The Department of History engages its students through a study of the past. We are committed to the idea that the most compelling stories are often the most revealing ones. In addition to teaching students the particular skills of historical inquiry, we provide them with tools that serve them beyond their majors and beyond the university.

The discipline of history poses challenging questions about the ways that human beings have made the worlds they live in. There are many approaches to history. Some historians study politics, whether that means political parties or the ways that people who never held public office nonetheless act to shape public life. Others study the lived experience of everyday Americans or the popular culture that reflects how people understand the world around them.

Still others are especially interested in the kinds of stories about the past that we tell ourselves, for those stories reveal a great deal about our own society as well as that of a different time. While it is not true that history repeats itself, it is true that without knowledge of the past we are unable to understand the present. The Department of History encourages all undergraduates to incorporate the discipline of historical thinking into their liberal arts education. Students will learn to organize and interpret data, to write with precision and clarity, to develop logical and convincing arguments, and to combine careful research with creativity.

In all of our courses, we emphasize the kinds of skills that will help students to succeed both in classes at Washington University and in their postgraduate careers. For our majors and minors, we offer the opportunity to work closely with a faculty mentor to develop a coherent yet challenging program of study. The history major is structured to be flexible, and we encourage students both to pursue established interests and to explore topics, time periods and locales that may be less familiar. We offer a broad range of courses from the ancient world to the present, and across Africa, Asia, the Mideast, Europe and the Americas.

We have many opportunities for small-group learning and discussion, including freshman seminars, our Historical Methods seminar, writing-intensive seminars and advanced seminars. Prior to graduation, every major is expected to demonstrate mastery of the field through an advanced seminar, an independent research project, formal fieldwork in the historical and archival professions, or by writing a senior honors thesis.

Some history majors go on to pursue graduate work in the field and become professional historians, but most find that the knowledge and skills they build through history courses fit them for a wide range of careers. Our graduates have attended law or medical school, and have pursued careers in government, education, research, business, communications, international agencies, publishing, museums and archives, public advocacy and many other fields. 

Contact:Margaret Williams
Phone:314-935-5450
Email:history@wustl.edu
Website:http://history.artsci.wustl.edu

The Major in History

Total units required: 28

I. Introductory Courses (6 credits required)

One introductory survey (100-level)

One additional introductory course, chosen from any 100- or 200-level course home-based or cross-listed in History and taught by history department faculty. This course can be an introductory survey, but it does not have to be.

*Note: A score of 5 on the AP European, U.S. or World History examination will constitute completion of the introductory survey History 102C, History 163, or History 164 respectively, and 3 units of credit equivalent to History 102C, 163, or 164 will be awarded, for a maximum of 6 credits toward the major and/or minor. A score of 4 on any of these exams may earn 3 units of elective credit but will not be counted toward the major or minor.

II. Upper-Level Courses:

At least 18 300- or 400-level units plus a capstone experience (for a minimum of 22 advanced units). Requirements at this level include:

  • at least one course designated "premodern" and one course designated "modern"
  • at least one course from three of the following geographical areas: Africa, East Asia, South Asia, Europe, Latin America, Middle East, the United States, or transregional history (please refer to Notes below*)
  • History 301 Historical Methods, a required methods course for all majors
  • the Capstone Experience: History majors must, prior to graduation, complete a capstone experience consisting of:
    • successful completion of the Senior Honors Thesis; or
    • an Advanced Seminar; or
    • an independent research project with a significant writing component (History 500); or
    • directed fieldwork in the historical or archival profession, with a significant writing component (History 4001/History 4002)

*Notes:

  1. International Baccalaureate: The department recognizes the superior preparation many students have received in the IB program; however, no credit is awarded for the International Baccalaureate.
  2. The department recognizes that some students take their first history course, or develop an interest in majoring in history, only in their junior year, and then face a dilemma in choosing between required introductory courses and upper-level course work more appropriate to their abilities. Such students, with the recommendation of their adviser in History, may petition the director of undergraduate studies to permit a designated upper-level course to substitute for one of the introductory courses. In all such cases, the minimum number of units in the minor remains 18, and in the major, 28.
  3. All upper-level units must be separate courses, not double-counted toward a minor or second major. (Exception: Double majors may count one course for both majors if it is cross-listed between the two departments). Courses in the major are excluded from the credit/no credit option.
  4. If a student chooses to count a transregional course toward the geographical requirement, at least one of the two other geographical areas the student counts toward the major must cover a region that is not included in the transregional course. For example, a student who has completed courses in U.S. and Latin American history could not count a transregional course that examines the comparative history of the U.S. and Latin America. But a student who has taken a transregional course on the U.S. and Latin America could take a course on either U.S. or Latin American history, and would then need to take a course covering an area other than the U.S. or Latin America in order to satisfy the third area requirement.

Additional Information

Fieldwork: History majors are eligible for fieldwork at the Missouri Historical Society or at other museums. Opportunities also are sometimes available in the special collections at Olin Library, with local businesses, and at historical sites.

Study Abroad: Students are encouraged to participate in various overseas studies programs, which normally may fulfill up to 6 units of credit for the major or minor.

Senior Honors: Students who have a strong academic record may work toward Latin Honors. It is recommended that students pursuing honors complete two advanced seminars in the junior year. Students graduating with Latin Honors must meet GPA requirements and satisfactorily complete History 399 Senior Honors Thesis and Colloquium: Writing-Intensive Seminar, while writing a thesis during the senior year.

The Minor in History

Units required: 18

I. Introductory Courses (6 units required):

One introductory survey (100-level)

One additional introductory course, chosen from any 100- or 200-level course home-based or cross-listed in History and taught by history department faculty. This course can be an introductory survey, but it does not have to be.

II. Upper-Level Courses:

12 additional units, 9 of which must be at the 300 or 400 level.

*Notes:

  1. A score of 5 on the AP European, U.S. or World History examination will constitute completion of History 102C, History 163, or History 164 respectively, and 3 units of credit equivalent to History 102C, 163, or 164 will be awarded, for a maximum of 6 credits toward the minor. A score of 4 on any of these exams may earn 3 units of elective credit but will not be counted toward the major or minor.
  2. All 18 units must be separate courses not double-counted toward the major or another minor. Courses in the minor may not be taken credit/no-credit.
  3. The department recognizes that some students take their first history course, or develop an interest in declaring a minor in history, only in their junior year, and then face a dilemma in choosing between required introductory courses and upper-level course work more appropriate to their abilities. Such students, with the recommendation of their adviser in History, may petition the director of undergraduate studies to permit a designated upper-level course to substitute for one of the introductory courses. In all such cases, the minimum number of units in the minor remains 18.

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for L22 History.


L22 History 101C Western Civilization

This course surveys the period from circa 3500 BCE to 1650 CE in the West. As we examine the civilizations of Mesopotamia, the ancient Mediterranean, and medieval and early modern Europe, we will focus on themes of cultural contact, conflict and change in order to understand the complex roots of conventional "western" history. Introductory course to the major and minor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L22 History 102C Western Civilization

This course provides an introduction to the history of modern Europe. It begins by following Europeans from the upheavals of the Enlightenment to the French Revolution, and from the industrial revolution to the era of nation-state building; continues by exploring how Europeans became embroiled in the scramble for empire, the era of "totalitarianism," and two disastrous world wars; and ends by examining how Europeans coped with the divisions of the Cold War, the collapse of communism, and the challenges of unification and resurgent nationalism. Introductory course to the major and minor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L22 History 102D Barbarity and Civilization in Modern Europe

The history of modern Europe is one of both barbarity and civilization. While Europeans staged revolutions to fight for democracy and argued for universal human rights, they also trafficked in slaves and practiced genocide. This course is a survey of modern European history, from Columbus' arrival in the New World through the 20th century. While major historical events like the French and Russian Revolutions, or the World Wars, will certainly be covered in detail, we will also focus our attention on longer-term developments like the rise of nationalism, the changing status of women, and the importance of race and religion in defining what it has meant to be European. Lastly this course will serve as an introduction to the practice of history and will familiarize students with a variety of different approaches: political, cultural, economic, global, comparative, social and intellectual. As such, our readings will range from philosophical treatises and popular novels to academic articles and manifestos. Introductory course to the major and minor.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 1119 Freshman Seminar: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America: Myths, Realities and Identities

This course examines the history of racial thinking and the experience of race in Latin America. Topics covered include: concepts of "blood purity" in early modern Spain; the casta system in colonial Spanish America; indigenous and African identities; race, citizenship and nation-building; whitening projects; discourses of mestizaje or "race mixture"; and the intersection of race, gender and class. While the focus of the course will be on the complexities of race in Latin America, a place of enormous ethnic and cultural diversity, we'll also be looking to draw comparisons to the history of race in the U.S.

Credit 3 units.


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L22 History 1500 Silver, Slaves and the State: Globalization in the 18th Century

In this course, students will look at how silver, and also porcelain, tobacco and salt, shaped the early modern world. The course will look at how merchants and adventurers, as well as pilgrims, pirates, migrants and captives, encountered very different facets of that world, and tried to make sense of it. Students will also study how these attempts at exchange, how that process of "making sense," transformed how men and women of the 18th century, around the globe, saw their territories and their fellow humans. This is a world history class.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 154 Freshman Seminar: Saints and Society

The topic of this course is saints and society in medieval and early modern Europe. It explores the complex relationships between exceptional holy men and women, the historical settings in which they lived, and the religious and cultural traditions on which they drew. It considers saints as both embodiments of the highest ideals of their societies and radical challenges to ordinary patterns of social existence.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L22 History 1550 Temple & Palace in World History: Approaches to Religion and Politics in the Middle East

This course aims to examine the ways in which temple and palace cooperated with and competed against each other in the Middle East from ancient to the present times. As sites of spiritual and political power, temples and palaces have played a major role in human history. They have been a source of cooperation and conflict by inspiring and regulating the spiritual and social lives of people, including how they enacted laws, developed cultures, established institutions, and interacted with each other as individuals, families and societies. The course will trace how their interactions produced various models of authority, law and social association and how they collectively and separately rationalized social hierarchy and diversity in human societies. Introductory course to the major and minor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 163 Freedom, Citizenship and the Making of American Life

This course offers a broad survey of American history from the era before European settlement of North America to the late 20th century. The course explores the emergence and geographic expansion of the United States and addresses changes in what it meant to be an American during the nation's history. Tracing major changes in the nation's economic structures, politics, social order and culture, the course chronicles, among other issues, changes in the meanings of freedom, citizenship and American identity. Introductory course to the major and minor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L22 History 164 Introduction to World History: The Second World War in World History

As an introduction to world and comparative history, this course tours the globe in an era when the world was engulfed by war. The Second World War was a period of intense violence, upheaval, and profound change that touched every continent in one way or another by destroying, remaking, and inventing international, domestic, and local institutions. Where conventional studies of the conflict focus on military and diplomatic matters, this course surveys the causes, scope and consequences of World War II for a representative sample of the common people of Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. It uses the war's influence on race, gender, disease, propaganda, technology, literature, film, music and material culture to introduce students to the basic concepts and methodologies of world and comparative history. Introductory course to the major and minor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 1640 Health and Disease in World History

Health and disease are universal human experiences, yet vary profoundly across time and place. Extending from ancient times to the present, this course surveys that variety from a global perspective. We explore medical traditions from around the world, then examine how these responded to major epidemic diseases such as the Black Death. We study the globalization of disease and the emergence of scientific medicine after 1450, then turn to the interrelated histories of health and disease in the modern era. Throughout, we attend carefully to how the biological aspects of health and disease have shaped world history, while at the same time exploring the powerful mediating role of social, cultural, economic, and political factors — from religious beliefs and dietary practices to inequality, poverty, empire and war — in determining the myriad ways in which health and disease have been experienced and understood. Introductory course to the major and minor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 1680 Beatrice's Last Smile: A History of the Medieval World, 200-1500

The medieval world, stretching from the Mediterranean to the Americas, lasted from the third to the 16th centuries. This course is a sweeping historical narrative framed around holiness. By vividly interweaving stories about men, women, children, gods, angels and demons, it is possible to evoke the reality of holiness in ideas, spaces, buildings, smells, rivers, religion, art, noises, trees, blood, shoes, etc., from one century to another. Students study the Late Roman Empire, Christianization, paganism, the "barbarian" invasions, the rise of Islam, the Carolingians, Vikings, Anglo-Saxons, and the Crusades, just to name a few. Students read poets, philosophers, historians and novelists, which are often the only surviving fragments of wills or testimonies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 176 Freshman Seminar: A Nation Apart? Jewish Identity in an Age of Nationalism

This course invites students to explore the varieties and limits of Jewish identity in a world in which nations appear to be the driving forces of history. In the "age of nationalism," beginning in the second half of the 18th and continuing to the end of the 20th century, traditional forms of Jewish identity as well as the place of Jews within the social fabric became problematic. Who were the Jews as individuals and as a collective? A nation? A religious group? Neither exactly? And what was their relationship to the emerging, modern nations of Europe to be? Did the process of emancipation resolve the problem? To what extent was antisemitism a response to the dilemma of defining and situating Jews in the new European order? How has the existence of a Jewish nation state in the Middle East affected Jewish identity in other parts of the world? Finally, how has globalization altered the relationship of Jews to the state as well as toward other Jews?
Same as L75 JINE 176

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L22 History 1771 Freshman Seminar: Jewish and Islamic Migrations in the 20th Century

This course will investigate how the Exodus has been, and continues to be, a crucial source of identity for both Jews and Judaism. We will explore how the Exodus has functioned as the primary model from which Jews have created historical self-understanding and theological meaning. We will investigate how and why this story continues to be vital to Jews throughout the unfolding of the Jewish experience. How does the Exodus remain pertinent? How has the Exodus been reimagined multiple times throughout the history of Judaism? Why has the Passover celebration been transformed radically in different Jewish communities? We will analyze many types of expression: historical sources, liturgy, art, commentaries, theology, literature, film, mysticism and music.
Same as L75 JINE 1771

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 1ABR History Course Work Completed Abroad

Students who wish to study overseas must contact the Department of History's Study Abroad Advisor. Please visit our website for more information.

Credit variable, maximum 12 units.


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L22 History 2006 "Reading" Culture: How to Read Images: Visual Culture and Visual Literacy

Consult section description.
Same as L98 AMCS 206

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 201A Puzzles and Revolutions: Text and Tradition

One major force in human history has been inquiry into the natural world. Especially after 1550, natural science has, by virtue of its role in the development of technology and the improvement of health, has brought about great changes on all scales of human existence, first in Western Europe and then globally. In this course, the changing character of inquiry into the natural world, from antiquity forward, will be the object of study. Does natural science enable us, for example, to study nature as it is in itself, or are culturally-determined perspectives or frameworks inescapable? How is it that natural science has, especially since 1800, proved so useful in the development of technology? How has it impinged on the arts? The requirements will include writing several short papers and brief responses to the readings.
Same as L93 IPH 201A

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: SCI EN: H


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L22 History 2061 Sophomore Seminar: The Culture of Death in East Asia

This course explores a wide range of historical themes pertaining to death in East Asia. The key question addressed in this course is how and why people in the past understood and experienced death in certain ways. We will attempt to answer this question by exploring historical and cultural terrains that shaped the ways in which people conceptualized death and afterlife in China, Korea and Japan, throughout the medieval, early modern and modern periods. We will also examine a rich array of topics through which scholars have approached the culture of death, such as death rituals, material culture and ghost stories. Students are encouraged to think comparatively and contemplate both continuities and changes in ideas, practices and anxieties of death throughout the historical landscape.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 2081 History, Text, and Identity: An Intro to Jewish Civilization

The anthropologist Clifford Geertz once famously invoked Max Weber in writing that "man is an animal suspended in webs of significance he himself has spun. I take culture to be those webs." The main goal of this course — designed as an introduction to Jewish history, culture and society — will be to investigate the "webs of significance" produced by Jewish societies and individuals, in a select number of historical periods, both as responses to historical circumstances and as expressions of Jewish identity. Over the course of the semester we will focus on the following historical settings: seventh-century BCE Judah and the Babylonian exile; pre-Islamic Palestine and Babylonia (the period of the Mishnah and the Talmud); Europe in the period of the Crusades; Islamic and Christian Spain; Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries; North America in the 20th century; and the modern State of Israel. For each period we will investigate the social and political conditions of Jewish life; identify the major texts that Jews possessed, studied, and produced; determine the non-Jewish influences on their attitudes and aspirations; and the explore the efforts that Jews made to define what it meant to be part of a Jewish collective.
Same as L75 JINE 208F

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH, IS EN: H


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L22 History 2090 Freshman Seminar: Chinese Diasporas

China has had one of the most mobile populations in world history. This freshman seminar explores migration patterns and networks in the creation of Chinese diasporas in the early modern and modern eras (1500-present). Rather than focus exclusively on the history of China or the Chinese overseas, this course more broadly considers practices and networks that sustained and linked internal and external migrations.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 2091 Freshman Seminar: The City in Early Modern Europe

From the city-states of Renaissance Italy to the 18th-century boomtowns of London and Paris, cities functioned as political, economic and cultural centers, creating unique opportunities and challenges for their diverse inhabitants. Using a wide variety of primary and secondary sources, this course examines how men and women, rich and poor, established citizens and marginal groups, tried to understand and manage life in the city. Their conflicting experiences and expectations created not only social and economic unrest, but also a resilient social infrastructure, a tradition of popular participation in politics, and a rich legacy of cultural accomplishment. Topics studied include: urban political and economic organization; the creation and use of public spaces; religion as a source of community and conflict; and urban crime and public punishment.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: BA, HUM


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L22 History 2093 Sophomore Seminar: Mobilizing Shame: Violence, the Media, and International Intervention

Deciding when and when not to intervene in the affairs of a foreign and autonomous state has become a hot-button issue in light of the occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan, and of the more recent lending of support to Syrian rebels. In this course, students will examine the emergence of the "international community," the development of human rights, the rise of the war correspondent as a mythical figure, the creation of supranational political and military institutions, the influence of the media on public sympathies, and the changing nature of global politics. Case studies may include: the Greek War of Independence, the Crimean War, the break-up of the Ottoman Empire, the Spanish Civil War, the Second World War, the Vietnam War, Apartheid in South Africa, the Rwandan genocide, the Somali Civil War, and the Balkan conflicts of the 1990s.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 209C America to the Civil War

The American experience from the age of Columbus to that of Lincoln; development of distinctive American patterns of thought, culture, society, politics and religion. Topics include efforts to cope with the wilderness; colonial maturity and the development of revolutionary ideology; defining the American character; literature and art for a new republic; the impulses of religion, idealism and perfectionism.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM


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L22 History 210 America from the Civil War

This is a course in modern American history. We begin with Reconstruction after the Civil War, with the transition of the United States from an agricultural nation to an urban industrial one. We will investigate changes in technology, urban growth, and immigration, and new ideas of government and nationalism as the United States achieves its position as a world leader through World War I and II, the Cold War, and the global world of the 21st century.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 2118 Freshman Seminar: Angels, Prostitutes and Chicas Modernas: Women in Latin American History

Women have been active players in the construction of Latin American nations. In the last two decades, leading scholars in the field have taken up the challenge of documenting women's participation. This research explosion has produced fruitful results to allow for the development of specialized courses. This course looks at the nation-building process through the lens of Latin American women. Students will examine the expectations, responsibilities and limitations women confronted in their varied roles from the Wars of Independence to the social revolutions and dictatorial regimes of the 20th century. Besides looking at their political and economic lives, students will explore the changing gender roles and relations within marriage and the family, as well as the changing sexual and maternal mores.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 2119 Freshman Seminar: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America: Myths, Realities and Identities

What does it mean to identify as mestizo, moreno or mulato? How have Latin American nations dealt with their mixed racial populations and their rich African and indigenous heritages? What does it mean to be black in nations where the official discourse is one of racial hybridity or color blindness? This course examines the history of racial thinking and the experience of race in Latin America. While the focus of the course will be on the complexities of race in Latin America, a place of enormous ethnic and cultural diversity, we will also draw comparisons to the history of race in the U.S.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 214C Introduction to Islamic Civilization

A historical survey of Islamic civilization in global perspective. Chronological coverage of social, political, economic and cultural history will be balanced with focused attention to special topics, which will include: aspects of Islam as religion; science, medicine and technology in Islamic societies; art and architecture; philosophy and theology; interaction between Islamdom and Christendom; Islamic history in the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Central Asia as well as Africa; European colonialism; globalization of Islam and contemporary Islam.
Same as L75 JINE 210C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH, IS


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L22 History 2152 The Theory and Practice of Justice: The American Historical Experience

This introductory course uses historical case studies combined with readings in law, literature and philosophy to illuminate key episodes where definitions of justice were contested in 19th- and 20th-century America. Some of the conflicts to be explored include: Cherokee Removal, Civil War era debates over southern secession; whether reparation should be offered to freed people to redress the injustices of racial slavery; the denial of voting rights to women as a case of "taxation without representation"; 20th-century controversies over legal bans on racial intermarriage; free speech versus hate speech in the 1960s and '70s; and recent debates over affirmative action and gay marriage. Attendance required.
Same as L98 AMCS 2152

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: BA, ETH, HUM


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L22 History 2157 Freshman Seminar: The Meaning of Pakistan: History, Culture, Art

Pakistan is the second-largest Muslim nation and the sixth most populous country in the world. Flanked by two rapidly growing superpowers and continually at the forefront of another global entanglement over Afghanistan, Pakistan has been forged through successive world historical epochs: colonialism, decolonization, the Cold War, neo-liberalism and the War on Terror. This course situates Pakistan in the context of U.S. imperialism, Indian regional hegemony, Chinese globalization and then turns to the powerful and diverse struggles launched by its own citizens against these external forces.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 2170 How to Sit on an Iron Throne: Reading (Early Modern) Politics and Violence Through Game of Thrones

This class will attempt to enthusiastically pillage Game of Thrones and investigate what possible storylines were supplied by the history of 15th-17th century Europe. These storylines are heavily politicized in Game of Thrones and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to investigate how early modern men and women thought about power, fought with words and gift, built loyalties, betrayed one another, killed one another, married one another, and fielded armies of soldiers and cronies. Through the characters of Jon Snow and Tyrion Lannister, students will study the historical stain of bastardy, and with the help of Cersei Lannister, Catelyn Tully and Arya Stark, the place of women in webs of power will also be examined.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 2171 Who Died and Made Them Kings? People, Politics and Power in the Atlantic World, 1500-1800

Who were the few, and who were the many, in the early-modern Atlantic World? The discovery of the Americas and the coalescing of an Atlantic World would do much to transform profoundly the common understanding of the body politics in the early-modern world. The Americas provided new models of kingship and empire; Aztecs and Incas ruled in ways which both seemed familiar and strange to Spaniards' eyes. In the Caribbean, the North, and the Amazon, nomadic and semi-nomadic nations presented even more puzzling situations, where no one seemed to rule. And yet other nations, such as the Iroquois, were experimenting with new political forms. This course is thus focused on tracking this multitude of experiences from a socio-political and anthropological perspective, rather than through intellectual history.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 2250 Freshman Seminar: African-American Women's History: Sexuality, Violence, and the Love of Hip-Hop

Black women, much like their male counterparts, have shaped the contours of African-American history and culture. Still, close study of African-American women's history has burgeoned only within the past few decades as scholars continue to uncover the multifaceted lives of black women. This course will explore the lived experiences of black women in North America through a significant focus on the critical themes of violence and sexuality. We will examine African-American women as the perpetrators and the victims of violence and as the objects of sexual surveillance, as well as explore a range of contemporary debates concerning the intersections of race, class and gender, particularly within the evolving hip-hop movement. We will take an interdisciplinary approach through historical narratives, literature, biographies, films and documentaries.
Same as L90 AFAS 2250

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 2255 Freshman Seminar: The Caribbean and the World

For many, the Caribbean evokes images of an exotic place with beautiful beaches, friendly, happy "natives" and unbridled hedonism. Yet, much more than a distant vacation destination for "first world" consumption, the Caribbean has long been closely intertwined with major events in World History. This course explores the ways in which the Caribbean has been a part of the making of World History, beginning in the 14th century and ending in the contemporary period. Themes covered will include: capitalism and slavery; the Haitian Revolution and its global reverberations; U.S. imperialism in the Caribbean; the impact of Caribbean migration on British culture; Caribbean sports; music and food in a global context; and the contributions of Caribbean thinkers to anti-colonial and anti-imperialist thought and action.

Credit 3 units. A&S: CD A&S IQ: LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 2356 From St. Louis to Shanghai: Cities and Citizens in Global Urban History

This course is designed to give students an introduction to key themes and scholarship in urban history. Readings and class discussions will examine how cities change over time, how urban spaces are continually built and rebuilt, and the way in which activists and government officials assert power. The course will span a large geographical and chronological scope. Special attention will be paid to St. Louis, in relation to urban spaces around the globe, especially Chinese, Brazilian and Indian cities, to reveal how an international framework forces us to rethink what we know about cities and what the concept of "urban" means.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 2400 Not Members of This Club: Women and Slaves in the Greco-Roman World

Both the Athenian Democracy and the Roman Senatorial Oligarchy were societies in which political power was the exclusive property of free, citizen males. With very few exceptions, the astounding accomplishments of those societies were also the creations of free, citizen males. This course examines the lives of two disparate but comparable groups of outsiders within Greek and Roman society. The status, rights and accomplishments of Athenian and Roman women are explored and placed in the context of other premodern societies. Likewise, the institution of slavery in Greece and Rome is explored and compared with other slave-holding societies, ancient and modern.
Same as L08 Classics 240

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L22 History 2440 Introduction to European Studies

This course provides an introduction to the study of contemporary Europe through an historical examination of the moments of crisis, and their political and cultural aftermath, that shaped modern Europe and continue to define it today. These crises will include: the revolutions of 1848, the advent of 19th-century nationalisms, the Great War, the Spanish Civil War, the rise and defeat of state fascism, the Cold War, the formation of the EEC and Union, May 1968, and the return of right-wing politics. After the study of these traditions, the final portion of the semester will consider contemporary Europe since 1991, considering such subjects as Green politics, internal migration and immigration, and the culture of the European Union.
Same as L97 IAS 244

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 2443 Freshman Seminar: The Nuremberg Trials and International Justice

This course is an exercise in understanding how professional historians and the general public discover and use the past. The main goals of this course are to understand the many different methods and standards applied to the past; to understand how and why each generation changes the past as it seeks to make it "usable"; and to develop the skills of exposition and argumentation necessary to describe and analyze complex historical issues and to express critical ideas effectively. The subject of this inquiry will be the Nuremberg trials — the innovations and critiques around the law and politics of the trials themselves, as well as the trials' legacies for ideas about international justice in postwar America and the world.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 2561 Urban America

The city is a crucial frame for understanding the nation's cultural, economic, social, political and ecological concerns. This course discusses its importance in shaping American society and considers urban environments as living, breathing, contracting and expanding regions in the landscape. Questions of race, class and gender will be explored in an attempt to understand the current configuration of American cities, and to allow students to engage meaningfully with the continual transformation of urban space. Attention will be paid to the role played by popular imagination in the formation of public policy, civic spatial arrangement, suburban development and urban historical geography.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 2590 Freshman Seminar: From the "City on a Hill" to 9/11: Religion and Social Justice in America

From the Puritans' search to build the "city on a hill," to the growing conflation of Islam with terrorism, Americans have long nurtured a self-identity as "God's chosen people," an idea that has helped them justify and normalize a theology of both conquest and suffering. This course will analyze how religion served to both buttress and contest notions of social domination, punishment, reform and revolution in the U.S. from the colonial era to the present. Topics will include the American Jeremiad, abolitionism, slave rebellions, Native American Catholicism, Fundamentalism, the Catholic Worker Movement, Pacifism, the Black Freedom Struggle, the Moral Majority, and Post-9/11 military and gender interventions with the Islamic world.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L22 History 260 Migrations in Past and Present: An Introduction to Migration Studies

The course, grounded in a multidisciplinary approach, provides an introduction to the study of migration, featuring significant mass movements in the past 150 years and crucial concepts of historical and theoretical analyses of the movement of people. Course units explore continuities, trends and shifts in human migration and migration policy and how they affect individual immigrants' lives. A variety of sources, such as oral history, films, novels, legal documents and scholarly secondary analysis help students to consider different perspectives on internal and international migrations, from the individual migrant to civil society, from political regulation to economic consideration. Throughout the course, students deepen their understanding of migration as a result of social transformation, force or individual choice. We study concepts of the nation-state and citizenship, the political economy of migration, gender, sexuality and migration, and notions of identity and social inclusion more generally to build a sound critique of contemporary discourses on immigration.
Same as L97 IAS 260

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 2674 Sophomore Seminar: Slavery and Memory in American Popular Culture

Sophomores receive priority registration. The history of slavery has long created a sense of unease within the consciousness of many Americans. Recognizing this continued reality, this seminar examines how slavery is both remembered and silenced within contemporary popular culture. Although slavery scholarship continues to expand, how do everyday Americans gain access to the history of bondage? Taking an interdisciplinary approach to these intriguing queries, we will examine a range of sources: literature, public history, art/poetry, visual culture, movies and documentaries, as well as contemporary music including reggae and hip-hop. The centerpiece of this course covers North American society, however, in order to offer a critical point of contrast students will be challenged to explore the varied ways slavery is commemorated in others parts of the African diaspora.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 270 Globalization and its Discontents

Today, the heady promises of globalization appear to have failed us. The notion of global markets and global citizens seems to have remained at best, an ideal. Meanwhile the world's majority has witnessed a staggering decline in education, nutrition, health and even physical mobility. Nowhere have these developments passed unquestioned: from the rise of the so-called Maoist insurgency in India to the Occupy movement in the U.S., people and especially the youth have expressed their outrage in creative and unconventional ways. This course plots the long and necessarily violent history of forging global interconnections. The lens for our analysis will be India, South Asia and their relationship with the United States. We will approach a range of novels, films and popular cultural artifacts as we build our own understanding of the nature, critique and promise of globalization.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 280 Freshman Seminar in Religious Studies: Miracles

This course is for freshmen only. The topic varies from semester to semester. Recent topics include Sexuality in Early Christianity; Miracles; and The Self in Chinese Thought.
Same as L23 Re St 180

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L22 History 2850 Freshman Seminar: The Holocaust: A European Experience

Between 1939 and 1945, Nazi troops invaded, occupied and destroyed major parts of Europe. A central aim of the Nazi project was the destruction of European Jewry, the killing of people, and the annihilation of a cultural heritage. This course seeks to deal with questions that, some sixty years after what is now known as the Holocaust, still continue to perplex. Why did Germany turn to a dictatorship of racism, war and mass murder? Why did the Nazis see Jews as the supreme enemy, while also targeting Poles, Ukranians, Soviets, homosexuals, the Roma and the disabled? The course introduces students to issues that are central to understanding Nazi occupation and extermination regimes. Students look at survival strategies in Western Europe including emigration, resistance movements in Eastern European ghettos, local residents' reactions to the murder in their midst, and non-European governments' reactions.
Same as L61 Focus 2850

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 299 Undergraduate Internship in History

Students receive credit for a faculty-directed and approved internship. Registration requires completion of the Learning Agreement, which the student obtains from the Career Center and which must be filled out and signed by the Career Center and the faculty sponsor prior to beginning internship work. Credit should correspond to actual time spent in work activities, e.g., eight to 10 hours a week for 13 or 14 weeks to receive 3 units of credit; 1 or 2 credits for fewer hours. Students may not receive credit for work done for pay but are encouraged to obtain written evaluations about such work for the student's academic adviser and career placement file.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L22 History 2ABR History Course Work Completed Abroad

Students who wish to study overseas must contact the Department of History's Study Abroad Advisor. Please visit our website for more information.

Credit variable, maximum 12 units.


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L22 History 3002 Independent Work

Permission of the instructor is required.

Credit 3 units.


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L22 History 3011 Biblical Law and the Origins of Western Justice

This course will explore how law developed from the earliest periods of human history and how religious ideas and social institutions shaped law. The course will also illuminate how biblical law was influenced by earlier cultures and how the ancient Israelites reshaped the law they inherited. It will further analyze the impact of biblical law on Western culture and will investigate how the law dealt with those of different social classes and ethnic groups, and we will probe how women were treated by the law.
Same as L75 JINE 3012

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 301E Historical Methods in East Asian History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis is placed on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically, and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L22 History 301F Historical Methods — African History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis will be on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically, and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L22 History 301L Historical Methods — Latin American History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis is on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 301M Historical Methods — Middle Eastern History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis is on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 301R Historical Methods — European History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis is on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 301S Historical Methods — South Asian History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis is on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L22 History 301T Historical Methods — Transregional History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis is on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 301U Historical Methods — United States History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis is on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3026 Home, Bittersweet Home: Histories of Housing and Homeownership in America Since 1850

The idea of owning one's own home has been central to realizations of the American dream or the "good life." By 1931, Herbert Hoover called the idea "a sentiment deep in the heart of our race and of American life." While the dream continues, the reality of homeownership has been elusive or fraught with struggle and sacrifice for many Americans. If home ownership is such a central part of American identity, why have so many generations of Americans struggled to achieve it? In this course, we explore the histories of different versions of home and homeownership by touching down in different locations at pivotal moments in order to investigate the varied meanings of housing and homeownership in the context of a particular place and time in American history. Using a case-study approach, the course travels across time and space to explore diverse forms of housing, including the following: the big house and slave house in the South under slavery, the immigrant tenement in New York City, the company town in south Chicago, the Midwest homestead, the planned postwar suburban neighborhood, high rise public housing and gated communities. This format exposes students to the important role of federal and local policies as well as themes of housing including: homes as private and domestic realms; housing as a commodity and the largest form of American debt; housing as an icon and encoder of social status; housing as exclusionary and inclusionary; housing as racial or socioeconomic discrimination; the suburbs and their discontents; and the recent housing crisis.
Same as L98 AMCS 3026

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3043 Renaissance Europe

The Renaissance was a time of tremendous cultural change, global expansion and political and religious conflict that gave birth to the modern world. Yet, these dynamic developments were produced by an anxious society, where limited technological capabilities and an increasingly rigid system of social and gender divisions discouraged innovation and encouraged repressive measures. This course seeks to answer the question of how these contradictory impulses shaped the European Renaissance.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L22 History 3044 Humors, Pox and Plague: Medieval and Early Modern Medicine

This course examines how people thought about, experienced and managed disease in the medieval and early modern periods. Students will consider developments in learned medicine alongside the activities of a diverse range of practitioners — e.g., surgeons, empirics, quacks, midwives, saints, and local healers — involved in the business of curing a wide range of ailments. Significant attention will be paid to the experiences of patients and the social and cultural significance of disease. Major topics include: the rise and fall of humoral medicine; religious explanations of illness; diseases such as leprosy, syphilis and plague; the rise of anatomy; herbs and pharmaceuticals; the experience of childbirth; and the emergence of identifiably "modern" institutions such as hospitals, the medical profession, and public health. The focus will be on Western Europe but we'll also consider developments in the Islamic world and the Americas.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3056 Material Culture in Modern China

In this course, we will explore change and continuity from late imperial to postsocialist China through an analysis of everyday material culture. Drawing upon material objects, historical texts, ethnographic studies and films, we will investigate values, beliefs and attitudes toward the material world in modern Chinese life. Readings, lectures and discussions will focus on how political, ethnic, regional, religious, and gender identities have been constructed and shaped by the use and production of material artifacts ranging from household goods and tomb objects to built forms and bodily dispositions. Case studies include foot-binding, opium use, fashion, tea culture, fast food consumption, sports and nation building, contemporary art markets, the privatization of housing, and worker discipline in transnational factories.
Same as L48 Anthro 3056

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L22 History 3060 East Asia Since 1500

This course seeks to explain the emergence of three of the most dynamic societies in early modern (1500-1800) and modern (1800-present) times: China, Korea and Japan. In addition to offering an introductory overview of East Asian history, this course provides an alternative view to American and European interpretations of early modern and modern world history. Rather than imagining East Asia as a passive actor in history, this course explores the ways in which East Asia has shaped global modernity.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3066 The American City in the 19th and 20th Centuries

This course explores the cultural, political and economic history of U.S. cities in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course focuses on New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Los Angeles and Atlanta, although other cities may be included. Students conduct significant primary research on sections of St. Louis, developing a detailed history of one of the city's neighborhoods. Much of the course readings address broad themes such as immigration, industrialization, deindustrialization and race and gender relations in American cities.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L22 History 3067 Current Topics in the History of Medicine

Mental health — its diagnosis, social implications and experience — is a central and increasingly visible part of the practice of medicine. This course explores "madness." How have different societies explained and responded to states of mind, behavior and emotion judged to be unreasonable? What role has medicine played in framing understandings about mental disorders and their management? During this course we will engage these questions, charting the shifting experience of mental illness roughly from the Middle Ages to the present. Themes covered include: religious models of madness; humoral medicine and disorders such as melancholy; the premodern madhouse and the emergence of the modern asylum; the history of psychiatry; the insanity defense in the courtroom; patient autobiography; gender, race and mental health.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L22 History 3068 The Human History of Climate Change

While climate change has become a hot-button issue in recent decades, it is by no means a new concern. Advisers to the king of France were warning against deforestation in the 18th century and 19th century. Scientific experiments revealed the arrival of acid rain in the industrial centers of Great Britain. This course examines the longer history of climate change and how it has been addressed as a scientific, political and environmental issue. Students will be introduced to the field of environmental history and explore how the methods of this field of inquiry challenge traditional historical categories.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS BU: HUM EN: S


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L22 History 306M Visualizing Segregation

This interdisciplinary course is designed to introduce students to the history of three of America's major cities. We will explore the political, social, and cultural histories of each of these cities while tracing changes in architecture and the built environment. We chose these three cities for their diverse and intersecting histories. In many ways, St. Louis, Chicago, and New Orleans represent the major social and political forces that forged the modern American city. From westward expansion and the growth of the slave system, through mass European immigration and industrialization, the rise of Jim Crow and the decline of American industry, suburbanization, mass incarceration, and gentrification: all are visible in the landscapes of these American cities. Segregation of social groups, so often seen as natural or inevitable, is the result of historical processes, political decisions, public policies and individual actions. The course, in addition, will provide students with the opportunity to use some of the research techniques employed by urban scholars. We will engage in a major research project, tracing the history of St. Louis through a variety of primary sources. Our aim will be to trace the historical processes that generated urban landscapes divided along lines of race, class, ethnicity or religion.
Same as I50 InterD 306M

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L22 History 3072 Cracks in the Republic: Discontent, Dissent, and Protest in America, 1950-1975

This course examines the rise and impact of several major political, social and cultural protest movements in the United States during the middle part of the 20th century. It focuses on the Beats, Civil Rights, New Left, Anti-Vietnam War, Counter-Culture, Black Nationalism, Ethnic Consciousness, Women's Liberation and Gay/Lesbian Liberation, and contextualizes these movements within major national and international developments including Jim Crow and de facto segregation, middle-class ennui, and the Cold War. We will pay special attention to the role of youth activism and the methods of dissent and protest used to challenge the status quo.

Credit 4 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: BA


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L22 History 3073 The Global War on Terrorism

This course presents an historical assessment of the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) from the perspective of its major participants: militant Sunni Islamist jihadists, especially the Al-Qaeda network, and the nation-states that oppose them, particularly the United States and its allies. The course concludes by analyzing the current state and future of Islamist jihad and the GWOT.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3082 City on a Hill: The Concept and Culture of American Exceptionalism

This course examines the concept, history and culture of American exceptionalism — the idea that America has been specially chosen or has a special mission to the world. First, we examine the Puritan sermon that politicians quote when they describe America as a "city on a hill." This sermon has been called the "ur-text" of American literature, the foundational document of American culture; learning and drawing from multiple literary methodologies, we re-investigate what that sermon means and how it came to tell a story about the Puritan origins of American culture — a thesis our class reassesses with the help of modern critics. In the second part of this class, we broaden our discussion to consider the wider (and newer) meanings of American exceptionalism, theorizing the concept while looking at the way it has been revitalized, redefined and redeployed in recent years. Finally, the course ends with a careful study of American exceptionalism in modern political rhetoric, starting with JFK and proceeding through Reagan to the current day. In the end, students gain a firm grasp of the long history and continuing significance — the pervasive impact — of this concept in American culture.
Same as L98 AMCS 3081

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3091 Poverty and Social Reform in American History

This course explores the history of dominant ideas about the causes of and solutions to poverty in American society from the early republic to the end of the 20th century. We investigate changing economic, cultural and political conditions that gave rise to new populations of impoverished Americans and to the expansion or contraction of poverty rates at various times in American history. We focus primarily on how various social commentators, political activists and reformers defined poverty, explained its causes, and struggled to ameliorate its effects. The course aims to highlight changes in theories and ideas about the relationship between dependence and independence, personal responsibility and social obligation, and the state and the citizen.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3105 American Holidays, Rituals and Celebrations

This seminar examines a variety of holidays, festivals, and rituals in American history and culture. Topics include: conflicts over Christmas, the sentiments of greeting cards, African-American emancipation celebrations, Roman Catholic festivals dedicated to the Virgin Mary, modern renderings of Jewish ritual (including Hanukkah), the masculinity embodied in fraternal lodge ceremonies, Neopagan festivals, and Halloween Hell Houses. Various interpretive approaches are explored, and the intent is to broach a wide range of questions about history and tradition, gender and race, public memory and civic ceremony, moral order and carnival, through this topical focus on ritual and performance. A major emphasis is also placed on original research and writing, evident in the weight given the concluding seminar report and the final paper.
Same as L98 AMCS 3105

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 310C Kings, Priests, Prophets and Rabbis: The Jews in the Ancient World

We trace Israelite and Jewish history from its beginnings in the biblical period (circa 1200 BCE) through the rise of rabbinic Judaism and Christianity until the birth of Islam (circa 620 CE). We explore how Israel emerged as a distinct people and why the rise of the imperial powers transformed the political, social and religious institutions of ancient Israel. We illuminate why the religion of the Bible developed into rabbinic Judaism and Christianity and how rabbinic literature and institutions were created.
Same as L75 JINE 301C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: BA, HUM


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L22 History 3122 Race, Caste, Conversion: Social Movements in South Asia

It is a truism that caste-based injustice is one of the abiding forms of inequality in South Asia. But what precisely is a caste, and how is injustice to be removed? In this course, students explore different theories of caste, beginning with the race-inflected theories of the 19th century; and different approaches to the remediation of inequalities, including social reform, religious conversion, political organization and legal remedies. Students also compare caste reform with gender reform and consider how the experience of caste is inflected by gender.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD EN: H


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L22 History 313C Islamic History: 600-1200

The cultural, intellectual and political history of the Islamic Middle East, beginning with the prophetic mission of Muhammad and concluding with the Mongol conquests. Topics covered include: the life of Muhammad; the early Muslim conquests; the institution of the caliphate; the translation movement from Greek into Arabic and the emergence of Arabic as a language of learning and artistic expression; the development of new educational, legal and pietistic institutions; changes in agriculture, crafts, commerce and the growth of urban culture; multiculturalism and inter-confessional interaction; and large-scale movements of nomadic peoples.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS


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L22 History 3149 The Late Ottoman Middle East

This course surveys the Middle East in the late Ottoman period (essentially the 18th and 19th centuries, up to World War I). It examines the central Ottoman state and the Ottoman provinces as they were incorporated into the world economy, and how they responded to their peripheralization in that process. Students focus on how everyday people's lived experiences were affected by the increased monetarization of social and economic relations; changes in patterns of land tenure and agriculture; the rise of colonialism; state efforts at modernization and reform; shifts in gender relations; and debates over the relationship of religion to community and political identity.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 314C Islamic History: 1200-1800

An introduction to Islamic politics and societies from the Mongol conquests to the 13th century to the collapse and weakening of the colossal "gunpowder" empires of the Ottomans, Safavids and Mughals in the early 18th century. Broadly speaking, this course covers the Middle Period (1000-1800) of Islamic history, sandwiched between the Early and High Caliphal periods (600-100) on the one hand and the Modern Period (1800-present) on the other hand. Familiarity with the Early and High Caliphal periods is not assumed. The course is not a "survey" of this period but a series of "windows" that allows students to develop both an in-depth understanding of some key features of Islamic societies and a clear appreciation of the challenges (as well as the rewards!) that await historians of the Middle Period. Particular attention is given to the Mamluk and Ottoman Middle East, Safavid Iran and Mughal India.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS


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L22 History 3150 The Middle East in the 20th Century

This course surveys the history of the Middle East since World War I. Major analytical themes include: colonialism; Orientalism; the formation of the regional nation-state system; the formation and political mobilization of new social classes; changing gender relations; the development of new forms of appropriation of economic surplus (oil, urban industry) in the new global economy; the role of religion; the Middle East as an arena of the Cold War; conflict in Israel/Palestine; and new conceptions of identity associated with these developments (Arabism, local patriotism, Islamism).

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3153 Sex and Gender in Greco Roman Antiquity

Ideas about sex and gender have not remained stable over time. The ancient Greeks and Romans had their own ideas — ideas that strike us today as both deeply alien and strikingly familiar. This course will consider questions such as: What constituted "normal" sex for the Greeks and for the Romans? What sex acts did they consider to be problematic or illicit, and why? What traits did the Greeks and Romans associate with masculinity? With femininity? How did society treat those who did not quite fit into those categories? How did peoples of the ancient world respond to same-sex and other-sex relationships, and was there an ancient concept of "sexuality"? How did issues of class, ethnicity and age interact with and shape these concepts? How does an understanding of these issues change the way we think about sex and gender today? We will read an array of ancient texts in translation, consider various theoretical viewpoints, and move toward an understanding of what sex and gender meant in the ancient world.
Same as L08 Classics 3152

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3161 Chinese Social History: Urban Transformations

The course examines major themes and debates in Chinese urban history since the mid-19th century. Topics include: the Western impact; the construction of modernity; elite activism and authoritarianism; consumerism and nationalism; shifting gender roles; political mobilization and social networking; and the Communist revolution. Understanding and analyzing the nuance and difference in views and interpretations in historical writings (historiography) are essential.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 3162 Early Modern China: 1350-1800

This course examines political, socioeconomic and intellectual — cultural developments in Chinese society from the middle of the 14th century to 1800. This chronological focus largely corresponds to the last two imperial dynasties, the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911). Thematically, the course emphasizes such early-modern indigenous developments as increasing commercialization, social mobility and questioning of received cultural values.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3163 Historical Landscape and National Identity in Modern China

This course attempts to ground the history of modern China in physical space such as imperial palaces, monuments and memorials, campus, homes and residential neighborhoods, recreational facilities, streets, prisons, factories, gardens, and churches. Using methods of historical and cultural anthropological analysis, the course invests the places where we see with historical meaning. Through exploring the ritual, political, and historical significance of historical landmarks, the course investigates the forces that have transformed physical spaces into symbols of national, local, and personal identity. The historical events and processes we examine along the way through the sites include the changing notion of rulership, national identity, state-building, colonialism and imperialism, global capitalism and international tourism. Acknowledging and understanding the fact that these meanings and significances are fluid, multiple, contradictory, and changing over time are an important concern of this course.
Same as L03 East Asia 3163

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3165 The Chinese Diaspora to 1949

China has had one of the most mobile populations in world history. This course will explore migration patterns and networks in the creation of Chinese diasporas in the early modern and modern eras (1500-present). Specific topics will include: the internal migration that has helped to consolidate the borders of the modern Chinese state, such as Chinese migration to the southwest in the 18th century, to Taiwan in the 18th and 19th centuries, and into western China in recent decades as well as overseas Chinese migration to Southeast Asia, Australia, Europe, and the Americas, including St. Louis. In addition to examining how Chinese immigrants have adapted to local conditions both within and outside China, this course will explore the practices that have created and sustained diasporic networks in nearly every part of the world today.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 316C Modern China: 1890s to the Present

A survey of China's history from the clash with Western powers in the 1800s to the present day economic revolution. This course examines the background to the 1911 revolution that destroyed the old political order. Then it follows the great cultural and political movements that lead to the Communist victory in 1949. The development of the People's Republic will be examined in detail, from Mao to the global economy.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS


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L22 History 3172 Queer Histories

Queer history is a profoundly political project. Scholars and activists use queer histories to assert theories of identity formation, build communities, and advance a vision of the meanings of sexuality in modern life and the place of queer people in national communities. This history of alternative sexual identities is narrated in a variety of settings — the internet as well as the academy, art and film as well as the streets — and draws upon numerous disciplines, including anthropology, geography, sociology, oral history, fiction and memoir, as well as history. This discussion-based course will examine the sites and genres of queer history, with particular attention to moments of contestation and debate about its contours and meanings.
Same as L77 WGSS 3172

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3192 Modern South Asia

This course covers the history of the Indian subcontinent in the 19th and 20th centuries. We look closely at a number of issues including colonialism in India; anticolonial movements; the experiences of women; the interplay between religion and national identity; and popular culture in modern India. Political and social history are emphasized equally.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS


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L22 History 3193 Engaging the City: The Material World of Modern Segregation

Consult course listings for current offering.
Same as L98 AMCS 3190

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Art: FAAM BU: BA EN: S


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L22 History 3194 Environment and Empire

In this course we study British imperialism from the ground up. At bottom, the British empire was about extracting the wealth contained in the labour and the natural resources of the colonized. How did imperial efforts to maximize productivity and profits impact the ecological balance of forests, pastures and farm lands, rivers and rainfall, animals and humans? We ask, with environmental historians of the U.S., how colonialism marked a watershed of radical ecological change. The course covers examples from Asia to Africa, with a focus on the "jewel in the crown" of the British empire: the Indian subcontinent. We learn how the colonized contributed to the science of environmentalism, and how they forged a distinctive politics of environmentalism built upon local resistance and global vision, inspired by religious traditions and formative thinkers, not least Mahatma Gandhi.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3202 Japan From Earliest Times to 1868

A survey of the history of the Japanese archipelago from prehistory to the Meji Restoration of 1868, this course is designed to acquaint students with pre-industrial Japanese society and the discipline of history. In addition to tracing political, social and cultural narratives across time, we focus on three themes: the emergence of a centralized state and the subsequent transition from aristocratic to warrior to commoner rule; interactions with the world beyond Japan's borders; and issues of gender and sexuality.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3212 Special Topics in History: Keble College, Oxford

For more information, please visit the Departments of History's website or contact the director of undergraduate studies.

Credit variable, maximum 10 units. A&S: TH


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L22 History 321C Introduction to Colonial Latin America until 1825

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the pre-Columbian civilizations through the Iberian exploration and conquest of the Americas until the Wars of Independence (roughly 1400-1815). Stressing the experiences and cultural contributions of Americans, Europeans and Africans, we consider the following topics through primary written documents, first-hand accounts, and excellent secondary scholarship, as well as through art, music and architecture: Aztec, Maya, Inca and Iberian civilizations; models of conquest in comparative perspective (Spanish, Portuguese and Amerindian); environmental histories; consolidation of colonialism in labor, tributary and judicial systems; race, ethnicity, slavery, caste and class; religion and the Catholic Church and Inquisition; sugar and mining industries, trade and global economies; urban and rural life; the roles of women, gender and sexuality in the colonies. Geographically, we cover Mexico, the Andes, and to a lesser extent, Brazil, the Southwest, Cuba, and the Southern Cone. Premodern, Latin America.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: HUM


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L22 History 3220 Modern Mexico: Land, Politics and Development

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the political, social, economic and cultural history of Mexico from the era of Independence (roughly 1810) to the present. Lectures outline basic theoretical models for analyzing historical trends and then present a basic chronological historical narrative.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 322C Modern Latin America

This course aims to present a survey of Latin American history from Independence to the present. Topics to be covered include the Wars of Independence; caudillismo; nationalism; liberalism; slavery and indigenous peoples; urbanization, industrialization and populism; ideas of race and ethnicity; the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions; U.S. intervention; modernity, modernism and modernization; motherhood and citizenship; the Cold War; terror and violence under military dictatorships and popular resistance movements. While the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the region, it focuses primarily on the experiences of Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Argentina and Central America.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS


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L22 History 3230 Black Power Across Africa and the Diaspora: International Dimensions of the Black Power Movement

This seminar explores the Black Power Movement as an international phenomenon. By situating Black Power within an African World context, this course examines the advent and intersections of Black Power politics in the United States, parts of Africa (including Ghana, Algeria, Nigeria and Tanzania), the Caribbean (Jamaica, Bermuda, the Bahamas and Cuba), South America (Brazil) and Canada. Particular emphasis is placed upon unique and contested definitions of "Black Power" as it was articulated, constructed and enacted in each region.
Same as L90 AFAS 3231

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3260 Topics in EAS: Divine Catastrophe, Human Calamity: Environmental Disasters in Chinese Lit & Culture

A topics course on a variety of East Asian subjects.
Same as L03 East Asia 3263

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3262 The Early Medieval World: 300-1000

A principal theme of this course is the Christianization of Europe. From the emergence of the Christian church in the Roman Empire and the conversion of the emperor Constantine in 312 through the turbulent adoptions of Christianity by different cultures in the Early Middle Ages; the rise of Islam in the seventh century; the Arab conquests of north Africa and southern Europe; and the Byzantine empire, especially in Constantinople.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3263 The High Middle Ages: 1000-1500

This course begins with the first millennium in the West and ends with the arrival of Europeans in the Americas. The course explores topics such as the relationship of popes to kings, of cities to villages, Jews to Christians, of vernacular literature to Latin, knights to peasants, the sacred to the profane. Topics include: different forms of religious life; farming; heresy; the shift from a penitential culture to a confessional one; the crusades; troubadour poetry; the Mongol Empire; universities; leprosy; and the conquest of New Spain.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3266 Scholarship and the Screen: Medieval History and Modern Film

Historical films are surprisingly accurate reflections of modern historiographical trends in the study of the Middle Ages. This course uses films on the Middle Ages, medieval documentary evidence, scholarship from the time the film was released, and current scholarship. It explores the shifts in historical interpretation of the Middle Ages over the past century and engages in debates over what evoking the past means for the scholar and the filmmaker.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3293 Beautiful Losers: The French in North America, 1500-1850

Adventurous fur-traders, fun-loving carnival-goers, magnanimous noblemen, simple but goodhearted Catholic peasants: the portrait of the French in the Americas rarely goes beyond these time-honored stereotypes. The French have usually been treated as quaint remnants of a bygone age, vanquished first by the British army, and then by the march of modernity. This class seeks to rescue these historical actors from the typecasting to which we often condemn them. Through this examination of the French presence in the Americas, we will rethink and revisit the familiar stories of British North America, stories of slavery, commerce, property, piety and migration. The contrasted differences will also allow us to reflect on the nature of colonialism and question some ready-made understandings about colonial British America and the Early Republic.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3306 Native American/Euro-American Encounters: Confrontations of Bodies and Beliefs

This course surveys the history and historiography of how Native Americans, Europeans and Euro-Americans reacted and adapted to one another's presence in North America from the 1600s to the mid-1800s, focusing on themes of religion and gender. We will examine the cultural and social implications of encounters between Native peoples, missionaries and other European and Euro-American Protestants and Catholics. We will pay particular attention to how bodies were a venue for encounter — through sexual contact, through the policing of gendered social and economic behaviors, and through religiously-based understandings of women's and men's duties and functions. We will also study how historians know what they know about these encounters, and what materials enable them to answer their historical questions.
Same as L57 RelPol 330

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 330C Culture & Identity: The Politics of Black Criminality and Popular Protest

Topics course focusing on instances of identity and culture within the American scope. Varies by semester; refer to Course Listings for description of current semester's offering.
Same as L98 AMCS 330C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 331 19th-Century China: Violence and Transformation

This course traces the history of China over the course of the 19th century, with an emphasis on social and cultural history. This was one of the most tumultuous centuries in Chinese history, during which China faced threats from abroad in the form of Western and Japanese imperialism, and from within, in the form of environmental degradation and rebellions resulting in an unprecedented loss of human life. The 19th century has thus often been portrayed as a period of sharp decline for China. At the same time, we explore the ways in which the origins of the dynamic society and economy found in China today, as well as the worldwide influence of overseas Chinese, can be traced to this century of turmoil.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM, HUM Art: HUM, HUM BU: IS


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L22 History 3320 Explosion on Contact: Combustible Politics of Medical Science in America from Colonial Times-Present

From Cotton Mather in 1721 weighing in on the rectitude of smallpox vaccination in Massachusetts to actor Michael J. Fox joining the 2006 Amendment 2 stem-cell debate in Missouri, Americans have fought vehemently about the politics of medical science. Arguments over what counts as legitimate medical science, and about the proper relationship of such science to public policy, have been central in U.S. political contestation over such seemingly unrelated themes as: immigration, race, imperialism, gender, sexuality, reproduction, crime and punishment, land use, ethics and religion.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 333 The Holocaust: History and Memory

Origins, causes and significance of the Nazi attempt to destroy European Jewry within the context of European and Jewish history. Related themes: the Holocaust in literature; the psychology of murderers and victims, bystanders and survivors; and contemporary implications of the Holocaust for theology and politics.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: ETH, HUM, IS EN: H


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L22 History 3340 Gender, Health, and Resistance: Comparative Slavery in the African Diaspora

Slavery is a field of historical study that continues to undergo considerable transformation within scholarly investigation. As such, scholars have sought to initiate much broader understandings of the evolution of slavery across both time and geographical space. This course will utilize a comparative approach to examine the experiences of enslavement common throughout the African diaspora, particularly within the United States, the Caribbean, and parts of Latin America. Some themes briefly covered within this course include: gender, sexuality, community, resistance, medicine, labor and culture.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 334C Crusade, Conflict, and Coexistence: Jews in Christian Europe

This course will investigate some of the major themes in the history of the Jews in Europe, from the Middle Ages to the eve of the French Revolution. Jews constituted a classic, nearly continuous minority in the premodern Christian world — a world that was not known for tolerating dissent. Or was it? One of the main purposes of the course is to investigate the phenomenon of majority/minority relations, to examine the ways in which the Jewish community interacted with and experienced European societies, cultures and politics. We will look at the dynamics of boundary formation and cultural distinctiveness; the limits of religious and social tolerance; the periodic eruption of persecution in its social, political, and religious contexts; and the prospects for Jewish integration into various European societies during the course of the Enlightenment era.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH, HUM, IS


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L22 History 3352 China's Urban Experience: Shanghai and Beyond

The course studies the history of Chinese cities from the mid-19th century to the late 20th century. It situates the investigation of urban transformation in two contexts: the domestic context of modern China's reform and revolution; and the global context of the international flow of people, products, capitals and ideas. It chooses a local narrative approach and situates the investigation in one of China's largest, complex, and most dynamic and globalized cities — Shanghai. The experience of the city and its people reveals the creative and controversial ways people redefined, reconfigured and reshaped forces such as imperialism, nationalism, consumerism, authoritarianism, liberalism, communism and capitalism. The course also seeks to go beyond the "Shanghai model" by comparing Shanghai with other Chinese cities. It presents a range of the urban experience in modern China.
Same as L03 East Asia 3352

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3354 Vienna, Prague, Budapest: Politics, Culture and Identity in Central Europe

The term Central Europe evokes the names of Freud and Mahler; Kafka and Kundera; Herzl, Lukács, and Konrád. In politics, it evokes images of revolution and counter-revolution, ethnic nationalism, fascism and communism. Both culture and politics, in fact, were deeply embedded in the structures of empire (in our case, the Habsburg Monarchy) — structures which both balanced and exacerbated ethnic, religious, and social struggles — in modern state formation, and in the emergence of creative and dynamic urban centers, of which Vienna, Budapest and Prague were the most visible. This course seeks to put all of these elements into play — empire, nation, urban space, religion and ethnicity — in order to illustrate what it has meant to be modern, creative, European, nationalist or cosmopolitan since the 19th century. It engages current debates on nationalism and national identity; the viability of empires as supranational constructs; urbanism and modern culture; the place of Jews in the social and cultural fabric of Central Europe; migration; and authoritarian and violent responses to modernity.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS


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L22 History 335C Becoming "Modern": Emancipation, Antisemitism and Nationalism in Modern Jewish History

This course offers a survey of the Jewish experience in the modern world by asking, at the outset, what it means to be — or to become — modern. To answer this question, we look at two broad trends that took shape toward the end of the 18th century — the Enlightenment and the formation of the modern state — and we track changes and developments in Jewish life down to the close of the 20th century with analyses of the (very different) American and Israeli settings. The cultural, social, and political lives of Jews have undergone major transformations and dislocations over this time — from innovation to revolution, exclusion to integration, calamity to triumphs. The themes that we will be exploring in depth include the campaigns for and against Jewish "emancipation"; acculturation and religious reform; traditionalism and modernism in Eastern Europe; the rise of political and racial anti-Semitism; mass migration and the formation of American Jewry; varieties of Jewish national politics; Jewish-Gentile relations between the World Wars; the destruction of European Jewry; the emergence of a Jewish nation-state; and Jewish culture and identity since 1945.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH, HUM


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L22 History 336C History of the Jews in Islamic Lands

This course is a survey of Jewish communities in the Islamic world, their social, cultural, and intellectual life from the rise of Islam to the Imperial Age. Topics include: Muhammad, the Qur'an and the Jews; the legal status of Jews under Islam; the spread of Rabbinic Judaism in the Abbasid empire; the development of new Jewish identities under Islam (Karaites); Jewish traders and scholars in Fatimid Egypt; the flourishing of Jewish civilization in Muslim Spain (al-Andalus); and Sephardi (Spanish) Jews in the Ottoman empire. On this background, we will look closely at some of the major Jewish philosophical and poetical works originating in Islamic lands. Another important source to be studied will be documents from the Cairo Genizah, reflecting social history, the status of women, and other aspects of daily life.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L22 History 3402 Money and Morals in the Age of Merchant Capital

Current events have showcased both the tremendous power and the moral questions surrounding global capitalism. Neither of these elements is new. Between the late medieval period and the 18th century, Europe underwent an economic transformation that, while creating an expansive and dynamic European economy, also prompted much debate and discussion about the changing patterns of production, consumption and social relations that went hand-in-hand with new economic practices. As state officials worked to make economic policies fit in with national priorities, other writers proclaimed that stock market bubbles, shady business practices,and the materialism and fickleness of consumers signaled the decline of morality and civilization. This course examines both theory and practice to develop a cultural history of merchant capitalism. Topics covered include: merchant training, the creation of public financial and stock markets, proto-industrialization, European colonization and trade, mercantilism, the figure of the merchant in literature, and Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS


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L22 History 3413 Women in Early Modern Europe

From the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, European women experienced tremendous change as Europe witnessed religious upheaval, economic retrenchment, political consolidation and intellectual revolution. However, many of the core ideas about women's role and status remained remarkably stable during this period, and women continually struggled to create opportunity for themselves. We examine both the changing and unchanging nature of women's lives through sources such as conduct manuals for women; biographies about women from different economic, social and religious backgrounds; and the works of female authors.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: BA


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L22 History 3414 The World is Not Enough: Europe's Global Empires, 1400-1750

"Non sufficit orbis" (the world is not enough) became the motto for King Philip II of Spain, whose empire touched nearly every part of the globe. Europe's expansion to Africa, Asia and the Americas was a transforming event for world history and for its willing and unwilling participants. This course examines the religious, political, and economic forces driving the overseas expansion of Europe, compares the experience of European sailors, soldiers and merchants in different parts of the world, and analyzes the effect of empire on the colonizers, the colonized, and the balance of world power. Topics covered include: Portuguese and Spanish conquests in the East and West Indies, religious conversion and resistance, trade routes and rivalries, colonial practices and indigenous influence, the establishment of Atlantic slavery, and the rise of the Dutch and English empires.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3416 War, Genocide and Gender in Modern Europe

This course explores the way in which gender and gender relations shaped and were shaped by war and genocide in 20th-century Europe. The course approaches the subject from various vantage points, including economic, social and cultural history, and draws on comparisons between different regions. Topics covered will include: new wartime tasks for women; soldiers' treatment of civilians under occupation, including sexual violence; how combatants dealt with fear, injury and the loss of comrades; masculine attributes of soldiers and officers of different nations and in different wartime roles; survival strategies and the relation to expectations with regard to people's (perceived) gender identity; the meanings of patriotism for women and men during war; and gender-specific experiences of genocide.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: BA, IS EN: H


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L22 History 341C Ancient History: The Roman Republic

Rome from its legendary foundation until the assassination of Julius Caesar. Topics include: the establishment, development, and collapse of Rome's Republican government; imperial expansion; Roman culture in a Mediterranean context; and the dramatic political and military events associated with figures like the Carthaginian general Hannibal, the Thracian rebel Spartacus, and the Roman statesman Cicero.
Same as L08 Classics 341C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L22 History 3420 Americans and Their Presidents

How have Americans understood what it means to be President of the United States? This seminar uses that question as a point of departure for a multidisciplinary cultural approach to the presidency in the United States, examining the shifting roles of the chief executive from George Washington through Barack Obama. In addition to a consideration of the President's political and policymaking roles, this course examines how the lived experiences of presidents have informed the ways Americans have conceived of public and private life within a broader political culture. In the process, this course uses the presidency as a means to explore topics ranging from electioneering to gender, foreign policy to popular media. Readings are drawn from a broad range of fields.
Same as L98 AMCS 3422

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3424 Childhood Culture and Religion in Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean World

From child saints to child scholars and from child crusaders to child casualties, the experience of childhood varied widely throughout the European Middle Ages. This course will explore how medieval Jews, Christians, and Muslims developed some parallel and some very much divergent concepts of childhood, childrearing, and the proper cultural roles for children in their respective societies. Our readings will combine primary and secondary sources from multiple perspectives and multiple regions of Europe and the Mediterranean World, including a few weeks on the history and cultural legacy of the so-called Children's Crusade of 1312. We will conclude with a brief survey of medieval childhood and its stereotypes as seen through contemporary children's books and TV shows. This course fulfills the Language & Cultural Diversity requirement for Arts & Sciences.
Same as L66 ChSt 342

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L22 History 342C Ancient History: The Roman Empire

An introduction to the political, military, and social history of Rome from the first emperor Augustus to the time of Constantine. Topics include: Rome's place as the center of a vast and diverse empire; religious movements, such as Jewish revolts and the rise of Christianity; and the stability of the state in the face of economic crises, military coups, and scandals and intrigues among Rome's imperial elite.
Same as L08 Classics 342C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM, SSC BU: HUM, IS EN: H


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L22 History 343C Europe in the Age of Reformation

How should people act toward each other, toward political authorities and toward their God? Who decided what was the "right" faith: the individual? the family? the state? Could a community survive religious division? What should states do about individuals or communities who refused to conform in matters of religion? With Martin Luther's challenge to the Roman Catholic Church, the debates over these questions transformed European theology, society and politics. In this class we examine the development of Protestant and Radical theology, the Reformers' relations with established political authorities, the response of the Catholic Church, the development of new social and cultural expectations, the control of marginalized religious groups such as Jews, Muslims and Anabaptists, and the experiment of the New World.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: BA, HUM


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L22 History 3445 Riots and Revolution: A History of Modern France from 1789 to the Present

This course surveys the history of France in the 19th and 20th centuries, from the French Revolution through the European Union. The focus in this course will be on the relationship between Paris and the provinces and how the dynamic between the seemingly all-powerful capital and its periphery, both colonial and metropolitan, played into the history of modern France. Major topics include: the legacy of the French Revolution; the development of French nationalism; popular political uprisings; the meaning of modernity; colonialism; French cultural capital; and the changing fortunes of France on the international stage.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3447 Visualizing Blackness: Histories of the African Diaspora Through Film

The African diaspora and, more importantly, variations of blackness, black bodies, and black culture have long captured the imagination of audiences across the globe. Taking a cue from exciting trends in popular culture, this course bridges the world of history, film and culture to explore where and how historical themes specific to African-descended peoples are generated on screen (film and television). Fusing the film world with digital media (i.e., online series and "webisodes") this class allows students to critically engage diasporic narratives of blackness that emerge in popular and independent films not only from the United States but other important locales including Australia, Brazil, Britain and Canada. Moving across time and space, class discussions center on an array of fascinating yet critical themes including racial/ethnic stereotyping, gender, violence, sexuality, spirituality/conjuring and education. Students should be either of junior- or senior-level and have taken at least one AFAS course. Permission of the instructor is required for enrollment.
Same as L90 AFAS 3447

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3450 Modern Germany

This course surveys the political, social, economic and cultural forces that have shaped German history since 1800. After examining the multiplicity of German states that existed in 1800, we identify the key factors that resulted in unification in 1871. We then turn to a study of modern Germany in its various forms, from the Empire through the Weimar Republic and Third Reich, to postwar division and reunification. A major focus is the continuities and discontinuities of German history, particularly with regard to the historical roots of Nazism and attempts to "break with the past" after 1945.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 346C Greek History: The Age of Alexander

From the death of Socrates until the foundation of the Roman Empire, Greece and the Ancient Near East underwent profound changes that still resonate today. This course surveys the political, social, economic, and military developments of this period, especially Alexander the Great's legacy.
Same as L08 Classics 346C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3470 Gender and Citizenship

In this writing-intensive course we examine how ideas about gender have shaped the ways Americans understand what it means to be a citizen. We focus on a variety of cases in the past and present to explore the means by which women and men have claimed the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. The types of questions that we ask include: What rights or duties devolve from the status of citizen? Who qualifies for citizenship and what qualifies them? What distinct models of citizenship have been available to Americans? How have individuals used notions of gender identity to make claims to political subjectivity? And finally, how do gendered claims to citizenship intersect or conflict with claims based on race, class, ethnicity or humanity? Prerequisite: previous course work in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies or permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken WGSS 210.
Same as L77 WGSS 347

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3481 Rethinking the "Second Wave": The History of U.S. Feminisms, 1960-1990

The U.S. women's movement has been called "the 20th century's most influential movement," but until recently assessments of its origins, characteristics and impact have been largely impressionistic and subjective, left to movement participants and popular culture. Building on a recent explosion of historical studies of American feminism, this course examines the history of the so-called "second wave" of the women's movement from its origins in the early 1960s to its alleged demise in the late 1980s. Topics covered include the origins of feminist activism; the traditional history of the women's movement and recent revisions; how race and class shaped the feminist movement; how feminist ideas and organizing transformed American society; feminism and individual experience; and responses to the women's movement. In this discussion-based course, we read scholarly analyses of the women's movement as well as memoirs, popular essays and many primary documents from the period.
Same as L77 WGSS 348

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3490 Europe in the 20th Century

In 1914, several European nations dominated much of the world through vast overseas empires in which they exercised military, political and economic power. This course explores the decline, fall and slow return of the "new Europe" by examining the history of Europe from World War I to the present. It considers the decline of Europe brought about by two devastating wars, and the crucial impact of war and genocide in shaping European politics, society and culture; the place of Europe in the Cold War; and the European retreat from empire in the post-war era.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3512 Muhammad in History and Literature

This course intends to examine the life and representations of the Prophet Muhammad from the perspective of multiple spiritual sensibilities as articulated in various literary genres from medieval to modern periods. The course is divided roughly into two parts. One part deals with the history of Muhammad and the related historiographical questions. The second part deals with the representations of Muhammad in juristic, theological, Sufi, etc., literature. Because of the availability of primary sources in English translation, there will be a healthy dose of primary source reading and analysis throughout the semester. Those students with advanced Arabic (and Persian and Turkish) skills will be encouraged to engage sources in their original language.
Same as L75 JINE 351

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L22 History 3521 Topics in American Culture Studies: Visions of the Machine in 20th-Century Art, Film, and Literature

The topic of this course varies from semester to semester. Please consult Course Listings for a description of the current offering.
Same as L98 AMCS 3520

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3554 Revolution with an Accent: The Haitian and French Revolutions, 1770-1805

How can politics enact fundamental changes? What makes those changes a "revolution"? How do we judge the legitimacy of such changes? When these questions arise over the course of ordinary political arguments, the example of the French Revolution often looms large, casting a shadow tinted with blood and Terror. Much less present in the collective political imagination is the Haitian Revolution. These two events are complex and complicated, and are filled with fascinating, chilling, inspired characters, enflamed rhetoric and challenging questions. This course examines both the unfolding of events and the rise and fall of protagonists within these two revolutions and explores the ways that issues such as religion, state finance, loyalty, race and slavery became politicized.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L22 History 3559 Socialist and Secular? A Social History of the Soviet Union

This class explores daily life and cultural developments in the Soviet Union, 1917 to 1999. Focusing on the everyday experience of Soviet citizens during these years, students learn about the effects of large-scale social and political transformation on the private lives of people. To explore daily life in the Soviet Union, this class uses a variety of sources and media, including scholarly analysis, contemporaneous portrayals, literary representations and films. Students receive a foundation in Soviet political, social and cultural history with deeper insights into select aspects of life in Soviet society.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3561 Andean History: Culture and Politics

Since pre-Columbian times, the central Andean mountain system, combining highlands, coastal and jungle areas, has been the locus of multiethnic polities. Within this highly variegated geographical and cultural-historical space, emerged the Inca Empire, the Viceroyalty of Peru — Spain's core South American colony, and the central Andean republics of Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. Taking a chronological and thematic approach, this course will examine pre-Columbian Andean societies, Inca rule, Andean transformations under Spanish colonialism, post-independence nation-state formation, state-Indian relations, reform and revolutionary movements, and neoliberal policies and the rise of new social movements and ethnic politics. This course focuses primarily on the development of popular and elite political cultures, and the nature and complexity of local, regional, and national power relations.
Same as L97 IAS 356

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L22 History 3563 Ancient Sport and Spectacle

Ancient sport and spectacle seem both familiar and foreign to us today. We share the Greek obsession with athletic success, and we have revived their Olympic games — and yet the Greeks competed nude and covered in oil and included in their celebration a sacrifice of 100 oxen to Zeus. So too do we recognize the familiar form of the Roman arena, but recoil from the bloody spectacles that it housed. In this class we will examine the world of ancient Greco-Roman sport and spectacle, seeking to better understand both ancient culture and our own. We will consider Greek athletic competition, Roman gladiatorial combat, chariot racing, and other public performances. We will set these competitions in their social and historical context, considering both their evolution and their remarkable staying power.
Same as L08 Classics 3563

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 359 Topics in European History: Modern European Women

This course examines the radical transformation in the position and perspective of European women since the 18th century. The primary geographical focus is on Britain, France and Germany. Topics include: changing relations between the sexes; the emergence of mass feminist movements; the rise of the "new woman"; women and war; and the cultural construction and social organization of gender. We will look at the lives of women as nurses, prostitutes, artists, mothers, hysterics, political activists, consumers and factory hands.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3590 Topics in American Culture Studies: Eating History: Cultural Creolization and the Clash of Tradition

The topic of this course varies from semester to semester. Please consult Course Listings for a description of the current offering.
Same as L98 AMCS 359

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3593 The Wheels of Commerce: From the Industrial Revolution to Global Capitalism

John Maynard Keynes once said, "The ideas of economists and political philosophers both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed the world is ruled by little else. Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences, are usually the slaves of some defunct economist." In this course we focus our attention on the blind spot that Keynes so astutely identified. We study seminal works in the history of political economy (Smith, Malthus, Marx, Keynes, Krugman, etc.) and explore the social, economic and political histories in which they were grounded. We begin with the Industrial Revolution in Britain, the works of Adam Smith, and the emergence of political economy as a field of inquiry. We end with the globalization of the 1970s, the works of Joseph Stiglitz, and the challenges that a more interconnected world has posed for both the organization of the economy and the practice of economics as a discipline.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3598 The First World War and the Making of Modern Europe

The First World War ushered our age into existence. Its memories still haunt us, and its aftershocks shaped the course of the 20th century. The Russian Revolution, the emergence of new national states, Fascism, Nazism, the Second World War, and the Cold War are all its products. Today, many of the ethnic and national conflicts that triggered war in 1914 have resurfaced. Understanding the First World War, in short, is crucial to understanding our own era.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3599 Travelers, Tricksters, and Storytellers: Jewish Travel Narratives and Autobiographies

Jewish literature includes a number of highly fascinating travel accounts and autobiographies that are still awaiting their discovery by a broader readership. In this course, we will explore a broad range of texts originating from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. They were written by both Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews hailing from countries as diverse as Spain, Italy, Germany, and the Ottoman Empire. Among the authors were pilgrims, rabbis, merchants, and one savvy business woman. We will read their works as responses to historical circumstances and as expressions of Jewish identity, in its changing relationship to the Christian or Muslim environment in which the writers lived or traveled. Specifically, we will ask questions such as: How do travel accounts and autobiographies enable their authors and readers to reflect on issues of identity and difference? How do the writers produce representations of an "other," against which and through which they define a particular sense of self? To what extent are these texts reliable accounts of their authors' personal experiences, and where do they serve their own self-fashioning? How do the writers portray Christians, Muslims and Jews from other cultural backgrounds than their own? How do they construe the role of women in a world dominated by men? How do they reflect on history, geography, and other fields of knowledge that were not covered by the traditional Jewish curriculum; and how do they respond to the challenges and opportunities of early modernity? This course is open to students of varying interests, including Jewish, Islamic, or Religious Studies, medieval and early modern history, European or Near Eastern literatures. All texts will be read in English translation.
Same as L75 JINE 359

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 35SM Hands on the Past: History, Murder and the Archive

The future depends on the past. This course taps into that understanding by offering an alternative hands-on methods class to encourage undergraduate student engagement with history and archives, both on- and offline. In this particular class, students will be nurtured to more deeply interact with the historical past by exploring gender, race, violence and sexuality through three central questions explored throughout the course: What and how is African-American history conducted? How do we best document the past with students fully at the intellectual table of production and preservation? How do we make history with history? These exciting and diverse interests will be pursued through in-class discussions and course assigned readings, but especially by taking a spring break research project trip across Missouri to various local repositories and the state archives, to activate and fuel the idea of putting hands on the past.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD BU: BA EN: S


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L22 History 3600 Topics in Caribbean History: Beyond Sea, Sunshine and Soca: Blacks in the Caribbean

This course examines major themes in the history of the Caribbean from the 15th to the 20th century. The first half of the course will focus on the 15th to the 19th century, exploring issues such as indigenous societies, European encounter and conquest, plantation slavery, the resistance of enslaved Africans and emancipation. The remainder of the course focuses on aspects of the cultural, economic, political and social experiences of Caribbean peoples during the 20th century. Major areas of inquiry include the labor rebellions of the 1930s, decolonization, diasporic alliances, Black Power, identity construction and the politics of tourism. While the English-speaking Caribbean constitutes the main focus, references will be made to other areas such as Cuba and Haiti.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3603 Renaissance Italy

This course examines the social, cultural, intellectual and political history of late medieval and Renaissance Italy: civic life and urban culture; the crisis of the 14th century; the city-states of Renaissance Italy; the revival of classical antiquity; art and humanism of the Renaissance; culture, politics and society; Machiavelli and Renaissance political thought; the wars of Italy; religious crisis and religious reaction in the 16th century.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3608 Science and Society Since 1800

This course surveys selected topics and themes in the history of modern science from 1800 to the present. Emphasis is on the life sciences, with some attention to the physical sciences.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3610 City of Peace: Baghdad in Medieval Times

The subject of this course is an exploration of the city of Baghdad in medieval times from its foundation in the eighth century to its sack by the Mongols in the 13th. Starting from the background history of its location in Mesopotamia, we study the reasons of its foundation in that location and examine its topography, city planning and layout, institutions, citizens, neighborhoods, markets, libraries and workshops to discuss life in the city. Because Baghdad was the seat of the Abbasid caliphate at the time, we examine its role as the hub of the empire (in politics, administration, economy and literature), and its links to and rivalries with other provincial cities.
Same as L75 JINE 361

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3622 Islam in the Indian Ocean

Selected themes in the study of Islam and Islamic culture in social, historical, and political context. The specific area of emphasis will be determined by the instructor.
Same as L75 JINE 3622

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3630 Mapping the World of Black Criminality

Ideas concerning the evolution of violence, crime, and criminal behavior have been framed around many different groups. Yet, what does a typical criminal look like? How does race — more specifically blackness — alter these conversations, inscribing greater fears about criminal behaviors? This course taps into this reality examining the varied ways people of African descent have been and continue to be particularly imagined as a distinctly criminal population. Taking a dual approach, students will consider the historical roots of the policing of black bodies alongside the social history of black crime while also foregrounding where and how black females fit into these critical conversations of crime and vice. Employing a panoramic approach, students will examine historical narratives, movies and documentaries, literature, popular culture through poetry and contemporary music, as well as the prison industrial complex system. The prerequisite for the course is L90 3880 (Terror and Violence in the Black Atlantic) and/or permission from the instructor, which will be determined based on a student´s past experience in courses that explore factors of race and identity. Enrollment limit: 20.
Same as L90 AFAS 363

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3632 The American Frontier: 1776-1848

This course will examine the nation's shifting frontier from independence through the Mexican-American War. It will consider people and places in flux as their nationality, demography and social order underwent dramatic changes. Students will make use of an extensive electronic archive of primary sources including period documents, historic maps and contemporary artwork, in order to consider how these sources confirm, reject or expand on the ideas they encounter in published scholarship.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L22 History 365 The New Republic: The United States, 1776-1850

"Go get yourself some democracy!" Americans have so often preached to other nations. But just how did Americans themselves go about creating the world's largest and most successful democratic republic? And how democratic was this violent new nation that reeled from one crisis to another, and ultimately to the brink of collapse in its first 75 years? This survey of American history from the creation of the Republic to the eve of the Civil War explores the Revolution and its ambiguous legacies, the starkly paradoxical "marriage" of slavery and freedom, and the creation of much of the America that we know; mass political parties; a powerful Presidency; sustained capitalist growth; individualistic creeds; formalized and folkloric racism; heteronormative patriarchal family life; technological innovation; literary experimentation; distinctively American legal, scientific and religious cultures; and the modern movements of labor, feminism, and African-American empowerment.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS


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L22 History 3660 Narratives of Discovery

This course examines Europe's encounter with the newly discovered lands and peoples of Africa, Asia and America through the writings of the travelers themselves. We read stories of exploration and conquest, cultural and commercial exchanges, religious visions and cannibal practices.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3662 Experts, Administrators and Soldiers: Governance and Development in Postcolonial Africa

Between 1957 and 1975, one African territory after another made the transition from European colony to independent nation-state. Widespread optimism that these "transfers of power" would bring a new era of prosperity and dignity dissipated quickly as the new nations struggled with political instability, military coups, social unrest, and persistent poverty. Consequently many western observers and development specialists are certain that they have become "failed states" requiring foreign assistance to develop properly. This course challenges these assumptions by tracing the origins of African governance and economic development from their imperial origins into the independence era. By exploring nation building, economic planning, and public administration from the perspective of political elites, foreign experts, and ordinary people, the class takes an intimate look at how colonies became nation-states. These new perspectives offer students a historical grounding in international public administration and development by exploring how imperial ideas and concepts continue to influence contemporary social planning and development policy in both Africa and the wider world.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3669 The Making of Modern Europe, 1945 to the Present

The history of Europe from the end of World War II to the present day. Topics include: the place of Europe in the Cold War; the divergent paths and experiences of Western and Eastern Europe; the emergence of the European Union; the 1968 student uprisings throughout Europe; the "revolutions" of 1989 throughout Eastern Europe; the collapse of the Soviet Union and reunification of Germany; the Balkan Wars of the 1990s and current social problems related to the minority ethnic and religious groups living in European nations.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 367 America in the Age of Inequality: The Gilded Age and the Progressive Era, 1877-1919

This course explores dramatic changes in American society during the half-century from the Civil War to the end of World War I. We discuss industrialization; mass immigration from Europe, Asia and Latin America; the vast movement of rural people to cities; the fall of Reconstruction and rise of Jim Crow; the expansion of organized labor; birth of American Socialism; and the rise of the American empire in the Caribbean and the Philippines. The course, in addition, analyzes the many and varied social reform efforts of the turn of the 20th century, from women's suffrage to anti-lynching campaigns; from trust-busting and anti-immigrant crusades to the settlement house movement.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA, HUM


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L22 History 3670 The Long Civil Rights Movement

The Civil Rights Movement is known as a southern movement, led by church leaders and college students, fought through sit-ins and marches, dealing primarily with non-economic objectives, framed by a black and white paradigm, and limited to a single tumultuous decade. This course seeks to broaden our understanding of the movement geographically, chronologically and thematically. It pays special attention to struggles fought in the North, West and Southwest; it seeks to question binaries constructed around "confrontational" and "accommodationist" leaders; it reveals how Latinos, Native Americans and Asian Americans impacted and were impacted by the movement; and it seeks to link the public memory of this movement with contemporary racial politics.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3672 Medicine, Healing and Experimentation in the Contours of Black History

Conversations regarding the history of medicine continue to undergo considerable transformation within academia and the general public. The infamous Tuskegee syphilis experiment serves as a marker in the historical consciousness regarding African Americans and the medical profession. This course taps into this particular evolution, prompting students to broaden their gaze to explore the often delicate relationship of people of African descent within the realm of medicine and healing. Tracing the social nature of these medical interactions from the period of enslavement through the 20th century, this course examines the changing patterns of disease and illness, social responses to physical and psychological ailments, and the experimental and exploitative use of black bodies in the field of medicine. As a history course, the focus is extended toward the underpinnings of race and gender in the medical treatment allocated across time and space — the United States, Caribbean and Latin America — to give further insight into the roots of contemporary practice of medicine.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3673 Gurus, Saints and Scientists: Religion in Modern South Asia

Many long-standing South Asian traditions have been subject to radical reinterpretation, and many new religious movements have arisen, as South Asians have grappled with how to accommodate their traditions of learning and practice to what they have perceived to be the conditions of modern life. In this course we consider some of the factors that have contributed to religious change in South Asia, including British colonialism, sedentarization and globalization, and new discourses of democracy and equality. We consider how new religious organizations were part and parcel with movements for social equality and political recognition; examine the intellectual contributions of major thinkers like Swami Vivekananda, Sayyid Ahmad Khan, and Mohandas Gandhi; and explore how Hindu, Islamic, and other South Asian traditions were recast in the molds of natural science, social science, and world religion.
Same as L23 Re St 3670

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L22 History 368 Modern America Since 1929

This course offers an intensive survey of U.S. history since World War I, concentrating on key turns in the development of American life: social and political strains of the 1920s as part of the "new era" commenced by the Great War; responses to the Great Depression and the construction of a limited welfare state in the 1930s and 1940s; the rise of Cold War anti-Communism in foreign and domestic affairs in the wake of World War II; the advent of a new period of social reform and disruptive protest in the 1950s and 1960s; the turn toward the political right since the 1970s; and the aftermath of the Cold War.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: HUM


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L22 History 3680 The Cold War, 1945-1991

This course presents an assessment of the Cold War from the perspective of its major participants. Topics include: the origins of the Cold War in Europe and Asia; the Korean War; the Stalin regime; McCarthyism and the Red Scare; the nuclear arms race; the conflict over Berlin; Cold War film and literature; superpower rivalry in Guatemala, Cuba, Vietnam, Africa and the Middle East; the rise and fall of detente; the Reagan years and the impact of Gorbachev; the East European Revolutions; and the end of the Cold War.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3681 The U.S. War in Iraq, 2003-2011

This course presents a historical assessment of the United States' eight year war in Iraq from its inception on March 20, 2003, to the withdrawal of all combat troops on December 15, 2011. Topics covered include: the Bush Administration's decision to make Iraq part of the "War on Terror" and the subsequent plan of attack; the combat operations; losing the victory; sectarian violence; torture; the insurgency; battling Al-Qaeda in Iraq; reassessment; the surge; the drawdown; and the end of the war. The course concludes with an assessment of the war's effectiveness regarding the Global War on Terrorism and U.S. policy in the Middle East.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3711 The History of Popular Culture in the United States

This course surveys major developments in the history of popular culture in America, stretching from the mid-19th century to the present. It explores topics such as literature, drama/theater, dance halls, movies, radio, advertising, television, music and the internet; it covers different types of popular culture such as printing, performance, image and audio; it looks at how popular culture has been depicted in terms of icons, myths, stereotypes, heroes, celebrities and rituals; it addresses the rise of mass production and consumption; it examines the ways in which race, class, gender, ethnicity and sexuality have been perceived and are portrayed in popular culture; and it illustrates how the content of popular culture shapes and reflects our personal, social, political and intellectual beliefs and values.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3729 The United States in the 20th Century

This course explores the dramatic changes that transformed American society from the 1890s to the 1980s. Covering the main themes of 20th-century U.S. history, students connect domestic policies and developments to international events, and study how Americans of diverse backgrounds thought about, experienced, and defined democracy and citizenship in the United States.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 373 History of United States Foreign Relations to 1914

This course explores the major diplomatic, political, legal, and economic issues shaping U.S. foreign relations in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries, up until the U.S. entry into the First World War.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS EN: H


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L22 History 3731 Topics in Near Eastern Cultures: Slavery in the Middle East

The topic for this course will change each semester; the specific topic for each semester will be given in Course Listings.
Same as L75 JINE 373

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3741 History of United States: Foreign Relations: 1920-1989

This course explores the major diplomatic, political, legal and economic issues shaping U.S. foreign relations with the wider world from the 1920s to the "fall of Communism" in 1989.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS


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L22 History 3743 History of U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1920

This course explores the major diplomatic, political, legal, and economic issues shaping U.S. relations with the wider world from the 1920s through the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3751 Women, Gender and Sexuality in Postwar America

We explore the history of the United States since 1945 by focusing on the ways that gender and sexuality have shaped the lives of Americans, particularly the diverse group of women who make up more than half the nation's population. Topics include: domesticity and the culture of the 1950s; gendering the Cold War; the gender politics of racial liberation; the sexual revolution; second-wave feminism and the transformation of American culture; the new right's gender politics; and the impact of new conceptions of sexual and gender identity at century's end. Course texts include scholarly literature, memoirs, novels and film.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: BA


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L22 History 375A Methods & Visions: America, Real & Imagined: The Curious Cases of Broadway & Hollywood

Required course for AMCS majors. Consult semester listing for current topic. As a Writing Intensive course, this course serves as an occasion for students to think about matters of argument and presentation, and to develop ideas and models for future research. This course is intended for students at the junior level or higher; it fulfills the "multidisciplinary" (MD) requirement for AMCS minors and the "Methods Seminar" requirements for AMCS majors.
Same as L98 AMCS 375A

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3789 Building St. Louis Oral History

This course aims to provide a national and local understanding of how Americans and St. Louisans dealt with the problems of racism, poverty and sexism from 1945 to the present. While history courses traditionally require that students analyze the credibility and subjectivity of each historical source, this course further challenges students to use the methods of oral history to compare evidence from oral historical memory with written texts. By comparing St. Louis history with that of the rest of the nation, students analyze regional differences and understand the unique historical conditions that shaped this city.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L22 History 3803 Ancient Greek and Roman Medicine

This course introduces the student to the practice and theory of medicine in the ancient Mediterranean, beginning in Egypt and continuing through Greece and Rome. In the end, we will find ourselves in the Middle Ages. Our focus will be on Greco-Roman medicine: how disease was understood; how disease was treated surgically, pharmacologically, and through diet; the intellectual origins of Greek medicine; the related close relationship between Greco-Roman medicine and philosophy; and the social status of medical practitioners. We will also discuss how medicine was written and in what terms its practitioners conceived it.
Same as L08 Classics 3801

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3840 Migration and Modernity: Human Mobility, Identity and State Formation — Russian/Soviet/post-Soviet Context

This class introduces students to a broad history of 19th- and 20th-century Russia and the Soviet Union alongside problems of migration. In this class, students will be introduced to the historical, social, and political dimensions of migration within, to, and from the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and its successor states. We will look at the intersection of the movement of people with long-term economic, social and political transformations, but also pay attention to crucial events and phenomena of Soviet history that set large-scale migrations in motion. Course materials will, for instance, address mass movements related to modernization and internal colonization, analyze the role of revolutionary change and warfare for forced displacement, and study the implications of geopolitical changes in the aftermath of the breakdown of the USSR for human rights discourses. Alongside the historically grounded overview, the class explores concepts of citizenship, diaspora, nationality policy, gender specific experiences of migration, and the ethics and political economy of migration politics, thereby highlighting how current trends in Russian society are indicative of broader discourses on difference and social transformation.
Same as L97 IAS 384

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L22 History 3843 Filming the Black Freedom Struggle in St. Louis

This interdisciplinary course is designed to introduce students to the history of the black freedom struggle in St. Louis and to the complex and multiple ways historic narratives are constructed. We will explore the political, economic and cultural history of black St. Louisans who challenged racial segregation in housing and work, fought white mobs in city streets, and battled the destruction of black communities by the federal urban renewal and public housing policies.This course will provide students with the opportunity to write history through visual sources, in order to construct a historical narrative on film. Students will be introduced to the technical skills involved in making a documentary film, and to the archival research and oral history skills required to document the past. This course brings together documentary filmmaking and history research to draw attention to the multiple narratives of African-American and urban history.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 3856 Topics in Jewish Studies: The Sephardic World, 1492 to the Present

This course explores the history and culture of the Sephardic diaspora from the expulsion of Spanish and Portuguese Jewry at the end of the 15th century to the present. We will start with a brief introduction into the history of Iberian Jews prior to 1492, asking how this experience created a distinct subethnic Jewish group: the Sephardim. We will then follow their migratory path to North Africa, Italy, the Ottoman Empire, the Netherlands and the Americas. The questions we will explore include: In what sense did Jews of Iberian heritage form a transnational community? How did they use their religious, cultural, and linguistic ties to advance their commercial interests? How did they transmit and transform aspects of Spanish culture and create a vibrant Ladino literature? How did the Sephardim interact with Ashkenazi, Greek, North African, and other Jewish, Muslim, and Christian communities? How did Jewish emigres from Spain and Portugal become intermediaries between Christian Europe and the Ottoman Empire? What was the role of Sephardim in Europe's transatlantic expansion? How did conversos (converts to Christianity) return to Judaism and continue to grapple with their ambiguous religious identity? How did Ottoman and North African Jews respond to European cultural trends and colonialism and create their own unique forms of modern culture? How did the Holocaust impact Sephardic Jewry? The course will end with a discussion of the Sephardic experience in America and Israel today.
Same as L75 JINE 366

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3857 Losing the Farm: 20th-Century Agriculture in a Global Context

Recent debates regarding food and farming have tended to turn on the question of industrialization. In this course, we will excavate the history of these debates by examining how agriculture has changed in the 20th century. We will begin with the industrialization of agriculture in the United States and then move to Mexico and Africa to discuss the Green Revolution, Cold War food politics, and the relationship between the developed and developing worlds.The course will end by using what we have learned from the readings to engage in an informed evaluation of contemporary critiques of agricultural industrialization.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3860 Empire in East Asia: Theory and History (WI)

An introduction to how historians and anthropologists incorporate theoretical insights into their work, this course first "reverse engineers" the main arguments in several insightful books and articles on empire in Asia, all of which are informed by the work of Michel Foucault. Retaining our theoretical knowledge, we then focus on the more empirical aspects of the Japanese empire in Korea, including settler colonialism, the colonial economy, representations of colonialism and the long-term ramifications of empire. We conclude with a general assessment of the history of empire. In these ways, this course seeks to equip students with a knowledge of empire in East Asia in the late 19th and 20th centuries while simultaneously investigating the nature of that knowledge.
Same as L97 IAS 386

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 3865 Topics in Jewish History: Colonialism, Post-Colonialism and the Modern Jewish Experience

Consult Course Listings for current topics. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Same as L75 JINE 386

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3880 Terror and Violence in the Black Atlantic

From the period of bondage through the 21st century, terror and racialized violence have consistently been used as a form of social control. This course is constructed to explore the historical foundations of extreme threats of violence inflicted among populations of African descent. The fabric of American culture has given birth to its own unique brand of terrorism, of which this class spends considerable time interrogating. Yet, in recognizing that these practices are commonly found in other parts of the Black Atlantic, students will be encouraged to take a comparative view to better tease out the wider strands of violence operative in places like England, the Caribbean, and Latin America. Within this course, we will explore the varied ways in which music, films, newspapers, and historical narratives shed light on these often life-altering stories of the past. Some of the themes touched upon include: the use of punishment/exploitation during the era of slavery; lynching; sexual violence; race riots; police brutality; motherhood; black power; and community activism.
Same as L90 AFAS 3880

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 388C How Free is Free?: African-American History Since Emancipation

The events that unfolded in Ferguson revealed the contradictions of a national government that is led by a black president yet also sanctions the susceptibility of its black citizens to police brutality. What has freedom really meant for African Americans since emancipation? This course addresses key events and movements that shaped African Americans' definition and pursuit of freedom and citizenship, emphasizing various strategies, successes, failures and legacies developed as a result. Key developments will include the Reconstruction, Jim Crow, the Harlem Renaissance, the World Wars, the Civil Rights Movement, and mass incarceration.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM


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L22 History 3891 East Asia Since 1945: From Empire to Cold War

This course examines the historical forces behind the transformation of East Asia from war-torn territory under Japanese military and colonial control into distinct nations ordered by Cold War politics. We begin with the 1945 dismantling of the Japanese empire and continue with the emergence of the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan), the two Koreas and Vietnam, all of which resulted from major conflicts in post-war Asia. We conclude with a look at East Asia in the post-Cold War era.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD EN: H


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L22 History 38A8 Women, Men and Gender in Africa: Writing-Intensive Seminar

This seminar explores the ways in which gender relations have been produced, reproduced and transformed through the everyday actions of women and men in Africa. The focus is both on agency and on structures of power, as we move from a consideration of gender relations during the 19th-century jihads in West Africa to problems of love, sexuality and marriage in contemporary South Africa.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 38B9 Understanding Lincoln: Writing-Intensive Seminar

This course explores the life, art (political and literary) and historical significance of Abraham Lincoln. It focuses first on how he understood himself and foregrounds his inspired conception of his own world-historical role in the Civil War. The course also traces how the larger world furnished the contexts of Lincoln's career, how his consciousness, speeches and writings, and presidential decisions can be understood against the backdrop of the revolutionary national democratic upheavals of the 19th century. Finally the course investigates how the 16th president, so controversial in his day, has remained a subject of cultural contestation, with historians, novelists, poets, cartoonists, filmmakers, advertisers and politicians struggling over his memory and meaning, to the present.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI EN: H


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L22 History 38C8 Religion and Politics in South Asia: Writing-Intensive Seminar

The relationship between religion, community and nation is a topic of central concern and contestation in the study of South Asian history. This course will explore alternative positions and debates on such topics as: changing religious identities; understandings of the proper relationship between religion, community and nation in India and Pakistan; and the violence of Partition (the division of India and Pakistan in 1947). The course will treat India, Pakistan and other South Asian regions in the colonial and postcolonial periods.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 38M8 The Making of the Modern American Landscape — Writing-Intensive Seminar

This writing-intensive seminar explores environmental change in relation to human actions in the United States. It provides a vision of American history from the perspective of the land itself. It traces transformations in the organization and uses of landed property from the 18th-century surveys of western lands through the expansion of slavery and the cotton kingdom; the construction of irrigation systems in the west; the emergence of new technologies of production and communication in 19th-century cities to the mass production of suburban housing; and finally to the rise of Disneyland and Las Vegas.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI BU: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 3900 Mormonism and the American Experience

The focus of this seminar is Mormonism, meaning, primarily, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (or LDS Church), which is the largest Mormon body. Mormons in the United States have gone from being one of the most intensely persecuted religious groups in the country's history to the fourth largest religious body in the U.S. (by one count), with a reputation for patriotism and conservative family values. In addition to introducing who the Mormons are, their beliefs and religious practices, this seminar will explore issues raised by Mormonism's move toward the religious mainstream alongside its continuing distinctiveness. These issues include: What is the religious "mainstream" in the U.S.? How did conflicts over Mormonism during the 19th century, especially the conflict over polygamy, help define the limits of religious tolerance in this country? How have LDS teachings about gender and race, or controversies about whether or not Mormons are Christian, positioned and repositioned Mormons within U.S. society?
Same as L57 RelPol 390

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L22 History 3921 Secular & Religious: A Global History

Recent years have seen a dramatic rethinking of the past in nearly every corner of the world as scholars revisit fundamental questions about the importance of religion for individuals, societies and politics. Is religion as a personal orientation in decline? Is Europe becoming more secular? Is secularism a European invention? Many scholars now argue that "religion" is a European term that doesn't apply in Asian societies. This course brings together cutting-edge historical scholarship on Europe and Asia in pursuit of a truly global understanding. Countries covered vary, but may include Britain, France, Turkey, China, Japan, India and Pakistan.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 393 Medieval Christianity

This course surveys the historical development of Christian doctrine, ecclesiastical organization, and religious practice between the fifth century and the 15th, with an emphasis on the interaction of religion, culture, politics and society. Topics covered include: the Christianization of Europe; monasticism; the liturgy; sacramental theology and practice; the Gregorian reform; religious architecture; the mendicant orders and the attack on heresy; lay devotions; the papal monarchy; schism and conciliarism; and the reform movements of the 15th century.
Same as L23 Re St 393

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 394C African Civilization to 1800

Beginning with an introduction to the methodological and theoretical approaches to African history, this course surveys African civilization and culture from the Neolithic age until 1800 AD. Topics include African geography and environmental history, migration and cross-cultural exchange, the development of Swahili culture, the Western Sudanese states, the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the historical roots of Apartheid.
Same as L90 AFAS 321C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS


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L22 History 395C African Civilization: 1800 to the Present

Beginning with social and economic changes in 19th-century Africa, this course is an in-depth investigation of the intellectual and material culture of colonialism. It is also concerned with the survival of precolonial values and institutions, and examines the process of African resistance and adaptation to social change. The survey concludes with the consequences of decolonization and an exploration of the roots of the major problems facing modern Africa.
Same as L90 AFAS 322C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H UColl: HAF, HSM


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L22 History 3960 Gender and Social Class

This course examines the intersection of class and gender from the late 19th century to the present. It begins by asking how a focus on women challenges conventional notions of class. Some of the topics covered include women, race and class; class and family formation; women, class and globalization; class and feminist politics; women and work; class and domestic labor; women and unionization; and class and sexual identity. The emphasis is on women and class in the U.S., but includes analysis of women and class in a broader, global context. This course examines these topics using nonfictional and fictional texts. Prerequisites: one 100- or 200-level Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Course or permission of instructor. Students who have taken L77 WGSS 3561 Women and Social Class can not take this class.
Same as L77 WGSS 396

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 3977 The Making of the Modern Catholic Church

This course examines the work of three church councils that put their stamp on the Catholic Church at key moments in its history, making it what it is today. The first section is dedicated to the Fourth Lateran Council (1215), which defined the high medieval church as an all-encompassing papal monarchy with broad powers over the lives of all Europeans, Christian and non-Christian alike. In the second section we turn our attention to the Council of Trent (1545-1563), which responded to the threat posed by the Protestant Reformation by reforming the Catholic church, tightening ecclesiastical discipline, improving clerical education, and defining and defending Catholic doctrine. We conclude with a consideration of the largest church council ever, Vatican II (1962-1965), which reformed the liturgy and redefined the church to meet the challenges of the modern, multicultural, postcolonial world.
Same as L23 Re St 3977

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 399 Senior Honors Thesis and Colloquium: Writing-Intensive Seminar

Prerequisites: satisfactory standing as a candidate for Senior Honors and permission of thesis director.

Credit variable, maximum 4 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI EN: H


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L22 History 39CJ The City in Early Modern Europe: Writing Intensive Seminar

From the city-states of Renaissance Italy to the 18th-century boomtowns of London and Paris, cities functioned as political, economic, and cultural centers, creating unique opportunities and challenges for their diverse inhabitants. Their conflicting experiences and expectations created not only social and economic unrest, but also a resilient social infrastructure, a tradition of popular participation in politics, and a rich legacy of cultural accomplishment.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 39F8 Gender and Sexuality in 1950s America: Writing-Intensive Seminar

Historians have recently begun to reconsider the dominant view of the 1950s as an era characterized by complacency and conformity. In this writing-intensive seminar we use the prism of gender history to gain a more complex understanding of the intricate relationship between conformity and crisis, domesticity and dissent that characterized the 1950s for both women and men.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, SD, WI BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 39J8 Mapping the Early Modern World: Writing-Intensive Seminar

Societies use maps not just to see the world, but also to assign meaning and order to space: both nearby spaces and spaces on the other side of the world. In this seminar, we will study how maps were created, circulated and interpreted between the 16th and 18th century, when Europeans came into contact with new regions throughout the world and reshaped their own backyards through the rise of the modern state and the development of national identity.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI EN: H


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L22 History 39S8 Rivers: A Comparative Approach to Chinese and World History: Writing-Intensive Seminar

This course uses rivers as geographical frames of reference to address a variety of issues, including physical and social mobility, agriculture and commerce, the state, environmental history and construction of cultural meanings. Each week begins with a focus on the West River, which flows through two provinces in southern China. Readings on the West River are matched with readings that address similar topics but focus on other important rivers in the world. The temporal focus is approximately 1500-1900, a period that witnessed the zenith of rivers as modes of transportation and commerce.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI


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L22 History 39SC Imperialism and Sexuality: India, South Asia and the World: Writing-Intensive Seminar

What is the connection between the appropriation of other people's resources and the obsession with sex? Why is "race" essential to the sexual imperatives of imperialism? How has the nexus between "race," sexuality and imperial entitlement reproduced itself despite the end of formal colonialism? By studying a variety of colonial documents, memoirs produced by colonized subjects, novels, films and scholarship on imperialism, we seek to understand the history of imperialism's sexual desires and its continuation in our world today.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 39SL Blacks, Latinos and Afro-Latinos: Constructing Difference and Identity: Writing-Intensive Seminar

Dominant discourses on Black-Latino relations focus on job competition, while a few others celebrate the future of an America led by "people of color." What is at stake in these narratives? How did we come to understand what is "black" and "Latino"? Students taking this course examine the history of African Americans' and Latinos' racialization under British, Spanish, and American empires, paying attention to both the construction of the racial "Other" by European elites, the reclaiming of identities by the racially marginalized through the Black and Brown liberation movements of the 1960s and 1970s, and the movements' impacts on black-Latino electoral and grassroots coalitions, mass incarceration of youth, and Afro-diasporic productions of hip-hop.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD, WI BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 4000 IPH Thesis Prospectus Workshop

Students assist each other in developing viable thesis topics, compiling bibliographies, and preparing research plans. Students give formal and informal oral presentations of their proposed topics. Prospectuses and, if possible, drafts of first chapters are peer-edited.
Same as L93 IPH 401

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, WI EN: H


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L22 History 4001 Directed Fieldwork in Historical and Archival Professions

A fieldwork project under the direction of a faculty member from the Department of History. Normally planned and undertaken in conjunction with an established museum or archival program.

Credit 4 units. A&S: TH


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L22 History 4002 Directed Fieldwork in Historical and Archival Professions

A fieldwork project under the direction of a faculty member from the Department of History. Normally planned and undertaken in conjunction with an established museum or archival program.

Credit 4 units. A&S: TH EN: H


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L22 History 4008 Senior Seminar on the Presidency: The Obama Administration

This is a research seminar that will begin with a series of common readings, after which students will constitute themselves into research teams that explore the current state of the Presidency in broad cultural perspective. Research topics may include: a survey of the books on the Presidential family; media interpretations of the administration and the political process; the political uses of information technology, specifically the web and social media; continuities and changes in voter behavior; the shifting powers of the Presidency. This course is designed as a complement to Focus on the Presidency, and Focus 200 is a prerequisite for this course.
Same as L98 AMCS 4008

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4010 Convivencia or Reconquista? Muslims, Jews, and Christians in Medieval Iberia

The capstone course for Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies majors, Arabic majors, and Hebrew majors. The course content is subject to change.
Same as L75 JINE 4001

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4020 Jerusalem, The Holy City

An examination of the role that Jerusalem has played in three religious traditions — Judaism, Christianity and Islam — through a study of archaeology, history, literature, politics and theology from antiquity to contemporary times. A senior seminar in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies. During winter break, the class goes to Jerusalem as part of the course. Student portion of travel costs TBA. Students unable to make the trip receive a reduction to 4 units of course credit. Preference given to seniors majoring in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies. Others may enroll with instructor's permission.
Same as L75 JINE 4020

Credit 5 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD EN: H


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L22 History 4040 Senior Seminar: Convivencia or Reconquista? Muslims, Jews and Christians in Medieval Iberia

Senior Seminar. This seminar will provide an opportunity to explore in some depth various facets of the convivencia ("dwelling together"; coexistence) of Muslims, Jews, and Christians in medieval Iberia. While we will pick up the timeline with the emergence of an Ibero-Islamic society in the eighth century CE, the seminar's historical horizon stretches up to the turn of the 15th to the 16th century, when Spanish Jews and Muslims were equally faced with the choice between exile and conversion to Christianity. Until about the mid-11th centuries Muslims dominated most of the Iberian Peninsula. From roughly the mid-11th through 15th centuries, Christians ruled much and eventually all of Spain and Portugal. Through a process termed, from a Christian perspective, as reconquista ("reconquest"), Catholic kingdoms acquired large Muslim enclaves. As borders moved, Jewish communities found themselves under varying Muslim or Christian dominion, or migrated from one realm to the other. Interactions between the three ethno-religious communities occurred throughout, some characterized by mutual respect and shared creativity and others by rivalry and strife. The course focuses on these religious and cultural contacts, placing them in various historical and geographic contexts. It will raise questions concerning the ambiguities of religious change and concerning the interplay of persecution and toleration. Methodologically, the seminar emphasizes the study of primary sources, including documentary, historiographical, literary and poetical texts. In the course of their study, attention will be paid to peculiarities of genre, and difficulties involved in formulating historical assessments. In this sense, we will also aim at developing critical reading skills in relation to secondary literature. Seniors in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies will be given preference in admission. Advanced students in other fields are asked to contact the instructor prior to enrollment.
Same as L75 JINE 4060

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 4051 Diaspora in Jewish and Islamic Experience

The polarities of diaspora and home — periphery and center, wandering and rest, exile and return — have played important roles in the historical experience and religious culture of both Jews and Muslims. For long stretches of time, Jewish culture has been marked by the historical condition of statelessness combined with a theology of redemptive return. Paradoxically, it was the significant political and military success of Islam in its first millennium that helped to create a far-flung diaspora well removed from its center in Arabia. The institution of pilgrimage to Mecca counterbalanced a sense of distance and remove. More recently, modern nationalisms, war, and postcolonial politics — including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict — have done much to underscore the continuing dilemmas of diaspora and home in both Jewish and Islamic identity. The goal of the seminar is to offer a comparative, historical perspective on this theme and to encourage students to examine an aspect of the diaspora experience in depth. (Note: This course fulfills the capstone requirement for Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies. It also qualifies as a history department advanced seminar.)
Same as L75 JINE 405

Credit 4 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4080 Nuns

Nuns — women vowed to a shared life of poverty, chastity, and obedience in a cloistered community — were central figures in medieval and early modern religion and society. This course explores life in the convent, with the distinctive culture that developed among communities of women, and the complex relations between the world of the cloister and the world outside the cloister. We look at how female celibacy served social and political, as well as religious, interests. We read works by nuns: both willing and unwilling; and works about nuns: nuns behaving well, and nuns behaving scandalously badly; nuns embracing their heavenly spouse, and nuns putting on plays; nuns possessed by the devil, and nuns managing their possessions; nuns as enraptured visionaries, and nuns grappling with the mundane realities of life in a cloistered community.
Same as L23 Re St 408

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 4120 Rainbow Radicalisms: Ethnic Nationalism, the Black Panther Party and the Politics of the New Left

The Black Panther Party remains one of the most iconic groups of the 1960s and 1970s. Perhaps one of the most understudied aspects of the Panther's legacy is their radical influence upon other American racial and ethnic groups, including Asian Americans, Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans and American Indians, among others. This seminar will consider the emergence of ethnic and racial nationalism among these various groups, as a result of their contact and relationship(s) with the Black Panther Party. Considering the politics of groups like the Red Guard, the Brown Berets, the Young Lords and the American Indian Movement, this course will chart the rise and fall of rainbow radicalism as a general offspring of the Black Power Movement and part and parcel of what is commonly referred to as "the New Left." It will also consider these groups in relation to the State by probing the dynamic push and pull between repression and democracy. Ultimately, this course will grant insight into the contemporary racial domain and current political landscape of America as we discuss how these groups helped to shape modern identity formations, discourses on multiculturalism and definitions of "minority," "diversity," and "equality."
Same as L90 AFAS 4121

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4154 From Decolonization to Globalization: Postcolonial South Asia

Independence from European colonialism was a victory for some people, although for the majority, the experience of nation-building and the Cold War only sanctioned further inequities. A further set-back arrived in the guise of globalization. The countries of Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri-Lanka have grappled differently with the many varieties of 20th-century transnational power. This course studies the histories of decolonization, nation-building and the Cold War for those South Asian countries created since the 1940s and traces the manner by which ordinary people have interrogated the multiple levels of state power unleashed upon them since the formal end of European colonialism.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L22 History 4222 Special Topics in History: Keble College, Oxford

Credit variable, maximum 10 units.


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L22 History 4242 Culture and Politics in the People's Republic of China: New Approaches

This course inquires into the political, ideological and social frameworks that shaped the cultural production and consumption in the People's Republic of China (PRC). In the realm of literature, film, architecture, and material culture and everyday life, this course pays a close attention to the contestation and negotiation between policy makers, cultural producers, censors and consumers. Understanding the specific contour of how this process unfolded in China allows us to trace the interplay between culture and politics in the formative years of revolutionary China (1949-1966), high socialism (1966-1978), the reform era (1978-1992), and post-socialist China (1992 to present). The course examines new scholarship in fields of social and cultural history, literary studies, and gender studies; and it explores the ways in which new empirical sources, theoretical frameworks, and research methods reinvestigate and challenge conventional knowledge of the PRC that have been shaped by the rise and fall of Cold War politics, the development of area studies in the U.S., and the evolving U.S.-China relations. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate students must have taken no fewer than two China-related courses at the 300 level or higher. Graduate students should be proficient in scholarly Chinese, as they are expected to read scholarly publications and primary materials in Chinese.
Same as L03 East Asia 4242

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4274 Palestine, Israel and the Arab-Israeli Conflict

This course examines the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict from the mid-19th century to the present. Topics include: Palestine in the late Ottoman period; the development of modern Zionism; British colonialism and the establishment of the Palestine Mandate; Arab-Jewish relations during the Mandate; the growth of Palestinian nationalism and resistance; the establishment of the state of Israel and the dispersion of the Palestinians in 1948; the Arab-Israeli wars; both Palestinian uprisings; and the peace process.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L22 History 4420 Empire and Memory: World of Books and Literary Culture in the Medieval Middle East

The subject of this course is an in-depth study of medieval Arabic historiography from the eighth through the 13th centuries, when the Mongols ran over the remnants of the Abbasid caliphate, established their own rule over Eurasia, and thereby sparked new questions about the past. After the initial survey of medieval Islamic history as background, we will focus on the development of historiographical writing in its sociopolitical context and examine one by one the most major historiographical traditions and philosophies from the eighth through the 13th centuries: prophetic traditions, belles lettres, annals, biographical dictionaries, and genealogical literature.
Same as L75 JINE 442

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4431 Empires in Comparative and World History

The core seminar in comparative and world history examines a historical institution, idea, phenomenon or process across a range of cultures and regions. Although the specific case studies will vary from year to year, topics might include: empires, urbanization, revolutions, famines or evangelism. The seminar will be of interest to students of all historical fields seeking to develop comparative historical models to their own areas of research.
Same as L22 History 5431

Credit 4 units.


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L22 History 4442 The Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe

A study of Jewish culture, society and politics in Poland-Lithuania, Hungary, the Czech lands, Russia, Romania and the Ukraine, from the 16th century through the 20th century. Among the topics covered are: economic, social and political relations in Poland-Lithuania; varieties of Jewish religious culture; Russian and Habsburg imperial policies toward the Jews; nationality struggles and anti-Semitism; Jewish national and revolutionary responses; Jewish experience in war and revolution; the mass destruction of East European Jewish life; and the transition from Cold War to democratic revolution.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD


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L22 History 4444 The Mystical Tradition in Judaism: Magic and Mysticism in the 15th to 19th Century

What is Jewish "mysticism"? What is its relationship to the category of "religion"? Is Jewish mysticism just one form of a general phenomenon common to a variety of religious traditions or is it a specific interpretation of biblical, rabbinic, and other Jewish traditions? Taking the above questions as a starting point, this course aims at a systematic and historically contextualized analysis of a broad range of Jewish texts that are commonly classified as "mystical." (All primary texts are read in translation.) At the same time, we explore such overarching themes as: the interplay of esoteric exegesis of the Bible and visionary experiences; the place of traditional Jewish law (halakhah) within mystical thought and practice; the role of gender, sexuality, and the body in Jewish mystical speculation and prayer; the relationship between mysticism and messianism; Ashkenazic and Sephardic traditions and their mutual impact on Jewish mysticism; the "absence of women" from Jewish mystical movements; esoteric traditions of an elite vs. mysticism as a communal endeavor; and the tension between innovation and (the claim to) tradition in the history of Jewish mysticism.
Same as L23 Re St 444

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH, IS


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L22 History 4491 American Unbelief from the Enlightenment to the New Atheism

This seminar examines American secularism, humanism, and atheism from the Enlightenment forward to the present. Topics emphasized include: the relationship between believers and nonbelievers, the civil liberties of atheists, religion in the public schools, social radicalism and women's rights, and the more recent growth of religious disaffiliation and public atheism. The course considers not only the intellectual dimensions of freethinking unbelief but also the broader politics of secularism in a nation routinely imagined as "under God."
Same as L57 RelPol 4491

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: SSP Art: SSP EN: H


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L22 History 4511 Urban Culture in Modern China

The narrative of rural crisis and peasant revolution has dominated China's modern history for decades. But there has been a growing interest in China's urban past and present with the increased prominence of cities in China's breathtaking economic development and the opening of municipal archives in post-Mao era. The course aims to introduce students to "conventional wisdoms," new directions, and major debates in the urban history field. Topics include: the urban political economy, the cultural dynamics of modernity, the reconstruction of traditions in the making of modernity, the cultural production and consumption, colonialism and imperialism in the urban setting, nationalism, and reform and revolution. Acknowledging and understanding the nuance and difference in views and interpretations in historical writings (historiography) are essential. The course seeks to develop students' research and analytical skills, such as locating secondary sources, incorporating scholarly interpretations, and developing and sustaining a thesis based on secondary and primary sources in student research. Prerequisites: This is an interdisciplinary seminar designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Advanced undergraduate students must have taken at least one China-related course at the 300-level or higher.
Same as L03 East Asia 4510

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4555 Advanced Topics in Modern Chinese History

This course introduces students to the variety of scholarly interpretations of modern Chinese history. Weekly class meetings focus on important historiographical topics. Acknowledging and understanding the nuance and difference in views and interpretations in historical writings (historiography) are essential. The course seeks to develop students' historical research and analytical skills, such as locating secondary sources, incorporating historians' interpretations, and developing and sustaining a thesis based on secondary sources in student research. This course is designed for graduate students in History, Chinese Literature, and East Asian Studies.
Same as L03 East Asia 555

Credit 3 units.


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L22 History 4564 American Pragmatism

This course examines the history of American pragmatism through three of its primary founders, the philosophers Charles Peirce, William James and John Dewey. It considers pragmatism as a response to the experience of uncertainty brought on my modernity and contextualizes it amid late 19th- and early 20th-century thought and politics, namely, scientific methodology, evolutionary theory, the probabilistic revolution, Transcendentalism, the rise of secularism, slavery, Abolitionism and the Civil War. Major essays by each thinker are read as well as three intellectual biographies and one critical survey.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 459 Topics in European History

Consult Course Listings for current topics.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: TH


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L22 History 4610 Latin American Populism and Neo-Populism

A salient feature of Latin America in the 20th and early 21st centuries has been the recurrence of populism. Mass-based political and social movements animated by nationalist and reformist impulses dominated Latin American politics in the 1920s, 1930s-60s, and 1980s to the present. This course provides a general historical and theoretically informed analysis of the origins, internal dynamics, and outcomes of classical populist and neo-populist governments and parties. Among the notable populist and neo-populist cases to be examined include: Peronism in Argentina , Velasquismo in Ecuador, Cardenismo in Mexico, APRA in Peru, Varguismo in Brazil, Garcia/Fujimori in Peru, Menen/Kirchners in Argentina, and Hugo Chávez in Venezuela. Issues pertaining to leader-follower relations, populist discourses, citizenship rights, populist gender and racial policies, labor and social reforms, and mass mobilization politics will also be explored.
Same as L97 IAS 4611

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4633 20th-Century Latin American Revolutions

Latin America was arguably one of the most "revolutionary" regions of the world in the 20th century. It registered four "great revolutions": Mexico 1910, Bolivia 1952, Cuba 1959, and Nicaragua 1979. These social revolutions entailed a substantial, violent, and voluntarist struggle for political power and the overthrow of the established political, economic, social, and cultural orders. In the wake of these successful revolutions, new revolutionary institutions of governance were founded, radical structural changes were implemented, and a new revolutionary ethos was adopted. With the exception perhaps of the Bolivian Revolution, these revolutions had a profound impact on Latin American and world politics. The primary aim of this course is to analyze and compare the causes, processes and outcomes of the Mexican, Cuban, and Nicaraguan revolutions.
Same as L97 IAS 4633

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD EN: S


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L22 History 4675 Beyond the Harem: Women, Gender, and Revolution

This course examines the history and current situations of women in Middle Eastern societies. The first half of the course is devoted to studying historical changes in factors structuring women's status and their sociopolitical roles. The second half of the course will focus on several case studies of women's participation in broad anti-colonial social revolutions and how these revolutions affected the position of women in those societies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: BA EN: H


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L22 History 4689 American Intellectual History to 1865

This course presents an overview of American intellectual history from the early 17th century and the founding of the first English settlements in North America to the mid-19th century and the American Civil War. We investigate how different thinkers responded to and helped shape key events and processes in colonial and early American history, concentrating in particular on developments in religious, political, social, scientific and educational thought. We cover major topics such as: Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Evangelicalism, Romanticism and the inner Civil War. We address concepts central to the formation of the nation's identity including those of the covenant, republicanism, citizenship, equality, freedom, liberty, natural law, transcendentalism, order, reason, progress and democracy.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 469 American Intellectual History Since 1865

This course concentrates on social, cultural, philosophical and political thought since the end of the Civil War, and investigates how American thinkers have responded to the challenge of modernity. After an examination of the end of the old religious order and the revolt against Victorianism, it analyzes the subsequent rise of pragmatism, progressivism, literary modernism, radical liberalism, political realism, protest movements and the New Left, neo-conservatism and the New Right, and the current state of intellectuals in post-9/11 America.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM


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L22 History 4710 Topics in Japanese Culture

A topics course on Japanese culture; topics vary by semester.
Same as L03 East Asia 471

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4742 Americans and Their Presidents

How have Americans understood what it means to be President of the United States? This seminar uses that question as a point of departure for a multidisciplinary cultural approach to the presidency in the United States, examining the shifting roles of the chief executive from George Washington through George W. Bush. In addition to a consideration of the President's political and policymaking roles, this course examines how the lived experiences of presidents have informed the ways Americans have conceived of public and private life within a broader political culture. In the process, this course uses the presidency as a means to explore topics ranging from electioneering to gender, foreign policy to popular media. Readings are drawn from a broad range of fields.
Same as L98 AMCS 474

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4743 Imagining the West

The historical, visual, literary and scientific encounter of Europeans and European-Americans with the North American frontier. Examines how the West as myth and reality was assimilated into, and imaginatively colonized by, both Europe and America from the pre-discovery period through the end of the 19th century. Images of the first encounter, cultural dynamics of the colonization process, cultural resistance of native Americans. Field trips, guest lectures. Prerequisite: 100-, 200- or 300-level courses in art history; or 300-level courses in European or American 19th-century comparative literature, history; or permission of instructors.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4743

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: AH


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L22 History 4751 Intellectual History of Feminism

We focus on feminist thought in Western culture but also examine non-Western ideas about feminisms. We trace the relationship among emergent feminist ideas and such developments as the rise of scientific methodology, Enlightenment thought, revolutionary movements and the gendering of the political subject, colonialism, romanticism, socialism, and global feminisms. Readings are drawn from both primary sources and recent feminist scholarship on the texts under consideration. Note: This course is in the core curriculum for the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate certificate. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: completion of at least one Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies course or permission of the instructor. Students who have taken L77 WGSS 475 Intellectual History of Feminism can not take this class.
Same as L77 WGSS 475

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 4761 Money, Exchange and Power: Economy and Society In the Ancient Mediterranean World

From seaborne trade and banking to slavery and the impact of new technology, the economy of the ancient Mediterranean world constitutes a particularly dynamic field of study. To examine a society's underlying economics is to gain critical insight into those historical phenomena that are themselves the product of multiple, overlapping dimensions of human action and thought. This course engages directly with a fascinating array of primary evidence for economic behaviors, beliefs, structures, and institutions among the Romans, Greeks, and their neighbors. We will also explore the methodological challenges and implications of that evidence as well as a variety of modern theoretical approaches. This year our focus is mainly upon developments among the Greeks, ranging from the transformative invention of coinage to the rise of commercial networks centered around religious sanctuaries like Delos. Prerequisites: Classics 341C or 342C or 345C or 346C or permission of instructor.
Same as L08 Classics 476

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 4763 Olympian Shadows: Macedon and Its Neighbors in Antiquity

The home of both Alexander the Great and Aristotle, Macedon was pivotal to the course of ancient Greek and Roman history and yet stood apart as a culturally and politically distinct region. Macedonian dynasts dominated the Hellenistic world and deeply shaped Roman reception of Greek culture, while others profoundly affected the intellectual life of antiquity. We will explore topics ranging from ethnicity, religion, and the nature of kingship to urbanization and Macedon's emergence as a great power until its subsequent transformation at the hands of the conquering Romans. We will pay special attention to Macedon's neighbors, especially Thrace and Illyria, as well as to Macedon's relationships with the Persian Empire and the Greek coastal colonies. Prerequisites: at least one semester of Classics 341C, 342C, 345C, or 346C, or instructor's permission.
Same as L08 Classics 4763

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 4790 Empire and Messianism in the Middle East

Senior Seminar: This course looks at imperial politics in its relations to monotheistic messianic movements and ideologies in the Islamic Mediterranean from the late antiquity to the 16th century. Messianic beliefs offered political hope, rallied opposition against the existing rule, defined and ordered lived reality for imperial subjects, presented a political leitmotiv for rulers, and advocated a just sociopolitical order to be realized in the immediate or indefinite future. Thus, this course attempts to see how politics became messianic by its very ability to promise a better future. Despite the chronological scope of the course, we will examine only specific ideas, practices and movements as case studies to study in-depth various facets of messianic movements and thought in their geographic and historical context. We will use primary sources, which will be the main methodological focus of the course, and secondary literature. We aim to develop skills in identifying, reading, analyzing and dealing with primary sources in their variety and critically engaging modern scholarship on the political role of messianism. Students will write a term paper and several reports on preassigned readings, and make regular class presentations. Admission preference will be given to graduating seniors in JINELC, but the course is open to all advanced students provided that they consult the instructor prior to enrolling. Knowledge of a relevant primary source language is highly desired but not required.
Same as L75 JINE 4970

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4791 Senior Seminar in Religious Studies: Saints and Society

The topic for this seminar differs every year. Previous topics include Saints and Society; Religion and the Secular: Struggles over Modernity; and Pilgrimage and Sacred Space in Antiquity. The seminar is offered every spring semester and is required of all religious studies majors, with the exception of those writing an honors thesis. The class is also open, with the permission of the instructor, to other advanced undergraduates with previous course work in Religious Studies.
Same as L23 Re St 479

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L22 History 4841 Core Seminar in East Asian Studies: A Consideration of Scholarship on East Asia

Introduction to problems and approaches in East Asian Studies.
Same as L03 East Asia 484

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4842 The Japanese Empire in Asia, 1874-1945

This course examines the expansion of the Japanese Empire in Asia from 1874 to 1945, focusing on Japan's acquisition of neighboring territory and the subsequent building of colonies in Taiwan, Korea and Manchuria. The course explores the concepts of imperialism and colonialism, how they functioned in East Asia, and how they intersect with other major developments in Asia, including ideas of civilization and race, the formation of the nation, and the growth of capitalism.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD


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L22 History 4844 Women and Confucian Culture

This course explores the lives of women in East Asia during a period when both local elites and central states sought to Confucianize society. The course focuses on Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) China, but also examines these issues in two other early-modern East Asian societies: Yi/Choson (1392-1910) Korea and Tokugawa (1600-1868) Japan. Course readings are designed to expose students both to a variety of theoretical approaches and to a wide range of topics, including: women's property rights; the medical construction of gender; technology, power and gender; and state regulations on sexuality.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L22 History 4851 Advanced Seminar: Prisons, Politics and Activism

Prison reformers argue that de-criminalizing nonviolent offenses will be enough to reduce mass incarceration, while prison abolitionists argue that we need to dismantle the entire carceral state in the U.S., which is maintained by a racially stratified system of public schooling, housing, employment and health care. What is at stake in these debates? Are we seeking to promote basic humanity, racial and gender equality or utopian visions of rehabilitation? This course seeks to historically contextualize prison reform and abolitionism from the 13th Amendment's re-articulation of slavery to current resistance to mass incarceration. Special attention will be paid to the intersections between the prisoner's rights movement and the Black & Brown Power, feminist, queer and disability movements.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 487 Topics in American History: Race and Drugs in American History

This course explores the racial construction of the use of legal and illegal substances in American history from the mid-19th century to the present. We will spend time engaging in a historical analysis of the social, economic, and racial dynamics that defined drug addiction in popular imagination, and examine how these factors contributed to discussions about legality, access to substances, one's ability to be rehabilitated, and criminal status. Regarding criminality we will particularly explore sociological and theoretical perspectives of labeling, habitual and occasional offenders, and moral panic in order to understand how racial minority groups were targeted for different rhetorical, legislative, and economic purposes. One major goal of the course will be to outline the early 20th century beginnings of the war on drugs and connect it to the century long growth of a militarized police system and prison industrial complex. We will secondly work to understand the role of local and national political actors, law enforcement, and the media in manufacturing and maintaining connections between race, crime and drugs. Ultimately, we will use our study of drugs to contextualize 21st-century issues of police violence, increases in homicide in minority communities, mass incarceration, poverty, segregation, and mass movements of protest.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4872 Colonial Cities and the Making of Modernity

Massive urban growth has been a central result of the incorporation of many areas — both central and peripheral — into the global economy in the 19th and 20th centuries. Scholars have long theorized urbanization as a key component of modernity, but they have usually done so by looking at urbanization and modernization from the perspective of the West. This course investigates the character of cities in the colony and then uses these empirical and analytical entry points to examine critically some theories of modernity. The geographical focus of the course is primarily on cities in the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4876 Advanced Seminar: Mexican Agriculture: Land, Politics and Development

Access to and ownership of land has been a major issue in Mexican history. Land tenure in economic development has been a constant source of tension and debate since the 18th century. Paradoxically, land tenure has been put forth as both the obstacle and the solution to the country's modernization. Given its centrality in the construction of the modern period, this course examines liberalism, agrarian revolts, the revolution, the green revolution and neoliberalism through the lens of land issues. This course will also explore how these have shaped and have been shaped by indigenous peoples and peasants, from land disentailment to the fight against GMO maize. Students will evaluate agrarian reforms, agricultural modernization programs, concepts of and transformations of natural resources, food production/consumption and social policies.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 4881 Advanced Seminar: Mad: Mental Illness, Power and Resistance in Africa and the Caribbean

This seminar explores the history of mental illness in Africa and the Caribbean during the colonial and postcolonial periods. We will be guided by the following questions: What is mental illness? How do social, cultural and political realities affect how mental illness is defined? Should mental illness always be analyzed within a specific cultural context? How did psychiatry factor into the efforts of European colonizers to maintain social order in their colonies? How have colonized people resisted colonial notions of madness? What is the place of religion in these histories? How did mental institutions change after the end of colonial rule and how was postcolonial Caribbean and African psychiatry harnessed in service of decolonization? The course will pay special attention to how European colonial powers employed similar understandings of blackness across regions as they formulated ideas concerning the black populations they deemed "mad" across Africa and the Caribbean.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 4885 Advanced Seminar: Medicine, Disease and Empire

This course examines the history of medicine in connection to the politics of colonialism and empire-building, spanning the 16th century through the 20th century. Topics covered include: epidemic disease outbreaks (e.g., smallpox, cholera, malaria); the role of science and medicine in endorsing the "civilizing missions" of empires; tropical climates and tropical diseases as western constructs; tensions between western medicine and indigenous healing practices and beliefs; ideas of race and racism in science and medicine; modern advancements in sanitation and public health and their implementation overseas; and the historical roots of the modern global health movement.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 4894 Advanced Seminar: The U.S. in Vietnam: Origins, Developments and Consequences

This course focuses on America's involvement in Vietnam from the era of French colonialism through the collapse of U.S. intervention. Special attention to political, military, economic and cultural aspects, as well as to international relationships, and the significance of the experience and subsequent developments upon both American and Vietnamese societies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD


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L22 History 4907 Advanced Seminar: Women and Social Movements in the United States

In this course we examine U.S. women's participation in diverse movements during the 19th and 20th centuries, ranging from suffrage and feminism, to the labor movement, civil rights activism, and conservative and queer movements. Among our questions: How does the social position of different groups of women shape their participation in social movements? Why are certain social movements successful, and how do we define success? What does looking at women's experience in particular tell us about social movements in general?

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD


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L22 History 4914 Advanced Seminar: Japan in World War II — History and Memory

This course examines the history of World War II in Asia and how it has been remembered in the postwar era. We trace the war, from the first Japanese military attack on China in 1931 through the U.S. atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. We also examine several postwar controversies concerning how the war has been forgotten and remembered in Japan, in the rest of Asia and in the United States. Goals include grasping the empirical history of the war as a step to becoming familiar with the theories and methods of memory studies in History.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L22 History 4918 Advanced Seminar: Sexuality in the United States

Does sex have a history, and if so, how can we study it? This seminar examines important themes in the history of sexuality: the relationship between sexual ideologies and practices; racial hierarchy and sexuality; the policing of sexuality; construction of sexual identities and communities; and sexual politics at the end of the century. Students also spend time discussing theoretical approaches to the history of sexuality, as well as methodological issues, including problems of source and interpretation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L22 History 4941 Advanced Seminar: The Inquisition in Europe, Asia, and Latin America, 1200-1700

This seminar will study the history of the Inquisition from its beginnings in southern France in the first half of the 13th century up to the investigations undertaken by Dominicans and Franciscans in 17th-century Mexico and Peru. Along the way the seminar will focus upon other inquisitions in Europe (especially those made in Italy, Spain and Germany), and the hunt for heresy in Goa and the Philippines. This course will read inquisitional manuals (books on how to conduct an inquisition) and original inquisitional documents (the records of the trials and interrogations). Consequently, the history of heresy and witchcraft, as understood by people in the past and historians in the present, will be discussed.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L22 History 4942 Advanced Seminar: Europe's "Jewish Question": Emancipation, Anti-Semitism and Jewish-Christian Confrontation

The so-called "Jewish Question" was a product of European modernity. It emerged in conjunction with the formation of modern states, Enlightenment projects for political reform, the decline of religious influence in society, and struggles over Jewish emancipation. In this seminar, students examine the unusual career of this obsession from the 16th through the 20th century by focusing selectively on a number of illustrative episodes: Christian Hebraism and the Reformation; the Enlightenment assault on religious power; European debates on Jewish emancipation; the emergence of the "Jewish Question" in the 19th century; anti-Semitism as a modern political phenomenon; the renewed discourse of Jewish "ritual murder" at the turn of the 20th century; Zionism and other forms of Jewish nationalism; and the question of anti-Zionism in the reformulation of the "Jewish Question" during the past half-century.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L22 History 4965 Advanced Seminar: Magic, Heresy and Witchcraft in the Middle Ages, 350-1550

This course will study the history of magic, heresy and witchcraft in the medieval world. It will begin in the fourth century after the conversion of Constantine the Great and will end with the great witchcraft trials of the 15th and 16th centuries. The seminar will read magical treatises, ecclesiastical polemics against vulgar belief, inquisitorial trials, chronicles and histories, in our attempt to define what was considered the ordinary and the extraordinary, the natural and the supernatural, good and evil, and the boundaries of heaven and earth. A common theme throughout this course will be the definition of evil and the powers of the devil.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 4967 Advanced Seminar: Migration and Travel in China, 1500-1900

Despite the growing importance of native-place identities during the late Imperial era, China had an increasingly mobile population. This course examines the movement of people in China approximately from 1500 to 1900, including voluntary and forced migration, travel associated with trade, travel for civil service examinations and official postings, exile, urban sojourning, religious pilgrimages, and touring. In addition, this course focuses on relations between locals and sojourners or migrants, as well as the perceived dangers that geographical mobility posed for the state and the social order.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L22 History 4974 Advanced Seminar: Gender, Property and Law in American Society

This course aims to explore the intersections of gender relations, work and property in law, custom and culture from the colonial period to the late 20th century. We read a wide range of articles and books, all of which in some way address the relationships among gender ideologies, social practices and property relations in American society.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L22 History 4976 Advanced Seminar: The American Trauma: Representing the Civil War in Art, Literature and Politics

This seminar is an interdisciplinary examination of how Americans represented the Civil War during and after the titanic conflict, with special attention given to the period between 1865 and 1915. The course explores how painters, novelists, photographers, sculptors, essayists, journalists, philosophers, historians and filmmakers engaged the problems of constructing narrative and reconstructing national and individual identity out of the physical and psychological wreckage of a war which demanded horrific sacrifice and the destruction of an enemy that could not be readily dissociated from the self.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4977 Advanced Seminar: A Long Road to Uhuru and Nation: The Social History of Modern Kenya

This seminar challenges the popular Western view that the African continent is a single place and that Africans are homogenous or inherently tribal. Focusing on the lived experiences of imperial rule, the struggle for independence, and the process of nation building, it explores the development of an African country. The seminar focuses on how common men, women and adolescents wrestled with the problem of turning a colony into the modern Kenyan nation. Admission to the seminar requires permission of the instructor and at least one previous upper-level course in African history.
Same as L90 AFAS 4977

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4979 Advanced Seminar: Gender, Race and Class in South Africa, 1880-Present

By focusing on the complex historical dynamics of race, gender and class in South Africa over the past 120 years, this course is aimed at understanding the development of segregation, apartheid and racial capitalism, as well as the emergence of multiple forms of resistance to counter white minority rule. Topics include: white settler expansion and the defeat of the African peasantry; the rise of mining capital and the emergence of a racially divided working class; the origins of African and Afrikaner nationalisms; migrant labor and the subordination of African women; and the prospects for a nonracial, nonsexist democracy in a unified South Africa.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L22 History 4981 Advanced Seminar: Historical Perspectives on Human Rights

This course offers a historical perspective on the modern international human rights regime, using materials drawn from diplomatic, legal, political and cultural studies. Successful completion of this seminar involves designing, researching, and writing a 25- to 30-page paper on a historically oriented, human rights-related topic of student's choice.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4982 Advanced Seminar: Women and Confucian Culture in Early Modern East Asia

This course explores the lives of women in East Asia during a period when both local elites and central states sought to Confucianize society. We focus on Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) China, but also examine these issues in two other early-modern East Asian societies: Yi/Choson (1329-1910) Korea and Tokugawa (1600-1868) Japan.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L22 History 4983 Advanced Seminar: Renaissance Florence and Venice

Venice was the most famously stable city-state in Renaissance Italy, Florence the most notoriously unstable one. This course explores how those contrasting political environments and experiences shaped social relations and cultural production (and vice versa) in those two cities.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 4984 Advanced Seminar: The Problem of Freedom: The Age of Democratic Revolution in the Americas

Ever since the improbable alliance of the English pirate and slave trader Sir Francis Drake and the fugitive slave Cimarrons on the Atlantic coast of Panama many centuries ago, the history of freedom in the New World has unfolded in unlikely fits and starts. The course explores two related conjectures: first, that maroon politics (the often short-lived alliances between slaves, quasi-free blacks and white allies), slave rebellion, provincial secession and civil war were the widespread and normative conditions of postcolonial regimes throughout the New World; and second, that the problem of freedom was especially challenging in a New World environment in which freedom was fleeting and tended to decompose. Special attention is given to antislavery insurgencies, interracial politics and alliances in the United States and the perspectives on freedom they produced, but the readings also include materials on debates over freedom in the Caribbean and South America over the course of the long age of democratic revolution, 1760-1888.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L22 History 4990 Advanced Seminar: History of the Body

Do bodies have a history? Recent research suggests that they do. Historians have tapped a wide variety of sources — including vital statistics, paintings and photographs, hospital records, and sex manuals — to reconstruct changes in how humans have conceptualized and experienced their own bodies. We pay particular attention to the intersection of European cultural history and history of medicine since 1500.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 4993 Advanced Seminar: Women and Religion in Medieval Europe

This course explores the religious experience of women in medieval Europe and attempts a gendered analysis of the Christian Middle Ages. In it, we examine the religious experience of women in a variety of settings — from household to convent. In particular, we try to understand how and why women came to assume public roles of unprecedented prominence in European religious culture between the 12th century and the 16th, even though the institutional church barred them from the priesthood and religious precepts remained a principal source of the ideology of female inferiority.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 4998 Advanced Seminar: Violence as Redemption: Heresy, Holy War and Inquisitions in the Middle Ages

This seminar studies the history of heresy, crusading and inquisition from the 11th to the 13th century. It begins with the apparent rise of heresy in Latin Christendom in the 11th century, examines the idea of holy war in Christianity and Islam during the 12th century, culminating with the Albigensian Crusade and the early inquisitions into heretical depravity in southern France.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 49BV Advanced Seminar: Topics in Environmental History

This course is an introduction to the study of environmental history. The semester begins with a general inquiry into the methods of the field and then we use what we have learned to move into a focused subtopic. Readings include seminal works in the field, as well as philosophical, scientific and science fiction texts that help us to explore more abstract questions dealing with the relationship between humankind and the natural world.

Credit 3 units.


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L22 History 49CA Advanced Seminar: Religion and the Secular: Struggles over Modernity

A generation ago, scholars and observers around the world felt assured that modernization would bring the quiet retreat of religion from public life. But the theory of secularization now stands debunked by world events, and a host of questions has been reopened. This course provides students with a forum to think through these issues as they prepare research papers on topics of their own choosing.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 49CJ Advanced Seminar: Medicine on the Frontiers

When Europeans established maritime empires and trading routes beginning in the 16th century, they encountered not only new cultures, but new environments, natural products, and understandings of the human body. The encounters also introduced new ideas and vectors of disease, injury and death to the societies of Africa, Asia and the New World. This course examines how ideas about health and healing shaped global interactions in the early modern period and how these ideas were transformed by the movement of information, drugs and medical practitioners around the world.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L22 History 49IR Independent Research for Capstone

This course is to be taken in addition to any Advanced Seminar for which a student registers.

Credit 1 unit. EN: H


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L22 History 49JK Advanced Seminar: Blood and Sacred Bodies: Ritual Murder and Host Desecration Accusations

This seminar follows the history of the ritual murder and Host desecration accusations from the origins in 12th- and 13th-century Europe to the 20th century. It pays close attention to the social and political functions of the narratives; their symbolic importance in Christianity's salviric drama; attacks on such beliefs from both within and outside the community of the faithful; the suppression and decline of the ritual murder accusation; the integration of Jews into European societies in the 19th century; and the reappearance of the blood libel in the aftermath of emancipation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 49MA Advanced Seminar: Visual Culture and American History

How does United States history look different with visual culture at the center of the story? Focusing on the 19th century in particular, this course investigates how images and other visual objects did not simply reflect, but also shaped society, culture, politics, ideas and identities. The course moves from the Revolution to the mass-culture society of the early 20th century. During this period, America experienced a litany of profound transformations in the growth of cities to the emancipation of slaves.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 49MB Advanced Seminar: Women and Gender in Modern Caribbean History

This course will highlight women in the "making" of Caribbean history, and it will consider how "men" and "women" were made in the English-speaking Caribbean from emancipation (1838) to the present. We will explore women and gender issues within the context of significant political shifts including the transition from slavery to wage and indentured labor, the labor rebellions of the 1930s, the rise of labor unions and political parties, anti-colonial activism, decolonization and nationalism. The course will also situate the Caribbean within an international context, paying attention to migration, black internationalism and the Third World movement.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L22 History 49MG Advanced Seminar: Planning Global Cities

This team-taught advanced seminar addresses the history and theory of a variety of metropolitan environments from the mid-19th century to the present. Readings move from the 19th-century state-centered urbanism of Paris or Vienna, through the colonial remaking of cities such as Manila or Caracas and their connections to urban reform and the City Beautiful movement in the U.S., then through the rise of planning, zoning, auto-centered cities, federal interventions such as urban renewal, the emergence of the preservation movement and new urbanism.

Credit 3 units.


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L22 History 49NR Advanced Seminar: Egypt and the Arab Spring: Middle Eastern Revolution in Historical Perspective

The uprisings of the "Arab Spring" of 2011 captivated global media and observers. The movements brought down established regimes in Tunisia, Libya, Yemen and Egypt. The focus of this course will be to understand the historical background and primary contemporary issues that have shaped Egypt's Arab Spring, and to examine the huge popular effort to document Egypt's revolution. Each student will design, research and write a 25-page paper on a topic of their choice related to the Arab Spring.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 49PK Advanced Seminar: The Founding Fathers' Government in an Electronic Age

This is a research seminar that examines how Americans sought to translate their notions of government into a realistic set of priorities and a functioning set of public institutions. Extending from 1789 through the 1820s, this course investigates how the federal government came into being, what it did, and who populated the civilian and military rank of American officialdom. This is also a course in digital history. Students create new knowledge through their own contributions to an ongoing digital project that seeks to reconstitute the early federal workforce. In the process, students learn a variety of digital techniques, ranging from encoding languages to electronic systems to software packages.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L22 History 49SA Advanced Seminar: Slavery in America: The Politics of Knowledge Production

This course focuses on the long history of black chattel slavery in America, from origins to emancipation. The course foregrounds the struggles over power, life and death that were at the heart of slavery's traumatic and grotesquely violent 250-year career in North America, with attention to hemispheric context. At the same time, it highlights the fiercely contested historical battleground where scholars have argued about how to define American slavery — as a system or site of labor; reproduction; law; property and dispossession; racial and gender domination; sexual abuse and usurpation; psychological terror and interdependency; containment and marooning; selfhood and nationality; agency; revolutionary liberation; and millennial redemption.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L22 History 49SC Advanced Seminar: Incredible India!

Yoga, the Kamasutra, nonviolence, poverty, royalty, population, asceticism, vegetarianism, anticolonialism, democracy, Hinduism: All these and more signify the idea of India. This course uncovers the history by which "India" has come to occupy a privileged position in the global imaginary. We view the circulation of India as a cultural resource over the centuries and ask what popular assumptions are made about it at a time of heightened globalization; how does the idea of India circulate and through what kinds of pathways; what political role does this seemingly cultural notion of India fulfill? Finally, what is the connection between such an idea of India and the rise of a new, U.S.-centered, imperial formation?

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L22 History 49TP Advanced Seminar: Whose Nairobi? Opportunity and Inequality in a 20th-Century African City

Visitors to East Africa often hear the cautionary refrain, "Nairobi is not Kenya." But over the past century, Kenya's largest city has meant distinctly different things to distinctly different people. Starting as a simple railway camp in the late 19th century, and shaped by decades of colonial racial and ethnic segregation, it has grown into a global "mega-city," where Kenyans from every background and every corner of the country interact with an equally diverse cast of foreigners. Focusing on the realities of the day-to-day, this research seminar deploys a wide variety of historical evidence to better understand how ordinary people experienced, and were shaped by, Nairobi during the long and tubulent 20th century. This seminar's centerpiece is an extensive and original research paper that offers students the opportunity to work a wide variety of primary souces including archives, city planning reports, maps, images of the built environment, music, material culture, memoirs and narrative fiction.

Credit 3 units. A&S: CD A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L22 History 49VB Advanced Seminar: Money Talks: Readings in Economic History

To date, economic history has been dominated by quantative research. In recent years, however, there has been a turn toward more qualitative analysis. With his landmark "Capital in the Twenty-First Century," Thomas Piketty argued that Economics ought to return to its origins in political and moral philosophy. Similarily, on this side of the Atlantic, a new generation of historians has begun to revisit the history of capitalism with methods that combine both numbers and narrative. In this advanced seminar, students will read both contemporary and seminal works in the field of economic history as well as writings from a wide variety of social scientists and humanistic scholars who study the economy. The aim of this course is to think critically about the historical construction of both economics as a discipline and "the economy" as a field of inquiry.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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