The Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures (EALC) offers a major and a minor in Chinese language and culture. As a major in Chinese, a student can expect to gain some proficiency in the language and acquire a foundation in Chinese literature, history and culture from earliest times to the present. All students majoring in Chinese must complete first- and second-level Chinese or its equivalent. They also must complete a prerequisite 200-level Civilization course and the two-semester literature survey, as well as additional advanced-level courses (300- and 400-level). In addition, all prime majors must complete the required EALC Capstone Experience.

The department strongly encourages overseas study of Chinese language and culture. All majors and minors are expected to maintain at least a B- average in all departmental courses.

Language Placement: Placement tests are required for all students entering our language programs, with the exception of those students who have had no previous exposure to the language and wish to enroll in the first semester of the first year of instruction. Students who test into second-year Chinese and satisfactorily complete (with a grade of B- or better) at least one semester of language study may petition for 3 units of retroactive credit; students who test into third year or above and satisfactorily complete (with a grade of B- or better) at least one semester of language study may petition for 6 units of retroactive credit. Credit is limited to 3 units for testing into second year and 6 units for testing into third year or above. Please note that students with native language proficiency as determined by the Chinese language section, as well as students who enroll in courses below their placement level, are ineligible for retroactive credit units. Students who misrepresent their language proficiency so as to gain entrance into a course at the elementary or intermediate level will be dropped from that course.

Phone:314-935-4448
Email:ealc@wustl.edu
Website:http://ealc.wustl.edu

The Major in Chinese Language and Culture

Units required: 24 upper-level (300-level or above) units

Prerequisites:
  1. First- and second-level Modern Chinese or the equivalent
  2. Chinese 227C Chinese Civilization

Requirements:

24 advanced (300-level) and above units to include:

  1. Chinese 341 Early and Imperial Chinese Literature
  2. Chinese 342 Literature of Modern and Contemporary China
  3. 400-level Capstone course (prime majors)
  • Chinese prime majors may satisfy their capstone requirement in one of two ways, both of which require a presentation at the EALC Senior Symposium in the spring.

a) Successful completion of a senior honors thesis. This option, which also entitles the student to Latin Honors, requires a minimum of a 3.65 GPA. The thesis is researched and written over two semesters, for a total of 6 units, which are in addition to the 24 upper-level units required for the major.

b) Successful completion of an approved 400-level seminar course, to be taken in the senior year. (This course may be included among the 24 advanced units for the major.)

Additional Information

  1. With adviser approval, students may include one course in a related area offered outside the department among the 24 advanced units. (For example, a student with focus on China/Chinese may take one course in Film and Media Studies or Art History that focuses on China.) With adviser approval, students may count one course from another area within the department among the 24 advanced units. (For example, a student with focus on China/Chinese may take one course in either Korean or Japanese.)
  2. Students must earn at least a B- in language courses in order to continue to the next level. They must also maintain at least a B- average in all required courses for the major. Students who do not meet this requirement may either repeat the course(s) in question or earn at least a B- in an approved equivalent course or courses (either during the summer or in a study abroad program).
  3. Courses for the major may not be taken Credit/No Credit.
  4. Core courses (Chinese 227C, 341, 342) should be taken in residence.
  5. Up to 6 units of credit may be applied toward the major from one semester abroad and up to 12 units of credit from two semesters abroad. Note that EALC no longer distinguishes study abroad credits earned in advanced language courses from those credits earned in other "content" (non-language) courses.
  6. No more than 3 units of Independent Study may be counted toward the required upper-level 24 units.
  7. EALC awards Departmental Honors to majors as an acknowledgment of exemplary work in the major.

The Minor in Chinese Language and Culture

Units required: 18 units

Requirements:

  • Two semesters of Chinese language
  • At least 9 units must be 300-level or above
  • And the following three courses: 
Chinese 227CChinese Civilization3
Chinese 341Early and Imperial Chinese Literature3
Chinese 342Literature of Modern and Contemporary China3

 Additional Information

  • Students must earn at least a B- in their language courses in order to continue to the next level. They must also maintain at least a B- average in all courses taken to fulfill the minor requirements. Students who do not meet this requirement may either repeat the course(s) in question or successfully complete an approved equivalent course or courses (either during the summer or in a study abroad program).
  • Courses for the minor may not be taken Credit/No Credit.
  • Core courses (Chinese 227C, 341, 342) should be taken in residence.
  • No more than 3 units of transfer or study abroad non-language courses may be applied to the minor.

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for L04 Chinese.


L04 Chinese 101D First-Level Modern Chinese I

Introduction to the modern spoken and written national language of China. Five regular hours and additional drill or laboratory sessions as assigned by instructor. Students with some previous Chinese language background must take placement examination.

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 102D First-Level Modern Chinese II

Continuation of 101D. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in 101D, or placement by examination. Five regular hours and additional drill or laboratory sessions as assigned by instructor.

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 106 Beginning Chinese for Heritage Speakers I

This course is designed for students who have basic speaking and listening skills and some background in writing or reading. Three class hours plus one additional hour are required. Prerequisite: placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 107 Beginning Chinese for Heritage Speakers II

Continuation of 106. Emphasis on improving basic reading and writing skills. Three class hours plus one additional hour are required. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 106 or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L04 Chinese 126 Chinese for Medical Purposes

This course is the continuation of Beginning Chinese taught in the fall at the Shanghai Fudan program. The spring course is targeted specifically to pre-medicine and/ or health care students who have studied at the Shanghai Fudan program in the fall. Students without the Fudan experience can also enroll after language evaluation. Prerequisites: L04 101D, L04 117F or the equivalent.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 130 Basic Chinese I

Basic Chinese I is the first half of the beginning-level Chinese and is designed to meet the practical needs of students who are interested in learning Chinese but do not have time for a full-load study. This course is scheduled to move at half the pace of regular Chinese 101. Students will learn slowly but surely the same basic knowledge of Mandarin phonetics, standard grammar, and 300 to 350 vocabulary items. This basic course emphasizes listening comprehension and conversational skills through aural-oral practices. The reading and writing of basic Chinese are strongly encouraged as secondary skills. After completing the spring course I, followed by the fall course II, interested students can then go on to regular Chinese 102.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 131 Basic Chinese II

This is the continuation of Basic Chinese I (L04 130). It is designed to meet the practical needs of students who are interested in learning Chinese but do not have time for a full-load study. This course will move at half the pace of Chinese 101D and will present the second half of the 101D curriculum. Students will learn basic knowledge of Mandarin phonetics, standard grammar, and approximately 350 new lexical items. This course emphasizes listening comprehension and conversational skills through aural-oral practice, with reading and writing Chinese as complementary skills. After completing this course, students can continue with Chinese 102D. Prerequisite: Grade of B- or better in 130, or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L04 Chinese 206 Intermediate Chinese for Heritage Speakers I

Designed for students who have either completed Chinese 107 or who have basic speaking and listening skills and mastery of at least 300 written characters. Three class hours plus one additional drill hour. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 107, or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 207 Intermediate Chinese for Heritage Speakers II

Designed for students who have either completed Chinese 206 or who have basic speaking and listening skills and mastery of at least 800 written characters. Four class hours a week. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 206, or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L04 Chinese 211 Second-Level Modern Chinese I

The standard second-year level of instruction in modern Chinese. Students learn both long and short forms of characters. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 102D or placement by examination. Five hours a week, plus drill and laboratory sessions as required by instructor.

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 212 Second-Level Modern Chinese II

The standard second-year level of instruction in modern Chinese. Students learn both long and short forms of characters. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 211 or placement by examination. Five hours a week, plus drill and laboratory sessions as required by instructor.

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L04 Chinese 227C Chinese Civilization

An introduction to Chinese culture through selected topics that link various periods in China's past with the present. Ongoing concerns are social stratification, political organization, the arts, gender relationships and the rationales for individual behavior, and the conceptions through which Chinese have identified their cultural heritage. Our readings include literary, philosophical and historical documents as well as cultural histories. Regular short writing assignments; take-home final. No prerequisites.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA, IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 260 Love and Murder in 17th-Century China

In this course we will read tales of sex and murder, of love and redemption, of ghosts and monsters, and of life and death. As such, it is a vivid depiction of life and society in all its ugliness and beauty during the last decades of the Ming dynasty. These tales are largely drawn from an English translation of the 17th-century collection of short, vernacular fiction known as Gujin xiaoshuo (Stories Old and New) as well as selections from subsequent collections. The course is discussion based, with periodic short writing assignments. Previous experience with Chinese literature and history is useful but not required. Topics of discussion will be wide-ranging but will include late Ming education, the literary representation of sex and gender, and the generic conventions of short vernacular fiction in the 17th century. Students new to Chinese literature are very welcome. Taught in English.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 303 The Taoist Tradition

This course offers an introduction to the history, practices and worldviews that define the Daoist traditions. Through both secondary scholarship and primary texts, we consider the history of Daoism in reference to the continuities and discontinuities of formative concepts, social norms, and religious practices. Our inquiry into this history centers on consideration of the social forces that have driven the development of Daoism from the second century to the modern day. Special consideration is given to specific Daoist groups and their textual and practical traditions: the Celestial Masters (Tianshi), Great Clarity (Taiqing), Upper Clarity (Shangqing), Numinous Treasure (Lingbao), and Complete Perfection (Quanzhen). Throughout the semester we also reflect on certain topics and themes concerning Daoist traditions. These include constructions of identity and community, material culture, the construction of sacred space, and cultivation techniques.
Same as L23 Re St 303

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L04 Chinese 3055 Contemporary Chinese Culture and Society

This course provides an introduction to emerging trends in Chinese culture and society. We will explore processes of change and continuity in the People's Republic, examining the complexity of social issues and the dynamics of cultural unity and diversity. While we will focus on the post-Mao reform era (1978 to the present), we will consider how contemporary developments draw upon the legacies of the Maoist revolution as well as the pre-socialist past. The course provides an overview of anthropological approaches to the study of contemporary China, introducing students to key concepts, theories, and frameworks integral to the analysis of Chinese culture and society. Readings, lectures, and discussions will highlight not only macro-level processes of social change and continuity but also the everyday experiences of individuals involved in these processes. We will pay particular attention to issues of family life, institutional culture, migration, religion, ethnicity, gender, consumption, and globalization.
Same as L48 Anthro 3055

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L04 Chinese 306 Advanced Chinese for Heritage Speakers I

This course is designed for heritage students who have studied at least two years of Chinese (or equivalent) with grade B- or better to achieve greater proficiency in the oral and written use of the language through reading, listening, speaking and writing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 307 Advanced Chinese for Heritage Speakers II

Continuation of Chinese 306.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 3091 Confucian Thought

This course is designed to introduce students to the history and teachings of one of the world's major religious traditions: Confucianism. We will examine how Confucianism developed in ancient China and afterwards spread throughout East Asia and beyond. In particular, we will pay attention to the issue of ritual and how Confucians attempted to ritualize social interactions and the world at large. In order to do so, we will engage in the writings of Confucius, Mengzi, and Xunzi, three early Chinese writers whose basic ideas about ritual heavily informed myriad cultural practices that are formative for large portions of East Asia today. Hence, this course on ancient thinkers not only introduces thoughts and practices prevalent throughout premodern China, Japan and Korea. It also functions as a catalyst that helps us understand some of the reasons and motivations behind these communities' recent efforts to renegotiate and question "the colonialist flavor" of human rights and democracy.
Same as L23 Re St 3091

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L04 Chinese 3162 Early Modern China

This course examines political, socioeconomic and intellectual-cultural developments in Chinese society from the middle of the 14th century to 1800. This chronological focus largely corresponds to the last two imperial dynasties, the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911). Thematically, the course emphasizes such early modern indigenous developments as increasing commercialization, social mobility and questioning of received cultural values.
Same as L22 History 3162

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 3163 Historical Landscape and National Identity in Modern China

This course attempts to ground the history of modern China in physical space such as imperial palaces, monuments and memorials, campus, homes and residential neighborhoods, recreational facilities, streets, prisons, factories, gardens and churches. Using methods of historical and cultural anthropological analysis, the course invests the places where we see with historical meaning. Through exploring the ritual, political and historical significance of historical landmarks, the course investigates the forces that have transformed physical spaces into symbols of national, local and personal identity. The historical events and processes we examine along the way through the sites include the changing notion of rulership, national identity, state-building, colonialism and imperialism, global capitalism and international tourism. Acknowledging and understanding the fact that these meanings and significances are fluid, multiple, contradictory, and changing over time are an important concern of this course.
Same as L03 East Asia 3163

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 316C Modern China: 1890s to the Present

A survey of China's history from the clash with Western powers in the 1800s to the present day economic revolution. This course examines the background to the 1911 revolution that destroyed the old political order. Then it follows the great cultural and political movements that lead to the Communist victory in 1949. The development of the People's Republic will be examined in detail, from Mao to the global economy.
Same as L22 History 316C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS


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L04 Chinese 3263 Topics in East Asian Studies

A topics course on a variety of East Asian subjects.
Same as L03 East Asia 3263

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 330 Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture

A topics course on Chinese literature and culture; topics vary by semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 3310 19th-Century China: Violence and Transformation

This course traces the history of China over the course of the 19th century, with an emphasis on social and cultural history. This was one of the most tumultuous centuries in Chinese history, during which China faced threats from abroad in the form of Western and Japanese imperialism, and from within, in the form of environmental degradation and rebellions resulting in an unprecedented loss of human life. The 19th century has thus often been portrayed as a period of sharp decline for China. At the same time, we explore the ways in which the origins of the dynamic society and economy found in China today, as well as the worldwide influence of overseas Chinese, can be traced to this century of turmoil.
Same as L22 History 331

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM, HUM Art: HUM, HUM BU: IS


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L04 Chinese 3352 China's Urban Experience: Shanghai and Beyond

The course studies the history of Chinese cities from the mid-19th century to the late 20th century. It situates the investigation of urban transformation in two contexts: the domestic context of modern China's reform and revolution; and the global context of the international flow of people, products, capitals and ideas. It chooses a local narrative approach and situates the investigation in one of China's largest, complex, and most dynamic and globalized cities — Shanghai. The experience of the city and its people reveals the creative and controversial ways people redefined, reconfigured and reshaped forces such as imperialism, nationalism, consumerism, authoritarianism, liberalism, communism and capitalism. The course also seeks to go beyond the "Shanghai model" by comparing Shanghai with other Chinese cities. It presents a range of the urban experience in modern China.
Same as L03 East Asia 3352

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 341 Early and Imperial Chinese Literature

An introduction to important genres and themes of Chinese literature through the study of major writers. Brief lectures on the writers' personal, social, intellectual and historical contexts; most class time is devoted to student discussions of masterworks as an avenue for understanding Chinese culture during selected historical periods. Required for all Chinese majors, and recommended for all Japanese and East Asian Studies majors. No prerequisites; all readings available in English translation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 3415 Early Chinese Art: From Human Sacrifice to the Silk Road

This course examines Chinese art and material culture from the prehistoric period through the end of the medieval Tang dynasty, when the Chinese capital boasted a cosmopolitan population of more than one million people. Topics covered include Neolithic ceramics and jades, the bronzecasting tradition, funerary art and architecture, the Terracotta Army, the origins of Chinese brush arts, Buddhist painting and sculpture, and the varied exotica of the Silk Road. Each class teaches recent works together with the ancient to demonstrate how the origins of Chinese art and architecture continue to influence contemporary works. Prerequisites: Intro to Asian Art (L01 111) or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3415

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: AH, GFAH, HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 342 Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature

An introduction to the major writers and works of Chinese literature from the turn of the 20th century to the present, including fiction, poetry and film. We look at these works in their relevant literary, sociopolitical and cultural contexts (including Western influences). Required for all Chinese majors, and recommended for all Japanese and East Asian Studies majors. No prerequisites; all readings in English translation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L04 Chinese 3425 Classical to Contemporary Chinese Art

Surveying Chinese art and architecture from the 10th century through today, this course examines classical and imperial works as the foundation for modern and contemporary art. Engaging with the theoretical issues in art history, we also pay particular attention to questions of gender, social identity, cultural politics and government control of art. No prerequisites.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3425

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: AH, GFAH BU: IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 3442 History of Chinese Painting

Tracing the unbroken history of Chinese painting from the first through 21st centuries, we explore the full evolution of its traditions and innovations through representative works, artists, genres and critical issues. From its ancient origins to its current practice, we will cover topics such as classical landscapes by scholar painters, the effects of Western contact on modern painting, the contemporary iconography of power and dissent, and theoretical issues such as authenticity, gender, and global art history. Prerequisites: Intro to Asian Art (L01 111) or one course in East Asian Studies recommended.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3442

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: AH, GFAH EN: H


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L04 Chinese 3582 Chinese Screen Romance

Romance is a popular theme in cinema. Since the early silent "Laborer's Love," Chinese filmmakers have created love stories on the silver screen through a variety of film genres, styles, and cultural perspectives. The "romantic" film lens not only follows popular narratives in general but also intervenes modern Chinese culture in significant historical moments. This course surveys the history of Chinese-language cinema through the diverse representation of romantic film plots from the 1920s to the contemporary. During the semester, we will explore the romantic trope in early cinema, leftist cinema of the Republican era, postwar musicals, popular genres in the 1970s and 1980s, new wave cinema in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the PRC, cinema dealt with historical legacies, and some transnationally coproduced films. By visiting a rich history of screen romance, we will learn how love, sexuality and emotion in Chinese cinema represent individual aesthetics and aspiring cultural critiques. All lectures and assignments will be in English. Film materials will be provided with English subtitles.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS


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L04 Chinese 360 Third-Level Modern Chinese I

Emphasis on improving speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Texts include Chinese newspapers and modern literary texts. Open to undergraduates only. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 212 or placement by examination.

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 361 Third-Level Modern Chinese II

Continuation of advanced work in reading Chinese newspapers and modern literary texts. Open to undergraduates only. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 360 or placement by examination.

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L04 Chinese 3702 The Dream of the Red Chamber

Considered by many to be the pinnacle of Chinese vernacular fiction, the sprawling novel The Dream of the Red Chamber (Honglou meng) follows the fortunes of a peculiar young man, Jia Baoyu, as his once elite family crumbles around him. This beloved novel, published in 1791 and known also as The Story of the Stone, has had an outsized impact on Chinese culture for well over two centuries, inspiring TV and movie adaptations, and even amusement parks. The course is largely discussion based, with periodic short writing assignments. Topics of discussion will be wide-ranging but will include Qing dynasty society, the literary representation of sex and gender, the distinction between fiction and nonfiction, and the generic conventions of the late imperial vernacular novel. Previous experience with Chinese literature and history is recommended but not required. Taught in English.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 3750 Revolution and the Modern Nation in Chinese Literature and Culture

This course is an introduction to modern China through literature, critical thought, and analysis during of the first half of the 20th century. In this semester we read the important examples of fiction, essays and criticism, against their historical and cultural background. Beginning with reform-minded Confucian scholars around the turn of the century, modern Chinese literature and culture has had an overriding concern with the fate of China itself. As a result, close readings of literature, popular culture, and criticism from the late Qing Dynasty to the Cultural Revolution give us insight into many of the fundamental issues facing the Chinese people through decades of revolution, foreign invasion, civil war and modernization. During the first half of the century, Chinese literature and culture saw the great achievements of canonical modern writers, such as Lu Xun, Shen Congwen, and Ding Ling. After the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, a singular revolutionary culture ensued, in which literature and the arts were put in the service of political consciousness-molding and Cultural Revolution. During this time, an alternative Chinese literary culture developed in Taiwan, resulting in work that featured various strains of modernism and its resistance. All readings are in English.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L04 Chinese 376 Topics in Comparative Literature


Same as L16 Comp Lit 375

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: IS


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L04 Chinese 399 Undergraduate Independent Study

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and section head.

Credit variable, maximum 6 units.


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L04 Chinese 4011 Popular Culture and Consumption in Modern China

This writing-intensive seminar explores transformations in popular culture and everyday life in Chinese society since 1949 through an analytical focus on political economy and material culture. Drawing upon ethnographic texts, films and material artifacts, we investigate how the forces of state control and global capitalism converge to shape consumer desires and everyday habits in contemporary China. Case studies include eating habits, fashion standards, housing trends, entertainment, sports and counterfeit goods. Prerequisite: previous course in China studies (anthropology, economics, history, literature, philosophy or political science) required. Enrollment by instructor approval only.
Same as L48 Anthro 4011

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, WI A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L04 Chinese 403 Topics in East Asian Religion and Thought

Topics in East Asian Religions is a course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students on specific themes and methodological issues in East Asian religions.
Same as L23 Re St 403

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L04 Chinese 410 Introduction to Traditional Literary Chinese I

Selected readings in premodern Chinese texts. Required of all majors in Chinese and students in fields of specialization where knowledge of literary Chinese is normally expected. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 427 or instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS EN: H


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L04 Chinese 411 Introduction to Literary Chinese II

Selected readings in premodern Chinese texts. Required of all majors in Chinese and students in fields of specialization where knowledge of literary Chinese is normally expected. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 410 or instructor’s permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS Art: HUM


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L04 Chinese 414 Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy

In this course we study Chinese philosophical texts from the classical period (ca. sixth through third centuries BCE). We read selections from the Analects, the Mengzi, the Xunzi, the Zhuanqzi, the Daodejing, and the Hanfeizi, in addition to commentaries on these primary texts. The readings are in classical Chinese with occasional supplemental readings in English and modern Chinese. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the language and grammar of Chinese philosophical texts, introduce students to the tradition of scholarly commentary, and explore a set of influential Chinese texts in the original language. Prerequisite: Chinese 411 or instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD EN: H


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L04 Chinese 418 Gender and Sexuality in East Asian Religions

In this course we explore the role of women in the indigenous religious traditions of China, Japan and Korea (Confucianism, Daoism, Shamanism and Shinto), as well as Buddhism, Christianity and Islam. We begin by considering the images of women (whether mythical or historical) in traditional religious scriptures and historical or literary texts. We then focus on what we know of the actual experience and practice of various types of religious women — nuns and abbesses; shamans and mediums; hermits and recluses; and ordinary laywomen — both historically and in more recent times. Class materials include: literary and religious texts; historical and ethnological studies; biographies and memoirs; and occasional videos and films. Prerequisites: This class is conducted as a seminar, with minimal lectures; substantial reading and writing; and lots of class discussion. For this reason, students who are not either upper-level undergraduates or graduate students, or who have little or no background in East Asian religion or culture, need to obtain the instructor's permission before enrolling.
Same as L23 Re St 418

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 419 Of Zombies, Ghosts, and Ancestors: Interactions of the Living and the Dead in Chinese Religions

This course introduces a basic aspect of the multifaceted history of Chinese religions, culture and civilization by centering on the practice of taking care of the dead. In particular, we will observe how various religious texts, short stories, and plays from China's earliest times until the 16th century depicted the interactions of the living and the dead. Despite the distinct genres, time periods and topics, one important aspect will regularly appear: Apparently people perceived the boundaries between the living and the dead to be quite porous in premodern China. In other words, the dead seemed to have played as much of a role in society and everyday life as living family members, friends and government officials.
Same as L23 Re St 419

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 4242 Culture and Politics in the People's Republic of China: New Approaches

This course inquires into the political, ideological and social frameworks that shaped the cultural production and consumption in the People's Republic of China (PRC). In the realm of literature, film, architecture, and material culture and everyday life, this course pays a close attention to the contestation and negotiation between policy makers, cultural producers, censors and consumers. Understanding the specific contour of how this process unfolded in China allows us to trace the interplay between culture and politics in the formative years of revolutionary China (1949-1966), high socialism (1966-1978), the reform era (1978-1992), and post-socialist China (1992 to present). The course examines new scholarship in fields of social and cultural history, literary studies, and gender studies; and it explores the ways in which new empirical sources, theoretical frameworks, and research methods reinvestigate and challenge conventional knowledge of the PRC that have been shaped by the rise and fall of Cold War politics, the development of area studies in the U.S., and the evolving U.S.-China relations. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate students must have taken no fewer than two China-related courses at the 300 level or higher. Graduate students should be proficient in scholarly Chinese, as they are expected to read scholarly publications and primary materials in Chinese.
Same as L03 East Asia 4242

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 427 Fourth-Level Modern Chinese I

Readings in advanced texts covering a wide variety of fields in social sciences and humanities. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 361 or 421, or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: IS


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L04 Chinese 428 Fourth-Level Modern Chinese II

Readings in advanced texts covering a wide variety of fields in social sciences and humanities. Required of all students desiring subsequent tutorial assistance from the department. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 427 or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L04 Chinese 4290 Madness in Modern Chinese Literature and Visual Culture

Madness is an important theme in literature and visual culture. Since Lu Xun's "The Diary of a Madman," modern Chinese writers and artists in the 20th century have created a diversity of mad characters, narratives, and worlds in their works. Madness in these works might be a means of social critique, a negotiation with the traumatic past, an experiment in the styles of storytelling, or some other alternatives that disrupt the normal orders. Through a close reading of selected cultural texts from China and transnational Chinese communities, this course surveys the representations of madness in modern Chinese literature, cinema and visual arts. All lectures, discussions and assignments will be in English. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L04 Chinese 4489 The Three Emperors: Redefining Chinese Art in the Golden Age

Ruling imperial China during its last Golden Age, the Qing emperors Kangxi, Yongzheng and Qianlong patronized the arts during an unprecedented period of prosperity and international exchange. Many of the works they commissioned are now icons of Chinese culture, but in their time these three Manchus redefined Chinese art with ideas and styles from Baroque Europe, Tibet, Mongolia, and even Islamic Central Asia. This seminar focuses on the ethnically and culturally diverse art, architecture, and material culture patronized by these three emperors to examine how they and their multi-ethnic empire changed the definition of Chinese art during the long 18th century. Prerequisites: Intro to Asian Art (L01 111); or one 300-level course in Asian Art History, History or Literature; or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4489

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L04 Chinese 449 Topics in Comparative Literature


Same as L16 Comp Lit 449

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L04 Chinese 4510 Urban Culture in Modern China

The narrative of rural crisis and peasant revolution has dominated China's modern history for decades. But there has been a growing interest in China's urban past and present with the increased prominence of cities in China's breathtaking economic development and the opening of municipal archives in post-Mao era. The course aims to introduce students to "conventional wisdoms," new directions, and major debates in the urban history field. Topics include: the urban political economy, the cultural dynamics of modernity, the reconstruction of traditions in the making of modernity, the cultural production and consumption, colonialism and imperialism in the urban setting, nationalism, and reform and revolution. Acknowledging and understanding the nuance and difference in views and interpretations in historical writings (historiography) are essential. The course seeks to develop students' research and analytical skills, such as locating secondary sources, incorporating scholarly interpretations, and developing and sustaining a thesis based on secondary and primary sources in student research. Prerequisites: This is an interdisciplinary seminar designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Advanced undergraduate students must have taken at least one China-related course at the 300-level or higher.
Same as L03 East Asia 4510

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 460 Fifth-Level Modern Chinese I

This course is designed for advanced students wishing to improve their skills in conversation, reading and writing of letters, essays, reports, and other types of compositions in Chinese. The reading material is composed of a variety of authentic texts, including newspapers, short stories and essays. This course is conducted entirely in Chinese. Required of all students desiring subsequent tutorial assistance from the department. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 428 or 411, by result of the placement examination, or by instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 461 Fifth-Level Modern Chinese II

This course is designed for advanced students wishing to improve their skills in conversation, reading and writing of letters, essays, reports, and other types of compositions in Chinese. The reading material is composed of a variety of authentic texts, including newspapers, short stories and essays. This course is conducted entirely in Chinese. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 428 or 411, by result of the placement examination, or by instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 4631 Business Chinese I

In the present globalization, China has been fertile ground for foreign joint business ventures, and this course focusing specifically on business Chinese attests to that fact. This course aims at teaching Chinese business communication using a series of case studies to involve and challenge the students as they refine their Mandarin Chinese language skills in a wide range of applied business contexts, from resolving contract disputes, to developing a business strategy, to establishing a franchise overseas. The course is designed to simulate real business environments where students interact with Chinese businesspeople in business settings and are motivated to achieve business goals. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Chinese 428 or instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L04 Chinese 4632 Business Chinese II

Continuation of Business Chinese 4631. This course uses a series of case studies to involve and challenge students as they refine their Mandarin Chinese language skills in a wide range of applied business contexts.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L04 Chinese 467 The Chinese Theater

Survey of the performance and literary traditions of the Chinese theater from their pre-Tang origins to the present day. The course focuses on three forms: 14th-century zaju plays, 16th- and 17th-century chuanqi plays, and recent films from China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Background in either China studies or theater in other cultures recommended.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L04 Chinese 470 Readings in Chinese Literature

Selected literary masterpieces in Chinese, including examples of poetry and prose. All readings and discussion in Chinese. Open to both graduate and undergraduate students. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L04 Chinese 4711 Topics in Religious Studies: Gender and Religion in China

In this course, we explore the images, roles and experience of women in Chinese religions: Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, and so-called "popular" religion. Topics discussed include: gender concepts, norms and roles in each religious tradition; notions of femininity and attitudes toward the female body; biographies of women in Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist literature; female goddesses and deities; and the place of the Buddhist and Daoist nun and laywoman in Chinese society. All readings are in English or in English translation. Prerequisite: senior/graduate standing. Students with no previous background in Chinese religion, literature or culture need to obtain instructor's permission before enrolling.
Same as L23 Re St 4711

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD


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L04 Chinese 476 Reading Seminar in Chinese Traditional Fiction

Extensive readings in major critical works in Chinese and English concerning fiction of imperial China, with emphasis on vernacular fiction of the Ming and Qing periods. Weekly discussions and short reading reports. Knowledge of Chinese language and literature normally required, but arrangements can be made for graduate students in such programs as East Asian Studies and Comparative Literature.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L04 Chinese 477 Reading Seminar in Chinese Traditional Poetry

A seminar on Chinese traditional poetry with varying topics. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 479 Reading Seminar in Modern Chinese Literature

A seminar on modern Chinese literature with varying topics. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L04 Chinese 480 Reading Seminar in Chinese Popular Literature and Culture

A seminar on Chinese popular literature and culture with varying topics. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 481 Reading Seminar in Religion and Chinese Literature

A seminar on religion and Chinese literature with varying topics. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L04 Chinese 482 Reading Seminar in Gender and Chinese Literature

A seminar on gender and Chinese literature with varying topics. Prerequisite: Chinese 341 or instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 486 Independent Work for Senior Honors

This course is taken in the fall semester. Prerequisites: senior standing, eligibility for honors and permission of the department.

Credit 3 units.


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L04 Chinese 487 Independent Work for Senior Honors

This course is taken in the spring semester. Prerequisites: senior standing, eligibility for honors, and permission of the department.

Credit 3 units.


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L04 Chinese 489 Topics in Modern Chinese Literature

A topics course on modern Chinese literature; topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L04 Chinese 4891 Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture

A topics course on Chinese literature and culture; topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: HUM EN: S


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L04 Chinese 490 Topics in Chinese Literature and History

A topics course on Chinese literature and history; topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: permission of the department.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L04 Chinese 498 Guided Readings in Chinese

Prerequisites: graduate standing and permission of the instructor and the graduate adviser. Course normally taken after successful completion of Chinese 428. May be repeated once for credit.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: LA


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