In the children's studies minor, students learn about children and childhood while drawing on the expertise of departments and programs from across Arts & Sciences, especially Education, English, and Psychological & Brain Sciences. Children's studies minors will develop a sophisticated interdisciplinary understanding of childhood and the issues surrounding the treatment and status of children throughout history. The minor combines social science courses that measure and analyze how children mature and how institutions have affected children with courses in the humanities that examine how children are portrayed and constructed in art, literature and film. Thus, a minor in children's studies will supplement students' majors while exposing them to an interconnected set of ideas about children as objects and subjects in a variety of essential disciplines. The minor in children's studies is housed in the Washington University Center for the Humanities.

Contact:Wendy Love Anderson
Phone:314-935-9523
Email:andersonwl@wustl.edu
Website:http://cenhum.artsci.wustl.edu/academics/minor

Children's studies is an interdepartmental minor; Washington University does not offer a separate major in children's studies.

The Minor in Children's Studies

Minor requirements for students entering Washington University in fall 2014 and after:

Units required: 16

Required courses (4 units):

ChSt 300Interdisciplinary Introduction to Children's Studies3
ChSt 499Senior Seminar in Children's Studies - open to juniors and seniors (to be offered beginning in SP17)1

Core courses (6 units from the following):

ChSt 313BEducation, Childhood, and Society3
ChSt 318The Cultural History of the American Teenager (previously offered as ChSt 236 & 336)3
ChSt 321Developmental Psychology3
ChSt 334A History of the Golden Age of Children's Literature3

6 additional units from either the core list or from elective courses, including but not limited to:

ChSt 178Imagining and Creating Africa: Youth, Culture, and Social Change3
ChSt 301CThe American School3
ChSt 304Educational Psychology3
ChSt 314Children's Literature Since World War II: From E.B. White to J.K. Rowling3
ChSt 316FRediscovering the Child: Interdisciplinary Workshops in an Urban Middle School3
ChSt 316WGirls' Fiction From Little Goody Two-Shoes to Nancy Drew3
ChSt 3195Abnormal Child Psychology3
ChSt 3270Comics, Graphic Novels, and Sequential Art3
ChSt 331Topics in Holocaust Studies: Children in the Shadow of the Swastika3
ChSt 337Play and Development3
ChSt 341Children and Childhood in World Religions3
ChSt 342Childhood, Culture, and Religion in Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean World3
ChSt 3620Anthropological Perspectives on the Fetus3
ChSt 381Banned Books3
ChSt 385Narratives of Childhood3
ChSt 3ABRChildren's Studies Course Work Completed Abroad1-3
ChSt 400Independent Work in Children's Studies1-3
ChSt 4036Children of Immigrants: Identity and Acculturation3
ChSt 4046Developmental Neuropsychology3
ChSt 4280History of Urban Schooling in the United States3
ChSt 4289Neighborhoods, Schools, and Social Inequality3
ChSt 453BSociology of Education3
ChSt 4591The Development of Social Cognition3
ChSt 4608The Education of Black Children and Youth in the United States3
ChSt 461BThe Construction and Experience of Black Adolescence3
ChSt 481History of Education in the United States3
ChSt 325Psychology of Adolescence3
ChSt 3254African Americans and Children's Literature3

Minor requirements for students entering Washington University before fall 2014:

Units required: 15

Required course (3 units):

ChSt 300Interdisciplinary Introduction to Children's Studies3

Core courses (6 units):

Psych 100BIntroduction to Psychology3
ChSt 313BEducation, Childhood, and Society3
ChSt 321Developmental Psychology3
ChSt 334A History of the Golden Age of Children's Literature3

Plus 6 additional units from either the core list or from elective courses (please refer to the table above for a list of recently offered electives).

Additional Information

The most up-to-date list of approved electives (applying to both pre- and post-2014 matriculants) is located on the children's studies minor website. Courses not on that list may be used to fulfill the requirements of the minor only if they have been approved by the student's minor adviser and/or by the Academic Coordinator.

A maximum of 3 units of course work completed at another university, whether in the United States or abroad, may be applied toward the children's studies minor. Credit will be awarded only to those courses that have been approved by the student's minor adviser and/or by the Academic Coordinator. In addition, a maximum of 3 units of course work applied to the children's studies minor can be counted simultaneously toward another major or minor, and only with the approval of the other major or minor. (Depending on the student's year of entry, additional Arts & Sciences restrictions on double-counting may apply.)

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for L66 ChSt.


L66 ChSt 178 Imagining and Creating Africa: Youth, Culture, and Social Change

The goal of this course is to provide a glimpse into how youth reshape African society. Whether in North Africa with the Arab Spring, in West Africa with university strikes, or in East Africa through a linguistic full bloom, youth have been shaping social responses to societies for a long period. In this course, we will study social structures, including churches, NGOs, developmental agencies as well as learn about examples of Muslim youth movements, and the global civil society. The course will also explore how youth impact cultural movements in Africa and how they influence the world. In particular, we will examine hip-hop movements, sports, and global youth culture developments that center on fashion, dress, dance, and new technologies. By the end of the course, students will have enriched ideas about youth in Africa and ways to provide more realistic comparisons to their counterparts in the United States.
Same as L90 AFAS 178

Credit 3 units. A&S: CD A&S IQ: LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L66 ChSt 236 Cultural History of the American Teenager

This course explores the recent history of the teenager in the United States, from the rise of teen culture in the 1950s to the current state of adolescence in the new century. Why have so many novels and films memorialized adolescence? How has the period of development been portrayed in books and film? How have depictions and attitudes toward teen culture changed over the past 60 years? In our consideration of teen culture, we take a multidisciplinary approach when tackling a variety of materials — including historical readings, literary fiction, Young Adult fiction, comic books, popular films, and popular music — in an attempt to come to a better understanding of how the notion of the American teenager has evolved over the past 60 years. We begin with J.D. Salinger's classic novel of adolescence alienation, The Catcher in the Rye, a book that in many ways helped initiate the rise of the youth movement in the 1950s and '60s. Our readings focus on the middle decades of the 20th century, when teen culture moved to the forefront of American life, but we end the semester by considering how teen life has recently been imagined in such novels as The Hunger Games. Our class also discusses a few films, such as Rebel Without a Cause and American Graffiti, which have helped shape our conception of the American teenager. Ultimately, we question what these depictions of teen culture can tell us about larger trends and concerns in American life. As this course serves as an introduction to American Culture Studies, we focus on the different methods that we can employ when attempting to interpret and analyze American culture.
Same as L98 AMCS 236

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L66 ChSt 299 Internship in Children's Studies

This course offers up to three hours of academic credit (on a pass/fail basis) for an unpaid internship with an outside organization in some area of Children's Studies. Enrollment is restricted to children's studies minors and will require completion of a final written project as well as coordination with a site supervisor. For more information, please contact Dr. Wendy Anderson at andersonwl@wustl.edu or 314-935-9523.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L66 ChSt 300 Interdisciplinary Introduction to Children's Studies

What is childhood? Is it supposed to be happy? And what can children's books, toys, and memoirs tell us about the experience of childhood in a certain time and place? This course is designed to introduce students to the field of children's studies, including readings in the history and literature of global childhood, excerpts from children's films and TV, visits from Washington University faculty studying children across various disciplines, and field trips to a children's museum and a juvenile detention facility. The course is intended to give students a richly detailed picture of how children and childhood are dealt with as subjects throughout the curriculum and the impact these approaches have had on how the greater society thinks about children. Freshmen are welcome to enroll. This course fulfills the Social Differentiation requirement in Arts & Sciences.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: HUM EN: H


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L66 ChSt 301C The American School

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers; changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family; and policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.
Same as L12 Educ 301C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: BA, ETH, HUM EN: H


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L66 ChSt 304 Educational Psychology

A course in psychological concepts relevant to education. Organized around four basic issues: how humans think and learn; how children, adolescents, and adults differ in their cognitive and moral development; the sense in which motivation and intention explain why people act as they do; how such key human characteristics as intelligence, motivation, and academic achievement can be measured. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Offered fall and spring semester.
Same as L12 Educ 304

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L66 ChSt 3132 Service Learning: Girls' Studies

2012 marked the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts of America, an organization that has played a significant role in defining what it means to be a girl in American culture. This class will look back at girlhood over the last hundred years to today by exploring topics that include literature for girls, the education of girls, sports and girlhood, marketing to girls, girls' health and sexuality, and, of course, the history of organizations for girls in the U.S. and abroad. This course introduces students to the emerging field of Girl Studies within the field of Feminist/Gender Studies research. Because the course builds upon basic knowledge of women's movements in the United of States and builds upon an understanding of core women and gender studies readings, students must take Introduction to Women and Gender Studies or Introduction to Sexuality Studies before enrolling in this course. This course includes a fieldwork component in addition to regular course meetings. Prerequisite: any 100-level Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies course.
Same as L77 WGSS 3132

Credit 4 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L66 ChSt 313B Education, Childhood, and Society

An examination of childhood, child development and education from different perspectives. Observation of children in a variety of settings, including classrooms. Through historical, sociological, psychological and political readings, students will clarify current ideas about children, investigate the nature of childhood, and begin to understand how and why childhood is constructed as it is. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Limited to 45 students.
Same as L12 Educ 313B

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L66 ChSt 314 Children's Literature Since World War II: From E.B. White to J.K. Rowling


Same as L14 E Lit 314

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS


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L66 ChSt 316F Rediscovering the Child: Interdisciplinary Workshops in an Urban Middle School

It is said that at this time in history the entire country must make a commitment to improve the positive possibilities of education. We must work to lift people who are underserved; we must expand the range of abilities for those who are caught in only one kind of training; and we must each learn to be creative thinkers contributing our abilities to many sectors of our society. In this course, we expand our views about learning by experimenting with the creative process of lateral thinking. In the first six weeks of the semester, we learn about learning by meeting with exceptional people with many scholarly, professional, and civic engagement accomplishments. We also learn by working in teams to develop an exciting set of 2-D/3-D, hands-on, problem-solving workshops for middle-schoolers from economically disadvantaged urban families; the workshop curriculum is based upon students' knowledge and passion as well as their interests. During the last eight weeks, we deliver these workshops once a week to students at Compton-Drew Middle School (adjacent to the Science Center in the city of St. Louis). In this course we celebrate the choices of studies we each pursue, and expand our experience by learning from each other's knowledge bases and creativity. The course is open to students from all disciplines and schools, freshmen through seniors, and meets the multidisciplinary fieldwork requirement for AMCS majors. To meet compliance with University Policies on Minors, all students participating in this class will be required to undergo a fingerprinting background check, which is done on campus, prior to interacting with the Compton-Drew students. The cost of this background check is covered by the lab and materials fee added to this course.
Same as L98 AMCS 316F

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L66 ChSt 316W Girls' Fiction From Little Goody Two-Shoes to Nancy Drew

Topic varies. Writing intensive.
Same as L14 E Lit 316W

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI BU: HUM EN: H


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L66 ChSt 318 The Cultural History of the American Teenager


Same as L14 E Lit 318

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L66 ChSt 3195 Abnormal Child Psychology

This course will familiarize students with current perspectives on the nature, causes, assessment, treatment and prevention of child psychiatric disorders and related family dysfunction. Theoretical perspectives and research findings will be discussed pertaining to anxiety, depression, conduct disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, learning impairments, and parent-child conflict. Prerequisite: Psych 100B.
Same as L33 Psych 3195

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L66 ChSt 321 Developmental Psychology

This course concentrates on the cognitive and social development of the person from conception to adolescence. Topics covered include: infant perception, attachment, cognitive development from Piagetian and information processing perspectives, aggression and biological bases of behavior. Prerequisite: Psych 100B.
Same as L33 Psych 321

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L66 ChSt 323 Children and War

This course considers 20th-century representations of war in American children's literature. Our scope will stretch from the run-up to World War II in the 1930s through the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. This period produced texts that debated not only the role of war in childhood development but also the role of the child in war's development. Genres will include picture and comic books, career and adventure fiction, science fiction, and childhood memoir.

Credit 3 units.


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L66 ChSt 325 Psychology of Adolescence

A broad introduction to adolescence as a developmental period of transition and change. The major topics include the fundamental changes of adolescence; the context of adolescence; and processes of psychological development. Prerequisite: Psych 100B.
Same as L33 Psych 325

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L66 ChSt 3254 African Americans and Children's Literature

This course explores two distinct themes: how African-descended people have been depicted in American and British children's literature, and how African Americans have established a tradition in writing for children and young adults. It will also examine two related questions: How has African-American childhood been constructed in children's literature, and how have African-American writers constructed childhood in children's literature? We will look at such classic white writers for children like Helen Bannerman, Annie Fellows Johnston, and Mark Twain as well as efforts by blacks like The Brownies' Book, published by the NAACP, and children's works by black writers including Langston Hughes, Ann Petry, Shirley Graham Du Bois, Arna Bontemps, Virginia Hamilton, Walter Dean Myers, Mildred Taylor, Floyd and Patrick McKissack, Julius Lester, Rosa Guy, Sharon Bell Mathis, bell hooks, and others.
Same as L90 AFAS 3254

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L66 ChSt 3270 Comics, Graphic Novels, and Sequential Art

This course traces the evolution of comics in America from the "comic cuts" of the newspapers, through the development of the daily and Sunday strips, into the comic book format, and the emergence of literary graphic novels. While not a uniquely American medium, comics have a specifically American context that intersects with issues of race, class, gender, nationalism, popular culture, consumerism, and American identity. Comics have repeatedly been a site of struggle in American culture; examining these struggles illuminates the way Americans have constructed and expressed their view of themselves. The way comics have developed as a medium and art form in this country has specific characteristics that can be studied profitably through the lens of American Culture Studies.
Same as L98 AMCS 3270

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L66 ChSt 330 Children and Censorship: What We Permit Children to Read and Why

The books that raise the issue of censorship most intensely are those written for children, not adults. Today, when parents seem more concerned than ever about what their children are exposed to, what children should read has become a burning issue, but an issue that often divides communities rather than uniting them. What is appropriate for children to read? Has this changed over time? Who determines what is appropriate reading material? And how have the issues of gender and race affected these determinations? In this course we will read and discuss many controversial children's books and comics, starting with Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Helen Bannerman's Little Black Sambo, and work our way through to such modern children's authors as Sherman Alexie, Judy Blume, Maurice Sendak, Walter Dean Myers, and J.K. Rowling as well as R. Crumb's controversial and sexually explicit underground comics.

Credit 3 units.


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L66 ChSt 331 Topics in Holocaust Studies: Children in the Shadow of the Swastika

Content variable.
Same as L21 German 331

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L66 ChSt 334 A History of the Golden Age of Children's Literature

A comprehensive survey of the major works for children written during this period.
Same as L14 E Lit 334

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L66 ChSt 336 The Cultural History of the American Teenager

This course will explore the recent history of the teenager in the United States, from the rise of teen culture in the 1950s to the current state of adolescence in the new century. Why have so many novels and films memorialized adolescence? How has the period of development been portrayed in books and film? How have depictions and attitudes toward teen culture changed over the past 50 years? We will begin with J.D. Salinger's classic novel of adolescence alienation, The Catcher in the Rye, a book that in many ways helped initiate the rise of the youth movement in the 1950s and 60s. From there, we will read a series of novels and historical studies that will trace the changes in teen culture that have occurred over the past half century. Our class will also consider a few films, such as Rebel Without a Cause and Dazed and Confused, which have helped shape our conception of the American teenager. Ultimately, we will question what these depictions of teen culture can tell us about larger trends and concerns in American life. Readings will include Judy Blume's Forever, Stephanie Meyer's Twilight, and Colson Whitehead's Sag Harbor.

Credit 3 units.


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L66 ChSt 337 Play and Development

An examination of current research and theory in play, in development and education, from infancy through the early school years. Topics include play and the development of language, social skills, creativity, and cognitive abilities. We will also examine the uses of play in educational contexts, focusing on preschool and the early primary grades. Prerequisite: Psych 321 (Developmental Psychology) or Educ 304 (Educational Psychology).
Same as L12 Educ 337

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L66 ChSt 341 Children and Childhood in World Religions

This course will investigate the roles children play in some of the world's major religious traditions and how those traditions construct their concepts of childhood. From child disciples to child martyrs, from the miraculous childhoods of religious founders to the rites marking childhood's end, and from divine commandments involving fertility to those mandating celibacy, we will explore a wide range of different religions' teachings about children and childhood. We will combine primary and secondary sources including written texts, movies/video, and web-based content in order to learn more about the complex relationships between children and the religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Confucianism.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L66 ChSt 342 Childhood, Culture, and Religion in Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean World

From child saints to child scholars and from child crusaders to child casualties, the experience of childhood varied widely throughout the European Middle Ages. This course will explore how medieval Jews, Christians, and Muslims developed some parallel and some very much divergent concepts of childhood, childrearing, and the proper cultural roles for children in their respective societies. Our readings will combine primary and secondary sources from multiple perspectives and multiple regions of Europe and the Mediterranean World, including a few weeks on the history and cultural legacy of the so-called Children's Crusade of 1312. We will conclude with a brief survey of medieval childhood and its stereotypes as seen through contemporary children's books and TV shows. This course fulfills the Language & Cultural Diversity requirement for Arts & Sciences.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L66 ChSt 3525 A History of the Boy's Book


Same as L14 E Lit 3525

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L66 ChSt 3620 Anthropological Perspectives on the Fetus

Where do we come from? How do we get here? When does "life" begin? Is the fetus a "person" or something else? How could we decide? This course will integrate biological, medical, philosophical, and cross-cultural perspectives to examine how various societies (including our own) understand the nature of the human fetus. The course will examine basic human embryology, beliefs about conception and fetal development, ideas about the moral status of the fetus, controversies surrounding prenatal care and antenatal diagnostic testing (including sex-selection and genetic screening tests), current controversies about fetal medicine and surgery, and the problem of abortion in cross-cultural perspective.
Same as L48 Anthro 3620

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L66 ChSt 381 Banned Books

Why would anyone want to burn a book? Under what circumstances would you support censorship? Several years ago a Russian student was exiled to Siberia for possessing a copy of Emerson's Essays; today, school boards in the United States regularly call for the removal of Huckleberry Finn and The Catcher in the Rye from classrooms and library shelves. Actions like these dramatize the complex interconnections of literature and society, and they raise questions about what we read and the way we read. The course explores these issues by looking closely at several American and translated European texts that have been challenged on moral, sociopolitical or religious grounds to determine what some readers have found so threatening about these works. Possible authors: Goethe, Voltaire, Rousseau, Defoe, Hawthorne, Flaubert, Twain, Chopin, Brecht, Salinger, Aldous Huxley, Ray Bradbury. Brief daily writing assignments.
Same as L14 E Lit 381

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L66 ChSt 385 Narratives of Childhood

Topics in Comparative Literature. Subject matter will vary from semester to semester.

Credit 3 units. EN: H


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L66 ChSt 3ABR Children's Studies Course Work Completed Abroad

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L66 ChSt 400 Independent Work in Children's Studies

This course provides credit for children's studies minors who undertake a program of independent reading and/or research under the supervision of a faculty mentor on some subtopic within Children's Studies for which there is no regular course available. Please contact the Academic Coordinator for more information.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L66 ChSt 401 Writing for Children and Young Adults

In this course we will examine various genres of writing for young people: poetry, fiction and nonfiction.
Same as L13 Writing 401

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA


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L66 ChSt 4036 Children of Immigrants: Identity and Acculturation

This seminar examines two subgroups: child immigrants and the native-born children of immigrants. It interrogates cultural/ethnic identity, cultural adaptation, bilingualism and biculturalism, and challenges and achievements of this young generation through ethnography, literature, and sociological accounts. We aim to scrutinize the studies of the "1.5" generation and the second generation, and theories such as "segmented assimilation," across a wide range of ethnic groups, from people of East Asian origins to those with Latin American ancestries, by mainly focusing on their experiences in the United States.
Same as L97 IAS 4036

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L66 ChSt 4046 Developmental Neuropsychology

Development of the brain and associated changes in cognitive abilities will be discussed, with an emphasis on recent research that integrates the theoretical perspectives of cognitive psychology and neuropsychology. Discussion will focus on early development and disorders affecting the brain such as cerebral palsy, sickle cell disease, and autism. Prerequisites: Psych 321, Psych 360, Psych 3604, or Psych 3401.
Same as L33 Psych 4046

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS, WI A&S IQ: NSM, WI Art: NSM


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L66 ChSt 407 Topics in Youth Studies: Media Arts and Culture

This course is designed as a special topics on youth studies. The focus examines youth as a cultural group in the U.S. and global context. It takes an interdisciplinary approach to explore youth, media arts, and culture and draws on education, sociology, cultural studies and literature. Such topics as youth development, youth engagement, and youth empowerment provide entry points for understanding youth as learners, consumers, producers, and active members of society. Central to the course are youth's very own textual productions, including but are not limited to poems, performances, visual art, short documentaries, music videos, web blogs and podcasts, among others. Readings, discussions and other activities will culminate in an inquiry-based multimedia project about youth or a specific youth group/organization.

Credit 3 units.


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L66 ChSt 4280 History of Urban Schooling in the United States

This reading colloquium examines the history of urban schooling and school policy in the United States. Readings focus on the growing literature in the history of urban schooling and on primary source material. We explore urban schooling in general, and we examine particular primary source material as well as particular cities and their school districts. Such districts may include New York, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, St. Louis, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Atlanta and others. The course has two goals: to develop a strong contextual understanding of the conditions of urban schooling, the history of urban school reform, and the debates over the purposes of urban schools; and to examine the ways historians have explored urban schooling in the U.S. Students should expect to read a book a week as well as primary source materials and occasional articles.
Same as L12 Educ 4280

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L66 ChSt 4289 Neighborhoods, Schools, and Social Inequality

A major purpose of the course is to study the research and policy literature related to neighborhoods, schools and the corresponding opportunity structure in urban America. The course will be informed by theoretical models drawn from economics, political science, sociology, anthropology, education and law. A major focus is to gain greater understanding of the experiences and opportunity structure(s) of urban dwellers, in general, and urban youth, in particular. While major emphasis will be placed on data derived from the interface of urban environments and the corresponding institutions within them, the generational experiences of various ethnic groups will complement the course foci.
Same as L12 Educ 4289

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L66 ChSt 453B Sociology of Education

This course provides an overview of sociological theory and research on education in contemporary U.S. society. Drawing from sociological perspectives, it covers the implications of schools and schooling for social inequality, mobility, and group relations. It examines major theoretical perspectives on the purpose and social organization of mass education in the United States, and topics related to the organization and function of schools, access to educational resources, and group disparities in school experiences and outcomes.
Same as L12 Educ 453B

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: BA, ETH


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L66 ChSt 4591 The Development of Social Cognition

This course will explore what is known about the development of social cognition. Our starting point will be infants' capacity to navigate the social world, for instance, detecting agents, identifying social partners, and learning from those around us. We will consider what happens when the human ability to reason about others breaks down (as with autism), and what this can teach us about typical development. Each week we will cover one topic and a related set of readings. Class meetings will be devoted to active discussion and debate about the content of the readings. Students are required to write a weekly reaction paper to the readings to promote class discussion, and will give an in-class presentation on a novel research topic at the end of the semester. Graduate students may have additional course requirements. Prerequisites: Psych 100B and one of the following: Psych 315 or 321 or 360.
Same as L33 Psych 4591

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L66 ChSt 4608 The Education of Black Children and Youth in the United States

This course provides an overview of the education of black children and youth in the United States. Covering both pre- and post-Brown eras, this course applies a deep reading to the classic works of DuBois and Anderson as well as the more recent works of Kozol, Delpit, and Foster. The social, political, and historical contexts of education, as essential aspects of American and African-American culture and life, will be placed in the foreground of course inquiries,
Same as L12 Educ 4608

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, SD, WI Art: HUM EN: H


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L66 ChSt 461B The Construction and Experience of Black Adolescence

This course examines the construct of black adolescence from the general perspectives of anthropology, sociology and psychology. It begins by studying the construct of black adolescence as an "invention" of the social and behavioral sciences. The course then draws upon narrative data, autobiography, literature and multimedia sources authored by black youth to recast black adolescence as a complex social, psychological, cultural and political phenomenon. This course focuses on the meaning-making experiences of urban-dwelling black adolescents and highlights these relations within the contexts of class, gender, sexuality and education.
Same as L90 AFAS 461B

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L66 ChSt 481 History of Education in the United States

Examines education within the context of American social and intellectual history. Using a broad conception of education in the United States and a variety of readings in American culture and social history, the course focuses on such themes as the variety of institutions involved with education, including family, church, community, work place, and cultural agency; the ways relationships among those institutions have changed over time; the means individuals have used to acquire an education; and the values, ideas, and practices that have shaped American educational policy in different periods of our history.
Same as L12 Educ 481

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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Co-Directors

Gerald L. Early
Merle Kling Professor of Modern Letters
PhD, Cornell University
(English; African and African-American Studies)

Desirée White
Professor
PhD, Washington University
(Psychological & Brain Sciences; Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology)

Academic Coordinator

Wendy Love Anderson
PhD, University of Chicago
(Center for the Humanities; Religious Studies)

Faculty Advisory Board

Annette Appell
Professor
JD, Northwestern University
(School of Law)

Garrett Duncan
Associate Professor
PhD, The Claremont Graduate School
(Education; African and African-American Studies; American Culture Studies)

Patricia Kohl
Associate Professor
PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
(George Warren Brown School of Social Work)

Joan Luby
Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Professor of Child Psychiatry
MD, Wayne State University
(School of Medicine; Director, Early Emotional Development Program)

Lori Markson
Associate Professor
PhD, University of Arizona
(Psychological & Brain Sciences; Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology)

Amy Pawl
Senior Lecturer
PhD, University of California, Berkeley
(English)