anthropology has been in contention amongst anthropologists throughout generations. But in the contemporary era of neoliberalism and big-data, social scientists are increasingly examining their ethical duty to their informants — specifically, concerns about maintaining neutrality versus leveraging ethnographic data to improve lives or to make a profit. We will begin with the history of this ethical debate and move into contemporary issues in anthropology for social change and in business anthropology. Topics will include multidisciplinary teamwork, practitioner capacity building, community action programming, policy development and ethical design. This course is designed for upper-level anthropology students but will be particularly useful for those considering combining anthropology as a double-major or minor in a range of applied fields (business, engineering, social work, law, health and medicine). It will prepare students for the practical use of anthropology in consulting firms, research institutes, corporations, NGOs, and federal, state, and local government agencies.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3582 Anthropology of the Human Face

A survey of the human face, including both an evolutionary perspective on why our faces changed to look the way they do today and a theoretical perspective on how we create and maintain self-image through body modification. Comparative and cross-cultural approaches are used to understand modern human craniofacial and cultural diversity. The course includes discussions of how perceptions of biological variation inform social interactions and of how sociocultural norms pattern body modification, both presently and historically. Most importantly, students learn how information obtained with archaeological, sociocultural, and biological methods is integrated to address anthropological questions.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 361 Culture and Environment

An introduction to the ecology of human culture, especially how "traditional" cultural ecosystems are organized and how they change with population density. Topics include foragers, extensive and intensive farming, industrial agriculture, the ecology of conflict, and problems in sustainability.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH


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L48 Anthro 3612 Population and Society

This review of population processes and their social ramifications begins with an introduction to the basic terminology, concepts and methods of population studies, followed by a survey of human population trends through history. The course then investigates biological and social dimensions of marriage and childbearing, critically examines family planning policies, deals with the social impacts of epidemics and population aging, and looks at connections between population movements and sociocultural changes. The overall objective of the course is to understand how population processes are not just biological in nature, but are closely related to social, cultural, political and economic factors.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3616 From Deep Ecology to Indigenous Ecological Identity: Environmental Social Movements and Anthropology

This course provides a survey of environmental social movements around the world and over time, in the process challenging commonly held perceptions about environmentalism and environmental movements. Specifically, it demonstrates that environmental social movements are often as much or more about people, identity and human rights than they are about protecting the environment. In addition to juxtaposing dominant traditions of American environmentalism with environmental movements in other parts of the world, the course focuses in on new and emerging social movements that are often transnational in scope but local in scale. These new movements offer holistic reinterpretations of human-environment relationships, identities and political and economic organization in their attempts to transcend socio-environmental inequalities. Throughout, the course draws on social scientists' (especially anthropologists') descriptive interpretations and critical theoretical analyses of various environmental social movements and the differences that constitute them.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3617 Past and Present Cultural Environments

Human societies are situated within and interact with their ecological and environmental systems. Even social relationships within and between groups imply spatial relationships and geographic orientation, advantages, influence and limitations. Beyond subsistence, environment and the "natural world" play an integral role in how humans pattern the landscape, structure society, develop their world view, and, in turn, alter and adapt the world in which they live. This upper-division undergraduate and graduate seminar course introduces students to anthropological conceptions of human-environmental relationships, past and present. Topics include environmental and landscape archaeology; historical, political, and human behavioral ecology; world view and conceptualizations of nature; human adaptation, resilience theory, and niche construction; anthropological case studies; the intersections of humans, animals and the environment; and end with environmental politics.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3618 Urban Ecological Anthropology

Anthropology's long history of studying human-environment interactions makes it well-suited to examine the complexities of urban environmental issues. Through ethnographies and other readings, this class introduces students to the ways social structures, power and knowledge contour people's experiences and understandings of nature in an urban environment. Of particular interest are environmental justice issues involving pollution and disasters; the creation of community gardens and other public space; cars and bicycles; and conservation or commercial uses of natural resources nestled in or on the edge of cities. Class discussion includes environmental issues in the St. Louis metropolitan area. No background in anthropology or environmental studies is required.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 362 The Biological Basis of Human Behavior

Infidelity, marriage customs, inner-city violence, infanticide, intelligence. Are the behavioral patterns we see genetically fixed and racially variable? What is the evolutionary and biological basis of human behavior? This course offers a critical evaluation of these from an anthropological perspective.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, NSM, SD Arch: NSM Art: NSM BU: BA


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L48 Anthro 3620 Anthropological Perspectives on the Fetus

Where do we come from? How do we get here? When does "life" begin? Is the fetus a "person" or something else? How could we decide? This course integrates biological, medical, philosophical and cross-cultural perspectives to examine how various societies (including our own) understand the nature of the human fetus. The course examines basic human embryology, beliefs about conception and fetal development, ideas about the moral status of the fetus, controversies surrounding prenatal care and antenatal diagnostic testing (including sex selection and genetic screening tests), current controversies about fetal medicine and surgery, and the problem of abortion in cross-cultural perspective.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSP Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3621 Anthropology of Human Birth

This course examines the interaction between human biology and culture in relation to childbirth. Emphasis is placed on understanding the cultural challenges posed by the physiology of human reproduction, the ways various cultures have attempted to meet those challenges, and the resultant consequences that this has had for women's lives. The course draws on material from human anatomy and embryology, paleoanthropology, clinical obstetrics, public health, social anthropology, the history of medicine and contemporary bioethics.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3626 Adventures in Nosology: The Nature and Meaning of Disease

What is a "disease" and how do you diagnose one? What are "medicines" and how, when, and for what purpose should they be used? These questions reflect universal human concerns, but the answers given to these questions have varied enormously in different times and places. The course considers the nature of health, illness, disease and its treatment, beginning with a detailed examination of the traditional ethnomedical system of the Hausa people of northern Nigeria. Using this West African medical system as a baseline for comparison, the course then explores the nature of "nosology" (the classification of diseases) and the underlying logic of different therapeutic systems in different times and cultures, including our own. The course draws on ethnography, the history of medicine, bioethics and human biology to understand how these questions are asked and answered in different societies, times and places.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: SCI EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3628 The Anthropology of Health Disparities

This course approaches the subjects of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and class-related health disparity epidemiologically and anthropologically. Students in this course explore these cultural categories both as factors that contribute to systematic differences in health status and outcomes and as dynamic frameworks through which those systematic differences can be examined and understood. The grounding assumptions of this course are 1) that race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and class are cultural constructs employed by humans in an effort to account for observed physical, dispositional and behavioral group-level diversity; 2) that disparity, and particularly health disparity, is meaningfully associated with diversity but is not caused by it; and 3) that because humans are the product of two dynamic, complex systems (biology and culture), health disparities are most usefully engaged as conditions of process and interconnectedness.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 365 Human Growth and Development

This course focuses on the life-history of humans from birth to death. Through a series of lectures we consider how humans grow and change both biologically and psychologically over the course of our lives. Topics include: human growth curves, sex-differences, adolescence and puberty, nutrition, environment, growth disorders, death, and the evolution of human growth.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L48 Anthro 3656 Behavioral Ecology of the Great Apes

This course introduces undergraduate students to the behavioral ecology of great apes. Lectures and readings provide an overview of the distribution, feeding ecology, social system and behavior of African and Asian apes. The main objective of this class is to examine variation in behavioral ecology with and between ape species. The comparative content within each lecture gradually increases throughout the course, and students are asked to synthesize this material in their final exam. Readings mainly consist of book chapter assignments from three recent texts on the ecology, behavior and geographic variation observed in great apes.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3661 Primate Biology

This course takes a multifaceted introductory approach to the primates, the closest relatives of human beings, by investigating anatomy, growth and development, reproduction, behavioral adaptations, ecology, geographic distribution, taxonomy and evolution. Emphasis is placed not only on the apes and monkeys, but also on the lesser-known lemurs, lorises, bushbabies, tarsiers and many others. The importance of primate biology to the discipline of anthropology is discussed. Intended for students who have already taken Anthro 150A and recommended for students who wish to take the more advanced 400-level courses on primates. Prerequisite: Anthro 150A or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM BU: SCI


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L48 Anthro 3662 Primate Conservation Biology

This class focuses on the ecological diversity of primates and how these and other traits are related to their present day abundance and distribution. In addition, the biological, abiotic and anthropogenic factors related to extinction risk are examined. It also reviews the endangered species of primates; case histories of conservation programs; and management practices in Asia, Africa, South America and Madagascar. Prerequisite: Anthro 150 or Biol 2970, or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM BU: SCI


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L48 Anthro 3665 Observing Animal Behavior at the St. Louis Zoo

This course is an introduction to methods for the collection of behavioral data in studies of animal behavior. Students are trained in the design of research projects and the analysis and interpretation of behavioral data. Students learn how different methods are used to answer specific questions in animal behavior research. Research is conducted at the Saint Louis Zoo.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 3666 Comparative Primate Socioecology

This course focuses on the interface between the behavior and ecology of nonhuman primates and its applications to primate conservation. We examine how the basic principles of animal ecology can help us understand primate behavior. We look at a wide range of primates from a comparative perspective as we explore primate habitats, diets, life histories and communities, social relationships, and much more. Because most primate species are threatened, endangered or even facing extinction, we also focus on how various aspects of ecology are used in the conservation of primates. We draw heavily on field studies and particular research projects of primates and emphasize their behavior in natural environmental and social settings. The objectives of the course are: 1) to gain an understanding of principles of animal behavior by using primates as a model, 2) to understand variation in behavior and how ecology influences this variation in living primates, 3) to use the comparative approach to better understand why primate societies differ, and 4) to understand how we address and answer questions about primate behavior through field research

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 367 Paleoanthropology

The prehistoric Pliocene and Pleistocene evidence for human emergence and evolution. The emphasis is on the human fossil record and its interpretation in functional and behavioral terms. This is placed in the context of the Paleolithic archaeological record and issues regarding the biological relationships between various human groups. Prerequisite: Anthro 150 or equivalent.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM BU: SCI


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L48 Anthro 3693 Anthropology of Death, Mourning and Burial

This course offers anthropological analysis of death, mourning and burial. It draws on data and theoretical explanations from different sub-disciplines of anthropology (archaeology, cultural anthropology and physical anthropology). In addition to theoretical conceptualization of mortuary practices, specific case studies are used to address a wide range of topics. The course covers cross-cultural comparison of burial among hunter-gatherers, pastoralists and complex societies. Mortuary practices also is conceptualized based on religion and secularity, social organization and biological approaches (eg. paleodiet, paleodemography, disease). Ethical and legal issues of using human remains worldwide also are addressed. This course helps train and stimulate academic enquiry into ancient and modern societal treatment of death around the globe. The time covered in this course ranges from the Lower Palaeolithic to the contemporary world.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 372 Geoarchaeology

Geoarchaeology involves the application of analytical techniques, concepts and field methods from the earth sciences to help solve archaeological problems. Issues explored in this course include human and environmental processes involved in archaeological site formation; the sedimentary context of archaeological remains, soils and sediments relevant to archaeology; and the relationship between past settlement and landscape evolution, paleoclimatic reconstruction, human impacts on the environment, geological sourcing of artifact proveniences, and remote sensing of the physical environment. Several field trips to local archaeological/geological sites provide an opportunity to understand how geoarchaeology is applied to specific research problems.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 373 Introduction to GIS for Anthropologists

Use of GIS is rapidly becoming standard practice in anthropological research. This course introduces students to the basic theories and techniques of GIS. Topics include the application of GIS in archaeological survey and ethnographic research, as well as marketing, transportation, demographics and urban and regional planning. This course enables students to become familiar not only with GIS software such as ArcGIS but also the methodologies and tools used to collect and analyze spatial data.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 374 Social Landscapes in Global View

From the beginning of the human campaign, societies have socialized the spaces and places where they live. This socialization comes in many forms, including the generation of sacred natural places (e.g., Mt. Fuji) to the construction of planned urban settings where culture is writ large in overt and subtle contexts. Over the past two decades or so, anthropologists, archaeologists and geographers have developed a wide body of research concerning these socially constructed and perceived settings — commonly known as "landscapes." This course takes a tour through time and across the globe to trace the formation of diverse social landscapes, starting in prehistoric times and ending in modern times. We cover various urban landscapes, rural landscapes, nomadic landscapes (and others), and the intersection of the natural environment, the built environments and the symbolism that weaves them together. Chronologically, we range from 3000 BCE to 2009 CE and we cover all the continents. This course also traces the intellectual history of the study of landscape as a social phenomenon, and investigates the current methods used to recover and describe social landscapes around the world and through time. Join in situating your own social map alongside the most famous and the most obscure landscapes of the world, and trace the global currents of your social landscape.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S UColl: NW


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L48 Anthro 376 Warriors, Merchants, Monks and Courtesans: Ancient Narratives of Globalization in Google Earth

This introductory seminar-style course examines the history of globalization through the narrative accounts of those who lived along some of the great trade routes of the Old World. Through a combination of in-class discussion and hands-on tutorials and projects in Google Earth, we examine how day-to-day local interactions and the experiences of individuals contributed to broader cultural exchanges and the shaping of ancient cosmopolitan centers. We use a bottom-up approach to understand the process of globalization, and why it is not only a phenomenon of the modern world. This course covers a large geographic and temporal span, but it is not about memorizing lists of dates and places or putting dots on a map — it is about learning how to interpret multiple strands of knowledge and put them together into a cohesive narrative of history. The course covers four broad anthropological themes related to Old World history and globalization in conjunction with weekly lessons in Google Earth; there are no prerequisites for either. The knowledge and skills gained in the course lead to a final independent research project consisting of a short paper and an interactive digital map that can be shared online through the Google Earth community.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3773 Culture and Society in East Asia

This course presents an overview of cultures and contemporary social/political changes in East Asia. In Western society, East Asia often has been viewed as a place of enduring cultural identities, but it also has been a region of one of the world's most dynamic and rapid transformations. In this course, we examine both the continuity and change of cultural and social patterns in this region. Students compare anthropological and ethnographic studies of the Peoples' Republic of China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan, supplemented by selected research from sociology, history and political science. The course focuses on specific areas of cultural and social change in each society, including kinship and family; gender; ethnicity; economic and political development; and health and social policy.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3775 Ancient Eurasia and the New Silk Roads

This course explores the rise of civilization in the broad region of Eurasia, spanning from the eastern edges of Europe to the western edges of China. The focus of the course is the unique trajectory of civilization that is made evident in the region of Central Eurasia from roughly 6000 BC to the historical era (ca. AD 250). In addition to this ancient focus, the course aims to relate many of the most historically durable characteristics of the region to contemporary developments of the past two or three centuries. Fundamentally, this course asks us to reconceptualize the notion of "civilization" from the perspective of societies whose dominant forms of organization defied typical classifications such as "states" and  "empires" and, instead, shaped a wholly different social order over the past 5,000 years or more. This class provides a well-rounded experience of the geography, social organization and social interconnections of one of the most essential and pivotal regions in world history and contemporary political discourse.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 380 Applications in GIS

This introductory course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is designed to provide basic knowledge of GIS theory and applications using the existing state-of-the-art GIS software. The course is taught using a combination of lectures, demonstrations and hands-on, interactive tutorials in the classroom. The first weeks of the course provide a broad view of how you can display and query spatial data and produce map products. The remainder of the course focus on applying spatial analytical tools to address questions and solve problems. As the semester develops, more tools are added to your GIS toolbox so that you can complete a final independent project that integrates material learned during the course. Students are encouraged to design individualized final projects using their own or other available data; however, some already prepared final projects also are available.
Same as L82 EnSt 380

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM


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L48 Anthro 3832 Music and Healing

In this course, we broadly consider issues of music and healing, drawing from the fields of medical ethnomusicology, medical anthropology, music therapy, and psychology. Our case studies are multi-sited, as we interrogate musical healings and healing music from diverse global and historical perspectives. We approach our study of musical practices with the understanding that the social, cultural and political contexts where "music" and "healing" are themselves created inform the sounds of the music and its various — and often conflicting — interpretations and meanings. We read a variety of academic literature and use media texts and listening examples to develop interdisciplinary and cross-cultural analyses of music and healing. Issues of national consciousness, post/colonialism, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, religion, dis/ability and the role of history/memory remain central to our explorations of music and healing.
Same as L27 Music 3031

Credit 3 units. A&S: CD A&S IQ: LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L48 Anthro 3833 Performance and Healing: The Politics of Health Representation

The purpose of this course is to bridge the disciplines of medical anthropology, global public health, and medical humanities through deep consideration of how variegated knowledge about health, healing and illness is produced and performed in a variety of public forums. Students explore the ways in which knowledge is produced about particular global health topics through representation in text, image, sound, film/television, and live performance art. Using interdisciplinary theory and methods, this course answers the following questions: Why are these representation modalities important, and how do we analyze them in practice? Drawing on the fields of medical anthropology, media studies, global public health, and performance studies, this course elucidates the relationships between knowledge production, representation, discourse, health and power through three case studies. Case study topics include: HIV/AIDS, Heroin Injection Use, and Domestic and Sexual Violence. Although the course provides an interdisciplinary perspective for understanding and analyzing different ways of representing illness and healing, it is also deeply grounded within the political-economy of health framework of critical medical anthropology. The following topics are central to our analyses in this class: gender, sexuality, the body, class, ethnicity and language.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3851 History and Theory of Anthropology

This course examines the history of anthropology and the major theoretical frameworks of the field to the present. Key theorists discussed in this class include Geertz, Foucault, Marx, Mead and Weber, as well as the deep roots of anthropology in strands of philosophy and social thought running back centuries. Ethnographic case studies from around the world are read in order to keep the theories palpable and grounded. Key themes discussed in the class include the concept of culture, how and why societies change and evolve, ways that meanings and identities are made, the role of history in the present, diverse forms of power and experience, and issues of diversity amid contemporary global life.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3874 International Public Health

This course explores current topics in international public health using a case-study–based approach, emphasizing public health issues affecting low- and middle-income countries; introduction to the tools and methods of international public health research and programs; in-depth examination and critique of the roles of local and national governments, international agencies and third-party donors in international public health work; and the contributions of anthropology to the international public health agenda.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3875 Pharmaceutical Personhood

This course examines sociocultural dimensions of pharmaceutical production and consumption in the contemporary world. Pharmaceuticals have brought remarkable promises. Their consumption also reflects various social inequalities and substantial transformations in human experience that demand critical attention. We examine the history and global reach of the pharmaceutical industry, the content of pharmaceutical advertising, and pharmaceutical use in the treatment of various kinds of illness, including common mental disorders, post-traumatic experience, chronic illness, eating disorders and lifestyle disorders. Case studies are drawn from diverse societies. We also explore various angles of public criticism about the pharmaceutical industry. No background in anthropology is required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3882 Psychological Anthropology

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the central topics and methods of psychological anthropology. Psychological anthropology is concerned with the interplay of psychology and culture on both the individual and group levels. We look cross-culturally at such topics as child and adolescent development; religious experience; illness and healing; self and identity, gender and sexuality; reasoning and symbolism; and psychopathology. This class draws upon a range of sources, including ethnographies, psychoanalytic theory, contemporary critical theory and cross-cultural materials.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3884 Regulating Reproduction: Morality, Politics and (In)justice

This course centers on the burgeoning corpus of anthropological scholarship on reproduction, with special attention to the regulation of reproductive behaviors and population management in cross-cultural perspective. Anthropologists and feminist scholars have shown how reproduction — which links individual bodies to the body politic — is a privileged site for processes of governance. Scholars have also shown how seemingly personal reproductive choices made in the micro units of families are always bound up with broader, if obscured, economic, national and political projects. In this course, we will cover how diverse entities, including the state, the Church, NGOs and feminist groups, seek to manage reproductive behaviors and politics across the world. We will discuss population control campaigns (such as China's notorious one-child policy) and pronatalist population policies (like those seen in Israel) in order to underscore how the management of fertility becomes a crucial site for nationalist and state-building projects. In this course we examine processes of "reproductive governance" around topics including pregnancy and birth, family planning, abortion and adoption. We also examine how the global proliferation of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (such as in vitro, sonogram, abortifacient pills, amniocentesis) intersects with efforts to govern reproduction. Crucially, we take class and race as key axes through which reproduction is experienced and stratified in diverse contexts. At the end of this course students should have a solid grasp of key topics and themes in the anthropology of reproductive governance, as well as more in-depth knowledge of a particular controversial reproductive issue that they choose to focus on for their final research paper.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 3900 Intermediate Directed Research

This course level is typically taken by juniors or seniors during their first semester in the lab, or by advanced freshmen and sophomores. The expectations of a 300-level directed research project will be greater than those of a 200-level directed research. Student participation in research activities should include higher-level participation, including completing literature reviews, running complex assays, or similar work. The student is expected to be proficient in the appropriate research techniques of a lab, familiar with relevant literatures surrounding the project, and capable of working with minimal supervision. There should be some form of final evaluation or project, but an independent research project is not necessary. May be taken for 1-3 credit hours, 1-2 recommended. Students must enroll in a specific section with a faculty member and receive approval from the department.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L48 Anthro 397 Proseminar: Issues and Research in Anthropology

Designed to introduce the student to current issues in Anthropology and to research being carried out by faculty. Topics vary each year. Each departmental member addresses issues in their particular specialty. Required of all majors; may be taken before declaring major, and may be taken by nonmajors.

Credit 1 unit. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 399 Undergraduate Teaching Assistant

Open to advanced undergraduates only. Usual duties of teaching assistant in laboratory or other selected courses. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units.


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L48 Anthro 3999 Class Mentor

Classroom instructional assistance through mentoring activities assigned by instructor. Limited to advanced undergraduates only. Permission of instructor required.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L48 Anthro 4002 Internship in Interrogating Health, Race and Inequalities

Internship in Interrogating Health, Race and Inequalities is intended for advanced undergraduates who are enrolled in the course Anthro 4003 (Interrogating Health, Race and Inequalities) and who have previous course work in (medical) anthropology, public health, urban policy, or African and African-American Studies. The internship experience is designed to facilitate students' familiarity with research and evaluation strategies that both address structural factors shaping health outcomes and are sensitive to community needs and sociocultural contexts. The internship experience contributes to students' in-class understanding of the ways that race as a historically produced social construct interacts with other axes of diversity and social determinants to produce particular health outcomes. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Corequisite: Anthro 4003.
Same as I50 InterD 4002

Credit 1 unit.


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L48 Anthro 4003 Interrogating Health, Race and Inequalities: Public Health, Medical Anthropology and History

Interrogating Health, Race and Inequalities is intended for graduate students in the School of Social Work and in Arts & Sciences as well as advanced undergraduates in Arts & Sciences who have previous course work in medical anthropology, public health or urban policy. The fundamental goal of the course is to demonstrate that health is not merely a medical or biological phenomenon but more importantly the product of social, economic, political and environmental factors. To meet this goal the course is designed to examine the intersection of race/ethnicity and health from multiple analytic approaches and methodologies. Course readings draw from the fields of public health, anthropology, history and policy analysis. Teaching activities include lectures, group projects and presentations, videos, and discussions led by the course instructors. These in-class activities are supplemented with field trips and field-based projects. By the end of the course students are expected to have a strong understanding of race as a historically produced social construct as well as how race interacts with other axes of diversity and social determinants to produce particular health outcomes. Students gain an understanding of the health disparity literature and a solid understanding of multiple and intersecting causes of these disparities.
Same as I50 InterD 4001

Credit 3 units.


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L48 Anthro 401 Evolution of Nonhuman Primates

Discussion and analysis of primate evolution with emphasis on comparative and functional anatomy and primate paleontology. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4011 Popular Culture and Consumption in Modern China

This writing-intensive seminar explores transformations in popular culture and everyday life in Chinese society since 1949 through an analytical focus on political economy and material culture. Drawing upon ethnographic texts, films and material artifacts, we investigate how the forces of state control and global capitalism converge to shape consumer desires and everyday habits in contemporary China. Case studies include eating habits, fashion standards, housing trends, entertainment, sports and counterfeit goods. Prerequisite: previous course in China studies (anthropology, economics, history, literature, philosophy or political science) required. Enrollment by instructor approval only.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, WI A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4022 Transnational Reproductive Health Issues: Meanings, Technologies, Practices

This course covers recent scholarship on gender and reproductive health, including such issues as reproduction and the disciplinary power of the state, contested reproductive relations within families and communities, and the implications of global flows of biotechnology, population and information for reproductive strategies at the local level. We also explore how transnational migration and globalization have shaped reproductive health, the diverse meanings associated with reproductive processes, and decisions concerning reproduction. Reproduction serves as a focus to illuminate the cultural politics of gender, power and sexuality.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 403 Archaeology and Early Ethnography of the Southwest

This course integrates archaeological, historical and early ethnographic dimensions of American Indian societies in the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico, a region famous for its challenging environment, cultural diversity and the contributions made by its Native inhabitants. Emphasis is placed on the development of sophisticated desert agriculture and on the rise of regionally integrated cultures including Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde. The impact of Spanish, Mexican and American colonization are explored. Ethnographies of Tohono O’odham (Papago), Hopi, Zuni, Rio Grande Pueblo and Navajo societies are discussed.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4033 Culture, Illness and Healing in Asia

This course examines the place of health, illness and healing in Asian societies. We explore how people experience, narrate and respond to illness and other forms of suffering — including political violence, extreme poverty and health inequalities. In lectures and discussions we discuss major changes that medicine and public health are undergoing and how those changes affect the training of practitioners, health care policy, clinical practice and ethics. The course familiarizes students with key concepts and approaches in medical anthropology by considering case studies from a number of social settings including China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Tibet, Thailand, Vietnam and Asian immigrants in the United States. We also investigate the sociocultural dimensions of illness and the medicalization of social problems in Asia, examining how gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability and other forms of social difference affect medical knowledge and disease outcomes. This course is intended for anthropology majors, students considering careers in medicine and public health, and others interested in learning how anthropology can help us understand human suffering and formulate more effective interventions.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4041 Islam and Politics

Blending history and ethnography, this course covers politics in the Islamic world in historical and contemporary times. Topics include history of Islam, uniformity and diversity in belief and practice (global patterns, local realities), revolution and social change, women and veiling, and the international dimensions of resurgent Islam. Geographical focus extends from Morocco to Indonesia; discussion of other Muslim communities is included (Bosnia, Chechnya, sub-Saharan Africa, U.S.).

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L48 Anthro 4042 Islam Across Cultures

In this seminar, we examine the variety of historical and contemporary ways of interpreting and practicing Islam, with special attention to issues of ritual, law and the state, and gender. Cases are drawn from Asia, Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and students engage in fieldwork or library research projects.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 406 Primate Ecology and Social Structure

Survey of the ecology and individual and social behavior, adaptations and interactions of the major groups of primates. Emphasis on studies designed to examine the relationships among ecology, morphophysiology and behavior. Methods used in collecting data on primates in the field. Prerequisite: Anthro 150A or one 100-level biology course.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4062 The Art of Borrowing: The "West" in Japanese Life

This course aims to examine Western influences in Japan and Japan's reconceptualizing the "West" in various aspects of popular culture, including cuisine, sports, music, language, advertising, entertainment and domesticity. It is primarily an anthropological survey with historical references on Japan's turn to Western civilization in the modern era. The course explores Japanese perceptions of the "West," and how Japanese consume the "West" by attaching meanings to "Western" symbols and practices, and making them part of Japanese culture and life. Rather than explicating Japan's relationship with the West, the course scrutinizes the "West" constructed within Japanese discourse, as both a racial/ethnic other and a cultural fantasy. Course assignments include a round table discussion on specific topics relating to cultural integration and internationalization, and globalization and localization.
Same as L97 IAS 4062

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L48 Anthro 4082 Origin of Evolutionary Thought

This course provides an in-depth introduction to classic works in evolutionary biology and evolutionary anthropology. Students will read primary as well as some secondary sources and be expected to discuss those materials each week in class. Students should expect a very heavy reading load, and should plan on reading the assignments throughout the week.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4091 Sexuality, Gender and Change in Africa

This course considers histories and social constructions of gender and sexuality in sub-Saharan Africa during the colonial and contemporary periods. We will examine gender and sexuality both as sets of identities and practices and as part of wider questions of work, domesticity, social control, resistance, and meaning. Course materials include ethnographic and historical materials and African novels and films. Prerequisite: graduate students or undergraduates with previous AFAS or upper-level anthropology course.
Same as L90 AFAS 409

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD, WI A&S IQ: SSC, SD, WI Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4100 Topics in Anthropology: Ethnographic Perspectives on Mental Health in Africa

In this course we will draw on ethnographic case studies from Africa in order to assess changing understandings of mental health and illness and look at institutions and therapeutic practices which have been developed at different times and in different sociocultural contexts to foster mental health and treat mental illness. The first part of the course has a historical focus and traces the development of "western" psychiatry during colonial times and its various "entanglements" with "traditional" ways of healing and dealing with mental illness. The second part of the course focuses on contemporary mental health regimes and the ongoing challenges of medical pluralism. By drawing on recent ethnographic research, we will discuss current diagnostic categories and phenomena — for instance, depression, schizophrenia, suicide or PTSD — and the ways these are dealt with from a critical, anthropological perspective.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD, SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4102 Latin America and the Rise of the Global South

The rise of the global south — and the reordering of global geopolitics, economics and cultural imaginaries — is characterized by progressive change and intense conflict. Economic growth coincides with the impacts of global warming, the assault on natural resources, the rise of new consumers and the entrenchment of deep inequalities. We also see the emergence of cultural and political formations that range from the horrific to the inspiring. Latin America is a central node of the new global south. Here history takes unpredictable turns in the face of declining U.S. hegemony, the economic growth of Brazil, legacies of militarism and political violence, a feverish attack on nature, resurgent economic nationalism, and defiant "anti-globalization" movements. Through close reading of contemporary ethnographies of Latin America we explore emergent cultural and political-economic processes in the region; we consider south-south articulations (theoretical, cultural, political-economic) between Latin America, China, Africa and India; and we reflect on the changing role, meaning and relationships of the United States in the region.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4112 Body and Flesh: Theorizing Embodiment

This seminar explores a wide range of readings on "the body" as a site of theoretical analysis in social scientific and humanistic inquiry. Issues include: How do we think about the body as simultaneously material (flesh and bone) and constructed in and through social and political discourse? How do we think about the relationship between these contingent bodies and subjective experiences of "self" in various contexts? The course focuses upon the different ways in which these questions have been posed and engaged, and the implications of these formulations for the theorizing of human experience. Prerequisite: Anthro 3201 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4113 Advanced Psychological Anthropology

This seminar examines the intersection of psychological and anthropological theories and methods and their utility in the study of culture and human experience. This course is an in-depth exploration of some of the key theorists and theoretical domains that have defined the field of psychological anthropology and beyond, including Bakhtin, Bateson, Chodorow, D’Andrade, Ewing, Freud, Goffman, Hallowell, Holland, Irigaray, Kleinman, Kohut, Lacan, Lutz, Rosaldo, Strauss, Sapir, Scheper-Hughes and Vygotsky, among others. By the end of the course, students have a solid grounding in linguistic, psychoanalytic, cognitive, symbolic, developmental, interactionist and critical approaches within psychological anthropology. Prerequisites: at least one of the following: Anthro 3201, Anthro 3882, graduate standing or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4114 Anthropology and Existentialism

This course examines what it means to be human. Drawing on existentialist philosophy and ethnography, this course is about appreciating the richness, the deep emotional tone, and also the dangers of human experience. Case studies look at profound aspects of existence, such as suffering, healing, mercy and hope, across diverse cultures. Specific themes covered include the ordinary life, how we perceive the world around us, the feeling of being at home and senses of place, how we experience pain, what makes our bodies powerful or vulnerable, why things really matter, and how communities cope with trauma and violence. This course is especially relevant for students interested in medical anthropology and social dimensions of health and illness. No background in anthropology or philosophy is required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4115 Anthropology of Deviance

This course provides an anthropological perspective on notions of "deviance" as social, psychological, moral and medical mechanisms of control and regulation. Students learn to critically engage and evaluate dominant etiological theories of deviance, local and global contexts of deviance, and social responses to deviance as cultural processes through which communities make (and unmake) meaningful human relationships. Through academic texts, ethnographic accounts, clinical case materials and firsthand accounts, students explore multiple dimensions of what it means to be "deviant" or "normal" in a given social or cultural context. Sample topics include: historical trajectories of deviance, deviance and criminology, social class and inequality, prison cultures, deviance and resistance, deviant personalities, forensic psychiatry, deviant vs. socially sanctioned violence, and stigma.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4116 Anthropology and Experiment

In recent years, many cultural anthropologists have described their work as
"experimental." On the surface, the notion of experimentation leads something of a double life. On the one hand, in its ideal form, it stands for rigidly held methodological tenets aimed at answering questions in rigorous ways. This kind of experimentations is the hallmark of "scientific" inquiry. On the other hand, experimentation implies something of open-endedness, of tentative and flexible exploration. Through an examination of works on experiments, as well as purportedly experimental ethnographies, we pursue the question: What is an experimental mode of inquiry in cultural anthropology, and how does it square with the two idealized meanings of experimentation? We examine the links and resonances between different notions of what experiments do, what they describe in terms of both form and method, how they begin and end, how they are assessed as successes or failures, and what sort of knowledge they produce. This course involves reading across cultural anthropology, science studies and the philosophy of science to better understand different approaches to experiments across domains of research and writing. Can we learn something about what anthropologists do in experimental works from the wealth of thoughtful scholarship on experiments in other fields? Is there something common to experimentation in cultural anthropology and experimentation elsewhere in the social sciences and beyond?

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4117 Nature/Culture

What do we mean by "nature" or by designating something as "natural"? How do we distinguish nature from culture and where does such a distinction break down, become political or controversial? Is the distinction between nature and culture itself universal, or does it emerge from a particular history and reflect particular preconceptions and understandings? And how do new technologies reconfigure this distinction? In this course, we explore such questions, paying special attention to the ways anthropology, as a discipline, has relied on, reinforced, and legitimated this great divide.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4118 The Good Cause: Psychological Anthropology of Moral Crusades

Why do people join moral crusades? These are social movements based on powerful moral institutions, ranging from the abolitionist and suffragette movements to witch hunts, insurgency and ethnic riots. Such movements are extremely diverse, yet their unfolding and the dynamics of recruitment show remarkably common properties. We will examine a series of empirical cases, including recent events, and assess the relevance of models based on individual psychological dynamics, intuitive moral capacities, and human motivation for participation in collective action.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 411W Anthropology and Existentialism — Writing-Intensive Seminar

This course examines what it means to be human. Drawing on existentialist philosophy and ethnography, this course is about appreciating the richness, the deep emotional tone, and also the dangers of human experience. Case studies look at profound aspects of existence, such as suffering, healing, mercy and hope, across diverse cultures. Specific themes covered include the ordinary life, how we perceive the world around us, the feeling of being at home and senses of place, how we experience pain, what makes our bodies powerful or vulnerable, why things really matter, and how communities cope with trauma and violence. This course is especially relevant for students interested in medical anthropology and social dimensions of health and illness. No background in anthropology or philosophy is required. This is the writing-intensive version of Anthro 4114.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, WI Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4123 Argumentation Through Ethnography

Ethnography is the traditional mainstay of anthropological academic writing. Through ethnography, anthropologists do more than simply describe a culture or a group of people; rather, they organize and present their field materials in particular ways in order to make intellectual, theoretical, and sometimes even political arguments. This seminar will explore the different ways anthropologists have used ethnography to make intellectual claims and frame theoretical or practical arguments. The aim of the course is to help students develop critical reading skills for engaging ethnographic materials as well as to explore the ways in which ethnography, when done well, can be a persuasive and engaging means of academic argumentation. This course is intended as a sequel to Anthro 472. Prerequisite: Anthro 472 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4124 Language and Politics

Language is a constitutive part of political processes. While many agree that language is used to symbolize or express political action, the main focus of this course is on how linguistic practice and ideology contributes to the creation of political stances, events and spheres. Topics addressed include political rhetoric and ritual, the emergence of public spheres, discrimination, as well as ethnic conflict, nationalism and colonialism.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4134 The AIDS Epidemic: Inequalities, Ethnography and Ethics

In the year 2000, HIV became the world's leading infectious cause of adult death, and in the next 10 years, AIDS was expected to kill more people than all wars of the 20th century combined. As the global epidemic rages on, our greatest enemy in combating HIV/AIDS is not lack of knowledge or resources, but global inequalities and the conceptual frameworks with which we understand health, human interaction and sexuality. This course emphasizes the ethnographic approach for cultural analysis of responses to HIV/AIDS. Students explore the relationship between local communities and wider historical and economic processes, and theoretical approaches to disease, the body, ethnicity/race, gender, sexuality, risk, addiction, power and culture. Other topics covered include the cultural construction of AIDS and risk, government responses to HIV/AIDS, origin and transmission debates; ethics and responsibilities; drug testing and marketing; the making of the AIDS industry and "risk" categories; prevention and education strategies; interaction between biomedicine and alternative healing systems; and medical advances and hopes.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4135 Tobacco: History, Culture, Science, and Policy

Tobacco is the most important public health and medical problem of our time, the leading cause of cancer and other chronic diseases. This course examines tobacco's important role in shaping the modern world and global health over the course of the last five centuries, from indigenous uses of tobacco to plantation slavery to the cigarette boom to the politics of health and smoking in the 21st century. Through in-depth historical and anthropological case studies, tobacco provides a window into trends in government and law, medicine and public health, business and economics, society and culture, including changing social meanings of gender, race, class, sexuality, advertising, consumerism, risk, responsibility and health in the United States and worldwide. This course also introduces students to public health approaches to noncommunicable disease prevention, environmental health, and healthy lifestyle promotion. No background in anthropology or public health is required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4136 Sexual Health and the City: A Community-Based Learning Course

In this community-based learning course, students partner with a St. Louis AIDS service organization (ASO) or sexual health agency to explore how the interrelationships among gender, class, race/ethnicity and sexual identity shape sexual health decisions, outcomes and access to services. Students also examine the complex relationship between men's and women's life goals and constraints, on the one hand, and the public health management of sexual health, on the other. In collaboration with their community partner and its clients, students develop a project that addresses an identified need of the organization and the community it serves. Course readings draw from the fields of anthropology, public health, feminist studies and policy making. Prerequisite: PHealth 4134 The AIDS Epidemic: Inequalities, Ethnography and Ethics or permission from the instructor, which is determined based on past student's experience in the fields of medical anthropology or sexual/reproductive health.
Same as L90 AFAS 406

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Arch: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 419 Primate Behavior

Discussion and analysis of recent research on the social behavior of nonhuman primates. Data from both field and laboratory study. Prerequisite: Anthro 406 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4191 Primate Cognition

This course investigates historical and current views regarding the cognitive capacities of nonhuman primates, and the extent to which these abilities are shared with humans. Topics for this class include: social cognition, problem-solving, tool use, culture, communication, theory of mind, deception, self-recognition, imitation and numerical cognition. The classes involve discussion and critical evaluation of theory and methods in this challenging and exciting area of primate cognitive research.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4202 Anthropological Genetics

This course examines the principles of evolutionary genetics as applied to complex characters such as morphology, behavior, life history and disease. Mathematical models of quantitative inheritance and evolution are discussed. Special topics include kin selection, sexual dimorphism and conservation genetics. Prerequisite: Anthro 150A or introductory biology.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4211 Paleoethnobotany and Ethnobotany

Interrelationships between plants and people, especially in past societies. Recovery and analysis of plant remains from archaeological sites; interpreting subsistence and vegetation changes; medicinal, ritual and technological uses of plants; plant domestication and agricultural intensification. Modern efforts to understand and preserve threatened traditional ethnobotanical practices. Prerequisite: Anthro 190BP or an introductory botany course, or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: SSC, WI Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 4212 Advanced Methods in Paleoethnobotany

Advanced analytical techniques for the study of archaeological plant remains. Tools and methods for micromorphological recognition, including electron microscopy. Photomicroscopy at low magnification, management, tabulation and reporting of data. Prerequisite: Anthro 4211 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 4214 The Archaeology of Food and Drink

Studies of past human diets have moved beyond analyses of animal bones and seeds to encompass new theoretical goals and innovative analytical techniques. In this seminar-style course, students explore methods of understanding food-related social interactions such as evidence including residues, ancient DNA, isotopes and trace elements, along with more traditional artifacts and archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological remains. By examining case studies from around the world, we evaluate the current state of research attempting to integrate the biological and cultural aspects of eating and drinking.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4215 Anthropology of Food

The rising interest in food research crosscuts various academic disciplines. This seminar focuses on aspects of food of particular interest in anthropology. The first two-thirds of the course is reading-intensive and discussion-intensive. Each student writes short review/response papers for major readings. For the final third, we still are reading and discussing, but the reading load is lighter (and we have a field trip) as students devote more time to their research papers. The research paper is a major effort on a topic discussed with and approved by the professor. In most cases it has to deal with cultural and historical aspects of a food, set of foods, form of consumption or aspect of food production. Papers are critiqued, assigned a provisional grade, revised and resubmitted.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4240 The Plundered Past: Archaeology's Challenges in the Modern World

The public imagination thrills at the fantastic adventures of Indiana Jones and Laura Croft, Tomb Raider, but the reality of modern archaeology is more complex, ethically challenging and interesting than a simple treasure hunt. In the United States and Canada, our science museums and museums of anthropology still display artifacts that are regarded as sacred and culturally definitive by Indian nations, although such holdings are now subject to negotiation and repatriation. Art museums in Europe and the U.S. still are stocked with looted ancient masterpieces that are revered as vital heritage by the nations from which they were stolen. We display looted art alongside a much smaller number of legitimately excavated artifacts of masterpiece quality, so it is no surprise that our popular images of archaeologists as avid and undiscerning collectors raise little concern. But modern archaeologists are not extractors of art or even of scientific information, from places as passive and inert as the museums' objects ultimately occupy. Archaeologists work with living people inhabiting societies and states that care deeply about their pasts and the relics of it. They are active agents engaged with many other people in the production of knowledge about the past. In our rapidly shrinking world, educated sensitivity to the many ancient cultural legacies that shape the values of modern global society is more than a moral imperative; it is a basic form of collaboration in the common project of survival. Archaeologists are ethically charged to advance that project through education about the complex contemporary arena of artifacts, sites and information they occupy.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L48 Anthro 4253 Researching Fertility, Mortality and Migration

Students undertake research projects centering on the most fundamental demographic processes — fertility, mortality and migration. The first section covers basic demographic methodology so that students understand how population data is generated and demographic statistics analyzed. Then, course readings include seminal theoretical insights by anthropologists on demographic processes. Meanwhile, students work toward the completion of a term paper in which they are expected to undertake some original research on a topic of their choice (e.g., new reproductive technologies; cross-cultural adoption; ethnicity and migration). Each assignment in this course is a component of the final term paper. Prerequisite: Anthro 3612 Population and Society or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, WI Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4254 The Anthropology of Maternal Death

No other commonly recorded health indicator shows such great disparities between rich and poor nations as does maternal mortality. More than 500,000 women die each year around the world from complications of pregnancy and childbirth, but 99 percent of these deaths occur in impoverished, non-industrialized countries. This course examines the reasons for this stunning discrepancy, looking at the biological, social, political and economic factors involved in maternal death. The course is conducted as a seminar based on detailed readings of relevant journal articles, group discussion, case studies and class presentations. Prerequisite: Anthro 3621.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4264 The Myth of Race

This course describes the history of the myth of race and racism from the Spanish Inquisition to modern times. Since race is not a biological term but a cultural term, it is important for students to understand the origins and connections of ideas of race and racism from its beginnings in western thought to its current usage. The historical and literature connections can be seen thoughout the writings and behavior of the Spanish Inquisition, to the Renaissance, though colonization and slavery, to the reconstruction, to the late 19th century, to the early 20th century, to modern times. In fact, the early history of anthropology can be traced through racist history.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD EN: S


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L48 Anthro 427 Social and Cultural Change

Analysis of political, economic, and social transformations among societies in the developing and developed world. Examples are drawn from many societies throughout the globe.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4282 Political Ecology

An exploration of how the interactions between culture and environment are mediated by local, national and global politics. Topics include "overpopulation," agricultural intensification, Green Revolution, biotechnology, corporate agriculture, green movements and organic farming. Each student prepares an in-depth research paper that may be presented to the class. Prerequisites: graduate standing, Anthro 361 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4286 Original Research in Environmental Anthropology

In this course, we will focus our ethnographic lens on environmental issues in St. Louis. Through readings and original research, this advanced course in anthropology closely engages discussion and debates about methods, ethics and representation in qualitative environmental studies. Students will identify and undertake qualitative, ethnographic research regarding a local environmental issue. The central goal of this class is to provide a forum for students to grapple with the practical and ethical considerations of anthropological research. The class will be segmented into the following three units: ethics in research, data gathering and analysis, and continuing conversations

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4287 Anthropology of Water

This course examines one of the world's largest risks and grandest challenges: water security. By exploring water flows between cultures and landscapes, students will think critically about the challenges faced in different regions and societies of the world which can exacerbate or ameliorate issues of social justice and equity. Topics include cultural notions and values of water, technologies of water purification and conservation, big dam controversies, water as a "right" or water as a "commodity," and how epistemologies of water can drastically impact people and ecosystems. Texts will mainly be anthropological but will also draw from history, political ecology, geography and development economics. These will underscore the importance of multiple contexts (social, religious, economic, political, cultural) to the understanding of the scale and scope of this major problem.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: HUM, SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4288 Being Human: The Food-Energy-Ecosytem-Water Nexus

This course examines a trilogy of resources that are essential to producing human life: food, water and energy. These resources are inextricably linked not only to the most common and necessary of our day-to-day activities, but impact each other in profound ways. Until recently, the study of these resources was fragmented in separate sectors, ultimately leading to lack of institutional coordination, infrastructural lock-in and incomplete modeling systems. These incomplete systems overlook the complex overlaps of natural systems and render sustainability planning more tenuous than it could be. In response, these core resources are being studied together as a "nexus" to enhance synergies and prevent trade-offs across sectors. However, this nexus further requires astute attention to the all too "human" questions of resource use, waste and justice. If water, energy and food security are to be simultaneously achieved, social scientists must be at the forefront, contributing holistic research that brings the human back into socio-natural systems.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSP Art: SSP EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4311 Biocultural Perspectives on Obesity and Nutrition

From pink slime to red wine, causes and treatments for obesity are constantly in the headlines. With more than 35 percent of Americans currently obese, this is a tremendous biological and social issue in the United States. Obesity rates also are increasing globally despite billions of dollars spent on diets and public health interventions. Why is this happening and what can be done to change this? Why are humans fat and prone to obesity? How do we interpret appropriate body size? These are some of the questions we investigate in this class, specifically looking at the important physiological functions of adipose tissue and how both biological and cultural factors shape our perceptions of body image, health and the obesity epidemic.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4321 History of Physical Anthropology

The history of physical (or biological) anthropology are traced from Darwin's time to the present. Factors that influenced major theories and subfields of physical anthropology are discussed along with current directions.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 434 Behavioral Research at the St. Louis Zoo

Students conduct research at the St. Louis Zoo. Training in designing of projects and analysis and interpretation of data. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit variable, maximum 6 units. A&S: NS, WI A&S IQ: NSM, WI Art: NSM BU: BA


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L48 Anthro 4361 Culture, Power and the State

This seminar surveys anthropological theory and ethnography of the nation-state. We will discuss how culture and power are interrelated in the formation of state institutions and ideologies, governance and violence, social and spatial inequalities, and citizen identities, daily lives, and movements for change. We'll read key theoretical works (Weber, Marx, Foucault, Gramsci, liberal political theory, feminism, and post-structuralism, among others) and contemporary ethnographies of the state. Anthropology's place in public debates on "culture" and violent crises of the state — from Iraq to the U.S. heartland — will be addressed at the end of the semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4367 Culture, Power, Knowledge

We often think of knowledge as universal and objective. But anthropologists have long studied ways in which knowledge varies in different cultural settings. In this course, we ask: What is knowledge, how does it arise, and what does it do? Is there such a thing as universal validity or is knowledge always tied to specific cultural practices? What happens when knowledge travels and how does knowledge figure in relations of power? We approach these questions through works in anthropology, philosophy and science studies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4392 Capitalism and Culture

Capitalism is perhaps the most important historical and social phenomenon in the modern world. In tribal settings and major cities alike, its complex impacts are evident. Through rich case studies of how capitalism touches down in diverse cultures, this course provides an introduction to anthropological perspectives on the economy and economic development. Themes covered include the history of capitalism and globalization, the cultural meanings of class and taste, the relationship between capitalism and popular culture, major artistic responses to capitalism, social movements such as environmentalism, and the field of international development. No background in anthropology or economics is required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4393 The Archaeology of Trade and Exchange

Studies of trade and exchange are fundamental to our past, as cultures in contact result in new imaginings of self, communities, and place in the world. This course engages in archaeological and anthropological discussions about the interconnectedness that results from trade. This seminar concentrates on the discourse of material trade and the mechanisms for exchange, redistribution, dependency and resistance. It also examines the immaterial exchange of ideas, perceptions and values that alter concepts of identity, space and time. Globalization, political economies, and power are also addressed, along with ideas about territory, value, and social and political consequences of trade.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4408 Trauma and Memory

A thorough investigation of the effects of trauma on memory in both individuals and collective groups. Topics include flashback memories, forgetting and repression, post-traumatic stress and memory, and effects of trauma on individual and group identity. Prerequisites: Psych 100B + 6 units of advanced-level Psychology or Anthropology course work.
Same as L33 Psych 4408

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4452 In the Field: Ethnographic and Qualitative Methods

This course provides an introduction to ethnographic and qualitative research. Ethnography is the study of culture and social organization primarily through participant observation and interviewing. Ethnographic research provides descriptive and interpretative analyses of the routine practices of everyday life. Ethnographic accounts represent different ways people live and make sense of their experiences and describe the types of social organization (for example, gender relations, class systems, racial divisions, or cultural contexts) that, in part, serve to structure or pattern social behavior. Students conduct a small-scale qualitative research project, and in the process they gain skills in various qualitative research methods. This course is suitable for both undergraduate and graduate students. One purpose of the course is to help students plan for subsequent thesis research, independent study projects, or dissertation research.
Same as L98 AMCS 441

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4453 Studying the City: Approaches to Social Research

In this course we will explore social science/social scientific research methods. The course is designed primarily for students majoring in urban studies. However, the research skills that students will acquire can be applied to any substantive topic in the social sciences. The main goal of this course is that students develop the skills to independently design and execute high quality social research, regardless of their substantive interests. To develop these skills we will read about methods, assess published research from a methodological perspective, and complete original research projects.
Same as L18 URST 418

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4454 Cultures of Science and Technology

This seminar explores questions of theory, method and ethics in the anthropology of science and technology. How is biomedicine changing what it is to be human? How can technologies and scientific practices be studied ethnographically? How are the politics of difference linked to the production of scientific knowledge? Through close reading of ethnographic texts and fieldwork experience both on- and offline, we investigate how scientific practice and technological innovation reorganize various aspects of human life on both global and local scales. Topics include the social construction of knowledge, the reproduction of racial categories in genomics, the cultures of cyberspace, the commodification of bodies in medical science, and the ways in which various technoscientific projects reshape natural and political orders in diverse locales.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: SSC, WI Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4455 Ethnographic Fieldwork: The Politics of Schooling

This is a practice-based course in ethnographic fieldwork. Using a local case study (the cultural politics of schooling), we examine ethnographic fieldwork as an academic instrument and public social action. The course prepares students for independent research in academic or professional fields developing skills in critical thought, thesis and question development, background and internet research, perspective and empathy, social and political-economic analysis, observation, interviewing, oral histories, note-taking, data analysis, cultural interpretation, and writing. Student work contributes to the ongoing "St. Louis Schools' Ethnographic Documentation Project."

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4456 Ethnographic Fieldwork: Energy Politics

This is a practice-based course in ethnographic fieldwork that will focus on the politics of fossil fuels and the renewable energy transition in St. Louis and Missouri. We will situate ourselves as anthropologists with an interest in understanding relationships between global warming, the socio-technical arrangements of energy production, circulation, and use in the city and region, public knowledge, health, and social and cultural practices, and the roles and activities of businesses, political institutions, and elected officials. Through case studies we will work to produce critical knowledge aimed at pushing institutions, the city, and the region toward the transition to renewable energy. Our efforts will produce empirical documentation, case studies, and proposals and may include field trips to resource extraction sites and government offices

Credit 3 units. Arch: SSP Art: SSP


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L48 Anthro 4481 Writing Culture

Different ways of writing about people, culture and society in past and present times. Readings include anthropological works as well as works of fiction that represent people and the times, places and circumstances in which they live. Students conduct and write about their own ethnographical observations.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, WI Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4517 Anthropology and Development

What is "development"? Economic progress for all? A slow and gradual "improvement" in the human condition? Helping people with "projects"? Westernization? Modernization? The sorting out of bodies that are useful and can be put to work from those less useful bodies that must be contained, imprisoned or killed? The militarized accumulation of capital? The commodification of labor? The exhaustion of nature? In this advanced seminar we will consider how anthropologists — as writers, analysts, and theorists — have engaged the theories, meanings, practices and consequences of (sometimes externally directed) economic and political change. We focus on issues of the contemporary moment: oil; urban poverty and inequality (sex work, migration, water, debt, and cash transfer programs); and cultures of militarism. The course is designed to provide a graduate-level introduction to theory and ethnography based on intensive reading, discussion, critique and writing, with revision. It is open to advanced undergraduates and fulfills writing-intensive (WI) requirements, as well as capstone requirements for some majors.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, WI Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4561 Ceramic Analysis

Method, techniques and models for analyzing prehistoric ceramics. Students conduct hands-on analyses of collections from Cahokia Mounds and the St. Louis region. Prerequisite: Anthro 314, graduate standing or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 4562 Artifact Analysis: Mississippian Cultures

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introductory, hands-on experience of the methods employed in the analysis of archaeological materials common to the Mississippian culture. Students conduct class projects based on collections from Cahokia Mounds and the St. Louis region. Prerequisite: Anthro 314 or equivalent, or graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 4564 Archaeobotanical Analysis

Advanced laboratory and analytical techniques. Prerequisite: Anthro 4211 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4565 Biomolecular Archaeology: Are You What You Eat?

A revolution is underway in archaeology. Working at the cutting edge of isotopic and genetic technologies, researchers have been probing the building blocks of ancient proteins, life-DNA, fats and microfossils to rewrite our understanding of the past. Their discoveries and analyses have helped revise the human genealogical tree and answer such questions as: Are you what you eat? How different are we from the Neanderthals? Who first domesticated plants and animals? What was life like for our ancestors? In this class, we address those fundamental issues to understanding human nature. Here is science at its most engaging.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4581 Principles of Human Anatomy and Development

This course is designed for both undergraduate and graduate students in the anthropological, biological, and/or pre-medical sciences who wish to learn about human anatomy from various evolutionary, functional, developmental, and clinical perspectives. Lectures will emphasize the organizational and developmental principles of various organ systems of the human body. The course will also make use of our extensive anatomy museum of labeled dissected human specimens as well as our cast collections of numerous specimens from the human fossil record where appropriate. Frequent use of X-rays, CT, and MRI scans will also be used to help students visualize human anatomy from a number of different imaging modalities. Prerequisites: Undergraduate or graduate students in the anthropological, biological, and/or pre-medical sciences who have had at least one course in physical anthropology and/or biology, or consent of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4582 Human Life History Theory

Life history theory postulates that organisms must allocate finite time and finite resources between growth, maintenance and reproductive effort. This balance necessitates trade-offs in specific traits related to body size and energy allocation between competing functions across the life of the organism. In this class, we start from this broad theory and look at the specific application of life history theory within anthropology. Humans, in particular, present unique and unusual life history characteristics, which we discuss in depth.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 459 Human Osteology

Analysis of skeletal material recovered in human paleontological and archaeological excavations. The development of bone and major diseases that affect skeletal structure. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4591 Human Functional Morphology

A detailed consideration of the biological basis for variation in recent and past human skeletal anatomy as a framework for the interpretation of prehistoric human skeletal and fossil remains. Emphasis is placed on the structure, development and degeneration of bones and joints, the soft tissues which impinge upon individual bones; and the biomechanical patterns relating to bone and joint structures. Prerequisite: Anthro 3661, Anthro 459 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4595 Developmental Plasticity and Human Health

A look at how early life — gestation plus infancy and childhood — contributes to the establishment of long-term physiology, variation and individual health from an anthropological perspective. The course includes current disease models of developmental origins, combined with evolutionary and adaptive perspectives on developmental plasticity and the construction of human health.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4597 The Archaeology of Life and Death

The study of human remains in archaeological contexts offers us a rich perspective on human life and society in the past. Our bodies are shaped by genetics, environmental factors, subsistence, disease, and physical activities over the life course. At the same time, social organization, inequality and ideologies also shape the human experience; they often become reflected in the built environments of tombs and cemeteries, the grave offerings, and interment styles that surround human remains in archaeological contexts. This course offers an introduction to bioarchaeology and mortuary archaeology as complementary approaches to the study of life in the past. The goal of the course is to understand how activities, norms and beliefs, and environments shaped bodies in life and death, and the different ways in which archaeologists can gain insight into the past through the study of human remains and burials. Course lectures and discussions focus on recent advances in research and ongoing debates in the two fields with examples from prehistory and history around the world, from North and South America, to Europe, Asia and Africa. Although this course will provide a basic overview of human skeletal anatomy, it is strongly recommended that students have taken an introductory course on the subject prior to enrolling in the class.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD, SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4601 Topics in African-American Studies: Health in the Black Community: A Social Science Perspective

Health matters for every facet of social life. In this course, we use a critical sociological perspective to explore the dynamic nature of health and health care experiences among blacks in the United States. We draw upon core concepts in Sociology, the Sociology of Health, Illness, and Care as well as Critical Race Theory and Social Epidemiology to guide our discussions throughout the semester. Using contemporary, real-world examples, we examine the causes and consequences of racial health disparities that too often situate blacks in positions of disadvantage. We use the work of scholars such as Patricia Hill Collins, David Williams, and Dorothy Roberts to explore topics ranging from racism in the health care system to the black immigrant health advantage to health and hip-hop. We consider how poor health and health care outcomes among blacks in the United States matter on a global scale. Throughout the course, we consider practical policy and programmatic interventions that can be implemented to eliminate poor health in black communities.
Same as L90 AFAS 4601

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4611 Seminar in Selected Topics in Learning & Memory: Collective Memory

This course provides an overview and analysis of phenomena of people remembering as part of a group — one's country, one's state, one's university, one's family. Collective memories are critical for one's identity, for knowing who we are and how to interpret the world around us. We will consider narcissistic tendencies of group memories in specific contexts (e.g., the Russian vs. American interpretation of world events; views of Trump supporters vs. Clinton supporters on events in the U.S.). The course will range from humanistic, anthropological, psychological, and sociological perspectives on memory. Prerequisites: Psych 100B and a course on human memory or permission of the instructor.
Same as L33 Psych 461

Credit 3 units.


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L48 Anthro 4623 Art and Science of Inferential Statistics

This course examines the historical roots, the scholarly development and the current applications of inferential statistics in a research context. The emphasis is on how social and natural variables are distributed, framing testable research questions, and choosing appropriate statistical tests. This course covers the testing of univariate, bivariate and multivariate hypotheses using parametric, non-parametric and re-sampling methods. Requires students to undertake statistical analyses of their own on real data sets. Familiarity with descriptive statistics is assumed. Designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Permission of instructor is required for undergraduate enrollment.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, QA A&S IQ: SSC, AN Art: NSM EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4655 New Advances in Archaeology

Archaeological research is moving at an increasingly rapid pace, with advances in archaeological methods and theory propelling new interpretations and understandings of archaeological findings. In this course we focus on contemporary developments in archaeology, with an emphasis on current trends in theory, method and discovery. The objectives of the course are to place emerging trends in archaeological research in a historical context, to understand new methods and to explore how various theoretical approaches influence the conduct of archaeological research around the globe.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4661 Historical Archaeology

This course focuses upon the methods and techniques employed in historical archaeology. We include methods of integration of written records through contextual studies, discussion of specific artifact type identification techniques, and seminar-type treatments of other aspects of the field. The class includes some hands-on lab work, working primarily with materials from the first American fort west of the Mississippi (Fort Belle Fontaine) and two Civil War period mansions. Prerequisite: 3 credits of archaeology or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI Art: HUM


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L48 Anthro 4682 Ethnoarchaeology

Theories, methods and techniques applied by archaeologists to contemporary societies and materials to aid their understanding of extinct societies. Analysis of ethnographic research in both the Old and New Worlds. Participation with Professors Watson, Browman and Fritz is included in relevant topics. Prerequisites: Anthro 160B or 190BP, and permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L48 Anthro 472 Social Theory and Anthropology

A seminar on social theory and its ethnographic implications. Course combines major works of modern social theory, including Marx, Weber and Durkheim, with current work by contemporary anthropologists, such as Clifford Geertz, Eric Wolf, Marshall Sahlins and Fredrik Barth, and ethnographers from related disciplines, such as Pierre Bourdieu and Paul Willis. Prerequisite: previous anthropology course work or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 474 National Narratives and Collective Memory

This course examines how national narratives shape the ideas of nation-states about themselves and others. It considers cultural, psychological and political aspects of narratives used to interpret the past and understand the present. In addition to reviewing conceptual foundations from the humanities and social sciences, particular national narratives are considered as case studies.
Same as L97 IAS 474

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4761 The Pleistocene Peopling of Eurasia

The paleolithic archaeology, human paleobiology and paleoecology of the geographical expansions and adaptations of Eurasian humans through the Pleistocene. Prerequisite: Anthro 150A or 190B.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 4771 Out of the Wild: Domestication and Socioeconomic Diversity in Africa

The reason for the beginnings and spread of food production during the early Holocene in so many parts of the world is one of the most interesting questions in archaeology. It now seems likely that there are many different pathways to domestication. In Africa, there is a record of up to several million years of human existence as hunter-gatherers before some human populations adopted food production. Domestication of plants and animals about 10,000 years ago resulted in fundamental changes in human societies. It provided the basis for the increase in settlement densities, specialization and social stratification, and general decrease in mobility and dietary diversity characteristic of non-hunter-gatherer societies in the modern world. In this seminar, the class explores the phenomenon of domestication and the spread of food production, surveying the evidence for manipulation and domestication of plant and animal species by prehistoric peoples in Africa. We focus on how and why domestication occurred and factors that influenced its spread; interactions between late hunter-gatherers and early pastoralists; and intersections with complex societies of the Nile. We also look at the contributions of Africa to understanding pathways to food production world wide.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, WI Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4792 The Many Paths Leading Toward the Creation of the Ancient City

The purpose of this class is to examine the emergence of the Ancient City across the globe. We want to begin with the concepts of urbanism, city and metropolis. These are words whose derivation are to be found in the classical languages of the Mediterranean. Is there any means to reach an understanding of how other civilizations and societies characterized these special places on the landscape? In the past, many scholars have argued that market economies and state-level societies are essential to their existence. Such arguments reflect issues of sustainability in terms of the economy and the effective control of large populations through state-level institutions. While we want to understand the role of the economy and the level(s) of political integration involved in the process of urbanism, are there other cultural institutions such as religion that play a much larger and more significant role? Do these places reflect the "citizens" perception of the cosmos?

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4803 Advanced GIS Modeling and Landscape Analysis

The aim of this course is to learn to analyze archaeological data in terms of its spatial layout, geography, ecology, and temporal dynamics, using Geographic Information Systems and associated computer modeling techniques. A focus is placed on the relationship between natural environments, cultural geography, and the mapping of archaeological landscapes, and on the archaeologist's ability to accurately recover, reconstruct and analyze this relationship in a virtual environment.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 481 Zooarchaeology

Methods and techniques of analysis of faunal remains recovered in archaeological context, including aging, sexing, and the study of cultural modification of archaeological faunas.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4851 Topics in Jewish Studies: Critical Issues in the Study of Popular Music

Consult Course Listings for current topic. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Same as L75 JINE 485

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH EN: H


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L48 Anthro 4881 Medicine and Anthropology

Explores the fundamental relationship of anthropology to the art and science of medicine. Emphasis on the impact of anthropology on current modes of biomedical research; alternative systems of health and healing; role of anthropologist in biomedicine and public health; critical medical anthropology; anthropology and epidemiology. Prerequisite: junior standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 4882 Anthropology and Public Health

Anthropological approaches to public health practice and research; role of anthropology in public health systems; cross-cultural public health research; community vs. institutional bases of public health advocacy.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH


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L48 Anthro 4883 The Political Economy of Health

This course reviews social science contributions to understanding health as a function of political and economic influences. Considers the ways in which personal health is affected by macrosocial processes. Examines effects of globalization, international development and political instability on the health of individuals. Examples drawn from the U.S. and international contexts. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 4885 Senior Seminar: Medicine and Society

This course provides a forum for graduating seniors in the Medicine and Society Program to reconvene for a semester of facilitated discussion about issues related to illness, healing and culture. Prerequisites: Students must be seniors in good standing in the Medicine and Society Program.

Credit 1 unit. A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 489 Seminar: Pathways to Domestication

Survey of the evidence of the domestication of plants and animals, focusing on processes leading to domestication, and on the recognition of pristine features of domestication in the archaeological record. Prerequisite: one 300- or 400-level course in archaeology.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 4892 Hunter-Gatherer Socioeconomic Variation

This class explores the nature and extent of variation in hunter-gatherer socioeconomic systems as documented in the literature on recent hunter-gatherers, and in the archaeological record of the past 20,000 years. We discuss Woodburn’s concept of delayed return hunter-gatherers, Testart’s writing on hunter-gatherer socioeconomic organization, and archaeological concepts of simple and complex hunter-gatherers. We examine case studies of both delayed and immediate return hunter-gatherers from the Americas, Asia, Africa and Australia and emphasize understanding underlying reasons for differences between groups, and implications of differences for patterns of cultural change, including the adoption of food production.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 489W Seminar: Pathways to Domestication

The origins of agriculture led to one of the most important transitions in human history, continuing to fascinate anthropologists and all who depend on farmers for food. We examine evidence for the development and spread of settled and mobile farming systems in diverse regions of the world. We discuss old and new theoretical approaches and apply increasingly sophisticated methods for recovering and interpreting the evidence. Recent research puts us in a better position than ever before to understand the preconditions, processes, and possibly the causes of domestication and the spread of food production. This course is the WI version of Anthro 489 Seminar: Pathways to Domestication.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: SSC, WI EN: S


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L48 Anthro 490 Anthropological Research

Designed to give undergraduates research experience in various subdisciplines of Anthropology. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of faculty member under whom the research will be done.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L48 Anthro 491 Advanced Anthropological Research

Limited to those students who have successfully completed L48-490 and have a qualifying continuing research project. Prerequisite: Anthro 490 and permission of the faculty member who will supervise the continuing research project.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L48 Anthro 4911 Methods in Molecular Anthropology

We learn techniques used in molecular genetics and their application to studying the evolution and adaptation of human and nonhuman primates. This course covers DNA extraction from biological materials (e.g., buccal cells from cheek swabs, potentially also fecal samples from the primates at the zoo), primer design and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify a region of interest (student lead, with guidance) from isolated DNA. Use of gel electrophoresis to visualize and purify PCR products and sequencing reactions to view nucleic acid structure also are conducted. We also have a lecture on introductory bioinformatics. Throughout the course, we discuss the mechanisms underlying these techniques, why they work and how to troubleshoot problems. Students are expected to submit lab reports and to engage in peer review of others' lab reports. Finally, we discuss how molecular methods inform anthropological research. Students are also expected to take online safety training modules through EH&S.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM


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L48 Anthro 4951 Senior Honors Research

Limited to students who have qualified for the Anthropology honors program and who are conducting research for an honors thesis. Prerequisites: permission of the Anthropology faculty member supervising the honors research, and concurrent filing of notification with the Anthropology senior honors coordinator.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L48 Anthro 4961 Senior Honors Thesis

Limited to students who have qualified for the Anthropology honors program and who are actively engaged in writing a senior honors thesis. Prerequisite: permission of the Anthropology senior honors coordinator.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L48 Anthro 4975 Collecting Cultures: Taste, Passion and the Making of Art Histories

This seminar examines the theory and the cultural history of the collecting of art objects and artifacts from a range of cultures and periods, considering how and why both individuals and institutions create collections. What social and psychological factors drive this passion? What are the various cultural, political and aesthetic priorities that have driven this practice historically? How is cultural patrimony defined, and how do law, the art market and cross-cultural ethics impact the placement, study and display of a culture's material heritage? We build the seminar around the history of collecting in America, with a focus on Midwestern examples, and particularly, important case studies in St. Louis. We, for example, consider the significant local collections built by Joseph and Emily Rauh Pulitzer (modern art), and Morton May (modern and oceanic art), as well as the histories of both modern and non-Western collections now owned by the St. Louis area museums. This course is complemented by various local field trips (SLAM, Pulitzer, Kemper and Cahokia). Prerequisites: Art-Arch 112, Art-Arch 113, Art-Arch 211 or Art-Arch 215; one 300-level course in art history preferred; or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4975

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L48 Anthro 4999 Capstone Experience

The Department of Anthropology offers several options for completing a capstone experience, which is recommended by the College of Arts & Sciences. One option is for students in any 400-level course in the department to secure permission of the instructor to simultaneously enroll in Anthro 4999. The instructor and student develop an individualized plan for expanding the normal content of the selected 400-level course into a capstone experience. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Enrollment requires permission of the department and the instructor.

Credit 1 unit.


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