Undergraduates who major or minor in English explore literature as readers and writers in small classes that focus on the individual student. With exposure to our wide array of course topics and intellectual approaches, alumni of the English department have succeeded in top-notch graduate programs in English and creative writing, as well as in law, business, medicine, journalism and government.

Preparation for the English major begins at the freshman level. In both the fall and spring semesters, freshman seminars of 15 students or fewer are led by distinguished faculty on subjects such as detective fiction, literature and justice, the invention of romantic love, and the cultural history of the American university. Majors go on to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the history and criticism of literature written in English. Our department's commitment to cross-fertilizing creative and critical literacy is genuine and longstanding. Home to one of the leading MFA programs in the United States, the department offers an undergraduate minor in writing as well as a major with a concentration in creative writing. English students frequently enroll in creative writing workshops or classes in advanced rhetoric, and three such courses may count toward the regular English major.  

Phone:314-935-5190
Email:english@wustl.edu
Website:http://english.artsci.wustl.edu

The Major in English Literature

Units required: 30

Prerequisites:

E Lit 2151Literature in English: Early Texts and Contexts3
E Lit 2152Literature in English: Modern Texts and Contexts3

Required credits: 24 units of upper-division (300- and 400-level) work (at least 6 units must be 400-level), distributed as follows:

Four required courses:

  • E Lit 3552 Introduction to Literary Theory
  • Three historical courses, covering three of the following five historical periods in American, British or Anglophone literature and including at least one course from each of the following two groups:

Group 1
Medieval
Early Modern

Group 2
The 18th Century
The 19th Century
The 20th Century and Later

Four electives                                                                   

Eight upper-division courses in all (including two 400-level courses)

  • All courses must be taken for letter grades.
  • Must receive a grade of C or better.
  • Only one cross-listed course not home-based in English may be counted toward the 24 units required. The two required 400-level courses must be home-based in English.
  • Maximum of 6 units from University College and/or Summer School courses may count toward the major. These selections need English department approval.
  • Study Abroad students are expected to complete the 200-level prerequisite courses and at least two upper-level courses in English literature before going abroad.
  • 3 units of 300- or 400-level courses in the literature of a language other than English may be counted toward the English major.
  • Before the end of junior year, majors are encouraged to consult with advisers regarding the fulfillment of major requirements.

Portfolio Capstone

All majors are required to complete a portfolio capstone project, for which the student provides a 200-level paper, a 400-level paper, and a brief essay (2-3 pages) that reflects on the student's overall learning experience in the major. 

Concentration in Creative Writing

There is the option of completing an English major with a creative writing concentration. To do so, students must take five creative writing courses, including at least three upper-division courses. Students will specialize in one particular genre — poetry, fiction or creative nonfiction — ultimately taking a three-course sequence in that genre (200-, 300- and 400-level) while taking at least one course outside this genre. The concentration will not change the current requirement structure in the English major and thus requires 6 additional credit hours to complete compared to a regular English major. For more information please consult the description of the major on the English department website.

Additional Information

Senior Honors: Students must have achieved a 3.65 grade point average in English and a 3.65 grade point average overall in order to apply for honors in English in spring of junior year. Students must successfully complete the required courses for the English major. Students must take L14 E Lit 5001 Honors Thesis Tutorial in both fall and spring of senior year and E Lit 3991 Senior Research Seminar I and E Lit 3992 Senior Research Seminar II in fall and spring, respectively, of senior year.

Study Abroad: Seven affiliate programs in England, Ireland and Scotland are open for well-prepared students: King's College, London (KCL); University College, London (UCL); University of Sussex; Oxford Program for Undergraduate Studies (OPUS); Keble College at Oxford; Trinity College, Dublin; and University of Edinburgh. Students interested in study abroad must apply and participate before senior year.

Transfer Units: Students must provide transcript(s) of previous work to receive approval from the director of undergraduate studies.

The Minor in English

Units required: 15

Required courses:

E Lit 2151Literature in English: Early Texts and Contexts3
E Lit 2152Literature in English: Modern Texts and Contexts3

Elective courses: Three upper-division (300- or 400-level) electives. These courses should be home-based in the Department of English.

Students are expected to take courses for letter grades and to receive a grade of C or better in each.

The Minor in Writing

The writing minor is fulfilled by completing 15 units of Writing courses, no more than 6 units of which can be taken at the 200 level. At least one of the five courses elected must be Writing 311 Exposition or Writing 312 Argumentation.

With department approval, up to 6 units of journalism courses in writing or editing offered in University College can be counted toward the minor. An off-campus internship (Writing 298 Journalism: Communications Internship) oriented toward writing may also be counted toward the minor. Regardless of level, at least 9 units counted toward the minor must be completed in regular courses home-based in Writing.

Students who wish to take a writing minor in addition to an English major are advised to take English and American literature courses (L14 E Lit) exclusively for the major and Writing courses (L13) exclusively for the minor. (Please note: 100-level L13 classes do not normally count toward the writing minor.) Students who wish to combine writing with their English major are encouraged to consider an English major with a concentration in creative writing.

English Composition

For courses in English Composition, please visit the Writing page.


English Language and Literature

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for L14 E Lit.


L14 E Lit 114 Freshman Seminar

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Topics vary. Refer to current semester course listings for current topic.
Same as L53 Film 114

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L14 E Lit 150 Literature Seminar for Freshman: How to Read a University

More than 70 percent of American adults now study at college for some time. But almost none study college as a formative individual experience and critical public institution while there. This course aims to fill this gap, encouraging students to reflect on the ground under their feet, the contemporary American university, and the myths, debates and histories that shape it. What is the purpose of higher education: to protect and defend islands of humanistic contemplation and disinterested scientific inquiry; to equip young citizens for informed democratic action; to train meritocratic elites for high office and high salaries? And how has this purpose shifted with the growth of leading American universities from clerical enclaves to worldly research corporations? This course addresses such questions with help from three bodies of texts: canonical modern fictions of campus life by such authors as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Willa Cather, Mary McCarthy and Ralph Ellison, Philip Roth and Don DeLillo; some influential theories of the university and its intellectuals from Thomas Jefferson to Michel Foucault; and a trio of iconic college films: the Marx Brothers' Horsefeathers, National Lampoon's Animal House and Spike Lee's School Daze.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L14 E Lit 151 Literature Seminar for Freshmen

Reading courses, each limited to 15 students. Topics: selected writers, varieties of approaches to literature, e.g., Southern fiction, the modern American short story, the mystery; consult Course Listings. Prerequisite: first-year standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 152 Literature Seminar for Freshmen

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 153 Literature Seminar for Freshmen

Reading courses, each limited to 15 students. Topics: selected writers, varieties of approaches to literature, e.g., Southern fiction, the modern American short story, the mystery; consult Course Listings. Prerequisite: first-year standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM


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L14 E Lit 155 Literature Seminar for Freshmen

Reading courses, each limited to 15 students. Topics: selected writers, varieties of approaches to literature, e.g., Southern fiction, the modern American short story, the mystery; consult Course Listings. Prerequisite: first-year standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA


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L14 E Lit 156 Literature Seminar for Freshmen

Reading courses, each limited to 15 students. Topics: selected writers, varieties of approaches to literature, e.g., Southern fiction, the modern American short story, the mystery; consult Course Listings. Prerequisite: first-year standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 160 Literature Seminar for Freshmen

The Monstrous Imagination. Reading course, limited to 15 students. Prerequisite: first-year standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 170 Literature Seminar for Freshmen

Reading courses, each limited to 15 students. Topics: selected writers, varieties of approaches to literature, e.g., Southern fiction, the modern American short story, the mystery; consult Course Listings. Prerequisite: first-year standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 171 Literature Seminar for Freshmen

Reading courses, each limited to 15 students. Topics: selected writers, varieties of approaches to literature, e.g., Southern fiction, the modern American short story, the mystery; consult Course Listings. Prerequisite: first-year standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 172 Literature Seminar for Freshmen

Reading courses, each limited to 15 students. Topics: selected writers, varieties of approaches to literature, e.g., Southern fiction, the modern American short story, the mystery; consult Course Listings. Prerequisite: first-year standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 180 Literature Seminar for Freshmen

Reading courses, each limited to 15 students. Topics: selected writers, varieties of approaches to literature, e.g., Southern fiction, the modern American short story, the mystery; consult Course Listings. Prerequisite: first-year standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 189 Literature Seminars for Freshmen

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 209 World Literature

This course teaches ways of reading literature across eastern and western cultures, introducing students to works of great imaginative power from many different regions of the world. The course focuses on a given historical period, such as the modern period or antiquity (the latter including Near Eastern as well as European texts). Organizing themes may include cultural translation, cross-cultural encounter (e.g., orientalism), hybridity, and displacement.
Same as L16 Comp Lit 211

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 214C Introduction to Women's Texts

Discussion of canonical and non-traditional texts, most by women. Emphasis on how these texts represent gender, how literature contributes to identity formation, and how women have used the written word to change their social and imaginative conditions.
Same as L77 WGSS 214C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 2151 Literature in English: Early Texts and Contexts

This course provides beginning students of English with a chronological outline of early literature in English from the middle ages to the late 18th century. It introduces them to the central themes, genres and forces that have shaped the early history of literature as well as the tools, vocabularies and critical practices of literary studies. We organize our semester around four themes: inventing a nation; the sacred and the secular; centers and margins; private and public. We study, among others, four of the following key texts and authors: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and one of Defoe's novels.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 2152 Literature in English: Modern Texts and Contexts

This course provides beginning students of English with a chronological outline of modern literature in English from Romanticism to the present. It introduces them to the central themes, genres and forces that have shaped the modern history of literature as well as the tools, vocabularies and critical practices of literary studies. We organize our semester around five themes: literary revolutions; questions of genre; subjectivity and authorship; gender, sexuality and identity; modernism. We study texts from Britain/Ireland, the United States and at least one example of global literature in English.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 228 Theatre Culture Studies I

Required of the drama major. An examination of ancient, medieval, and Renaissance theater and performance. Close reading of dramatic texts written by such authors as Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plautus, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Jonson, with attention also given to the collaborative theaters of the medieval period (the Corpus Christi play) and the Italian Renaissance. In tandem with the close study of dramatic literature, we study theater history (playing spaces, costumes, actors, etc.) and performance (ritual, performances of everyday life, etc.) from antiquity to the Renaissance.
Same as L15 Drama 228C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 229C Theatre Culture Studies II

This course provides a survey of theater history from the early 17th through mid-19th centuries, covering plays, theories of drama and acting, and the material conditions of theatre production. We will explore events in Asia, the Americas and Europe with particular attention to the Baroque era, Sentimentalism and Romanticism. The central objectives of the course are 1) to teach students to analyze plays in complex and creative ways, and 2) to cultivate understanding of the ways theater and performance practices reflect the philosophical ideas, aesthetic values, and sociopolitical realities of their historical context — even as these practices sustained and challenged such ideas, values and realities.
Same as L15 Drama 229C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 2361 Cultural History of the American Teenager

This course explores the recent history of the teenager in the United States, from the rise of teen culture in the 1950s to the current state of adolescence in the new century. Why have so many novels and films memorialized adolescence? How has the period of development been portrayed in books and film? How have depictions and attitudes toward teen culture changed over the past sixty years? In our consideration of teen culture, we take a multidisciplinary approach when tackling a variety of materials — including historical readings, literary fiction, Young Adult fiction, comic books, popular films, and popular music — in an attempt to come to a better understanding of how the notion of the American teenager has evolved over the past sixty years. We begin with J.D. Salinger's classic novel of adolescence alienation, The Catcher in the Rye, a book that in many ways helped initiate the rise of the youth movement in the 1950s and '60s. Our readings focus on the middle decades of the 20th century, when teen culture moved to the forefront of American life, but we end the semester by considering how teen life has recently been imagined in such novels as The Hunger Games. Our class also discusses a few films, such as Rebel Without a Cause and American Graffiti, which have helped shape our conception of the American teenager. Ultimately, we question what these depictions of teen culture can tell us about larger trends and concerns in American life. As this course serves as an introduction to American Culture Studies, we focus on the different methods that we can employ when attempting to interpret and analyze American culture.
Same as L98 AMCS 236

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L14 E Lit 241E Masterpieces of European Literature I

Masterpieces of Western literature in English translation: Homer through Dante.

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 245 Topics: Banned Books: From the Giver to Lord of the Flies

Topics varies by semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 257 The Art of Poetry

An introduction to the critical vocabulary necessary for the study and evaluation of poetry; provides a basic understanding of prosody, poetic forms and figurative language, and the historical periods in which poetry has been written.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 258 Art of the Novel

In this course we read novels drawn from several literary traditions and a number of distinctive narrative modes. Among the questions we consider are those addressing the nature of narrative form, and the literary and stylistic choices made in order to express such things as character and consciousness, society and history, and the relation between the fictive and the real. There are two papers and several short writing assignments.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 299 Research Assistantship

For students assisting English faculty members with their research. Students must provide a description of their assistantship and secure permission of the director of undergraduate studies. At the end of the semester, the student must submit a four-page essay describing the work done during the assistantship, along with any documents or work produced. In addition, a written evaluation by the faculty member they assisted is required. Up to 3 units acceptable toward the English major. Only for declared English majors. Must be taken pass/fail.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 302W Writing Modern War

The 20th century, as Graham Greene observed, was a century "in which there would never be a peace." This writing-intensive course examines the ways in which modern writers have tried to describe warfare and its impact on both combatants and those on the homefront.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI


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L14 E Lit 303W Strangers and Savages, Aliens and Outcasts

This writing-intensive course focuses on a literary tradition united by its representation of passionate hatred and intolerance.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI


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L14 E Lit 304W Craft of Fiction: Historical Fiction

This writing-intensive course is a literature/creative writing hybrid course in which a number of contemporary historical fictions (meaning, fictions set in periods prior to the authors' births, and sometimes incorporating real historical events or figures) are covered.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3050 Literary Modernities: Text and Tradition

The course examines the various facets of modernity in major works of European, Eurasian and, sometimes, American literature from the early 17th century to the 1920s, starting with Don Quixote. We explore, among other things, the eruption of the novel, the secularization of autobiography, the literary discovery of the city, the rise of literary and aesthetic criticism that takes literature and art seriously as political and social institutions. In addition to literary works, the course engages with two or three important models of critical practice, e.g., Wollstonecraft's Vindication of the Rights of Women, Marx's German Ideology, Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams, T.S. Eliot's Tradition and the Individual Talent, or perhaps that great work of fictionalized literary criticism, Borges' "Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote."
Same as L93 IPH 3050

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 305W Fabricating Lives

The premise of this writing-intensive course is that autobiography is not a straightforward narrative of the past but a conscious shaping of life into a meaningful design.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI


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L14 E Lit 306 Old English Literature: Beowulf

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 307 The Writing of the Indian Subcontinent

The Indian subcontinent has in recent years yielded a number of writers, expatriate or otherwise, whose works articulate the postcolonial experience in the "foreign" English tongue. This course is designed as an introductory survey of such writing, drawing on select subcontinental writers. Covering both fiction and nonfiction by several authors, including R.K. Narayan, Salman Rushdie, Anita Desai, Amitav Ghosh, Sara Suleri, Micheal Ondaatjie and Romesh Gunesekera, we discuss such issues as the nature of the colonial legacy, the status of the English language, problems of translation (linguistic and cultural), the politics of religion, the expatriate identity and the constraints of gender roles.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3071 Caribbean Literature in English

Rum! Fun! Beaches! Sun! This is the image of the Caribbean in America today. This course surveys literature and culture from these islands, looking both at and beyond this tourists' paradise. It aims to introduce students to the region's unmistakably vibrant tradition of multicultural mixture, while keeping an eye on the long history of slavery and rebellion out of which the islands' contemporary situation formed. Along the way we encounter a wide variety of texts, from the earliest writing focused on life in urban slums, to the first novel ever to have a Rastafarian as its hero, to more contemporary considerations of the region's uncertain place in a U.S.-dominated world. Toward the end of the course, we also look at important films such as The Harder They Come as well as discuss the most globally famous cultural product of the contemporary Caribbean: reggae music. The course involves readings from multiple genres and covers authors such as C.L.R. James, Derek Walcott, Jean Rhys, V.S. Naipaul, Jamaica Kincaid and Caryl Phillips.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3075 The American Radical Novel: Literature Versus Inequality

Intended to help students reckon knowledgably, imaginatively and articulately with our era of escalating social inequality, this class is a writing-intensive study of representative American radical novels stretching from the 19th-century abolitionism of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin to the 21st-century dystopianism of Gary Shteyngart's Super Sad True Love Story. Its main goals are two: (1) to introduce students to the long history and current significance of efforts to pit American literature against American inequality; and (2) to improve the quality of advanced student writing in the related fields of American Culture Studies and English literature. The first goal is pursued through close analysis of both radical novels and the contemporary political documents that inform them, juxtaposing such texts as Upton Sinclair's The Jungle and Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, Alice Walker's Meridian and Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Nonviolence and Racial Justice." The second goal is pursued through hands-on analysis of successful rhetorical strategies sampled from The Hodges Harbrace Handbook, and, more importantly, from the scholarly writing of students themselves.
Same as L98 AMCS 3075

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, SD, WI BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 308 Topics in Asian-American Literature: Identity and Self-image

Topics in Asian-American literature that vary from semester to semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3081 City on a Hill: The Concept and Culture of American Exceptionalism

This course examines the concept, history and culture of American exceptionalism — the idea that America has been specially chosen, or has a special mission to the world. First, we examine the Puritan sermon that politicians quote when they describe America as a "city on a hill." This sermon has been called the "ur-text" of American literature, the foundational document of American culture; learning and drawing from multiple literary methodologies, we re-investigate what that sermon means and how it came to tell a story about the Puritan origins of American culture — a thesis our class reassesses with the help of modern critics. In the second part of this class, we broaden our discussion to consider the wider (and newer) meanings of American exceptionalism, theorizing the concept while looking at the way it has been revitalized, redefined and redeployed in recent years. Finally, the course ends with a careful study of American exceptionalism in modern political rhetoric, starting with JFK and proceeding through Reagan to the current day. In the end, students gain a firm grasp of the long history and continuing significance — the pervasive impact — of this concept in American culture.
Same as L98 AMCS 3081

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L14 E Lit 311 Topics in English & American Literature: Contemporary Literature of the East West Divide

Topics: themes, formal problems, literary genres, special subjects (e.g., the American West, science and literature, the modern short story). Consult Course Listings for offerings in any given semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM UColl: NW


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L14 E Lit 311E Electronic Poetry

An inquiry into new forms of screen art beginning with traditional printed poetry to varieties of virtual poetry emergent on the computer screen; the stream of programming code as a level of writerly activity.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA


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L14 E Lit 311W Electronic Poetry

The primary focus in this writing-intensive course is to look at every possible kind of electronic poetry we can come up with in order to evaluate it as poetry.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 312 Introduction to Digital Humanities

It is a truism that computers have changed our lives and the way we think and interact. But in fact, systematic efforts to apply current technologies to the study of history and culture have been rare. This course will enable students to consider how these technologies might transform the humanities. We will explore the various ways in which ideas and data in the humanities can be represented, analyzed and communicated. We will also reflect on how the expansion of information technology has transformed and is continuing to transform the humanities, both with regard to their role in the university and in society at large. Readings and classwork will be supplemented by class presentations and a small assigned group project.
Same as L93 IPH 312

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3121 The Medieval Romance

The romance grows out of the epic: how we get from the fall of Troy to the fall of Troilus. Readings from Vergil's Aeneid to Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3122 Topics in Literature: Heroes and Lovers

We read Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, The Mabinogion, The Tain, Margery Kempe and Malory's Morte d'Arthur.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 312W Topics in English and American Literature: Literature of Consolation

This course explores the theme of consolation in medieval poetry. We read narratives that represent the consolation of a variety of melancholy figures — philosophers in exile, lovers in mourning, citizens in plague-ridden cities, and women disturbed by misogynous writing. We examine the connection between representations of consolation and the act of reading, and think about literature itself (along with other art forms) as a contested site of entertainment, moral guidance, self-fashioning and redemption. Authors may include Boccaccio, Boethius, Chaucer, Christine de Pizan, Abelard and Heloise, and the Pearl-poet. As a writing-intensive class, we spend time writing and talking about writing in the classroom. We read our literary texts as "arguments" about literature in addition to other topics, and we read secondary articles as examples of scholarly writing that we may or may not want to adopt as models.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 313 Topics in English and American Literature

Called the "Age of Revolution," the Romantic Age of British literature, 1770-1830, witnessed the birth of new lyric forms, the effacement of traditional strictures on style and taste, and produced through poetic voice (and its quaverings and multiplications) what might be called, oversimply, the modern subject. Within a developing discourse of human rights and personal freedom, this growing assertion through poetry of individual expressivity allowed William Blake to construct in a single work a visual and verbal "Jerusalem." It encouraged William Wordsworth to write a pathbreaking investigation of the sources of his own creativity that challenged conventional restraints on what topics can, and cannot, be confessed in poetry. Beginning with these two poets, we consider the historical contexts, and the sometimes competing histories of ideas, that shaped the five major British Romantic poets: Blake, Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, and John Keats. We follow an anthology for much of the poetry, including the poems and prose of influential contemporaries (female as well as male) who included the political philosopher Edmund Burke and Mary Wollstonecraft. Texts also assigned include Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Byron's Don Juan.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 314 Topics in English and American Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS


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L14 E Lit 315 Topics in American Literature

Topics: themes, formal problems, literary genres, special subjects (e.g., the American West, American autobiographical writing). Consult Course Listings for offerings in any given semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 315W The Literature of the American Revolution

While not a historical survey, the course presents several case studies raising questions about later myth and contemporary reportage.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 316 Topics in American Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 316W Topics in American Literature

Topic varies. Writing-intensive.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 317 Topics in American Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 317W Topics in English and American Literature

Selected topics vary from semester to semester. Writing-intensive.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 318 Topics in American Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3191 Contemporary American Women Poets

An introduction to the work of contemporary American poets who are women; extensive reading of both poetry and prose. Readings include the work of poets such as Bishop, Rich, Plath, Sexton, Clampitt, Gluck, Moss, Graham, Howe, Dove, Oliver, Forche, Lauterbach.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3192 Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, 20th Century: The European Avant-Garde

The first half of the 20th century witnessed the emergence of artistic movements characterized by revolt against tradition, emphasis on radical experimentation and redefinition of the art work. This course familiarizes students with the avant-garde's main currents: Italian Futurism, English Vorticism, Russian Constructivism, "stateless" Dadaism and French Surrealism. We ask ourselves how to define the avant-garde, how it is related to modernity and whether its aesthetic is necessarily political. Texts include Futurist Manifestos, Cendrars' Trans-Siberian Prose, Stein's Tender Buttons, Breton's Nadja. We also examine artworks such as Duchamp's "Large Glass" and films such as Buñuel's Un Chien Andalou.
Same as L93 IPH 3191

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 319A Topics in English & American Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM


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L14 E Lit 321 American Literature to 1865

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3211 Topics in 19th-Century American Writing

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 321A American Literature I

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 322 American Literature 1865 to Mid-20th Century

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3222 20th-Century American Writers

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3227 Devising, Adaptation and Docudrama

This course explores three ways of theatre-making that have revolutionized the contemporary stage: devising (a collaborative process emphasizing physical techniques to realize ideas), adaptation (the transposition of a narrative from one mode to another), and docudrama (the self-conscious staging of history through the assemblage of documentary records). Beginning with a focus on the current "postdramatic theatre" and the pre-histories of these contemporary practices, we will engage current scholarship on each form, learning the "how" and "why" from contemporary practitioners, while considering the rhetorical structure of each form in relation to the social meanings they generate for their audiences. Divided into three units, the course will combine the study of each method with hands-on practice, and will conclude with a showcase featuring an original performance created by the student collective. A theme (variable by semester) will unite the three sections of the course, helping students see how a single topic can be illuminated in different ways through these three methods of creating performance.
Same as L15 Drama 3227

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 322A American Literature II

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 322C Major American Writers II

Representative works of American writing from 1880 to the present, with particular attention to fiction and poetry; authors include James, Stein, Hemingway, Faulkner, Ellison. Prerequisite: 6 units of sophomore literature, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 322W Major American Writers II

This writing-intensive course is intended as an in-depth introduction to arguably the two most significant American fiction writers of the first half of the 20th century.

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 323 Selected American Writers

Intensive study of one or more American writers. Consult Course Listings for offerings in any given semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 323A American Literature III

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 326 Selected American Writers

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 327 Selected American Writers

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 328W Selected English and American Writers

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 329 Selected English and American Writers

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3311 Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities

In this course we will trace a tradition of writing on laughter. While we will read texts that might explain laughter by way of comedy or humor, we will be interested in laughter itself. What does the body in laughter look like? How does laughter sound? Where, when and how does laughter happen? What is laughter's relation to language, to song, to thought? What kind of communities does laughter form? We will read texts by Joubert, Erasmus, Hobbes, Descartes, Chesterfield, Kant, Bergson, Freud, Bataille, Sarraute, and Ellison. We will listen to music like Louis Armstrong's "Laughin' Louie" and we will watch films like Laughing Gas, The Man Who Laughs and A Question of Silence.
Same as L93 IPH 3311

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 331C Tragedy

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3322 Reading in the Renaissance: Texts and Practices

This course aims, first, to acquaint students with English Renaissance literature, from Shakespeare to Dryden; then to investigate the ways in which that literature might have been read by its original audience; and finally to consider how such knowledge might, or should influence, our own understanding and experience of Renaissance texts.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 334 A History of the Golden Age of Children's Literature

A comprehensive survey of the major works for children written during this period.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3341 The History of Children's Literature from the End of the Golden Age to the Age of Multiculturalism

A continuation of E Lit 334, this is a comprehensive survey looking at the major works of children's and adolescent literature in both Britain and America.

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 335 Modern Drama 1850-1920

The emergence of modern drama: emphasis on Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Shaw.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3351 Modern Drama 1880-1945

Major figures of modern drama: Ibsen, Strindberg, Shaw, Chekhov, Lorca, Synge, Pirandello, Brecht and O'Neill. Close literary study and consideration of these plays as examples of the art of the stage. Reference also is made to contemporary experiments in the other arts and to major literary movements in the time period under consideration.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3361 Modern Drama, 1945 to the Present

Course concentrates on the development of modern drama from 1945 to the present. Focus is on both literary and theatrical techniques as well as the examination of trends in the contemporary theater from Samuel Beckett through Sam Shepard. Perspective is comparative and international in scope, with particular attention given to women and minority playwrights.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3370 Contemporary Stages: An Anglo-American History of Performance after 1950

Credit 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 3371 The Theater of the Absurd

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 339 Topics in 19th-Century American Writing

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3391 Topics in 19th- and 20th-Century American Writing: American Short Fiction

This course is directed toward a broad range of majors and nonmajors with a serious but not scholarly interest in American Short Fiction.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 340 Topics in 20th-Century American Writing

An introduction to major American works and writers from the later 19th century through the mid-20th century. Writers studied include Twain, James, Crane, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Frost, Eliot and Stevens. The course assumes no previous acquaintance with the material and is directed toward a broad range of majors and nonmajors with a serious but not scholarly interest in the subject. Students with little or no background in literature might be advised to take E Lit 213C Chief American Writers, while English majors looking to do advanced work should consider the 400-level American literature sequence. Students who have taken E Lit 213C should not enroll in this course.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 340W The American Novel: Split and Hybrid American Identities

Examination of the struggle to form an enabling identity for author, characters and text against the divisive pressures of family and society.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI BU: BA, HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 342W The Romance: Medieval to Modern

Credit 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 343 Two Cultures: Literature and Science

The relation between biology and literature as it has been examined and expressed in poetry, fiction and nonfiction of the past two centuries.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 344W Writing About Performance

In this writing-intensive course, students develop critical strategies for writing about theatre and other performance events, in the present and in a range of historical periods.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3451 Topics in American Literature

Emerging in American films most forcefully during the 1940s, film noir is a cycle of films associated with a distinctive visual style and a cynical worldview. In this course, we explore the sexual politics of film noir as a distinctive vision of American sexual relations every bit as identifiable as the form's stylized lighting and circuitous storytelling. We explore how and why sexual paranoia and perversion seem to animate this genre and why these movies continue to influence "neo-noir" filmmaking into the 21st century, even as film noir's representation of gender and sexuality is inseparable from its literary antecedents, most notably, the so-called "hard-boiled" school of writing. We read examples from this literature by Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, Raymond Chandler and Cornell Woolrich, and discuss these novels and short stories in the context of other artistic and cultural influences on gendered power relations and film noir. We also explore the relationship of these films to censorship and to changing post-World War II cultural values. Films screened in complete prints or in excerpts include many of the following: The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, Murder My Sweet, Phantom Lady, Strangers on a Train, The Big Sleep, The Killers, Mildred Pierce, The High Wall, Sudden Fear, The Big Combo, Laura, The Glass Key, The Big Heat, Kiss Me Deadly, The Crimson Kimono, Touch of Evil, Alphaville, Chinatown, Taxi Driver, Devil in a Blue Dress, The Bad Lieutenant and Memento. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 345

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L14 E Lit 346 British Enlightenment Culture

To capture the range and vibrancy of British enlightenment culture, this class invites students to read broadly and imaginatively in the most influential literary, economic and philosophical texts of the time.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L14 E Lit 347 Masterpieces of Literature I

Masterpieces of Western literature in English translation: Homer through Dante.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 348 Masterpieces of Literature II

Masterpieces of Western literature in English translation: the 17th century through the 20th century.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3520 Introduction to Postcolonial Literature and Theory

At its zenith, the British Empire encompassed almost a quarter of the globe, allowing the diminutive island nation unprecedented economic, military, and political influence upon the rest of the world. This course will introduce some of the foundational responses to this dominance, both literary and theoretical, by the colonized and their descendants. We will examine important critiques of colonialism by theorists such as Frantz Fanon, Aimé Césaire, Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, and Gayatri Spivak, as well as literary works that reflect a postcolonial critique by authors such as V.S. Naipaul, George Lamming, Doris Lessing, and N'gugi wa Thiong'o. The course will interrogate how literature could be said to help consolidate Empire as well as ways in which it might function as rebellion against imperial power, with a view toward teasing out the problematics of race, gender, language, nationalism and identity that postcolonial texts so urgently confront.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3522 Topics in Literature

Topics course which varies by semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3524 Topics in Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3525 Topics in English Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3527 Blacks and Jews in America

Credit 3 units. A&S: SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L14 E Lit 352A Topics in English & American Literature

The black athlete is a central figure in American entertainment, and has been since Frederick Douglass decried Christmastime slave games in his Narrative. This course will examine literary depictions of black athletes — in novels, memoirs, essays and poems — in order to better understand the cultural significance of sportsmen and women in the African-American struggle for equality, from abolitionism to the "Black Lives Matter" movement. We will read works by Douglass, Ralph Ellison, Maya Angelou, and John Edgar Wideman, among others, and examine the lives and athletic pursuits of prominent athletes such as Jackie Robinson, Muhammad Ali, Wilma Rudolph, Michael Jordan, and LeBron James. Popular perceptions of gender and sexuality, in addition to race and racism, will factor into our readings, especially as students incorporate secondary sources into their own research.
Same as L98 AMCS 352A

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 352B Topics in Literature


Same as L98 AMCS 3525

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3530 Topics in American Culture Studies

The topic of this course varies from semester to semester. Consult Course Listings for a description of the current offering.
Same as L98 AMCS 3520

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3531 Selected English and American Writers

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3551 Topics: Literary Criticism and Theory: Ways of Approaching a Literary Text

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA


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L14 E Lit 3552 Introduction to Literary Theory

This course introduces students to some of the most influential theoretical approaches to interpretation in Western culture, to the conceptual and historical debates about theory, and to the keywords used in these debates. Students learn how to write and speak about theoretical texts and how to recognize the theoretical assumptions that underlie acts of interpretation. Theoretical approaches featured may include: formalism; Marxism; psychoanalysis; gender and sexuality studies; structuralism and post-structuralism; postcolonial studies; critical race studies; new historicism and cultural materialism; cultural studies. This course fulfills the literary theory requirement for the major; no substitutions are permitted. In order to preserve necessary seats for English majors, the course is enrolled through the wait list.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H UColl: HUM


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L14 E Lit 356 The Art of the Novel

This course takes as its starting point traditional models of the novel and then examines a variety of novels from different traditions — American, British, continental — which, in differing ways, play against this type, bending, challenging or ignoring "the rules." We are interested in attempting to understand the logic of such idiosyncratic forms, both why each writer is attempting to defy or undo our understanding of a normative "reality" and of the usual novelistic proprieties and how each novel provides its own manner of coherence.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 357 The Art of Poetry

Techniques of poetry, considered theoretically and practically in relation to problems of form and significance: meter, rhyme, image, metaphor, stanzaic patterns and others.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3571 20th-Century Poetry

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 358 Studies in Short Fiction

Study of the work of four novelists who also were fascinated by shorter forms throughout their careers: D.H. Lawrence, Joseph Conrad, Henry James and William Faulkner. The course is concerned with the variety of forms their work takes as it is shaped by the very individual visions of each.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3581 Historical and Comparative Linguistics

Historical linguistics focuses on how languages change over time. Comparative linguistics focuses on their similarities and differences. In this course we trace some of the differences and changes in sound (phonetics and phonology), word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), and meaning (semantics). Topics include linguistic universals, the structural and genetic classification of languages, the techniques of reconstructing proto-languages, and the causes of language change. Examples from Indo-European languages (for example, Greek, English, and Spanish) and from Native American languages (for example, Quechua and Mayan) are emphasized. Prerequisite: Ling 170D.
Same as L44 Ling 320

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: S


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L14 E Lit 3582 Black Literature: Race, Class and Writing in the United States and the Caribbean, 1900-1950

Study of the differences in literary tradition arising from the divergent social, racial and educational milieux of the United States and the West Indies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD BU: BA, HUM


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L14 E Lit 359 19th-Century American Women Writers

In 1855, Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote to his publisher, William Tichnor, that "America is now wholly given over to a damned mob of scribbling women and I should have no chance of success while the public taste is occupied with their trash." In this class, we examine works of those scribbling women of the 19th century. We read one of the best-selling novels of the century, one that created a scandal and ruined the author's literary reputation, along with others that have garnered more attention in our time than their own. In addition to focusing on these women writers, we also explore questions about the canon and American literature: What makes literature "good"? What constitutes American literature? How does an author get in the canon and stay there? Finally, in this writing intensive course, there are frequent writing assignments and a strong emphasis on the essential writing process of drafting and revising.
Same as L77 WGSS 358

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 359A (Re)Writing Slavery

This special topics course considers black-authored texts ranging from the 18th to the 21st century to examine the ways slavery has been discussed in American literature and culture. We pay attention to the role of slavery in creating the African diaspora, the contribution of slave narratives to the Abolitionist movement, and how the structures of American slavery did not disappear after the Civil War. We look at the ways Civil Rights-era and contemporary African-American writers such as Margaret Walker, Toni Morrison, and Charles Johnson have appropriated the slave narrative to engage and critique present day concerns. Their works are read against 19th-century slave narratives by ex-slaves such as Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs. In addition to the texts, students are asked to consider how slavery and its aftereffects have been portrayed in film and other forms of media.
Same as L90 AFAS 359

Credit 3 units. Art: HUM BU: BA


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L14 E Lit 360 The Writings of Philip Roth

Fiction by Philip Roth in chronological order from his earliest to his last major effort.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L14 E Lit 3601 The Traffic in Women and Contemporary European Cinema

What binds society together? One of the most influential answers to this question was offered by French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss. He argued that the fabric of a society is formed by a network of exchanges among kinship groups, which circulate three kinds of objects: economic goods, linguistic signs and women. In this course, we inquire into the place of women in this argument. We trace rudiments of the traditional marriage system (a father figure still "gives away" the bride in the marriage ceremony), its range of displacements in a global economy (transnational wives, nannies and domestic servants), the role of new media in the formation of new systems of trafficking (internet brides), and the place of the debate on gay marriage within the larger conversation. We read texts by Friedrich Engels, Sigmund Freud, Marcel Mauss, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Gayle Rubin, Luce Irigaray, Judith Butler, Barbara Ehrenreich and Arlie Russell Hochschild; and we watch a number of films that dramatize the traffic in women in the context of contemporary Europe: Coline Serreau's Chaos, Lukas Moodisson's Lilja 4-ever, Cristian Mungiu's Occident, Nilita Vachani's When Mother Comes Home for Christmas, Fatih Akin's Head-on, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne's The Silence of Lorna.
Same as L93 IPH 360

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 362 The 18th Century: A Study of Major Texts

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 363C Theatre Culture Studies III

The third of three historical survey courses in theater and performance studies, this course traces the origins of the modern theater. Beginning with Romanticism's self-conscious break with the past, we study the rise of bourgeois melodrama with its intensely emotional rendering of character and spectacular visual effects. We consider how those effects were made possible by advances in industrial stage technology which reproduced the everyday world with unprecedented realism, and how playwrights responded to those technologies by calling for the theatre to become either a "total work of art" which plunged its spectators into a mythical realm, or a petri dish which analytically presented the struggles of the modern individual within their modern milieu. Exploring a range of aesthetic modes (including melodrama, Realism, Naturalism, Aestheticism, Symbolism, Expressionism, the Epic theatre, and the Theatre of the Absurd), we read classic plays by modern playwrights such as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Pirandello, Brecht, and Beckett to consider how the modern theatre helped its audiences understand as well as adapt to the rapidly changing conditions of modernity.
Same as L15 Drama 365C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L14 E Lit 365 The Bible as Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L14 E Lit 365F The Bible as Literature

Extensive reading in English translations of the Old Testament and the New Testament, with emphasis on literary forms and ideas.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L14 E Lit 367 Religious Themes in Contemporary Literature

The use by selected 20th-century writers of religious themes and symbols. Close analysis of the literary techniques by which religious concepts and images are developed and differing insights of writers representing a broad spectrum of contemporary attitudes toward religious issues.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L14 E Lit 3676 Rhetoric: Ancient and Modern

Rhetoric, or the art of persuasion, has played a prominent and controversial role in political and educational theory and practice. We survey rhetorical texts, ranging from Plato and Aristotle through Augustine and Edmund Burke, to Kenneth Burke and Jürgen Habermas.
Same as L08 Classics 3676

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 368 The Development of American Romantic Thought: Enlightenment Confidence to Postmodern Questioning

We examine the revolutionary shift in human sensibility commonly known as "Romanticism" by tracing its development in America from the "Fireside Poets" (Bryant, Longfellow) and Transcendentalism (Emerson, Whitman) to anticipations of Modernism and Postmodernism (Henry Adams, Louis Sullivan, Charles Ives). Fulfills the 19th century and American literature requirements for the English major.

Credit 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 369 Reading Sex in Premodern England

This course introduces students to the literary representation of gender and sexuality in England from the medieval period to the 18th century. To understand a tradition that addressed the intractable problem of human sexuality in terms very different from ours, we ask: how does premodern culture imagine gendered identities, sexual difference, and erotic desire? How do various contexts — medical, religious, social, private, public — inform the literary representation of gender and sexuality? What are the anatomies and economies of the body, the circuits of physical pleasure, and the disciplines of the self that characterize human sexuality? Students have the opportunity to study romances, saints' lives, mystical writings, diaries, plays, sex guides, novels and scientific treatises. By learning how to "read sex" in premodern literature, students acquire a broad cultural and historical understanding of English sexualities before the descent of modern sensibilities.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L14 E Lit 370 The Age of Victoria

Works of fiction, poetry, journalism, children’s literature, political cartoons, book illustrations, genre paintings and photographs. The course aims to give a sense of the age in all its diversity and peculiarity, as well as to concentrate on a few central issues and developments in 19th-century British society: e.g., industrialism, materialism, feminism, liberalism, the rise of the social sciences. Readings include works by Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, Lewis Carroll, Dickens, George Eliot, John Stuart Mill, Trollope, Oscar Wilde and Edmund Gosse.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 371 The Age of Chaucer

Study of the ways in which literature and history interplay between 1340 and 1400. Literary texts include writings by Chaucer, Langland, the Pearl Poet and anonymous composers of songs, dream visions, romances, satires, debates and low stories; attempts to move from these to theoretical and over into historical texts, alienating where necessary and translating where possible.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 372 The Renaissance

Major texts of the European Renaissance examined to set English literary achievement in a continental context. Among authors studied: Petrarch, Castiglione, Erasmus, More, Luther, Wyatt, Rabelais, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Spenser, Jonson, Milton. Prerequisite: 6 units of literature, junior standing or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM UColl: ENE


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L14 E Lit 3725 Topics in Renaissance Literature

Topics course in Renaissance Literature.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3731 Writing and the Representation of Pain

Writing-intensive course on the representation of pain at every level, from private suffering to public policy. Course reader consists of examples of or extracts from a diversity of materials: the Bible and Ovid, medieval religious lyric, saints’ lives, visions of hell and damnation, descriptions of visionary illness; Freud’s Anna O, Kafka’s In the Penal Colony, Wilde’s The Nightingale and the Rose, Woolf’s On Being Ill, Artaud and the Theater of Cruelty; autobiographical and other writings by Susan Sontag and Inga Clendinnen; theory by Bataille, Deleuze, Dollimore and Elizabeth Grosz; work on pain by Leder, Morris, Rey and others; poetry by Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, Gwen Harwood, Alan Jenkins and others. We also read Elaine Scarry’s The Body in Pain and two recent novels: Andrew Miller’s Ingenious Pain and Manil Suri’s The Death of Vishnu.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 374W Epistolary Literature in the 18th Century: Other Peoples' Letters

In this writing-intensive course, we examine the attraction the letter held for authors and readers alike, taking into consideration the advantages and the disadvantages of the form, its role in the development of the early novel, and current theories of epistolary writing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 375 The Romantic Period

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3752 Modern British Novel

Credit variable, maximum 6 units.


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L14 E Lit 375A American Culture Studies: Methods & Visions

Required course for AMCS majors. Consult semester listing for current topic. As a Writing Intensive course, this course serves as an occasion for students to think about matters of argument and presentation, and to develop ideas and models for future research. This course is intended for students at the junior level or higher; it fulfills the "multidisciplinary" (MD) requirement for AMCS minors and the "Methods Seminar" requirements for AMCS majors.
Same as L98 AMCS 375A

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 375C Pastoral Literature


Same as L16 Comp Lit 375

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: IS


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L14 E Lit 376 The Victorian Period

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 3778 Comparative Studies in the Novel

This course introduces students to novels from a given period or from a geographical area, with attention to how novels are read and how they communicate.
Same as L16 Comp Lit 3778

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 381 Banned Books

Why would anyone want to burn a book? Under what circumstances would you support censorship? Several years ago a Russian student was exiled to Siberia for possessing a copy of Emerson’s Essays; today, school boards in the United States regularly call for the removal of Huckleberry Finn and The Catcher in the Rye from classrooms and library shelves. Actions like these dramatize the complex interconnections of literature and society, and they raise questions about what we read and the way we read. The course explores these issues by looking closely at several American and translated European texts that have been challenged on moral, sociopolitical, or religious grounds to determine what some readers have found so threatening about these works. Possible authors: Goethe, Voltaire, Rousseau, Defoe, Hawthorne, Flaubert, Twain, Chopin, Brecht, Salinger, Aldous Huxley, Ray Bradbury. Brief daily writing assignments.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L14 E Lit 3831 Topics in African-American Poetry

Beginning with the year in which Gwendolyn Brooks became the first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize, we will examine the tradition of African American poetry and the ways in which that tradtition is constantly revising itself and being revised from the outside. We will focus in particular on the pressures of expectation -- in terms of such identity markers as race, gender, and sexuality -- and how those pressures uniquely and increasingly affect African American poetry today.
Same as L90 AFAS 3838

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3838 Topics in African-American Poetry

Same as AFAS 3838

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 387 African-American Literature: Early Writers to the Harlem Renaissance

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3881 Black Women Writers

When someone says black woman writer, you may well think of Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison. But not long ago, to be a black woman writer meant to be considered an aberration. When Thomas Jefferson wrote that Phillis Wheatley's poems were "beneath the dignity of criticism," he could hardly have imagined entire Modern Language Association sessions built around her verse, but such is now the case. In this class we will survey the range of Anglophone African-American women authors. Writers likely to be covered include Phillis Wheatley, Harriet Wilson, Nella Larsen, Lorraine Hansberry, Octavia Butler, and Rita Dove, among others. Be prepared to read, explore, discuss and debate the specific impact of race and gender on American literature.
Same as L90 AFAS 3651

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 388C African-American Literature: African-American Writers Since the Harlem Renaissance

African-American literature in the 20th century moves from a renaissance into an institution. Guggenheim, Pulitzer and Nobel prize winners; Communist and Conservative Party sympathizers; Black Power advocates, inaugural poets, Broadway playwrights, Book-of-the-Month Club novelists, along with writers whose allusive and elliptical pages may never win them legions of fans, are among the many whose works we discover together. Written assignments may include two papers and two exams. Prerequisites: none, but related classes such as E Lit 215 and/or AFAS 208 are suggested. Satisfies the American literature requirement in English, and/or one 300-level elective requirement in AFAS.
Same as L90 AFAS 388C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 391 Literature and Medicine

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L14 E Lit 392W The Rise of the American Short Story

The course focuses on several short stories by six different authors in this order — Hawthorne: "My Kinsman," "Major Molineux," "The Birthmark," "Young Goodman Brown," "Artist of the Beautiful." Poe: "The Black Cat," "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar," "The Tell Tale Heart," "The Fall of the House of Usher." James: "The Jolly Corner," "The Figure in the Carpet," "The Real Thing." Crane: "The Upturned Face," "The Open Boat," "The Blue Hotel." Anderson: "Winesburg, Ohio." Hemingway: "Indian Camp," "A Clean Well-Lighted Place," "In Another Country," "Now I Lay Me." Faulkner: "A Rose for Emily," "The Evening Sun," "Pantaloon in Black." There are two brief papers two to three pages; two introductory paragraphs; two four- to six-page papers; and one paper covering an entire author. There is one rewrite in each category.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI EN: H


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L14 E Lit 393 Literary Theory: Subject and Subjection


Same as L16 Comp Lit 393

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 395 Shakespeare

Credit 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 3951 Shakespeare's Sonnets: Framing the Sequence

We will begin by exploring ways of reading a small number of individual sonnets, proceeding thereafter to think about patterns of meaning in language and image across broader groupings and the sequence as a whole. We will investigate the influence of earlier sonnet tradition, especially Petrarch's sonnets, and the relationship of the poems to modes of sexuality and selfhood. Finally, we will ask how some of Shakespeare's most creative readers — including Wilde, Booth, and Vendler — have responded to the challenges of the sonnets. Students will work on writing their own commentary on a group of poems.
Same as L93 IPH 3951

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 399 Senior Research Seminar

This course is tailored to the needs of students who are pursuing honors in English in their senior year. It develops students’ ability to gauge how different approaches affect the research and the outcome of a project in literary studies. It guides them in their research by analyzing and discussing research design, the construction of an archive, and the assessment and use of sources. Assignments include annotated bibliographies, summaries of the critical debate on student topics, abstract writing, research presentations, as well as drafts and final versions of chapters or essays. We workshop many of these assignments in the classroom and practice peer review. The seminar stretches over two semesters, ending before spring break, when honors work is due in the college. It is required for students who pursue honors by course work and by thesis.

Credit 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 3991 Senior Research Seminar I

This course is tailored to the needs of students who are pursuing honors in English in their senior year. It develops students’ ability to gauge how different approaches affect the research and the outcome of a project in literary studies. It guides them in their research by analyzing and discussing research design, the construction of an archive, and the assessment and use of sources. Assignments include annotated bibliographies, summaries of the critical debate on student topics, abstract writing, research presentations, as well as drafts and final versions of chapters or essays. We workshop many of these assignments in the classroom and practice peer review. The seminar stretches over two semesters, ending before spring break, when Honors work is due in the College. It is required for students who pursue honors by course work and by thesis.

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM


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L14 E Lit 3992 Senior Research Seminar II

This course is tailored to the needs of students who are pursuing honors in English in their senior year. It develops students’ ability to gauge how different approaches affect the research and the outcome of a project in literary studies. It guides them in their research by analyzing and discussing research design, the construction of an archive, and the assessment and use of sources. Assignments include annotated bibliographies, summaries of the critical debate on student topics, abstract writing, research presentations, as well as drafts and final versions of chapters or essays. We workshop many of these assignments in the classroom and practice peer review. The seminar stretches over two semesters, ending before spring break, when Honors work is due in the College. It is required for students who pursue honors by course work and by thesis.

Credit 2 units.


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L14 E Lit 4003 Blacks in Fiction

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 402 Introduction to Graduate Studies I: Research

Introduction to academic scholarship and related professional activities. A workshop in developing topics, conducting research, preparing and presenting conference papers, articles and grant proposals.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 403 Black and White in American Drama

This course addresses the complex issue of race in America through the 19th and 20th centuries as dramatized by American playwrights, black and white. Authors include Countee Cullen, Lillian Hellman, Eugene O’Neill, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes and Arthur Miller. Prerequisites: junior standing, two 300-level courses or better.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 404 Topics for Writers: Beckett

Waiting for Godot, Happy Days, Krapp’s Last Tape: these are but three of Samuel Beckett’s revolutionary texts for theater. The complete canon of plays is examined for structure and compositional elements. Students undertake exercises in dramatic composition and perform a chamber presentation of Endgame. Course is intended for writers with some experience of the dramatic form. Intending students must interview with instructor in November.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 405 Living Influences: Poets and the Poets Who've Shaped Them

This course examines a number of very contemporary collections of poetry (e.g., from first-book writers such as Karen Volkman and Greg Williamson, to more established writers such as Carl Phillips and Frank Bidart) to discover how generations of writers speak to and through one another. The course considers the nature and possible anxieties of writerly influence and how traditional and/or canonical writers' voices, verse, and vision have shaped a number of poets writing today. This class requires at least a basic knowledge of poetry in English up to the 1950s as we move freely among writers such as Ben Jonson, George Herbert, Gerard Manly Hopkins and Emily Dickinson, as well as Pound, Eliot, Lowell and Plath.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 407 Old English, Introductory

Study of the Anglo-Saxon language and introduction to major prose and short poetry of the period. Prerequisites: junior standing and 6 units of literature.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 408 Old English Literature

Close study of some major literary texts (e.g., Beowulf, the Exeter book) and major issues (e.g., Anglo-Saxon and Latin culture, traditions of heroic literature) of the Anglo-Saxon tradition. Prerequisite: E Lit 407 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 410 Medieval English Literature I

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4101 Medieval English Literature II

Topics course in Medieval English literature.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 411 Old and Middle English Literature

Early English literature from Beowulf and Anglo-Saxon poetry, in translation, through major works in Middle English of the 14th and 15th centuries, exclusive of Chaucer.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4111 Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities

This course will open with a survey of the classical tradition in pastoral/bucolic. We will consider questions of genre, intertextuality and ideology, and we will ask how "the lives and loves of herders" became favored ground for literary meditation on issues of surface and depth, reality and illusion, artifice and sincerity. This portion will involve intensive reading in translation of Theocritus, Vergil and Longus. In the second half of the semester, we will consider the survival, adaptation and deformation of ancient pastoral themes, forms and modes of thought in British and American writing from the 19th and 20th centuries. We will read works of Mark Twain, Kenneth Grahame, Thomas Hardy and Tom Stoppard.
Same as L93 IPH 4111

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L14 E Lit 412 16th-Century English Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 413 17th-Century English Literature: 1603-1660

Selected readings in English literature from Donne and Jonson through Dryden.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 415 18th-Century English Literature

Selected readings in English literature from Pope and Swift through the age of Johnson.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 415A Readings in 19th-Century English Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 416 English Literature of the Romantic Period

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4172 Roman Remains: Traces of Classical Rome in Modern British Literature

This course will examine the use of the Roman textual and material inheritance in poets, novelists and critics of the late 19th and 20th centuries working in Britain, and will ask how modernity addresses the claims of the classical tradition. We will place Thomas Hardy's Poems of 1912-13 next to Vergil's Aeneid, then survey Hardy's relationship to the visible remainders of Rome and the people it conquered — roads, barrows, forts — in the landscape of Dorset. After examining the representation of the Celtic hill-fort in fiction, and the legacy of Vergilian representations of the countryside in poetry, we will consider representations of Rome in light of modern imperialism (Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Ezra Pound's "Homage to Sextus Propertius") and examine the place of Vergil in T.S. Eliot's critical and poetic practice.
Same as L93 IPH 4171

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 418 Victorian Literature 1830-1890

Readings in such authors as Carlyle, Tennyson, Browning, Mill, Arnold and Pater.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 420 Topics in English and American Literature

Comparing the literatures — readings in the literature and theory of English and American Literature. Topics vary according to semester offerings.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4204 Film Theory

This course is an introduction to both classical and contemporary film theory. Beginning with the earliest attempts to treat cinema as a new and unique art form, the course initially reviews the various ways in which film theory attempted to define cinema in terms of its most essential properties. The course then examines more contemporary developments within film theory, more specifically its attempt to incorporate the insights of other critical and analytical paradigms, such as semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory and postmodernism. Throughout the course, we consider questions regarding the ontology of cinema, its relation to spectators, and the various ways in which its formal properties create meaning. Readings for the course include the major works of Sergei Eisenstein, Andre Bazin, Christian Metz, Laura Mulvey and Fredric Jameson. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 420

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 423 Topics in American Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4231 Topics in American Literature I

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4232 Slavery and the American Imagination

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 424 Topics in American Literature II: Modernisms in America

This course offers an advanced introduction to both the literature and the concept of modernism, the "ism" used to mark the experimental verve of early 20th-century writing and to grasp its ties to modernity or the modern social world. As the course title suggests, we devote most of our time to the career of modernism in the United States, a place imagined as both the modernist nation par excellence and the desert modernism escaped to be born. Three groups of primary texts — early modernist experiments, 1920s modernist landmarks and Great Depression revisions — illuminate the grand ambitions of eccentric literary forms and sequestered avant-garde movements; the public disputes and buried alliances between "high" expatriate and Harlem Renaissance modernisms; and the influential Depression-era reinterpretation of modernism as reactionary self-indulgence. The syllabus features fiction, poetry and drama by old and new literary celebrities: Djuna Barnes, John Dos Passos, T.S. Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Mike Gold, Ernest Hemingway, Nella Larsen, Meridel LeSueur, Claude McKay, Clifford Odets, Tillie Olsen, Ezra Pound, Jean Toomer and Richard Wright. A shorter list of critical essays highlights modernism's tendency to theorize itself while introducing 21st-century perspectives from the "New Modernist Studies." Satisfies the American literature requirement. For undergraduates, junior or senior standing is required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4240 Topics in American Literature II

Fiction not often found in the standard survey course, such as Harold Frederic's The Damnation of Theron Ware, G. W. Cable's The Grandissimes, Frank Norris' The Octopus, Jack London's Martin Eden, Thornton Wilder's Heaven's My Destination, Dorothy Baker's Young Man With a Horn, R. P. Warren's All the King's Men, Thomas Pyncheon's V, and short works by Edith Wharton and Ring Lardner.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4241 In the Kingdom of Swing — Black American Culture

An examination of the development of African-American literature and culture between 1929 and 1941.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4243 Contemporary African-American Drama

A close study of selected plays from Africa, the Caribbean and the United States. We consider plays by Lonnie Carter, John Pepper Clark, Adrienne Kennedy, Wole Soyinka, Efua T. Sutherland, Derek Walcott and Edgar White, among others.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4244 Topics in African-American Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 425 Early American Literature: American Modernisms

This seminar offers an advanced introduction to both the literature and the concept of modernism, the "ism" used to mark the experimental verve of early 20th-century writing and to grasp its ties to modernity, or the modern social world. As the course title suggests, we devote most of our time to the career of modernism in the United States, a place imagined as both the modernist nation par excellence and the desert modernism escaped to be born. Three groups of primary texts — early modernist experiments, 1920s modernist landmarks, and Great Depression revisions — illuminate the grand ambitions of eccentric literary forms and self-sequestered avant-garde movements; the public disputes and buried alliances between "high" expatriate and Harlem Renaissance modernisms; and the influential Depression-era reinterpretation of modernism as reactionary self-indulgence. The syllabus features fiction, poetry and drama by old and new literary celebrities: Djuna Barnes, John DosPassos, T.S. Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Mike Gold, Ernest Hemingway, Ella Larsen, Meridel LeSueur, Claude McKay, Clifford Odets, Tillie Olsen, Ezra Pound, Jean Toomer and Richard Wright. A shorter list of critical essays highlights modernism's tendency to theorize itself while introducing 21st-century perspectives from the "New Modernist Studies."

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 425C Humanities by the Numbers: Shakespeare

To what extent can computational techniques that draw on statistical patterns and quantification assist us in literary analysis? Over the semester, we juxtapose the close reading of historical documents or literary works with the "distant reading" of a large corpus of historical data or literary texts. We ask how the typically "human" scale of reading that lets us respond to literary texts can be captured on the "inhuman" and massive scales at which computers can count, quantify and categorize texts.While this class introduces students to basic statistical and computational techniques, no prior experience with technology is required. Prerequisites: two 200-level or one 300-level course in literature or history. This is a topics-type course and the specific documents and works examined vary from semester to semester. Please consult semester course listings for current offerings.
Same as L93 IPH 425

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 426 The American Renaissance

Literature of the mid-19th century with attention to social and intellectual backgrounds and the sources of the transcendentalist movement.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 426C Imagining the City: Crime and Commerce in Early Modern London

The astonishing demographic and economic growth of early modern London, and the rapid increase in spatial and social mobility that accompanied this growth, seemed to harbinger, in the eyes of many contemporaries, a society in crisis and perhaps on the brink of collapse. As increasing numbers of vagrants or masterless men flocked to the metropolis and a growing number of people — apprentices, domestic labor, street vendors, etc. — lived on the fringes of legitimacy and at risk of lapsing into vagrancy, policing early modern London provided unique challenges for authorities. At the same time, the very notion of the social — a shared space of kinship and community — could often seem to be under threat as an emerging market and a burgeoning commodity culture reshaped the traditional underpinnings of social and economic transactions. Yet, late Tudor and early Stuart London remained by far England's most prosperous metropolis — its primary market, home to a burgeoning print culture and nourishing theater — and emerged, eventually, as the epicenter of a global economy. This course considers the topographic, social and institutional configuration of early modern London and the ways in which these were reimagined and negotiated in the literature of the period. Drawing on the drama of the period and a wide array of pamphlet literature, we discuss how civic institutions handled the growing influx of the poor and adapted to the increasing power of an emerging bourgeoisie who asserted themselves in unprecedented ways. In addition, we consider secondary sources ranging from maps, theories of urban space and social and economic historiography as well as digital archives and computational techniques that allow us to "scale up" our thinking about early modern London to a vast corpus of texts and documents.
Same as L93 IPH 426

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 427 American Literature: The Rise of Realism to World War I

The maturing of American literature from the regional origins of realistic fiction just prior to the Civil War through the early naturalist novel and the beginnings of modern American poetry.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 428 Modernism and Postmodernism

Readings in early sources of 20th-century developments, followed by a selective survey of literary discourse from the 1920s through the 1990s in the United States. Prerequisites: junior standing and 6 units of literature or graduate standing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4282 English Modernist Fiction

The first half of the 20th century produced some of English fiction’s greatest individual achievements, linked by writers’ attempts to represent, through narrative experiments, a world in which many certainties about self and society were dissolving. Attentive reading of 10 novels or short story collections; study of the historical and cultural contexts to which these writers were responding. Among writers considered: E.M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, Rebecca West, Joseph Conrad, Katherine Mansfield and Ford Madox Ford.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L14 E Lit 429 American Fiction Since 1945

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 431 English Drama, Exclusive of Shakespeare, to 1642

Studies of selected major plays against a background of change and tradition in English drama from its beginnings to the closing of the theaters.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4312 Early Drama

This unit is concerned with English and European drama and spectacle from late Roman theater onward: primarily in England, but with comparative material from France and Italy. The chronological span of the course ends at about 1600; the working assumption is that there is no clean break between "medieval" and "Renaissance" drama, but that the theaters and scripts of the late 16th century should be understood as developing out of, as well as departing from, earlier theatrical traditions and practices.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 432 Topics in Renaissance Drama

A study of Elizabethan and Jacobean theatrical culture — the plays, players, playwrights and audiences of public theaters, private theaters and banqueting halls. Study includes the plays of Lyly, Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Chapman, Ford, Beaumont, Fletcher, Marston, Middleton, Webster and Shakespeare.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 4323 Reading in the Renaissance: Texts and Practices

Examination of reading practices among original audiences for Wyatt, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Herrick, Marvell, Rochester, and Dryden and application to our understanding and experience of early modern texts.

Credit 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 434 Topics in English and American Drama

Varies from semester to semester.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 435 Childhood and Society: The Formation of Children’s Literature

An intensive examination of some of the major works that have shaped the canon and conception of children's literature in the English-speaking world. Among the authors studied are George Macdonald, Mark Twain, Kenneth Grahame, L. Frank Baum, Lewis Carroll, Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling and others. If time permits at the end of the course, we examine some works that appeared in the Brownies' Book, the children's publication of the NAACP that appeared in 1920 and 1921, edited by W.E.B. Du Bois and Jessie Fauset, a significant attempt to create a literature for children of color.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 436 Craft of Fiction: Dialogue

A literature/creative writing hybrid course, we concentrate on the element of dialogue in fiction. We focus on 20th-century novels and stories that use dialogue in radical ways or place conversational dynamics at the center of their projects, probably including works by Don DeLillo, Henry Green, Grace Paley and Philip Roth. We consider the architecture of conversations — the evasions and hidden agendas; the art of the well-made monologue; how speech is shaped by varieties of linguistic capital; and secrets as a narrative device, extending into issues of conspiracy and paranoia. Because this is a craft rather than a traditional literature course, we approach the texts as creative writers (although experience as such is not required), considering what they have to say through a primary emphasis on the means they develop to say it, and we put the craft into practice: assignments include both a critical paper and a short story using radical elements of dialogue. We also make room for some consideration of the dynamics of actual conversations, outside of fiction, through a reading of some conversational analysts and speech-act theorists, and through some real-world experiments.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH EN: H


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L14 E Lit 437 Literary Theory: The Subject and Subjection

Credit 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 438 African-American Comedy

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4381 Aesthetic Negativity: Adorno, Benjamin and Kracauer on Literature, Art and Media


Same as L16 Comp Lit 438

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 438C Un-Framed: Toward an Aesthetic of Contemporary Media Art and Culture


Same as L16 Comp Lit 438

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 439 Literary Theory

Literary Theory course.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 440 Modernism

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 441 Literature of Catastrophe

In this course we examine the ways in which art, both literary and visual, attempt to address catastrophic events.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L14 E Lit 442 Introduction to Romantic Poetry

We read the poetry of the major Romantics — Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, and Keats — with attention to their biographical, historical, economic and cultural contexts.

Credit 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 444C Psychoanalysis and its Literary Cultures

This course examines interactions between texts from the domains of literature and psychoanalysis. We read theory and literature side by side, in order to ask the following questions: Does the relationship between literary text and theory necessarily entail the subjection of literature to analysis, or can one, as Pierre Bayard asks, apply literature to psychoanalysis? What can psychoanalytic readings tell us more broadly about the act of reading? How can psychoanalysis enrich our sense of the ethical import of reading and writing, and how can literature challenge psychoanalytic goals and values? In terms of psychoanalytic authors, we focus on Freud, Lacan, Klein, Winnicott and Bayard. In terms of literature, we range widely from Sophocles to Henry James.
Same as L93 IPH 444

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 445 Readings in American Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 4454 Irish Women Writers

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 446 Introduction to Contemporary Poetry

Introduction to contemporary poetry.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4461 American Studies and Poetry: The 20th Century

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 447 Modern British and American Poetry

Modern poetic forms, schools and techniques. Readings in such poets as Yeats, Eliot, Pound, Moore, Auden, Bishop, Hill.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 4471 Modern Poetry I: Modernisms

American and British poetry before, during and after World War I. Readings include Hardy, Yeats, Frost, Stein, Eliot, Williams, Moore, Johnson, Pound, H.D. and Stevens, as well as selections from Wordsworth, Whitman and Dickinson. First half of two-course sequence; second half optional

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4472 Modern Poetry II: Postmodernisms

American and British poetry from 1930 to the present. Readings include Stevens, Riding, Crane, Zukofsky, Bunting, Auden, Brooks, Olson, Bishop, Merrill, Ashbery, Hill, Ammons, Rich, Wright and Howe. Prerequisite: E Lit 4471 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4485 Topics in Irish Literature I

Topics course in Irish literature.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L14 E Lit 449 20th-Century Irish Poetry

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4492 The Irish Literary Revival

The class will study major writings by Oscar Wilde, W.B. Yeats, J.M. Synge, James Joyce, & Flann O'Brien within the contexts of the language movement, colonialism, cultural nationalism, the socialist movement and the 1913 Lockout, the Easter Rising and the War for Independence, the Civil War, the founding of the Irish Free State, the Partition, and the Irish Theocracy. Wilde's notions of the primacy of art with regard to politics and their elaboration by W.I. Thompson and Declan Kiberd will be an organizing principle in the course. The class will see two films, offer oral reports, and write papers.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L14 E Lit 449A Topics in Literature


Same as L16 Comp Lit 449

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 450 American Film Genres

By close examination of three or four specific types of film narratives, this course will explore how genre has functioned in the Hollywood mode of production. Students will gain an understanding of genre both as a critical construct as well as a form created by practical economic concerns, a means of creating extratextual communication between film artist/producers and audience/consumers. Genres for study will be chosen from the western, the gangster film, the horror movie, the musical, screwball comedy, science fiction, the family melodrama, the woman's film and others. In addition to film showings, there will be readings in genre theory as well as genre analyses of individual films. Required screenings Tuesdays at 4 p.m.
Same as L53 Film 450

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4505 Interdisciplinary Topics in the Humanities


Same as L93 IPH 450

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI EN: H


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L14 E Lit 450A Interdisciplinary Topics in the Humanities


Same as L93 IPH 450A

Credit 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 4531 American Drama

Topics in American Drama.
Same as L15 Drama 453

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 456 English Novel of the 19th Century

Prose fiction by such writers as Jane Austen, Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, the Brontës and Hardy.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 458 The Modern Novel

Content and craft in the varying modes of the American, British and continental modern novel by such writers as James, Joyce, Lawrence, Faulkner, Kafka, Mann, Gide and Camus.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4581 Modern British Novel

A selection of books by some of the major 20th-century figures: Henry James, Samuel Butler, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forster, Elizabeth Bowen, Graham Greene, Christopher Isherwood, Sybille Bedford, V.S. Naipaul, William Trevor and Kazuo Ishiguro.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 4582 The North American Novel, 1945 to the Present

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4583 British Fiction after Modernism

Course attempts to identify characteristics of British postmodern fiction: experimental novels of the 1970s and 1980s — works by, for example, John Fowles, Alasdair Gray and Martin Amis; the "devolution" of British fiction into its constituent Scottish and English strands in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as its simultaneous globalizing as diasporic novelists wrote from Britain about "home." Younger writers, in frequently provocative ways, address the questions of nation, place, class and sexual identity that have dominated the postwar period.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L14 E Lit 4584 Contemporary Fiction

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 4591 The Modern European Novel

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4601 The Shaping of Modern Literature

Themes and major figures associated with the shaping of the modern literary imagination, including such topics as Freudian and Jungian versions of the self, phenomenological thought, the symbolist imagination and such masters as Hegel, Kafka, Kierkegaard, and William and Henry James. Topics vary each semester; consult Course Listings.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 461 Topics in English Literature I

Studies in special subjects, e.g., allegory and symbolism in the medieval period; the sonnet in English literature, English poetry and politics. Consult Course Listings.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 462 Topics in English Literature II

Variable topics, such as Travel and Colonization in the Renaissance; Renaissance Skepticism and the Literature of Doubt.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4631 Topics in English Literature and History: The 17th Century

Variable topics, such as writing, politics and society in Revolutionary England; life writing and literature in Early Modern England.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4653 Banned Books

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4655 The Pre-History of Blogging: Social Media of the Enlightenment

This course will explore the ways in which the Enlightenment — in France, England, Germany and the U.S. — was shaped by the emergence of new literary forms, media and technologies of communication. Like our blogs, Facebook and email, the 18th century had its new social media — newspapers and literary journals, letters that surged through the national postal systems — as well as new social institutions — salons and coffeehouses — that served as forums for public debate. We will examine these novelties in order to investigate the often ambivalent heritage of the Enlightenment: the use of media to exchange knowledge and express dissent; the use of media for surveillance and state control.
Same as L93 IPH 465

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 466 Theory and Methods in the Humanities: What is Interdisciplinary?

Does humanity make progress? What does it mean to be part of a society, a culture, or an economy? And how do human beings find hope in the face of violence, loneliness, inequality, and the prospect of their own mortality? These fundamental questions about the human condition are the province of social theory, a way of thinking that intersects with philosophy, politics, economics, religion, anthropology and sociology. This seminar will examine an array of classic texts in this field, including works from Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, Theodor Adorno, Hannah Arendt, and Michel Foucault.
Same as L93 IPH 405

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 4693 Topics in European Literature and History

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 470 Research Lab

This class allows faculty members to work on their research in collaboration with undergraduate and graduate students. The content of the class (and its subtitle) will be determined by the faculty member's research project; its primary activities will involve the students in making concrete contributions to the faculty member's research. The basic idea is to create a collaborative environment akin to a lab, in which researchers of various skills pursuing various tasks contribute to a distinctive project.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 472 History of the English Language

Concepts and methods of linguistical study: comparative, historical and descriptive. Application of methods to selected problems in the history of English. Contrastive analysis of excerpts from Old, Middle and later English; sounds, meanings, syntax and styles.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 475 Intellectual History of Feminism

We focus on feminist thought in Western culture but also examine non-Western ideas about feminisms. We trace the relationship among emergent feminist ideas and such developments as the rise of scientific methodology, Enlightenment thought, revolutionary movements and the gendering of the political subject, colonialism, romanticism, socialism, and global feminisms. Readings are drawn from both primary sources and recent feminist scholarship on the texts under consideration. Note: This course is in the core curriculum for the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate certificate. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: completion of at least one Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies course or permission of the instructor. Students who have taken L77 WGSS 475 Intellectual History of Feminism can not take this class.
Same as L77 WGSS 475

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 476 Feminist Literary and Cultural Theory

This course is intended to acquaint students with basic ideas and issues raised by a diversity of voices in contemporary feminist and cultural theory. Readings cover a wide range of approaches and tendencies within feminism, among them: French feminism, Foucauldian analyses of gender and sexuality, lesbian and queer theories, Third World/postcolonial feminism, and feminism by women of color. Given that feminist theories developed in response to and in dialogue with wider sociopolitical, cultural and philosophical currents, the course explores feminist literary and cultural theory in an interdisciplinary context. Note: This course is in the core curriculum for the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate certificate. Prerequisite: advanced course work in WGSS or in literary theory (300-level and above) or permission of the instructor required.
Same as L77 WGSS 419

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 478 The Craft of Fiction

A literature/creative writing hybrid course concentrating on the element of dialogue in fiction, reading novels and stories that use dialogue in radical ways, including works by Don DeLillo, Henry Green, Zora Neale Hurston, Grace Paley and Philip Roth.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 479 The Art and Craft of Poetry

An examination of poetry from its beginnings in English to the present day considering the relationship between earlier traditions and the manifestations of those traditions in contemporary poetry. Issues such as image; metaphor and the employment of it; notions of vision; the extent to which vision can spring from the intersection of art and craft. Study of prosody, reading poems that exemplify the successful use of prosodic technique, and trying our own hands at those techniques as well.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 481 Selected English Writers I

Concentrated study of one or two major English writers, e.g., Spenser, Dickens, Blake, Yeats. Consult Course Listings.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 482 Selected English Writers II

Concentrated study of one or two major English writers, e.g., Spenser, Dickens, Blake, Yeats. Consult Course Listings.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 483 Selected American Writers I

Concentrated study of one or two major American writers, e.g., Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright; Emily Dickinson. Consult Course Listings each semester for specific authors.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 484 Selected American Writers II

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 493 Spenser

Readings in the Faerie Queene and Shepheardes Calender, with attention to Spenser’s deliberate fashioning of a literary career.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4930 The Unmaking and Remaking of Europe: The Literature and History of the European War of 1914-1918


Same as L16 Comp Lit 493

Credit 3 units.


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L14 E Lit 494 Milton

Major poems and prose works in relation to literary and intellectual currents of the 17th century.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4951 Seminar: The 19th-Century European Novel

Seminar in Comparative Literature Studies. Topics vary. Consult Course Listings for current semester's offering.
Same as L16 Comp Lit 495

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 496 Shakespeare Advanced Course

A study of Shakespeare’s career as a dramatist, with intensive work on particular plays in the light of critical traditions. Prerequisite: E Lit 395C or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L14 E Lit 4968 Digital Methods in Literary Analysis: Shakespeare by the Numbers

This course explores how emerging digital techniques can help us read literary texts in new ways. We read a set of Shakespeare plays closely but also work with a large corpus of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries as we cover basic text-mining and visualization techniques and use simple statistical and quantitative approaches to think about questions of genre and style. We ask how the typically "human" scale of reading that lets us respond to these texts can be captures on they massive scales at which computers can count, quantify and categorize. What nuance is lost in this translation between "close" and "distant" readings and what insights are gained?

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 4969 Shakespeare in Production

This course examines Shakespeare's comedies in performance. Combining scene work and production history, students gain access to the world of the comedies from both a hands-on, theoretical and historical perspective. Prerequisites: Drama 395C or permission of instructor.
Same as L15 Drama 469

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 4976 Advanced Seminar in Literature

This seminar is an interdisciplinary examination of how Americans represented the Civil War during and after the titanic conflict, with special attention given to the period between 1865 and 1915. The course explores how painters, novelists, photographers, sculptors, essayists, journalists, philosophers, historians, and filmmakers engaged the problems of constructing narrative and reconstructing national and individual identity out of the physical and psychological wreckage of a war which demanded horrific sacrifice and the destruction of an enemy that could not be readily dissociated from the self.
Same as L22 History 4976

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 498 The Spenser Lab

This course involves graduate and undergraduate students in the ongoing work of the Spenser Project, an interinstitutional effort to produce a traditional print edition of the Complete Works of Edmund Spenser.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L14 E Lit 498W The Spenser Lab

In this writing-intensive course, the students are given a variety of writing tasks: writing commentaries, introductions, software manuals, grant proposals, software requirements and design documents (SRDDs).

Credit 4 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI EN: H


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