The Department of Education offers students a choice between three basic types of major: the teacher education majors, which allow students to prepare for careers as teachers; the educational studies major, which allows students to study educational institutions and their sociocultural contexts and processes; and the applied linguistics major, which emphasizes the theoretical and empirical foundations of second language studies.

Our teacher education programs prepare students to teach in their choice of elementary, middle or high school settings. While this major is preparation for a teaching career, students also will be prepared to seek positions in cultural institutions or educational agencies. Our teacher education majors provide course work in the psychological bases of learning and teaching; the social and historical background of school systems; and teaching methodology, which includes student teaching. Student teaching is done during the senior year as part of an integrated professional semester of interrelated courses and teaching experiences in a local school. Students also will have other opportunities to participate in field experiences because school visits and observations are included in many additional teacher education courses.

Our major in educational studies examines the historical, social, cultural, psychological and public policy aspects of education. As educational studies majors, students may choose to observe in schools, to engage in internships, or to work with faculty members on their research. Many educational studies majors pursue graduate or professional study; however, this major also prepares students to work in educational, nonprofit or government agencies.

Our major in applied linguistics is concerned with increasing the understanding of the role of language in human affairs and therefore with providing the knowledge necessary for those who are responsible for making language-related decisions, whether the need arises in the classroom, the workplace, the law court or the laboratory. Students evaluate theory and research in different dimensions of the field, such as educational linguistics, second language studies, sociolinguistics and language policy. The major in applied linguistics meets the increasing domestic and international demand for second and foreign language researchers and specialists and helps students qualify for positions that may involve linguistically and culturally diverse learners in the United States and around the world.

Contact:Ronald Banfield
Phone:314-935-3571
Email:rbanfiel@wustl.edu
Website:http://education.wustl.edu

Please refer to the following sections for more information about the:

The Major in Education

Our major in educational studies examines the historical, social, cultural, psychological and public policy aspects of education. Educational studies majors may choose to observe in schools, to engage in internships, or to work with faculty members on their research. Many educational studies majors pursue graduate or professional study; however, this major also prepares students to work in educational, nonprofit or government agencies.

Teacher education majors should seek admission to a teacher preparation program early in their sophomore year. To be eligible, students must pass an entrance examination mandated by the State of Missouri and have at least a 3.0 overall grade point average. In addition, students should consult with an education department adviser as early as possible to ensure that they fulfill College of Arts & Sciences, departmental and professional requirements for certification. Upon completion of the program, a satisfactory records check, and the recommendation of the Washington University Department of Education, the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education issues a teaching certificate if the student has passed the required Missouri certification exams and has an overall grade point average of at least 3.0 and no grade lower than B in required field or education course work. The following teacher education majors are available:

The Major in Elementary Teacher Education

Total units required: 48

This major prepares students to teach grades one through six and may be completed within a four-year undergraduate degree. Students are required to complete a second major and complete the following education courses:

Educ 313BEducation, Childhood and Society3
Educ 314Sociolinguistics, Literacies and Communities3
Educ 4052Educational Psychology: A Focus on Teaching and Learning4
Educ 408Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children3
Educ 466Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers3
Educ 4681Teaching Reading in the Elementary School3
Total units19
  • Students must enroll in the methods block during spring of the junior year:
Educ 4731Elementary School Mathematics3
Educ 4741Elementary Science: Content, Curriculum and Instruction2
Educ 470Language, Learning and Instruction3
Educ 4751Elementary Social Studies: Content, Curriculum and Instruction2
Educ 4771Arts and Aesthetics: A Means of Communication3
Educ 4841Elementary Methods Field Experience2
Total units15
  • Elementary student teaching (Educ 4911) occurs during fall of the senior year, during which students concurrently enroll in Educ 470 and Educ 4831:
Educ 4831The Teaching-Learning Process in the Elementary School3
Educ 4911Student Teaching in the Elementary Schoolvar.; max 8
Educ 525Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Disabilities3

The Major in Middle School Teacher Education

Total units required: 44

This option prepares students to teach in middle school grades five through nine. Students must major in a subject field taught at the middle school level (English, science, mathematics or social studies) and maintain a 3.0 grade point average in that content field. In addition, students are required to take the following education courses:

  • 3 credits in educational foundations:
Educ 301CThe American School3
or Educ 453B Sociology of Education
or Educ 459F Philosophies of Education
or Educ 481 History of Education in the United States
  • plus:
Educ 325Psychology of Adolescence3
Educ 4052Educational Psychology: A Focus on Teaching and Learning4
Educ 408Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children3
Educ 4451Teaching Writing in School Settings3
Educ 4821The Teaching-Learning Process in the Secondary School3
Educ 4843Field Experience Seminarvar.; max 3
Educ 4951Middle School Philosophy and Organization2
Educ 4952Middle School Curriculum and Instruction3
Educ 5253Instructional Interventions in Reading for Adolescents and English Language Learners3
  • The student's content area curriculum and instruction course
  • Educ 4922 and Educ 5681. This course work includes a semester of student teaching during the senior year.

The middle school teacher education option may be done in conjunction with the secondary major (all requirements for both must be met, including student teaching at both levels). Students who choose middle school will student teach in the spring of their senior year. Some education course work will be taken concurrently with student teaching, but that course work will vary depending upon the option selected.

The Major in Secondary Teacher Education

Total units required: 36-39

This major prepares students to teach in a senior high school, grades nine through 12. Students are required to complete a major in a teaching field, such as English, mathematics, sciences or social studies, and to maintain a 3.0 grade point average in that major. In addition, students are required to take the following education courses:

  • 3 credits of educational foundations:
Educ 301CThe American School3
or Educ 453B Sociology of Education
or Educ 459F Philosophies of Education
or Educ 481 History of Education in the United States
  • plus:
Educ 313BEducation, Childhood and Society3
Educ 4052Educational Psychology: A Focus on Teaching and Learning4
Educ 408Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children3
Educ 4821The Teaching-Learning Process in the Secondary School3
Educ 4843Field Experience Seminarvar.; max 3
Educ 5253Instructional Interventions in Reading for Adolescents and English Language Learners3
  • The student's content area curriculum and instruction course (plus Educ 4451 for English majors)
  • Educ 492 and Educ 5681. This course work includes a semester of student teaching (Educ 492) during spring of the senior year during which students concurrently enroll in Educ 4821.

The Major in K-12 Teacher Education

Total units required: 36

This major prepares students to teach K-12 in the areas of art and foreign languages, including Latin. Students are required to complete a major in their teaching field and to maintain a 3.0 grade point average in that major. In addition, students are required to take the following education courses:

  • 3 credits of educational foundations:
Educ 301CThe American School3
or Educ 453B Sociology of Education
or Educ 459F Philosophies of Education
or Educ 481 History of Education in the United States
  • plus:
Educ 313BEducation, Childhood and Society3
Educ 4052Educational Psychology: A Focus on Teaching and Learning4
Educ 408Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children3
Educ 4821The Teaching-Learning Process in the Secondary School3
Educ 4843Field Experience Seminarvar.; max 3
Educ 5253Instructional Interventions in Reading for Adolescents and English Language Learners3
  • the student's content area curriculum and instruction course
  • Educ 494 and Educ 5681. This course work includes a semester of student teaching (Educ 494) during spring of the senior year during which students concurrently enroll in Educ 4821.

The Major in Educational Studies

Total units required: 24

This major applies the perspectives and methods of various disciplines to questions about educational institutions and processes and the social and cultural factors that affect them. Students are required to complete 24 units of advanced study as follows:

  • three courses in discipline-based studies selected from:
Educ 304Educational Psychology3
Educ 434BSeminar in Black Social Sciences3
Educ 453BSociology of Education3
Educ 459FPhilosophies of Education3
Educ 462Politics of Education3
Educ 4621The Political Economy of Urban Education3
Educ 481History of Education in the United States3
  • one or two courses in individual processes of education selected from:
Educ 315Cognitive Bases of Peak Performance I3
Educ 4023Second Language Acquisition and Technology3
Educ 4052Educational Psychology: A Focus on Teaching and Learning4
Educ 408Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children3
Educ 461Introduction to Educational Tests and Measurements3
Educ 4692Second Language Reading and Writing: Theory, Research and Practice3
  • one or two courses in social context of education selected from:
Educ 301CThe American School3
Educ 303RGender and Education3
Educ 313BEducation, Childhood and Society3
Educ 4111Linguistics and Language Learning3
Educ 4280History of Urban Schooling in the United States3
Educ 4288Higher Education in American Culture3
Educ 4289Neighborhoods, Schools and Social Inequality3
Educ 4315Culture, Language and the Education of Black Students3
Educ 4511Race, Ethnicity and Culture: Qualitative Inquiry in Urban Education3
Educ 4608The Education of Black Children and Youth in the United States3
Educ 489Education and Public Policy in the United States3
Educ 4891The Science and Politics of Testing in the United States3

Educational studies majors are strongly urged to complete a second major.

The Major in Applied Linguistics

The major in applied linguistics is concerned with increasing the understanding of the role of language in human affairs and, therefore, with providing the knowledge necessary for those who are responsible for making language-related decisions, whether the need arises in the classroom, the workplace, the law court or the laboratory. With the major in applied linguistics, students learn to evaluate theory and research in different dimensions of the field, such as educational linguistics, second language studies, sociolinguistics and language policy. Required introductory courses provide the necessary foundation of advanced classes. Courses at all levels include critical analysis of different theories, conceptual models, and research methodologies. Students in applied linguistics may engage in international or domestic internships or work with faculty members on their research.

Specifically, the major in applied linguistics at Washington University meets the increasing domestic and international demand for second and foreign language specialists. This major, combined with a major or minor in educational studies, any language (Spanish, French, Italian, Chinese, Swahili, German, Japanese, etc.), anthropology, philosophy-neuroscience-psychology (PNP), or psychological & brain sciences, helps students qualify for positions that may involve linguistically and culturally diverse learners in the United States and around the world. The major is also suitable for students who wish to pursue graduate studies in applied linguistics, education, psychology and other related fields.

This major is composed of 30 credits that focus on the theoretical, empirical and practical foundations of teaching and learning languages.

Required Courses:

Educ 4111Linguistics and Language Learning3
  • And one of the following:
Ling 170DIntroduction to Linguistics3
Educ 200Topics in Education3
  • Study of a second language (three semesters)
  • Elective Courses: at least two of the following: (Subfield: Second Language Studies)
Educ 4023Second Language Acquisition and Technology3
Educ 4692Second Language Reading and Writing: Theory, Research and Practice3
Ling 466Second Language Acquisition3
Span 467Grammar and Vocabulary Acquisition3
  • At least two of the following: (Subfield: Educational Linguistics or Sociolinguistics)

One course from following list:

AFAS 210The Linguistic Legacy of the African Slave Trade in Interdisciplinary Perspective3
Anthro 3386Language, Culture and Society3
Ling 311Introduction to Semantics3
Ling 312Phonetics3
Ling 339Introduction to Sociolinguistics3
Ling 341Linguistic Diversity in the United States3

Other courses from following list:

Comp Lit 394Worldwide Translation: Language, Culture, Technology3
Educ 4014Urban Education in Multiracial Societies3
Educ 4036Children of Immigrants: Identity and Acculturation3
Educ 4302Cognitive Psychology Applied to Education3
Educ 4315Culture, Language and the Education of Black Students3
Educ 453BSociology of Education3
E Lit 407Old English, Introductory3
E Lit 472History of the English Language3
Psych 433Psychology of Language3
Span 417Spanish Phonetics, Phonology and Dialectology3

Additional Information

Senior Honors: Students who wish to pursue honors study need to contact the departmental Honors Coordinator about eligibility. Qualifications for eligibility include a minimum 3.65 grade point average and completion of some education course work. Honors study involves both demonstration of acquired knowledge and a thesis based on an original research project. Students may contact a faculty honors adviser as early as the sophomore year, but ideally this is done during the junior year.

Title II: Section 207 of Title II of the Higher Education Act mandates that Washington University's teacher education programs (or Department of Education) make public specific teacher education performance data. That information can be found on the Department of Education website.

Please refer to the following sections for more information about the:

The Minor in Educational Studies

Units required: 18

Required courses:

Discipline-based study (two courses required):

Educ 304Educational Psychology3
Educ 434BSeminar in Black Social Sciences3
Educ 453BSociology of Education3
Educ 459FPhilosophies of Education3
Educ 462Politics of Education3
Educ 4621The Political Economy of Urban Education3
Educ 481History of Education in the United States3

Individual Processes of Education (one course required):

Educ 315Cognitive Bases of Peak Performance I3
Educ 4023Second Language Acquisition and Technology3
Educ 4052Educational Psychology: A Focus on Teaching and Learning4
Educ 408Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children3
Educ 461BThe Construction and Experience of Black Adolescence3
Educ 4692Second Language Reading and Writing: Theory, Research and Practice3

Social Context of Education (one course required):

Educ 301CThe American School3
Educ 303RGender and Education3
Educ 313BEducation, Childhood and Society3
Educ 4111Linguistics and Language Learning3
Educ 4280History of Urban Schooling in the United States3
Educ 4288Higher Education in American Culture3
Educ 4289Neighborhoods, Schools and Social Inequality3
Educ 4315Culture, Language and the Education of Black Students3
Educ 4511Race, Ethnicity and Culture: Qualitative Inquiry in Urban Education3
Educ 4608The Education of Black Children and Youth in the United States3
Educ 489Education and Public Policy in the United States3
Educ 4891The Science and Politics of Testing in the United States3

Elective courses:

The remaining 6 units are electives that can be satisfied with any courses from the above lists.

The Minor in Applied Linguistics

Units required: 18

The minor in applied linguistics meets the increasing domestic and international demand for second and foreign language teachers. This minor, combined with a major in educational studies, language (Spanish, French, Italian, Chinese, Swahili, German, Japanese, etc.), anthropology, philosophy-neuroscience-psychology (PNP), or psychological & brain sciences, helps students qualify for teaching positions in a variety of language programs for linguistically and culturally diverse learners in the United States and around the world. The minor is also suitable for students who wish to pursue graduate studies in applied linguistics, education, literature, psychology and other related fields. The minor enhances students' job prospects, applications to graduate programs, and opportunities to obtain teaching assistantships in graduate school.

This minor is composed of 18 credits that focus on the theoretical, empirical and practical foundations of teaching and learning languages. All participating students must have a declared primary major.

Required courses: (courses taught in English unless otherwise indicated)

Educ 4111Linguistics and Language Learning3
Educ 4692Second Language Reading and Writing: Theory, Research and Practice3
Ling 466Second Language Acquisition3

Elective Courses:  at least one of the following:

AFAS 210The Linguistic Legacy of the African Slave Trade in Interdisciplinary Perspective3
Anthro 3386Language, Culture and Society3
Anthro 4122Language and Gender3
Educ 4023Second Language Acquisition and Technology3
Educ 4302Cognitive Psychology Applied to Education3
Educ 4315Culture, Language and the Education of Black Students3
Ling 312Phonetics3
Psych 433Psychology of Language3
Span 417Spanish Phonetics, Phonology and Dialectology3

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for L12 Educ.


L12 Educ 102 Freshman Seminar: Social Forces, Development, and Early Childhood Education

The purpose of this seminar is for students to gain a greater understanding of some of the most critical issues in education today. In addition to course readings and discussions, the class travels to various sites in the community in order to see some of the effects of these issues on students, parents, schools, teachers and their communities. The seminar consists of several segments. In each one, students read literature addressing a particular issue surrounding education, schooling and learning. Students then participate in a site visit to observe and/or experience the issue we are examining. Class sessions alternate between weekly meetings and site visits.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L12 Educ 200 Topics in Education

Introduction to broad areas of educational concern. Topics vary by semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: HUM EN: S


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L12 Educ 203A Introduction to Education

This course is a broad look at the diverse issues surrounding education not only in the United States but around the world. Students examine schooling in areas such as the Pacific Rim, Middle East, Europe and America. We also take a look at educating when working with children with special needs. In addition, students explore some of the ideas and issues unique to the experience of teaching and learning in the U.S. Students work in small groups throughout the semester in projects designed to deepen their understanding of Education in the 21st Century. Throughout the semester, students participate in the Each One Teach One program as tutors. (This course is recommended for freshmen and sophomores only.)

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L12 Educ 234 Introduction to Speech and Hearing Disorders

Introduction to the fields of speech-language pathology, audiology, education of hearing-impaired children, and speech and hearing sciences. Normal speech and hearing processes are discussed, as well as communication disorders. Selected research topics in speech and hearing sciences are presented.

Credit 3 units. BU: BA EN: S


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L12 Educ 300 Topics in Education

An examination and appraisal of major educational issues, drawing on normative frameworks, empirical research and analytical literature. Seminar format. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L12 Educ 301C The American School

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: BA, ETH, HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 303 Gender and Education

An examination, through the lens of gender, of educational practices at the preprimary, primary, secondary and higher education levels. A sociological and historical approach links gender discrimination in education to other forms of discrimination as well as social forces. Students' own gender-related educational experiences are analyzed in the context of the literature used in the course. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L12 Educ 304 Educational Psychology

A course in psychological concepts relevant to education. Organized around four basic issues: how humans think and learn; how children, adolescents and adults differ in their cognitive and moral development; the sense in which motivation and intention explain why people act as they do; how such key human characteristics as intelligence, motivation and academic achievement can be measured. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Offered fall and spring semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L12 Educ 306 Literacy Education in the Context of Human Rights and Global Justice

Literacy is a fundamental human right. In this course, we explore the current and historical relationships between literacy and human rights. This includes an analysis of the ways in which literacy education is fundamentally linked to issues of global justice, including political engagement and voting rights, environmental sustainability, gender and racial equality, and participation in the globalized economy. We investigate how literacy education has played a role in social struggles at local, national and international levels such as the creation of the Freedom Schools in St. Louis; the Native American boarding school movement; the Civil Rights movement in the United States including the creation of the Citizenship schools; the Ebonics debate in Oakland, California; the Nicaraguan Literacy Campaign; and the current No Child Left Behind federal educational policy. Students explore how literacy education has been used, in each of these cases, as a tool of empowerment and a tool of oppression.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS BU: BA EN: S


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L12 Educ 313B Education, Childhood and Society

An examination of childhood, child development and education from different perspectives. Observation of children in a variety of settings, including classrooms. Through historical, sociological, psychological and political readings, students clarify current ideas about children, investigate the nature of childhood, and begin to understand how and why childhood is constructed as it is. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Limited to 45 students.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L12 Educ 314 Sociolinguistics, Literacies and Communities

The well-known "literacy crisis" has forced scholars from many nations to turn their attention to learning about linguistic, cultural and class diversity of students and what this means for learning in schools. In this course we engage with the perceived disjuncture between homes, communities and schools in an era of higher literacy standards, local literacies and community knowledge. We examine the contribution of sociolinguistics to what we know about language and literacy education, achievement and how this relates to social transformation within and across communities. Students can expect theoretical and methodological conversations as we use critical discourse theories, systemic linguistic approaches and empowerment theories as lenses to formulate, challenge and critique the existing status of language and literacy education.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L12 Educ 315 Cognitive Bases of Peak Performance I

An examination and appraisal of major educational issues, drawing on normative frameworks, empirical research and analytical literature. Seminar format. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L12 Educ 325 Psychology of Adolescence

A broad introduction to adolescence as a developmental period of transition and change. The major topics include the fundamental changes of adolescence, the context of adolescence, and processes of psychological development. Prerequisite: Psych 100B.
Same as L33 Psych 325

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L12 Educ 326 Topics in AMCS: From Neurons to Neighborhoods: Inequality & Childhood in America

The topic of this course varies from semester to semester. Consult Course Listings for a description of the current offering.
Same as L98 AMCS 336

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 337 Play and Development

An examination of current research and theory in play, in development and education, from infancy through the early school years. Topics include play and the development of language, social skills, creativity and cognitive abilities. We also examine the uses of play in educational contexts, focusing on preschool and the early primary grades. Prerequisite: Psych 321 Developmental Psychology or Educ 304 Educational Psychology.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L12 Educ 338 Computer Technology in Education

Technology has become increasing important in education in the last 10 years. Many exciting new software applications have been developed by scholars in the learning sciences, an interdisciplinary field based in cognitive psychology. Many of these systems draw on the power of the internet to support online student collaboration in inquiry-based and project-based learning. This course introduces students to computer technology in education. No prior knowledge of computer programming or software design is required. A major goal of the course is to teach students the basic concepts behind computer programming and design. Toward this end, a significant portion of the course involves laboratory work where students solve programming assignments. This basic knowledge allows students to acquire a deeper understanding of the different possible approaches to developing computer applications that are based on learning sciences research. This course requires a special classroom in which each student has his or her own computer during the class. Enrollment is limited to the number of students that can be supported by this classroom.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS EN: S


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L12 Educ 343 Text, Memory and Identity

This course explores issues of collective memory and identity through the study of texts such as national myths and official histories taught in schools. The focus is on texts themselves and how they are produced (e.g., by the state, popular culture) and consumed. The course has two components, methodological and analytical. In the first, we read a number of theoretical works devoted to definitions of the text from a historical and structural point of view. In the second, we analyze various key works that have played a crucial role in the formation of communities of memory and identity and the borders that separate them. The course is comparative, multidisciplinary and international in its scope.
Same as L97 IAS 343

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L12 Educ 366 Psychology of Creativity

This course is an introduction to the psychological study of art and creativity. Our topics include the artist; the audience; the artistic product; the creative process; and social, cultural and institutional influences on the creative process. We explore these issues by considering a range of creative fields, including painting, literature, music and theater performance. Throughout the semester, we take a developmental perspective on psychology and art. How do children learn to create, perceive and understand different art forms? What role can the arts play in education? To ground our study of the psychology of art, we explore what "art" is, which members of society are labeled "artists," and how these categories are socially and culturally defined. Prerequisite: Educ 304 Educational Psychology or Psych 325 Adolescent Psychology or Psych 321 Developmental Psychology.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L12 Educ 400 Topics in Education

An analysis of major educational issues, drawing on empirical research and literature. Seminar format. Topics vary by semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS


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L12 Educ 4014 Urban Education in Multiracial Societies


Same as L18 URST 400

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: SSC, WI EN: S


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L12 Educ 4015 American Democracy and the Policy-Making Process

This course is part of the Semester in DC Program
Same as L32 Pol Sci 4001

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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L12 Educ 4022 Higher Education Administration: History, Research, and Practice.

Higher education is the subject of much general public interest and commentary, and yet it is an endeavor with an extraordinary amount of specific detail, practices and expertise. In this course, students will study the history and research that underlies the current state of higher education in America. Then, specific practices and regulations in higher education administration will be described and related to the research. Students will then apply this information to the analysis of specific situations in higher education administration and the management of public perceptions of universities. There are no prerequisites, but the course is intended for advanced undergraduates and PhD students and is restricted to the consent of the department.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: HUM EN: S


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L12 Educ 4023 Second Language Acquisition and Technology

This seminar, for undergraduate and graduate students, transforms research and theory about second language acquisition into practice while focusing on technology-driven applications. The course fosters professional development as participants formulate critical skills for evaluating, creating and integrating technology into the language classroom. Course formats include readings, discussions and demonstrations with technologies. The course is now open to undergraduates. Graduate students can enroll whenever it suits their course planning. The course counts for the Graduate Certificate in Language Instruction and for the undergraduate minor in applied linguistics. This course carries the Social Sciences attribute and can be taken as an elective in several different programs.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4033 Video Microanalysis: Methods and Tools

The purpose of this course is to explore video microanalysis as a methodological tool for studying and valuing unconscious aspects of culturally diverse settings. Utilizing social cultural theoretical lens, this type of analysis reveals fleeting actions, subtle movements, peripheral events and nonverbal communication that are not easily identified in real-time viewing. Specifically we may look at facial expressions, direction of gaze, hand movements, body position and use of material resources as micro techniques to expand our capacity to explore minute aspects and alternative interpretations of social interactions.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD EN: S


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L12 Educ 4036 Children of Immigrants: Identity and Acculturation

This seminar examines two subgroups: child immigrants and the native-born children of immigrants. It interrogates cultural/ethnic identity, cultural adaptation, bilingualism and biculturalism, and challenges and achievements of this young generation through ethnography, literature and sociological accounts. We aim to scrutinize the studies of the "1.5" generation and the second generation, and theories such as "segmented assimilation," across a wide range of ethnic groups, from people of East Asian origins to those with Latin American ancestries, by mainly focusing on their experiences in the United States.
Same as L97 IAS 4036

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L12 Educ 4037 Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity in Higher Education

The course will address historical and contemporary aspects related to diversity, inclusion and equity in American higher education, with a specific focus on "the student." We will concentrate on three primary themes: the history of higher education within a sociocultural context; politics, movements and student access; and current diversity trends/issues in higher education. Through the integration of relevant information from history, law and critical policy (i.e., Affirmative Action), this course will attempt to develop a complex, comprehensive understanding of diversity and equity within American higher education. Additionally, the course will examine the conceptual and linguistic evolution of diversity and cultural advances in higher education. An emphasis is placed on critical reading, writing and class participation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC, SD


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L12 Educ 404 Study for Honors

A research program arranged by the student and a faculty member. Prerequisite: recommendation for Honors study.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS EN: S


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L12 Educ 4052 Educational Psychology: A Focus on Teaching and Learning

The classroom as a physical, social and intellectual environment. Selected psychological concepts and theories are applied to processes and practices of teaching and learning through readings, discussions and participation/observation in preschools and elementary and secondary schools. A systematic, firsthand look at schooling in America both for prospective teachers and those interested in furthering their understanding of fundamental principles of teaching and learning. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Must enroll in fieldwork laboratory (5 hours per week).

Credit 4 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L12 Educ 4055 Central Topics in Learning Sciences Research

The learning sciences are a group of disciplinary approaches to the study of learning, including cognitive science, education, psychology, anthropology and sociology. The core of the approach is based in the study of cognition and its relationship to the disciplines of science, mathematics and literacy. Technology has become increasingly important in the last 10 years, as computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) software has grown in sophistication and effectiveness. The learning sciences have contributed interesting new methodologies for studying and documenting how learning occurs in real-world settings. In this course, we review the broad range of research currently taking place in the learning sciences, including methodologies for studying learning, computer software that supports both solitary and collaborative learning, the impact of new technologies on educational practice, and how learning sciences research impacts teacher professional development and school-wide reform. Students acquire the ability to think creatively and critically about the learning sciences, and to critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of specific classroom approaches and software applications.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS EN: S


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L12 Educ 407 Curriculum and Instruction in Modern Foreign Languages

Modern foreign language curriculum in the secondary schools, with emphasis on the selection, organization and appraisal of materials. Analysis of methods of instruction and evaluation in teaching modern foreign languages. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Secondary teacher education majors are required to take 3 credit hours during the fall semester in which student teaching is done.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 408 Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children

Major handicaps of children that require educational modifications. The nature of the handicaps, their known causes and educational provisions for exceptional children, ranging from special schools to "mainstreaming" children into regular classrooms. The nature of giftedness, together with current practices of educating gifted children and youth. Required in teacher certification program. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Offered fall and spring semesters.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L12 Educ 4111 Linguistics and Language Learning

The course, taught in English, provides a critical survey of various components involved in the relationship between linguistics and language learning. The course emphasizes the language learner and explores dimensions of second language acquisition. The course begins with an examination of linguistic theories and then highlights the influence of linguistic theories on L2 acquisition research. The course then moves to an exploration of research on language and the brain. With this foundation, the course covers both internal and external factors related to language acquisition, such as language aptitude, age, gender, memory, prior knowledge, etc. In summary, theoretical and research dimensions of both linguistics and language learning are treated. This course counts as a requirement for the Graduate Certificate in Language Instruction and for the undergraduate minor in applied linguistics. Prerequisite: Ling 170 is recommended but not required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L12 Educ 413 Curriculum and Instruction in Art K-12

Art curriculum in the public schools, with emphasis on examination of methods and materials for teaching art. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Secondary teacher education majors are required to take 3 credit hours during the year in which student teaching is done. Offered fall semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 414 Curriculum and Instruction in English

English curriculum in the secondary school; emphasis on the selection and organization of materials. Analysis of methods of instruction and evaluation in teaching literature and language. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Secondary teacher education majors are required to take 3 credit hours during the year in which student teaching is done. Offered fall semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 415 Curriculum and Instruction in Science

Secondary school science curriculum and instructional methods, including evaluation of curricular materials and student performance based on specific teaching objectives. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Secondary teacher education majors are required to take 3 credit hours during the fall semester during the year in which student teaching is done. Offered fall semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L12 Educ 417 Curriculum and Instruction in Mathematics

Mathematics curriculum in the secondary school, with emphasis on modern developments in organization of mathematics. Analysis of methods of instruction and evaluation in teaching mathematics. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Secondary teacher education majors are required to take 3 credit hours during the fall semester during the year in which student teaching is done.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L12 Educ 418 Curriculum and Instruction in Social Studies

Goals of general education in social studies and their relationship to the nature of knowledge in the social sciences. Introduction to the nature of thinking and its relationship to pedagogy and teaching materials. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Secondary teacher education majors are required to take 3 credit hours during the year in which student teaching is done.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4211 New Media Literacy and Popular Culture in Education

At the closing of the 20th century, the "digital turn" began to shape how individuals learn, communicate and interact with one another. Current and emerging media technologies have continued to change how individuals (youth and adults alike) gather information; consume, produce and disseminate texts; and participate in both local and global communities through print- and screen-based platforms such as email, blog, podcast and mash-ups, among others. In this course, we explore what we mean by technology, the various types and uses of technology and the relationship of technology to literacy and education. We begin with characteristics of "new media" and consequences of the digital revolution. Then, we examine conceptualizations of literacy in a historical context-from literacy as reading and writing to literacy as multimodality, convergence and participation. Finally, we shift our inquiry to investigate how new media literacies and technologies are shaping (and are shaped by) different forms of popular culture in United States and international contexts, including parts of Asia, Australia, Europe, Africa and North and South America. We make explicit the connections to education and explore possible directions for research and practice, including copyright and fair use issues present in educational settings. Readings, discussions and activities online and in actual communities culminate in individual- and class-based new media productions. Prerequisite: at least junior standing or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4271 Health of the Child

A study of the health and nutrition of children. Prerequisites: admission to the teacher education program or permission of director of Teacher Education.

Credit 1 unit. A&S: SS EN: S


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L12 Educ 428 History of Education in the United States

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS EN: S


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L12 Educ 4280 History of Urban Schooling in the United States

This reading colloquium examines the history of urban schooling and school policy in the United States. Readings focus on the growing literature in the history of urban schooling and on primary source material. We explore urban schooling in general and we examine particular primary source material as well as particular cities and their school districts. Such districts may include New York, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, St. Louis, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Atlanta and others. The course has two goals: to develop a strong contextual understanding of the conditions of urban schooling, the history of urban school reform, and the debates over the purposes of urban schools; and to examine the ways historians have explored urban schooling in the U.S. Students should expect to read a book a week as well as primary source materials and occasional articles.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 4288 Higher Education in American Culture

Colleges and universities in the United States have been the sites of both cultural conservation and political and cultural subversion from their founding in the 17th and 18th centuries. They have been integral to national and regional cultural and economic development. In addition, they have functioned as one component of an increasingly diversified and complex system of education. This course, a reading colloquium, surveys higher education in American history, including the ideas that have contributed to shaping that history, beginning with its origins in European institutional models. We use primary and secondary readings to examine critically its conflict-ridden institutional transformation from exclusively serving the elite to increasingly serving the masses. We explore the cultural sources of ideas as well as the growth and diversification of institutions, generations of students and faculty as they changed over time, and curricular evolutions and revolutions in relation to the larger social and cultural contexts of institutional expansion.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: HUM


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L12 Educ 4289 Neighborhoods, Schools and Social Inequality

A major purpose of the course is to study the research and policy literature related to neighborhoods, schools and the corresponding opportunity structure in urban America. The course is informed by theoretical models drawn from economics, political science, sociology, anthropology, education and law. A major focus is to gain greater understanding of the experiences and opportunity structure(s) of urban dwellers, in general, and urban youth, in particular. While major emphasis is placed on data derived from the interface of urban environments and the corresponding institutions within them, the generational experiences of various ethnic groups complement the course foci.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4301 Historical Social Content of the American School

An analysis of the development of American schooling within the context of American social history. Focus on three general themes: differing conceptions of schooling held by leading American educational thinkers, changing relationships among schools and such other educational institutions as the church and the family, policy issues that have shaped the development of schooling in America. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: BA, ETH, HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 4302 Cognitive Psychology Applied to Education

This course is intended to cover topics in the cognitive psychology of human memory, conceptual learning, and comprehension with special focus on areas, theory and research that have potential application to education. Thus, the course provides selective coverage of theoretical and empirical work in cognitive psychology that provides potential to inform and improve educational practice. The applicability of these themes is explicitly developed and evaluated through the primary research literature using educationally oriented experimental paradigms. The course is expected to be of interest and benefit to education majors and to psychology majors interested in cognitive psychology and its applications. Prerequisites: junior/senior status, 9 units in Psychology and Psych 100B or junior/senior status, 9 units in Education and Psych 100B.
Same as L33 Psych 4302

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4312 Tools of Inquiry

This course offers an introduction to teacher inquiry and provides a foundation of skills, knowledge and performances that effective teachers use to monitor and improve practice. In this course teachers are actively involved in their own teaching and learning with an emphasis on the following: (1) Reflective practice: Reflective practitioners continually evaluate the effects of their choices and actions on others (e.g., students, parents and other professionals in the learning community) and actively seek out opportunities to improve practice and grow professionally. (2) Use of technology: Teacher leaders model the use of media and technology as tools of inquiry. This course supports teachers to do the following: use multiple sources of data to assess the growth of individual learners; use assessment data to adjust curriculum and instruction to student needs; investigate their own biases, assumptions and ideologies and monitor the effects on student learning; conduct research in the classroom to assist them in improving their practice; and use portfolios and other reflective practices to document and monitor their professional development. Offered spring semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4315 Culture, Language and the Education of Black Students

This course examines the communicative patterns of what is called variously African-American language, Pan-African linguistic systems and Ebonics within the context of public school policy and practice. In addition to a review of the structural and pragmatic aspects of Black speech, the course highlights relationships between controversies within the linguistic community, contrasting views of speech within Black lay communities, public discourse, and educational policy. Students also conduct a field-based research project in accord with their particular interests.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 434B Seminar in Black Social Sciences

This seminar applies a deep reading to social science texts that examine the construction and experiences of black people in the United States from the point of view of black scholars. Readings include theoretical and empirical work. The seminar focuses on the influence of the disciplines of psychology, sociology and anthropology on the policy and social practices that characterize dominant North American institutions. Advanced class level strongly advised.
Same as L90 AFAS 434B

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L12 Educ 4351 Reading and Reading Development

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an up-to-date understanding of the scientific research on skilled reading and its development. The readings for the course include some very recent materials as well as some of the important older work. The course focuses on the cognitive and linguistic bases of reading and spelling and the implications of this research for such issues as developmental dyslexia and reading instruction. Most of the research covered examines reading processes in English, but we also discuss other languages and writing systems.
Same as L33 Psych 4351

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 440 Women in the History of Higher Education and the Professions

An advanced seminar with readings exploring education, historical studies and feminist theory. Each student writes a paper, based on research in local archives and in other primary sources, on a topic related to women in higher education and/or professions. Prerequisites: junior standing or above; some background in American history.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD


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L12 Educ 4413 Project Design for Math and Science Education

A course for those students who have an interest in teaching or educational design: This graduate/advanced-undergraduate course focuses on the design and construction of educational projects for schoolchildren in the middle and high school levels of mathematics and science. Students in the course, in small group collaborations, conduct an entire cycle of design, implementation and evaluation of a small math or science project (or both) for local middle or high school students. Projects are aligned with state and national standards, so they could be used in Missouri public schools. Creativity is encouraged! The class includes four phases of work throughout the semester: 1) Ongoing reading and discussion of the national and state standards for math and science instruction, and of research literature on inquiry in science and math education; 2) design of project activities, materials and assessments, including specification of content, pedagogical and technology goals, and alignment with standards; 3) conduct of the teaching projects at selected sites with middle school or high school students; 4) evaluation of projects in a final presentation and report. Students in science, mathematics, psychology and education, with interests in teaching, educational research or educational outreach, are encouraged to attend.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS EN: S


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L12 Educ 4414 Learning Technologies for Math and Science

What does the integration of electronic technology into classrooms, projects and informal settings mean for the development of our students' understanding of mathematics and science? What implications does it have for our own content understanding and for how we lead our students in the classroom? Can we really integrate information technology into the classroom in ways that truly enhance student inquiry and reasoning? This course focuses on the function, design, use and effectiveness of electronic technology in mathematics and science education, and, in particular, how it interacts with content and classroom practice. A primary perspective in the course is the ways in which electronic tools can be used to promote understanding and interpretation of data and quantitative thinking as springboards to inquiry, modeling, and the doing of "authentic science." Participants learn several software applications and computer-based curricula and read current research on the implications for the learning sciences of technology and modeling in science and math. Content emphasis is from middle and high school science and mathematics and is accessible to all teachers of science and math. In-service teachers, graduate students and advanced undergraduates in education, mathematics, science and psychology are invited.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS EN: S


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L12 Educ 4415 Learning Sciences in Math and Science

This course introduces the concepts of the learning sciences as related to mathematics, science and technology education. The focus of the course is on how students learn fundamental concepts selected each semester from topics such as number, space, shape, data, operations, functions, rate, balance, density, etc. and how their ideas evolve and develop over time. The inventiveness of children's thinking and the sophistication of their interactions are shown as rich resources, often underutilized in typical classroom instruction. The developmental and epistemological theories of scholars such Jean Piaget and the von Hieles are contrasted with sociocultural and linguistic approaches such as of Lev Vygotsky, Sylvia Scribner and Michael Cole, and the pragmatic theories of John Dewey. Topics include studies of error patterns, misconceptions, alternative conceptions in mathematics and science and how these relate to outside experience, student interactions and discourse patterns using excerpts from real classrooms. Students are expected to read original works, learn to analyze video interviews from each perspective, and to read and summarize existing literature on children's reasoning for specific topics. The course is targeted toward upper-division undergraduates, master's and doctoral students in education, psychology and/or mathematics and science, and adjusted to meet these various levels of preparation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS EN: S


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L12 Educ 4451 Teaching Writing in School Settings

Writing teachers often know how to write well but less about the teaching of writing. To provide effective instruction in writing, teachers need, first of all, experiences with writing instruction and theoretical knowledge to guide classroom practices. The goals of this course are as follows: to provide opportunities for all teachers of English and language arts, to develop theoretical knowledge and skill as teachers of writing, to connect the practices of research and teaching, to encourage teachers to give their students multiple and varied experiences with writing, to assist teachers in learning to respond to students' writing and assess their progress as writers.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4511 Race, Ethnicity and Culture: Qualitative Inquiry in Urban Education

Drawing on traditional and recent advances in the field of qualitative studies, this course is the first in a series to examine ethnographic research at the interlocking domains of race, ethnicity, class, gender and culture. The emphasis is on how these concepts are constructed in urban educational institutions. The course includes a field component that involves local elementary and/or middle schools.
Same as L90 AFAS 4511

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L12 Educ 4512 Race, Ethnicity and Culture: Qualitative Inquiries into Urban Education II

This course is the second of two to examine ethnographic research at the intersecting and overlapping points of race, ethnicity, class, gender and culture. The emphasis in this course is on developing methodology that is consistent with critically grounded, socially responsible, culturally responsive and humane research projects and programs. Secondary English education majors are required to take fall semester during the year in which student teaching is done. Prerequisites: AFAS/Educ 4511 and/or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: SSC, WI Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4521 Teaching Adults in Community Settings

Communities possess a vast and varied choice of learning opportunities for the citizens, whose participation as volunteers, communicators, facilitators, mentors, leaders and instructors can enhance their own lives as well as the life of the community. This course helps students acquire the knowledge, skill sets, habits of mind, and learning strategies necessary for understanding the adult learner and the effective design of learning for personal and professional growth by adults in a variety of community settings. We inventory the class members' interests in specific community contexts so that we can work with those settings in mind throughout the semester. Discussion of learners' needs and peer practice of appropriate, effective instructional and learning strategies provide experience, new perspectives and opportunities for reflection. Course work serves as preparation for the final project, which is to create an instructional plan for adult learners that addresses a specific community learning need or situation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 453B Sociology of Education

This course provides an overview of sociological theory and research on education in contemporary U.S. society. Drawing from sociological perspectives, it covers the implications of schools and schooling for social inequality, mobility, and group relations. It examines major theoretical perspectives on the purpose and social organization of mass education in the United States, and topics related to the organization and function of schools, access to educational resources, and group disparities in school experiences and outcomes.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: BA, ETH


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L12 Educ 459F Philosophies of Education

An examination of distinct educational philosophies (traditional, progressive and radical) and an analysis of perennial topics in the philosophy of education (educational goals, the teacher's and student's roles, and curricular content). Discussion of such recent themes as gender relations and education; democracy and education; and moral values and education. Seminar format.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L12 Educ 4608 The Education of Black Children and Youth in the United States

This course provides an overview of the education of Black children and youth in the United States. Covering both pre- and post-Brown eras, this course applies a deep reading to the classic works of DuBois and Anderson as well as the more recent works of Kozol, Delpit and Foster. The social, political and historical contexts of education as essential aspects of American and African-American culture and life, are placed in the foreground of course inquiries.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, SD, WI Art: HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 461 Introduction to Educational Tests and Measurements

Basic concepts of tests and measurements for teachers (and other school personnel). Topics: test reliability and validity; fundamentals of test construction and standardization; analysis of major types of group tests used in schools, including achievement and aptitude tests; meaning and interpretation of test scores; development of school testing programs. Teacher-made tests a central concern. Prerequisite: Educ 4052 or the equivalent.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 461B The Construction and Experience of Black Adolescence

This course examines the construct of black adolescence from the general perspectives of anthropology, sociology and psychology. It begins by studying the construct of black adolescence as an "invention" of the social and behavioral sciences. The course then draws upon narrative data, autobiography, literature and multimedia sources authored by black youth to recast black adolescence as a complex social, psychological, cultural and political phenomenon. This course focuses on the meaning-making experiences of urban-dwelling black adolescents and highlights these relations within the contexts of class, gender, sexuality and education.
Same as L90 AFAS 461B

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L12 Educ 462 Politics of Education

Politics is interpreted broadly to include not just government, but any situation in which people have to solve a problem or come to a decision. This course focuses on schools and the processes through which certain stories, identities and practices are promoted, and others, not.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4621 The Political Economy of Urban Education

Defining a political economy of urban education involves the examination of power and wealth and the manner in which they operate in urban settings. It requires analysis of the larger urban social and economic context and consideration of historical forces that have brought the schools to their present state. In this course, we consider various political and economic factors that have influenced and shaped urban education in the United States, drawing upon the extant literature on urban education and related social science disciplines to characterize and discuss them. A particular focus of this course is on the dynamic interrelationships among the political economy, urban education and social stratification.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 463 Economics of Education

How does society shape schools and how do schools shape society? An examination of cultural, political and economic factors and their relationship to the structure of our educational institutions; how control is exercised in classrooms; how knowledge and learning are defined; and how basic values about equality, gender and social justice are shaped by teachers' educational decisions. Students analyze their own schooling experience, visit at least two schools, interview teachers and students, and consider what changes are needed to make schools more responsive to students and communities. Prerequisite: minimum sophomore standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS EN: S


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L12 Educ 4681 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School

This course, emphasizing emergent literacy and children's literature, is the first in a sequence of three courses on teaching reading and writing. The purposes of this course are to survey children's acquisition of oral and written language from an emergent literacy perspective, to focus on methods of teaching beginning reading, to develop uses of children's literature in a reading program. Offered fall semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 4692 Second Language Reading and Writing: Theory, Research and Practice

This course, taught in English, extends issues in second language literacy beyond pedagogy by examining the wide range of theoretical and research issues, both historical and current. Literacy acquisition among second language learners involves a number of variables including both cognitive and social factors. Topics to be discussed in class include literacy and social power, universal cognitive operations, individual learner differences, text types and literary forms, and the extent to which reading and writing are interrelated. Students will discuss how to bridge research and practice, and they will create reading and writing activities driven by theory and empirical investigations. This course is a required course for both the major and minor in applied linguistics and the second language research strand for the PhD in Education. Students pursuing the graduate certificate in language instruction may take the class for elective credit..

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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L12 Educ 4699 Adolescent Psychology in School Settings

An examination of current research on adolescent psychological development and the adolescent experience across different cultures. Emphasis is on the application of theories of adolescence to the classroom setting to those settings outside the classroom that can affect how students learn. Students are given a repertoire of pedagogical and communication strategies for effectively teaching adolescents as well as opportunities to implement and analyze them in the classroom and school.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS


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L12 Educ 470 Language, Learning and Instruction

This course, which emphasizes children's writing and literacy issues, is the third of three courses in a sequence on teaching reading and writing. The course reviews and elaborates on work from previous courses on children's acquisition of written language, examines approaches to teaching writing, and focuses on work from sociological, feminist and philosophical perspectives to affirm and criticize aspects of these approaches. Prerequisites: Educ 4681 and 525.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 4731 Elementary School Mathematics

Fundamental concepts, properties, operations and application of mathematics related to the systems of whole numbers, integers, rational numbers and real numbers. Also included are measurement, simple geometry, probability and logical reasoning. Examination and implementation of varied curricula and teaching strategies. Prerequisite: admission to Elementary Education program or permission of director of Teacher Education. Offered spring semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L12 Educ 4741 Elementary Science: Content, Curriculum and Instruction

Focus on key concepts appropriate for elementary school science and health instruction. Repertoire of effective teaching strategies and approaches to curriculum development. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Offered spring semester.

Credit 2 units. A&S: NS A&S IQ: NSM Art: NSM


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L12 Educ 4751 Elementary Social Studies: Content, Curriculum and Instruction

Introduction to key concepts in social studies, including economics and geography. Repertoire of effective teaching strategies and approaches to curriculum development in all areas of social studies. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program.

Credit 2 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4771 Arts and Aesthetics: A Means of Communication

Methods and materials for integrating the arts and aesthetics into the elementary classroom. Emphasis on art, music and oral communication as well as curricula in movement. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 481 History of Education in the United States

Examines education within the context of American social and intellectual history. Using a broad conception of education in the United States and a variety of readings in American culture and social history, the course focuses on such themes as the variety of institutions involved with education, including family, church, community, work place and cultural agency; the ways relationships among those institutions have changed over time; the means individuals have used to acquire an education; and the values, ideas and practices that have shaped American educational policy in different periods of our history.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L12 Educ 4821 The Teaching-Learning Process in the Secondary School

Secondary teacher education majors are required to take this teacher-learning course during the spring semester in which student teaching is done. The course focuses on the study, practice and analysis of generic teaching strategies and skills needed to meet the needs of all students. Topics include classroom management, lesson planning, instructional and ethical decision making and strategies for presenting clear explanations, asking effective questions, conducting productive discussions, reaching students with different learning styles/abilities/cultural backgrounds, and using cooperative learning groups. Secondary teacher education majors are required to take 3 credit hours during the year when student teaching is done.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: SSC, WI Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4831 The Teaching-Learning Process in the Elementary School

Focus on four broad areas: self-awareness and human relations; generic teaching and behavioral management strategies; analysis of instruction; and social and political issues affecting the classroom. Topics include teacher-pupil relationships, evaluation of pupil progress, curriculum development, instructional technology and school organization. Prerequisite: admission to Elementary Teacher Education program required. Elementary teacher education majors are required to take this course in the fall semester during which student teaching is done.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: SSC, WI Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4841 Elementary Methods Field Experience

Application and analysis of specific content area methods strategies in an elementary school classroom. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Elementary teacher education majors are required to take this course during the spring semester before the year in which student teaching is done. Offered spring semester. CBTL course.

Credit 2 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4843 Field Experience Seminar

This course guides students through a field experience in middle or secondary public school. Students observe and document classroom environment characteristics, professional teacher behaviors and student behaviors; work with students individually and/or in small groups; prepare and teach a lesson.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 489 Education and Public Policy in the United States

This course takes a triangulated approach to the field of public policy as it relates to education and social problems. First, the course emphasizes theories of public policy that frame the field of policy studies. Major questions extending from this course feature include: What is public policy, policy behavior, its defining processes/features, and what social function does it serve? Second, the course emphasizes the skills related to the exercise of policy analysis. These skills include the crafting of technical documents within the field of public policy (e.g., a policy brief) and the application of scientific methods to the exploration of social problems/governmental actions. Likely issues related to this course feature include the use of scientific knowledge in political arenas, engagement with stakeholders and the intended/unintended consequences of policy science to political decision-making. Third, this course simulates the policy-making context through students' participation in mock congressional testimonies. These focal areas become central to an understanding of four social concerns: school desegregation following the Brown decisions; affirmative action in higher education; Head Start programs; and/or the ESEA Act of 1965, also known as No Child Left Behind. Educational opportunity, achievement inequality and social change are the primary interests that link these course features.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S UColl: ACS


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L12 Educ 4891 The Science and Politics of Testing in the United States

Why do tests permeate American Society? Tests have been integral to the decision-making process in many venues of American culture — immigration opportunities, voting rights, college admissions, workforce considerations, special education placement, educational reform and graduation requirements. The credibility of these decisions depends upon the claim that a particular test is a scientific instrument and relevant to the decision-making process. This claim is worthy of study. The purpose of this course is twofold. The first purpose is to examine how the nexus of science and politics influence testing practices in American society. The second purpose is to explore how testing practices influence the culture of schools, civil liberties, the work place and public discourse about merit.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD EN: S


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L12 Educ 4911 Student Teaching in the Elementary School

Supervised teaching experience. Group meetings and individual conferences. Emphasis on integration of theory/practice and reflection on teaching through videotape analysis. Prerequisites: admission to elementary teacher education program and permission of director of teacher education. Credit/no credit only. Elementary teacher education students enroll for 8 credits during the fall semester.

Credit variable, maximum 8 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 492 Student Teaching in the Secondary School

Supervised teaching experience. Group meetings and individual conferences. Emphasis on integration of theory/practice and reflection on teaching through videotape analysis. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Credit/no credit only. Secondary teacher education students enroll for 8 credits during the spring semester.

Credit variable, maximum 8 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4922 Student Teaching in Middle Schools

Supervised teaching experience. Group meetings and individual conferences. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Credit/no credit only. Middle-school teacher education students enroll for 8 credits. Offered spring semester.

Credit variable, maximum 8 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 494 Student Teaching in Grades K-12

Supervised teaching experience. Group meetings and individual conferences. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program. Credit/no credit only. K-12 teacher education students enroll for 8 credits. Offered spring semester.

Credit variable, maximum 8 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4951 Middle School Philosophy and Organization

This course examines the history, goals, organization and philosophy of middle schools as institutions. Students explore how the characteristics and needs of early adolescents guide the mission, structure and operation of middle schools. Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program.

Credit 2 units. A&S: SS EN: S


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L12 Educ 4952 Middle School Curriculum and Instruction

Building on knowledge of the middle-level child and the ways in which middle schools are organized to meet the needs of middle-level children (covered in Educ 4951), this course explores the learning styles and attributes of middle school students and examines instructional theory, methods and materials appropriate to grades five through nine. In addition, portions of this course are devoted to specific content field methodology subdivided into English/language arts and social studies or science and math. The English/social studies and science/math sessions are held concurrently and students attend the session appropriate to their content major or minors. Interdisciplinary team teaching is modeled and featured in these sessions. Features a required practicum experience. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education program.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L12 Educ 4999 Capstone Seminar in Educational Studies

All majors not writing an Education senior honors thesis are required to enroll in the senior seminar, a reading colloquium. Students read with faculty and write papers based on the readings and the courses taken to complete the major requirements in the program. All honors students are required to attend at least one session of the seminar to present their work, and all graduating Educational Studies majors, including those completing honors work in Educational Studies, are required to attend the final session of the seminar.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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Chair

Christopher Wellman
Professor of Philosophy
PhD, University of Arizona

Endowed Professor

Carol Camp Yeakey
Marshall S. Snow Professor of Arts & Sciences
Ph.D., Northwestern University

William F. Tate
Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences
PhD, University of Maryland, College Park

Professor

Cindy Brantmeier
Professor of Education and Applied Linguistics
PhD, Indiana University Bloomington

Associate Professors

Garrett A. Duncan
PhD, The Claremont Graduate School

Mary Ann Dzuback
PhD, Columbia University

Rowhea Elmesky
PhD, Florida State University

Odis Johnson
PhD, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Assistant Professors

Ebony Duncan
PhD, Vanderbilt University

Michelle Purdy
PhD, Emory University

Senior Lecturers

Judy Lamb
MA–Ed, Washington University

Madonna Riesenmy
PhD, Washington University

Affiliate Faculty

John Baugh
Margaret Bush Wilson Professor in Arts & Sciences
PhD, University of Pennsylvania

William W. Clark
PhD, University of Michigan

Sarah C.R. Elgin
Viktor Hamburger Professor in Arts & Sciences
PhD, California Institute of Technology

Patrick C. Gibbons
PhD, Harvard University

Allison King
MD, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia

Mark A. McDaniel
PhD, University of Colorado

Mike Strube
PhD, University of Utah

Rebecca Treiman
Baker Professor of Child Developmental Psychology
PhD, University of Pennsylvania

James V. Wertsch
Marshall S. Snow Professor in Arts & Sciences; Vice Chancellor for International Relations
PhD, University of Chicago