International and Area Studies (IAS) offers an interdisciplinary major that allows undergraduate students to develop a broad understanding of the world, while exploring the diversity and richness of other cultures. One of the hallmarks of the contemporary era is the complex relationship between globalization and local differences. New information technologies and worldwide markets connect people, ideas and products throughout the globe. Yet even in this context of globalization, strong attachments to local languages, cultures and societies remain. In some ways, differences among people — whether of government, economy, religion or ethnicity — are becoming more pronounced.

How can we understand these tensions between the global and the local? International and Area Studies courses explore this question in a combination of ways that makes it unique among undergraduate majors at Washington University. IAS is committed to an interdisciplinary perspective that spans the humanities and social sciences and encourages both a contemporary and a historical point of view. It introduces IAS majors to comparative local, international and global perspectives on important issues in the 21st century. 

IAS challenges students to master a foreign language as well as the cultural contexts in which the language is spoken, but it also requires study of more than one world area. In addition to conventional course work, IAS encourages exploration of contemporary foreign affairs through speakers, conferences and faculty panels; and provides an introduction to international careers. The program provides robust support for foreign study and independent research, and IAS majors frequently take advantage of one of Washington University's overseas programs during the junior year or the summer.

There are five concentrations available to IAS majors: (1) IAS with a concentration in development; (2) IAS with a concentration in Eurasian studies; (3) IAS with a concentration in European studies; (4) IAS with a concentration in global cultural studies; and (5) IAS with a concentration in international affairs.

Contact:Toni Loomis
Phone:314-935-5073
Email:aloomis@wustl.edu
Website:http://ias.wustl.edu

The Major in International and Area Studies

There are five concentrations available to IAS majors: (1) development; (2) Eurasian studies; (3) European studies; (4) global cultural studies; and (5) international affairs.

Please visit the following pages for more information about their requirements:

Please visit the separate European studies page for information on this concentration.

Total units required: 36 graded credits plus four semesters of any modern foreign language.

Required courses:

  • These depend on the concentration.

Elective courses:

  • Depending on the concentration, two to four introductory courses (3 credits each, at the 100 or 200 level).
  • Depending on the concentration, eight to ten upper-level courses (3 credits each, at the 300 or 400 level).

Regulations:

  • Completion of all IAS course work with a grade of C+ or higher; all courses for the major must be taken for a letter grade.
  • Students must satisfy the standard IAS foreign language requirement with a language appropriate to their concentration and consistent with their study abroad location (more details below).
  • Students must complete one semester of language before declaring the major.
  • We strongly encourage students to study abroad. For those who do not study abroad, an additional 3 credits at the 300 or 400 level are required (more details below).
  • We strongly prefer students to select a study abroad location consistent with their chosen language of study (e.g., students who wish to study in Latin America must satisfy their language requirement with either Spanish or Portuguese).
  • Throughout the course of completing the IAS major, students must show depth in at least one world area by taking a minimum of two courses focused on the same area, and breadth by taking a third course focused on a different area. We consider world areas to be Africa, East Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, North America (for some concentrations) and South Asia.
  • Students must choose their upper-level course work from a minimum of three academic disciplines (for example, anthropology, art history, economics, film, history, literature, music, philosophy and political science).
  • No more than 12 total credits earned outside of the day school of Washington University may be applied to a student's IAS major. This limit includes credits from study abroad (never more than 6 credits from a single semester, 3 from a summer, or 12 from a year), University College, or summer school from other U.S. universities, or any combination thereof. (400-level credits must be earned on campus or in Washington University courses taught abroad.)
  • No more than 3 credits may be from directed readings, research or independent study excluding the honors thesis.
  • The advanced credits must be unique to the IAS major.
  • At least 6 credits must be at the 400 level.

Additional Information

Language Requirement: All IAS majors must satisfy a foreign language requirement that entails the successful completion of four semesters of one language appropriate to their concentration while at Washington University. For some students, this may mean the first four semesters of a language; for others who place into advanced language classes, and with approval from IAS language faculty, this may include literature, culture, oral communication and linguistic courses in the target language, once such students complete the basic language sequence. These four semesters are in addition to the 36 units of course work outlined above, and thus advanced courses in literature and culture used to satisfy the four-semester requirement may not also be counted as advanced credit for the IAS major. Native speakers of a foreign language must satisfy the four-semester requirement in another language appropriate to their concentration. Heritage speakers must seek appropriate placement by the coordinator of the language program and complete the four-semester requirement.

Study Abroad: Majors are strongly encouraged to study abroad in one of Washington University's overseas programs during junior year or the summer. Some credit for courses taken abroad may be applied to the major. For those who do not study abroad, an additional 3-credit course at the 300 or 400 level is required.

Senior Honors: Students must confidently expect to graduate with an overall GPA of 3.65 or higher in order to qualify for Senior Honors. Students should enroll in IAS 485 Preparation for IAS Honors Thesis in the fall of senior year, and in IAS 486 IAS Senior Honors Thesis in the spring of senior year (under the corresponding section number of the faculty member overseeing their thesis) in order to be properly tracked by the IAS capstone coordinator.

The International and Area Studies program does not offer a minor.

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for L97 IAS.


L97 IAS 103B International Public Affairs

We live in a complex, fast-paced world. Technological advances and economic interdependence bring us closer together, even as globalization creates new challenges that cannot be solved by one country alone. In this class we will examine the forces that affect competition and cooperation in a globalized world. Students will engage with influential social science literature on these topics, participate in classroom discussion, and take part in classroom activities, such as debates and policymaking simulations, to build a deeper understanding of these theories. In addition, students will work on semester-long policy projects to build practical skills in problem solving, team building and communication. This course is restricted to freshmen in the Global Citizenship program.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC


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L97 IAS 107 A World on the Move: Post-Conflict Migrations

Migration is the human face to our modern era of globalization, entailing incredible costs, risks and returns for migrants along with important consequences for host societies, sending societies and the wider world. This course offers a new perspective on how and why people move by examining general theories and practices of migration and then analyzing various geographic locations, policies and individual experiences through the detailed study of two cases of global movement that occurred after the end of World War II and again after September 11, 2001. While close attention is paid to Europe, as both host and home to many migrants during these two key moments, we also spend time visiting North Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Latin America and the United States to follow the paths of important migrant groups during these eras. We contextualize the historical factors that led to these migrations, the social and economic consequences of these large movements of people, but spend the bulk of our time looking at the multiple perspectives of peoples involved from migrants themselves (both forced and voluntary), refugees and displaced people, soldiers, government officials from both host and home societies, representatives from the host society and more.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 125 Migration and the Migrant Experience

Regular migrations of people across international borders continue to perplex governments, policy expert  and human rights advocates. This course uses the lived experiences of the millions of people who have moved and currently move between Mexico and the United States each year to think about migration's meanings in local, multinational and global contexts. What does the relocation of individuals, families and communities tell us about boundaries, nation states and globalization? What does it mean to be a transnational citizen? What is the relevance — and responsibility — of nation states in the new "global" world?

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 127 Migration in the Global World: Stories

The expression "Stories of Migration" has a variety of meanings. A "story" is a narrative that has a beginning, middle and an end; an account of imaginary or real people and events told for entertainment, a report of an item of news in a newspaper, magazine or broadcast; or an account of past events in someone's life or in the development of something. This course is restricted to and required of participants in the International Leadership Program. A story also can be a way to make sense of the world, and, as we discuss throughout the semester, a tool to change the world. This course is based on the premise that in order to shape the future of migration in the global context, it is imperative to understand how stories of migration emerge, are told, passed on, shared, translated, disseminated, collected, challenged and retold. For these purposes we examine a wide range of stories of migration from the past decade. We experiment with both low-tech and high-tech media in order to come up with different ways to showcase stories of migration, and to assess the actual repercussions that these stories of migration have. While we address migration in the global context, we focus on three regions: the U.S. Mexican border, the Mediterranean and St. Louis. We study immigrant communities in these different locations and analyze a variety of narrative forms and structures in order to discern the impact that stories of migration have both locally and globally. Course materials include novels, memoirs, journalism, essays, short stories, graphic novels, radio programs, film and performance pieces. This course is restricted to freshmen in the International Leadership program.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 129 Perspectives on Migration: History, Memory and the Making of Modern Europe

Politicians in several European countries recently declared that "multiculturalism has failed," emphasizing immigration as the cause of contemporary social and political conflict and denying the historical role of migration on the European continent. However, from Teutonic and Slavic settlement migration in the first 10 centuries AD to recent guest worker programs and immigration from former colonies, encounters between different cultures, religions, and forms of social organization have been a staple of European societies' development and contributed to producing the continent's geopolitical map as we know it today. In this course we trace significant mass movements of people in Europe and the historical and political repercussions of these migrations to try to understand why some migrations are remembered and others are not. We also study how notions of "otherness" and "diversity" have come to be central points of contention within current discourses in Europe. Primary sources, autobiographical narratives, scholarly analyses and a range of visual material including maps are the basis for class lectures and individual and group work assignments in this course. This course is restricted to and required of participants in the International Leadership program.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 1300 The Art of Medicine

This interdisciplinary, cross-school course at the intersection of the humanities and medicine offers students a singular encounter with the changing art and craft of medicine from ancient times to the present day. The course highlights transformational moments in the chronological history of medicine. It engages a variety of texts, including primary works and scholarship in the history of medicine as well as artworks and literary and dramatic narratives that represent the body, disease and healing care. A principal aim is for students to learn to see medicine as a social practice deeply implicated in the beliefs and struggles of particular cultural and historical contexts. Collaborating faculty come from the School of Engineering, the Washington University School of Medicine, the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts and the School of Arts & Sciences. This course is for freshmen only.
Same as I50 InterD 130

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 135 Freshman Seminar — Chinatown: Migration, Identity and Space

"Chinatown," as a cultural symbol and a spatial entity, links various topics and studies in this course. Our survey starts with a historical and geographical glimpse of five Chinatowns in the U.S. through the real life stories of their residents. This is followed by an in-depth study of Chinese restaurants and food all over the world using texts, images and films that reveal how Chinese cuisine is inherited in and adapted to each local culture and society. The seminar culminates in a discussion of Chinese migration and settlement, the representations of identity, and the cultural and spatial constructions in particular historical and social contexts. The assignments include field trips to Chinese businesses, and a debate on whether or not Olive Boulevard constitutes a Chinatown in St. Louis.

Credit 3 units. A&S: CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 140 East Asia in the World

This course covers the geopolitical history of 20th-century East Asia, from its colonial constellation through its transformation into Cold War nation-states. We then use an interdisciplinary approach to investigate contemporary problems accompanying the emergence of regional economies and institutions. We grapple with the question of when people in East Asia — China, Taiwan, the Koreas and Japan — act as members of a transnational region and when they act in ideological, national or local terms. We evaluate different disciplinary approaches in order to understand the combination of knowledge and skills necessary for drawing meaningful research conclusions. In reading articles produced by a range of scholars and institutions, the course is also an introduction to the politics of the production of knowledge about East Asia. We then apply our knowledge to a real-world conflict and give team presentations on our proposed solutions. This course is restricted to freshmen in the Global Citizenship program.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM


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L97 IAS 1500 Silver, Slaves, and the State: Globalization in the 18th Century

In this course, students will look at how silver, and also porcelain, tobacco and salt, shaped the early modern world. The course will look at how merchants and adventurers, as well as pilgrims, pirates, migrants and captives, encountered very different facets of that world, and tried to make sense of it. Students will also study how these attempts at exchange, how that process of "making sense," transformed how men and women of the 18th century, around the globe, saw their territories and their fellow humans. This is a world history class.
Same as L22 History 1500

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 1503 Workshop for the Global Citizenship Program

This workshop, which is restricted to and required of participants in the Global Citizenship Program (GCP), is a companion to the core GCP fall course. The workshop will foster critical thinking and push students to explore the significance of cultural and social identities in a globalized society. In addition to the assigned course content, students will also examine their own mutual interests, build relationships and develop valuable skill sets as they collaborate together to plan an event of global concern for the campus community.

Credit 1 unit.


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L97 IAS 1504 Workshop for the Global Citizenship Program

This workshop, which is restricted to and required of participants in the Global Citizenship Program, is a continuation of the fall L97 IAS 1503 workshop. Course content will foster critical thinking and push students to explore the significance of cultural and social identities in a globalized society. Students plan a second campus event, and an optional off-campus trip provides further opportunities to engage with experts at large and gain new perspectives on the topics discussed in class.

Credit 1 unit.


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L97 IAS 155 Freshman Seminar: Mapping the World: Introduction to Human Geography

What is human geography and why is it important? This course addresses these questions by introducing students to the fundamentals of the discipline of human geography. A geographic perspective emphasizes the spatial aspects of a variety of human and natural phenomena. This course first provides a broad understanding of the major concepts of human geography, including place, space, scale and landscape. It then utilizes these concepts to explore the distribution, diffusion and interaction of social and cultural processes across local, regional, national and global scales. Topics include language, religion, migration, population, natural resources, economic development, agriculture, and urbanization. In addition to providing a general understanding of geographic concepts, this course seeks to engender a greater appreciation of the importance of geographic perspectives in an increasingly interconnected and globalized world. No prerequisites.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: SCI EN: S


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L97 IAS 160 World Politics and the Global Economy

Globalization, the accelerating rate of interaction between people of different countries, creates a qualitative shift in the relationship between nations, communities and economies. Conflict and war is one form of international interaction. Movement of capital, goods, services, production, information, disease, environmental degradation and people across national boundaries are other forms of international interactions. This course introduces major approaches, questions and controversies in the study of global political-economic relations. In a small group seminar we examine the building blocks of world politics, the sources of international conflict and cooperation, and the globalization of material and social relations. This course is restricted to freshmen in the Global Citizenship program.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 164 Introduction to World History: Theory and Practice

As an introduction to world and comparative history, this course tours the globe in an era when the world was engulfed by war. The Second World War was a period of intense violence, upheaval, and profound change that touched every continent in one way or another by destroying, remaking, and inventing international, domestic, and local institutions. Where conventional studies of the conflict focus on military and diplomatic matters, this course surveys the causes, scope and consequences of World War II for a representative sample of the common people of Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. It uses the war's influence on race, gender, disease, propaganda, technology, literature, film, music and material culture to introduce students to the basic concepts and methodologies of world and comparative history. Introductory course to the major and minor.
Same as L22 History 164

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 1640 Health and Disease in World History

Health and disease are universal human experiences, yet vary profoundly across time and place. Extending from ancient times to the present, this course surveys that variety from a global perspective. We explore medical traditions from around the world, then examine how these responded to major epidemic diseases such as the Black Death. We study the globalization of disease and the emergence of scientific medicine after 1450, then turn to the interrelated histories of health and disease in the modern era. Throughout, we attend carefully to how the biological aspects of health and disease have shaped world history, while at the same time exploring the powerful mediating role of social, cultural, economic, and political factors — from religious beliefs and dietary practices to inequality, poverty, empire and war — in determining the myriad ways in which health and disease have been experienced and understood. Introductory course to the major and minor.
Same as L22 History 1640

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 165D Latin America: Nation, Ethnicity and Social Conflict

This class is an interdisciplinary introduction to the academic study of modern and contemporary Latin America. The course focuses on main issues in Latin American politics, history and culture, both in the continent at large and in the specific regions and subregions within it. The class will particularly explore topics such as nation creation, national identity, modes of citizenry, the role of race, ethnicity, gender and class in the region's historical development, as well as social and political conflicts, which have defined the region over the centuries. This course is suggested before taking any other upper-level courses on Latin America or going abroad to other countries, and required for all Latin American Studies majors and minors. Through the course, students gain basic bibliographic knowledge and experience with research tools for a comparative study of Latin American politics society and culture. Prerequisites: none.
Same as L45 LatAm 165D

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 174 Medicine East and West: Comparing Health Care in the U.S. and China

This course provides a foundational introduction to comparative health studies by examining the health care systems of the United States and China. Using the tools and interpretive frameworks of the field of medical anthropology, students in this course are exposed to a broad range of topics dealing with health and health care in Eastern and Western contexts. These include the study of medical pluralism, meaning of illness, health care financing, preventive care, political-economic perspectives, and sociobehavioral perspectives on health and wellness. Students taking this class are prepared to understand and address ongoing health care concerns affecting U.S. and Chinese society.
Same as L48 Anthro 174

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA, IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 1750 Freshman Seminar: Seeing is Believing: Visuality, Power and Truth

How does seeing work? Does the process of seeing begin with light bouncing off of objects and into our eyes — or when we ascertain what we are looking at? Visual interactions are far from neutral perceptions of objective truth, as they always involve interpretation of the world. Yet visual representations are one of the most common ways that we classify and understand the world around us. This course considers seeing as it affects social, spiritual and political life: from religious practices of iconic representation and iconoclasm (and the politics these practices engender), to the technological practices of reproduction in creating "realistic" forgeries, to the ways that visuality can be a technology of power. This freshman seminar considers examples from across a wide range of times and places. We begin by exploring visuality, representation, art and the ways that these produce meaning. We then move to examining several premodern and contemporary visual practices of major religions, considering how practices and ideologies of the visual vary dramatically across space and time. Next, we explore the relationship of changing technologies to notions of reality and authenticity. We then consider how techniques of visuality can be used for domination, particularly in contexts of economic and racial inequality. Finally, we examine the ways in which people use visual codes to define themselves through clothes, hair and other visible signs of identity. Throughout, students use the tools of art history, anthropology and religious studies to gain a greater critical understanding of the practices, ideologies and histories through which seeing meaningfully emerges across space and time.
Same as L93 IPH 175

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 208 Introduction to Jewish Civilization

The anthropologist Clifford Geertz once famously invoked Max Weber in writing that "man is an animal suspended in webs of significance he himself has spun. I take culture to be those webs." The main goal of this course — designed as an introduction to Jewish history, culture and society — is to investigate the "webs of significance" produced by Jewish societies and individuals, in a select number of historical periods, both as responses to historical circumstances and as expressions of Jewish identity. Over the course of the semester we focus on the following historical settings: seventh-century BCE Judah and the Babylonian exile; pre-Islamic Palestine and Babylonia (the period of the Mishnah and the Talmud); Europe in the period of the Crusades; Islamic and Christian Spain; Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries; North America in the 20th century; and the modern State of Israel. For each period we investigate the social and political conditions of Jewish life; identify the major texts that Jews possessed, studied and produced; determine the non-Jewish influences on their attitudes and aspirations; and the explore the efforts that Jews made to define what it meant to be part of a Jewish collective.
Same as L75 JINE 208F

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH, IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 209B African Studies: An Introduction

This course will introduce students to a variety of approaches to the study of Africa by considering the ways that scholars have understood the African experience. It will expose students to the history, politics, literary, and artistic creativity of the continent. Emphasis will be placed on the diversity of African societies, both historically and in the present, and explore Africa's place in the wider world. Required for the major.
Same as L90 AFAS 209B

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 210C Introduction to Islamic Civilization

A historical survey of Islamic civilization in global perspective. Chronological coverage of social, political, economic and cultural history will be balanced with focused attention to special topics, which will include: aspects of Islam as religion; science, medicine and technology in Islamic societies; art and architecture; philosophy and theology; interaction between Islamdom and Christendom; Islamic history in the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Central Asia as well as Africa; European colonialism; globalization of Islam and contemporary Islam.
Same as L75 JINE 210C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH, IS


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L97 IAS 223 Korean Civilization

A comprehensive introduction to the study of Korea. Following a historical survey, the course examines key cultural themes and social institutions and explores aspects of Korea's relationship with its East Asian neighbors. Attention is also be paid to contemporary issues, social problems, and cultural trends.
Same as L51 Korean 223C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 2230 The African Diaspora: Black Internationalism Across Time and Space

This course is an introduction to the history of the African diaspora. It engages the following questions: What constitutes a diaspora and what is the African diaspora in particular? Where is it? What were the conditions that led to the dispersal of Africans throughout the world? How have Africans in the diaspora constructed cultural and political identities across time and space? What were the circumstances that led to the dispersal of Africans? When the dispersal resulted from conditions of inequality, as was the case when the transatlantic slave trade led to the forced migration of Africans to the "new world," what were the legacies of that inequality? How has the African presence transformed the societies in question? Though the course focuses on readings from the United States, the Caribbean and South America, students also are exposed to the African diaspora as a series of dispersals, with a view to placing the African diaspora in the "new world" within the historic context of a longer history of African dispersal.
Same as L90 AFAS 2230

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 226C Japanese Civilization

The development of Japanese culture from antiquity to the present: an overview of Japanese cultural history, focusing on the interplay of crucial aspects of contemporary Japanese society and Japanese social psychology.
Same as L05 Japan 226C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 227C Chinese Civilization

An introduction to Chinese culture through selected topics that link various periods in China's past with the present. Ongoing concerns are social stratification, political organization, the arts, gender relationships and the rationales for individual behavior, and the conceptions through which Chinese have identified their cultural heritage. Our readings include literary, philosophical and historical documents as well as cultural histories. Regular short writing assignments; take-home final. No prerequisites.
Same as L04 Chinese 227C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA, IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 229 Modern European History: Migrations, Nation States, Identities

Politicians in several European countries recently declared the failure of multiculturalism, emphasizing immigration as the cause of social and political conflict. These statements deny that the European continent as a whole has been shaped by various forms of migration, ranging from Teutonic and Slavic settlement migration in the first 10 centuries AD, and rural-to-urban migration and religious expulsions in the Middle Ages, to recent guest worker programs and immigration from former colonies. Encounters between different cultures, religions and forms of social organization are a staple of European societies' development. The course begins with a brief overview of significant population movements since the Early Modern Era and then focuses on important mass movements since the French Revolution. Course units study the nexus between migration and modernization, people's movement and the nation-state, empire and citizenship, and economic and social development. The class also poses the questions: Why are some migrations remembered and others not? Why do we know what we know about migration and migrant experiences? How do notions of "otherness" and "diversity" come to be central points of contention within current discourses in Europe? How do race, class and gender interact in shaping the experience and perception of immigrants? Primary sources, autobiographical narratives, scholarly analyses and a range of visual material including films and maps are the basis for class lectures and individual and group work assignments, helping students to develop critical thinking and effective oral and written communication skills.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 244 Introduction to European Studies

This course provides an introduction to the study of contemporary Europe through an historical examination of the moments of crisis, and their political and cultural aftermath, that shaped modern Europe and continue to define it today. These crises include: the revolutions of 1848, the advent of 19th-century nationalisms, the Great War, the Spanish Civil War, the rise and defeat of state fascism, the Cold War, the formation of the EEC and Union, May 1968, and the return of right-wing politics. After the study of these traditions, the final portion of the semester considers contemporary Europe since 1991, considering such subjects as Green politics, internal migration and immigration, and the culture of the European Union.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 2500 Topics in Asian-American Studies

An introductory survey covering United States immigrant populations from throughout Eastern and Southern Asia.
Same as L98 AMCS 250

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 260 Migrations in Past and Present: Introduction to Migration Studies

The course, grounded in a multidisciplinary approach, provides an introduction to the study of migration, featuring significant mass movements in the past 150 years and crucial concepts of historical and theoretical analyses of the movement of people. Course units explore continuities, trends and shifts in human migration and migration policy and how they affect individual immigrants' lives. A variety of sources, such as oral history, films, novels, legal documents and scholarly secondary analysis help students to consider different perspectives on internal and international migrations, from the individual migrant to civil society, from political regulation to economic consideration. Throughout the course, students deepen their understanding of migration as a result of social transformation, force or individual choice. We study concepts of the nation-state and citizenship, the political economy of migration, gender, sexuality and migration, and notions of identity and social inclusion more generally to build a sound critique of contemporary discourses on immigration.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 301 Historical Methods: Transregional History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis is on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.
Same as L22 History 301T

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 301L Historical Methods — Latin American History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis is on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.
Same as L22 History 301L

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3024 International Institutions

This course surveys in historically and theoretically informed fashion the role of various international institutions in international relations. It addresses the fundamental question of the contribution of international institutions to world order. The course first traces the historical evolution of international organization before turning to international institutions since World War II. It then focuses on the following: the most important regional international organization, the European Union; the most important international organizations dealing with the issues of peace and security, the United Nations and NATO; and the major international economic institutions, the WTO, the IMF and the World Bank. Prerequisites: Intro to International Politics L32 103B.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3024

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 302B Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East

This course will introduce the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of the Middle East. The emphasis is on historical and ethnological relationships, social and political structure, religious pluralism and contemporary youth issues. We will explore the lived experiences of the peoples in the modern nation-states of Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, Israel, the Palestinian Territories, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and the countries of the Arabian Peninsula, Iraq and Iran. We will access this material through short stories, poetry, biographies, essays, videos, blogs, and political and anthropological reports.
Same as L48 Anthro 302B

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3030 The Daoist Traditions

This course offers an introduction to the history, practices and worldviews that define the Daoist traditions. Through both secondary scholarship and primary texts, we consider the history of Daoism in reference to the continuities and discontinuities of formative concepts, social norms, and religious practices. Our inquiry into this history centers on consideration of the social forces that have driven the development of Daoism from the second century to the modern day. Special consideration is given to specific Daoist groups and their textual and practical traditions: the Celestial Masters (Tianshi), Great Clarity (Taiqing), Upper Clarity (Shangqing), Numinous Treasure (Lingbao), and Complete Perfection (Quanzhen). Throughout the semester we also reflect on certain topics and themes concerning Daoist traditions. These include constructions of identity and community, material culture, the construction of sacred space, and cultivation techniques.
Same as L23 Re St 303

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L97 IAS 3034 Christianity in the Modern World

Survey of Christianity since the Reformation. Focus on the divisions in Christianity, its responses to modern science, the rise of capitalism, and European expansion into Africa, Asia and the Americas. Attention to ecumenism and the contemporary status of Christianity in the world.
Same as L23 Re St 3031

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L97 IAS 3040 International Law and Politics

What is international law? Does it really constrain governments? If so, how? In this class we will examine these questions through a mixture of political science and legal theories. Students will become familiar with the major theories in both disciplines and be introduced to the basic tenets of public international law. Students also will develop basic skills in legal research by reading and briefing cases from international tribunals and through an international law moot court simulation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3042 Making Sex and Gender: Understanding the History of the Body

This course provides an overview of the history of the body from antiquity to modern times using an interdisciplinary approach. By exploring selections from medical texts, literature, fashion, art, accounts of "new world" exploration, legal records, self-help books and contemporary media representations of human bodies, we consider the changing historical perception of the body. The intersection of gender, race and class factor significantly in our discussions of how the body has been construed historically and how it is currently being constructed in contemporary American culture. This course also provides an introduction to feminist/gender methodologies that apply to understanding the history of the body. This course is not open to students who have taken WGSS 204. Prerequisite: any 100- or 200-level WGSS course or permission of instructor.
Same as L77 WGSS 3041

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 305 Music of the African Diaspora

This course explores musical cross-fertilization between the African continent and South America, the Caribbean and Europe. Beginning with traditional musics from selected regions of the African continent, the course examines the cultural and musical implications of transnational musical flows on peoples of the African diaspora and their multicultural audiences.
Same as L27 Music 3021

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3053 Anthropology of Tibet and the Himalayas

This course is an anthropological and historical examination of Tibetan societies inhabiting the Tibetan Plateau and the highlands of Nepal. In addition to providing basic ethnographic descriptions of Tibetan societies, the course will explore the changing nature of relations between Tibet and China, and between Tibet and the West. Guiding concepts include adaptation (both social and ecological), the politics of ethnicity and identity, and processes of culture change.
Same as L48 Anthro 3051

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3055 Contemporary Chinese Culture and Society

This course provides an introduction to emerging trends in Chinese culture and society. We explore processes of change and continuity in the People's Republic, examining the complexity of social issues and the dynamics of cultural unity and diversity. While we focus on the post-Mao reform era (1978 to the present), we consider how contemporary developments draw upon the legacies of the Maoist revolution as well as the pre-socialist past. The course provides an overview of anthropological approaches to the study of contemporary China, introducing students to key concepts, theories and frameworks integral to the analysis of Chinese culture and society. Readings, lectures and discussions highlight not only macro-level processes of social change and continuity but also the everyday experiences of individuals involved in these processes. We pay particular attention to issues of family life, institutional culture, migration, religion, ethnicity, gender, consumption and globalization.
Same as L48 Anthro 3055

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3056 Material Culture in Modern China

In this course, we will explore change and continuity from late imperial to postsocialist China through an analysis of everyday material culture. Drawing upon material objects, historical texts, ethnographic studies and films, we will investigate values, beliefs and attitudes toward the material world in modern Chinese life. Readings, lectures and discussions will focus on how political, ethnic, regional, religious, and gender identities have been constructed and shaped by the use and production of material artifacts ranging from household goods and tomb objects to built forms and bodily dispositions. Case studies include foot-binding, opium use, fashion, tea culture, fast food consumption, sports and nation building, contemporary art markets, the privatization of housing, and worker discipline in transnational factories.
Same as L48 Anthro 3056

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 305M Survey of Mexican Studies

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Mexico, with a particular focus on the 20th and the 21st century. The class will cover the main historical and cultural processes of Mexico in this period: The Mexican Revolution; the consolidation of a one-party political system; the construction of Mexican national identity and the arrival of neoliberalism. The course also focuses on the main aspects of Mexico's relationship to the United States: the Free Trade Agreement, the history of Mexican migration and the Drug War. From this framework, the course touches upon questions of race (particularly the politics of racial mixture), modernization, construction of social identities and the unique nature of governance in Mexico, due to the single-party regime. It also touches on Mexico's specificities and particularities due to the uniqueness of situation as the southern neighbor of the United States. Prerequisites: none.
Same as L45 LatAm 305

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3063 Islam, Culture and Society in West Africa

This course explores the introduction of Islam into West Africa beginning in the 10th Century and explores its expansion and development in the region, placing emphasis on the 19th century to present day. It focuses on the development of West African Muslim cultural, social, religious and political life, to understand not only how the religion affected societies, but also how West African local societies shaped Islam. The course also aims to introduce students to a critical understanding of Islamic writing in West Africa. It also examines the organization of Muslim Sufi orders in West Africa through time and space. The course is organized around a series of lectures and readings, as well as print and visual media.
Same as L90 AFAS 3062

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S UColl: NW


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L97 IAS 306B Africa: Peoples and Cultures

An anthropological survey of Africa from the classic ethnographies to contemporary studies of development. Emphasis on the numerous social and economic changes African peoples have experienced from precolonial times to the present.
Same as L48 Anthro 306B

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: HUM, IS


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L97 IAS 307 The Writing of the Indian Subcontinent

The Indian subcontinent has in recent years yielded a number of writers, expatriate or otherwise, whose works articulate the postcolonial experience in the "foreign" English tongue. This course is designed as an introductory survey of such writing, drawing on select subcontinental writers. Covering both fiction and nonfiction by several authors, including R.K. Narayan, Salman Rushdie, Anita Desai, Amitav Ghosh, Sara Suleri, Micheal Ondaatjie and Romesh Gunesekera, we discuss such issues as the nature of the colonial legacy, the status of the English language, problems of translation (linguistic and cultural), the politics of religion, the expatriate identity and the constraints of gender roles.
Same as L14 E Lit 307

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 3073 The Global War on Terrorism

This course presents an historical assessment of the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) from the perspective of its major participants: militant Sunni Islamist jihadists, especially the Al-Qaeda network, and the nation-states that oppose them, particularly the United States and its allies. The course then concludes by analyzing the current state and future of Islamist jihad and the GWOT.
Same as L22 History 3073

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3081 Topics in Asian-American Literature: Identity and Self-Image

Topics in Asian-American literature which will vary from semester to semester.
Same as L14 E Lit 308

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 3092 Indigenous Peoples and Movements in Latin America

This course focuses on the contemporary lives and political struggles of Indigenous Peoples in Latin America, with specific focus on Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. Through course lectures, ethnographic texts, and four in-depth case studies, we explore how the politics of Indigeneity articulate with political and economic processes including (neo)colonialism, global capitalism, state transformation and social movement struggle. Themes include: demands for territory and autonomy; environmentalism and natural resource exploitation; gender and economic inequality; race, racism and political violence; language and education; and the complexities of building multicultural or "plurinational" democracies.
Same as L48 Anthro 3092

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3093 Anthropology of Modern Latin America

A survey of current issues in the anthropological study of culture, politics and change across contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. Topics include machismo and feminismo, the drug war, race and mestizaje, yuppies and revolutionaries, ethnic movements, pop culture, violence, multinational business, and the cultural politics of U.S.–Latin American relations. Attention is given to the ways that anthropology is used to uderstand complex cultural and social processes in a region thoroughly shaped by globalization.
Same as L48 Anthro 3093

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3098 African Art in Context: Patronage, Globalisms and Inventiveness

This course offers an introduction to principal visual arts from Africa, prehistoric to contemporary. It explores traditions-based and contemporary arts made by African artists from across the continent in conjunction with their various contexts of creation, use, understanding and social history. Theoretical perspectives on the collection, appropriation and exhibition of African arts in Europe and North America will be examined. Course work will be complemented by visits as a group or independent assignments at the Saint Louis Museum, the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, and possibly a local private collection.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3090

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H UColl: NW


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L97 IAS 3101 Ancient Civilizations of the New World

An examination of the Inca empire in Peru, and the Maya and Aztec empires in Mexico through the inquiry into the roots, development, form, and evolutionary history of pre-Colombian civilization in each region from its earliest times to the rise of the classic kingdoms. Examples of respective artistic accomplishments will be presented and discussed.
Same as L48 Anthro 310C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: SSC BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 311 Buddhist Traditions

This course examines the historical development of Buddhism from its origins in South Asia in the sixth to fifth century BCE, through the transmission of the teachings and practices to East Asia, Southeast Asia and Tibet, to contemporary transformations of the tradition in the modern West. In the first third of the course, we focus on the biographical and ritual expressions of the historical Buddha's life story, the foundational teachings attributed to the Buddha, and the formation and development of the Buddhist community. In the second third, we examine the rise of the Mahayana, the development of the Mahayana pantheon and rituals, and the spread of Mahayana in East Asia. In the final third, we explore the Theravada tradition in Sri Lanka and Thailand, then Tantric Buddhism in India, Tibet and East Asia. We close the course with an overview of Buddhism in the modern West.
Same as L23 Re St 311

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H UColl: NW


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L97 IAS 3110 Topics in English & American Literature: Contemporary Literature of the East West Divide

Topics: themes, formal problems, literary genres, special subjects (e.g., the American West, science and literature, the modern short story). Consult Course Listings for offerings in any given semester.
Same as L14 E Lit 311

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM UColl: NW


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L97 IAS 3114 Culture, Politics and Society in Francophone Africa

France and Africa have a long historical relationship, dating back to the early Euro-Mediterranean empires, the first explorers, long-distance traders, Christian missionaries, colonialists, and today's French West and North African communities. In this course, we delve into this long process of interaction between France and its colonies of Africa. During the first half of the semester, we explore these historical relationships and examine the scientific constructs of race in the 19th and early 20th century. We touch on themes that defined the colonial encounter, including the development of the Four Communes in Senegal, the Negritude movement, and French Islamic policies in Africa. The curriculum for this course includes articles, films, and monographs, to explore these themes and includes writers and social activists living in France and the African diaspora. The second half of the course examines Francophone Africa after independence. Here the course explores the political and cultural (inter) dependence between France and its Francophone African partners. In addition, we examine the challenges of many African states to respond to their citizen's needs, as well as France's changing immigration policies in the 1980s, followed by the devaluation of the West and Central African Franc (CFA).
Same as L90 AFAS 3113

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3120 South Asian Religious Traditions

The Indian subcontinent is home to Hindu, Islamic, Buddhist, Jain, and Sikh traditions, among others. In this course we explore several traditions that are vital to life in India, Pakistan and beyond. We first encounter each tradition through narrative, with the support of visual media. We then explore how contemporary adherents make these traditions meaningful for themselves — in their everyday lives, in their struggles for social change, and in their political statements and contestations. Students will have the opportunity for creative projects or individual research.
Same as L23 Re St 312

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H UColl: NW


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L97 IAS 3124 Race, Caste, Conversion: Social Movements in South Asia

It is a truism that caste-based injustice is one of the abiding forms of inequality in South Asia. But what precisely is a caste, and how is injustice to be removed? In this course, students explore different theories of caste, beginning with the race-inflected theories of the 19th century; and different approaches to the remediation of inequalities, including social reform, religious conversion, political organization and legal remedies. Students also compare caste reform with gender reform and consider how the experience of caste is inflected by gender.
Same as L22 History 3122

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 3130 Topics in English and American Literature

Called the "Age of Revolution," the Romantic Age of British literature, 1770-1830, witnessed the birth of new lyric forms, the effacement of traditional strictures on style and taste, and produced through poetic voice (and its quaverings and multiplications) what might be called, oversimply, the modern subject. Within a developing discourse of human rights and personal freedom, this growing assertion through poetry of individual expressivity allowed William Blake to construct in a single work a visual and verbal "Jerusalem." It encouraged William Wordsworth to write a pathbreaking investigation of the sources of his own creativity that challenged conventional restraints on what topics can, and cannot, be confessed in poetry. Beginning with these two poets, we consider the historical contexts, and the sometimes competing histories of ideas, that shaped the five major British Romantic poets: Blake, Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, and John Keats. We follow an anthology for much of the poetry, including the poems and prose of influential contemporaries (female as well as male) who included the political philosopher Edmund Burke and Mary Wollstonecraft. Texts also assigned include Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Byron's Don Juan.
Same as L14 E Lit 313

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3132 Introduction to Comparative Arts


Same as L16 Comp Lit 313E

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 3149 The Late Ottoman Middle East

This course surveys the Middle East in the late Ottoman period (essentially the 18th and 19th centuries, up to the First World War). It examines the central Ottoman state and the Ottoman provinces as they were incorporated into the world economy, and how they responded to their peripheralization in that process. Students will focus on how everyday people's lived experiences were affected by the increased monetarization of social and economic relations; changes in patterns of land tenure and agriculture; the rise of colonialism; state efforts at modernization and reform; shifts in gender relations; and debates over the relationship of religion to community and political identity.
Same as L22 History 3149

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 314B International Politics

Globalization, the accelerating rate of interaction between people of different countries, creates a qualitative shift in the relationship between nation-states and national economies. Conflict and war is one form of international interaction. Movement of capital, goods, services, production, information, disease, environmental degradation and people across national boundaries are other forms of international interactions. This course introduces major approaches, questions and controversies in the study of global political-economic relations. In a small group seminar we examine the building blocks of world politics, the sources of international conflict and cooperation, and the globalization of material and social relations.

Credit 3 units. BU: IS


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L97 IAS 315 Indian Barbie, Asian Tigers and IT Dreams: Politics of Globalization and Development in South Asia

This course explores how South Asia is at the heart of current debates about globalization, development, empire, gender, sexuality and ethnic identity. We raise questions such as: What has lead to sex trafficking in Nepal? Can information technology solve India's social problems and unemployment? What is biopiracy and how are South Asian activists challenging the global corporatization of world food and water supplies? Readings, films and discussions take us to countries such as Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and India.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3150 The Middle East in the 20th Century

This course surveys the history of the Middle East since World War I. Major analytical themes include: colonialism; Orientalism; the formation of the regional nation-state system; the formation and political mobilization of new social classes; changing gender relations; the development of new forms of appropriation of economic surplus (oil, urban industry) in the new global economy; the role of religion; the Middle East as an arena of the Cold War; conflict in Israel/Palestine; and new conceptions of identity associated with these developments (Arabism, local patriotism, Islamism).
Same as L22 History 3150

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3153 Russian Music


Same as L27 Music 315

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3160 Chinese Social History: Urban Transformations

The course examines major themes and debates in Chinese urban history since the mid-19th century. Topics include: the Western impact; the construction of modernity; elite activism and authoritarianism; consumerism and nationalism; shifting gender roles; political mobilization and social networking; and the Communist revolution. Understanding and analyzing the nuance and difference in views and interpretations in historical writings (historiography) are essential.
Same as L22 History 3161

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 3163 Early Modern China: 1350-1800

This course examines political, socioeconomic and intellectual — cultural developments in Chinese society from the middle of the 14th century to 1800. This chronological focus largely corresponds to the last two imperial dynasties, the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911). Thematically, the course emphasizes such early-modern indigenous developments as increasing commercialization, social mobility and questioning of received cultural values.
Same as L22 History 3162

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3165 The Chinese Diaspora to 1949

China has had one of the most mobile populations in world history. This course will explore migration patterns and networks in the creation of Chinese diasporas in the early modern and modern eras (1500-present). Specific topics will include: the internal migration that has helped to consolidate the borders of the modern Chinese state, such as Chinese migration to the southwest in the 18th century, to Taiwan in the 18th and 19th centuries, and into western China in recent decades as well as overseas Chinese migration to Southeast Asia, Australia, Europe, and the Americas, including St. Louis. In addition to examining how Chinese immigrants have adapted to local conditions both within and outside China, this course will explore the practices that have created and sustained diasporic networks in nearly every part of the world today.
Same as L22 History 3165

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 3166 Topics in Chinese Policy at Fudan

A topics course on Chinese Policy at Fudan University. Must be enrolled in the study abroad program at Fudan University in Shanghai, China.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3167 Topics in Chinese Economy at Fudan: The Political Economy of China

A topics course on Chinese Economy at Fudan University. Must be enrolled in the study abroad program at Fudan University in Shanghai, China.

Credit 3 units. BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3168 Historical Landscape and National Identity in Modern China

This course attempts to ground the history of modern China in physical space such as imperial palaces, monuments and memorials, campuses, homes and residential neighborhoods, recreational facilities, streets, prisons, factories, gardens and churches. Using methods of historical and cultural anthropological analysis, the course invests the places where we see with historical meaning. Through exploring the ritual, political and historical significance of historical landmarks, the course investigates the forces that have transformed physical spaces into symbols of national, local and personal identity. The historical events and processes we examine along the way through the sites include the changing notion of rulership, national identity, state-building, colonialism and imperialism, global capitalism and international tourism. Acknowledging and understanding the fact that these meanings and significances are fluid, multiple, contradictory and changing over time is an important concern of this course.
Same as L03 East Asia 3163

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3190 The European Avant-Garde: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, 20th Century

The first half of the 20th century witnessed the emergence of artistic movements characterized by revolt against tradition, emphasis on radical experimentation and redefinition of the art work. This course familiarizes students with the avant-garde's main currents: Italian Futurism, English Vorticism, Russian Constructivism, "stateless" Dadaism and French Surrealism. We ask ourselves how to define the avant-garde, how it is related to modernity and whether its aesthetic is necessarily political. Texts include Futurist Manifestos, Cendrars' Trans-Siberian Prose, Stein's Tender Buttons, Breton's Nadja. We also examine artworks such as Duchamp's "Large Glass" and films such as Buñuel's Un Chien Andalou.
Same as L93 IPH 3191

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3192 Modern South Asia

This course covers the history of the Indian subcontinent in the 19th and 20th centuries. We look closely at a number of issues including colonialism in India; anticolonial movements; the experiences of women; the interplay between religion and national identity; and popular culture in modern India. Political and social history are emphasized equally.
Same as L22 History 3192

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS


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L97 IAS 3194 Environment and Empire

In this course we study British imperialism from the ground up. At bottom, the British empire was about extracting the wealth contained in the labour and the natural resources of the colonized. How did imperial efforts to maximize productivity and profits impact the ecological balance of forests, pastures and farm lands, rivers and rainfall, animals and humans? We ask, with environmental historians of the U.S., how colonialism marked a watershed of radical ecological change. The course covers examples from Asia to Africa, with a focus on the "jewel in the crown" of the British empire: the Indian subcontinent. We learn how the colonized contributed to the science of environmentalism, and how they forged a distinctive politics of environmentalism built upon local resistance and global vision, inspired by religious traditions and formative thinkers, not least Mahatma Gandhi.
Same as L22 History 3194

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 320 British Cinema: A History

In cinema, as in politics, Britain is caught awkwardly between America and Europe, never quite knowing how to position itself. Should it try to compete seriously with Hollywood, or develop a smaller-scale and more distinctive national cinema on the French or Swedish model? This uncertainty has commonly been seen as a weakness but it can be seen, conversely, as a strength, fostering a rich diversity and complexity both in the output overall and in the work of key British filmmakers such as Michael Powell, David Lean and, in the first half of his career, Alfred Hitchcock. This course traces the fortunes of British cinema from its lively beginnings through a switchback history of slump and recovery, giving equal attention to the work of high-profile directors such as Hitchcock and to important genres such as 1930s documentary, Ealing comedy and Hammer horror. A continuing theme is the complex economic relationship between British cinema and Hollywood: co-productions, trade barriers, the drain of talent to Hollywood, and the intermittent success of British films such as The King’s Speech in the American market. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 320

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3201 Japan from Earliest Times to 1868

A survey of the history of the Japanese archipelago from prehistory to the Meji Restoration of 1868, this course is designed to acquaint students with pre-industrial Japanese society and the discipline of history. In addition to tracing political, social, and cultural narratives across time, we will focus on three themes: the emergence of a centralized state and the subsequent transition from aristocratic to warrior to commoner rule; interactions with the world beyond Japan's borders; and issues of gender and sexuality.
Same as L22 History 3202

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3204 Civic Scholars Study Abroad Semester One: Self Awareness, Civic Life, and Citizenship

This is the first semester, foundation course for students in the study abroad cohort Civic Scholars program of the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement. This program recognizes rising juniors enrolled in a study abroad program fall of their junior year who have demonstrated exemplary commitment to civic engagement and community service while at Washington University. The Civic Scholars program recognizes Washington University undergraduate students who exemplify future potential for civic leadership. Rising juniors are selected for the program based on their commitment to community service and civic engagement. Through this four-semester program, cohorts receive intensive leadership training and mentorship to prepare them for a life dedicated to public service, and a scholarship of $5,000 to support a substantial civic project or internship. The program begins with a cohort retreat, and students will complete a course each semester in the program. Students will apply their $5,000 scholarship toward a civic project during the summer between junior and senior year. This course provides students with a context for examining civic engagement and developing civic leadership skills. Through lectures, guest speakers, readings, excursions and class discussion, students will 1) explore the history and current status of civic engagement; and 2) prepare for the implementation of a civic project the summer between their junior and senior years. Students will meet in a structured class to discuss concepts, engage in critical reflection, and develop leadership skills. In addition, students will critically reflect on course content to enrich their learning. This is a one-credit course offered between spring break and the end of the semester.

Credit 1 unit. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 3205 Civic Scholars Study Abroad Semester Two: Civic Engagement in Action

This is the second semester, foundation course for students in the Civic Scholars Program of the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement. The Civic Scholars program recognizes Washington University undergraduate students who exemplify future potential for civic leadership. Rising juniors are selected for the program based on their commitment to community service and civic engagement. Through this four-semester progam, cohorts receive intensive leadership training and mentorship to prepare them for a life dedicated to public service, and a scholarship of $5,000 to support a substantial civic project or internship. The program begins with a cohort retreat, and students complete a course each semester in the program. Students apply their $5,000 scholarship toward a civic project during the summer between junior and senior year. This second course provides students in the Civic Scholars Program of the Gephardt Institute for Civic and Community Engagement with a context for developing their civic projects. Students engage in a semester-long research and project planning process tied to their civic projects. Through research, lectures, workshops and presentations, students develop a project proposal for their civic projects. Students meet in class to discuss concepts, engage in critical reflection, and develop skills for project implementation.

Credit 2 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3206 Global Gender Issues

This course compares the life experiences of women and men in societies throughout the world. We discuss the evidence regarding the universal subordination of women, and examine explanations that propose to situate women's and men's personality attributes, roles and responsibilities in the biological or cultural domains. In general, through readings, films and lectures, the class will provide a cross-cultural perspective on ideas regarding gender and how gendered meanings, practices and performances serve as structuring principles in society.
Same as L48 Anthro 3206

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA, IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3212 French Topics I

Focusing on topics of cultural and social importance, this course offers students the opportunity to learn about defining moments in the French tradition. The specific topic of the course varies from semester to semester and may include works from different disciplines, such as art, film, gender studies, history, literature, music, philosophy, politics, science. Prerequisite: French 307D.
Same as L34 French 321

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS BU: ETH EN: H


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L97 IAS 321C Introduction to Colonial Latin America until 1825

This course surveys the history of Latin America from the pre-Columbian civilizations through the Iberian exploration and conquest of the Americas until the Wars of Independence (roughly 1400-1815). Stressing the experiences and cultural contributions of Americans, Europeans and Africans, we consider the following topics through primary written documents, first-hand accounts, and excellent secondary scholarship, as well as through art, music and architecture: Aztec, Maya, Inca and Iberian civilizations; models of conquest in comparative perspective (Spanish, Portuguese and Amerindian); environmental histories; consolidation of colonialism in labor, tributary and judicial systems; race, ethnicity, slavery, caste and class; religion and the Catholic Church and Inquisition; sugar and mining industries, trade and global economies; urban and rural life; the roles of women, gender and sexuality in the colonies. Geographically, we cover Mexico, the Andes, and to a lesser extent, Brazil, the Southwest, Cuba, and the Southern Cone. Premodern, Latin America.
Same as L22 History 321C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 322 Contemporary East Asian Cinema

This course focuses on films made in Japan, Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and South Korea over the past three decades. Students examine how the global/local geopolitics specific to the post-Cold War period, the passing of authoritarian regimes, the boom and bust of the Asian economy, and international film festivals have influenced the shaping of New East Asian cinemas across borders. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 322

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3220 Modern Mexico

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the political, social, economic and cultural history of Mexico from the era of Independence (roughly 1810) to the present. Lectures will outline basic theoretical models for analyzing historical trends and then present a basic chronological historical narrative.
Same as L22 History 3220

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3221 Topics: The Jewish Experience in Italy

This course will examine the social and political history of the Jews of Italy from the period of Italian unification through the end of World War II. We will look through two different prisms: first, the constant of Jews' minority status in a Catholic country at a time when Church doctrine was hostile to them, and second, their changing status during significant moments in the brief history of the Italian monarchy. Under the latter rubric, we will study the rehabilitation of the Jews under liberal political philosophies, their problematic relationship with Fascism, and finally the arrival of the Holocaust in Italy and efforts to defend Jews against Nazi genocide. We will approach these topics wherever possible through primary texts, including essays, memoirs and novels. Reading knowledge of Italian is not required. Readings in English; some readings in Italian for Italian majors. Discussion in English. Prerequisite for Italian majors: Ital 307D; no prerequisite for students in other majors. Three five-page papers. Please note: The Ital 5221 cross-listing course is for graduate students only.
Same as L36 Ital 3221

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 3224 Topics in Italian: Basilisks to Botticelli: the Birth, Development and Politics of Museums in Italy

This course investigates the rise and cultural authority of museums in Italy from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. The course unfolds chronologically, beginning with the distant precursors and etymological roots of the museum in ancient Alexandria and Rome. We trace the origins of the museum in the art collection and patronage that surged during the Renaissance, including the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Curiosity Cabinet with its fossils, mythical basilisks, gems and weapons and church displays of religious and classical art. We will study the establishment during the Enlightenment in Italy of the first public art museums epitomized by the Vatican Museums, the Uffizi Gallery and the Capitoline Museums. We will conclude by examining the impact on national and cultural identity of Fascist propaganda museums instituted under Mussolini's regime. No prerequisites.
Same as L36 Ital 3224

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 322C Modern Latin America

This course aims to present a survey of Latin American history from Independence to the present. Topics to be covered include the Wars of Independence; caudillismo; nationalism; liberalism; slavery and indigenous peoples; urbanization, industrialization and populism; ideas of race and ethnicity; the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions; U.S. intervention; modernity, modernism and modernization; motherhood and citizenship; the Cold War; terror and violence under military dictatorships and popular resistance movements. While the course aims to provide students with an understanding of the region, it focuses primarily on the experiences of Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Argentina and Central America.
Same as L22 History 322C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS


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L97 IAS 323 The Cinema of Eastern Europe in the Cold War Era

This course has two objectives. On the one hand, we watch masterpieces of European cinema, awarded at international festivals and directed by legendary names such as Milos Forman, Emir Kusturica and Andrzej Wajda, and focus on their artistic genius. On the other hand, we study the way in which the confrontational politics of the Cold War inform these films, with a special focus on the perplexing predicament of a divided and antagonized Europe. The readings for this class emphasize our dual exploration. We work with texts dealing with both film history and its aesthetics and with broader analyses of the intellectual and political landscape of the Cold War context. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 323

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3231 Black Power Across Africa & the Diaspora: International Dimensions of the Black Power Movement

This seminar explores the Black Power Movement as an international phenomenon. By situating Black Power within an African World context, this course will examine the advent and intersections of Black Power politics in the United States, parts of Africa (including Ghana, Algeria, Nigeria and Tanzania), the Caribbean (Jamaica, Bermuda, the Bahamas and Cuba), South America (Brazil) and Canada. Particular emphasis will be placed upon unique and contested definitions of "Black Power" as it was articulated, constructed and enacted in each region.
Same as L90 AFAS 3231

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 3243 A User's Guide to Japanese Poetry

This course introduces the art and craft of Japanese poetry, one of the world's great literary traditions. Exploring the many styles of traditional verse — the poetic diary, linked verse, haiku and others — and their historical contexts, we gain insights into Japanese aesthetics and study the unique conventions of Japanese poetic production that have evolved over a span of some 1500 years. The course also incorporates a "haiku workshop," where we engage in group-centered poetry writing and critiquing. No prior knowledge of Japanese is required.
Same as L05 Japan 324

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3245 History of Chinese Cinemas: 1930s-1990s

This course offers an overview of Chinese cinemas, including those of Mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, over the 20th century. We study major trends such as the left-wing filmmaking in the 1930s, the Maoist revolutionary narratives, Taiwanese healthy realism, the New Cinemas of the three regions, and contemporary transnational productions. Major topics include urban modernity, gender formation, national and transnational cinemas within specific historical contexts. All films come with English subtitles. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 324

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3248 Intercultural Communication

"Intercultural communication" and "cross-cultural communication" are interchangeable terms in referring to the field of studies covered in this course. This course is designed to further students' sensibility toward cultural variables and to cultivate their practical skills in managing cultural diversity in everyday life and business. Our interrogation focuses on how cultural variables affect the thought, behavior, and value systems, the transmission and interpretation of messages, and characteristics of interpersonal and cross-cultural communication. We learn key concepts in this field (verbal and nonverbal communication, individualism and collectivism, stereotypes and ethnocentrism, etc.) and issues of particular concern in the current world (gender, race, inter-ethnic/racial relations, and intercultural communication in classrooms, medical care, and international business, etc.).

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L97 IAS 3250 French Film Culture

Called "the seventh art," film has a long tradition of serious popular appreciation and academic study in France. This course offers an overview of French cinema, including the origins of film (Lumière brothers, Méliès), the inventive silent period (which created such avant-garde classics as Un chien andalou), the poetic realism of the '30s, the difficulties of the war years, the post-war emphasis on historical/nationalist themes in the "tradition of quality" films, the French New Wave's attempt to create a more "cinematic" style, the effects of the political turmoil of May '68 on film culture, the "art house" reception of French films in the United States, and the broader appeal of recent hypervisual ("cinéma du look") films, such as La Femme Nikita and Amélie. While the primary focus of the course is on French cinema, we also discuss the reciprocal influences between American and French film culture, both in terms of formal influences on filmmaking and theoretical approaches to film studies. French film terms are introduced but no prior knowledge of the language is expected. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 325

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3256 French Literature I: Dramatic Voices: Poets and Playwrights

An interpretation of cultural, philosophical and aesthetic issues as presented in influential works of French poetry and drama from the Middle Ages to the present. May be taken before or after French 326. Prerequisite: French 308D or French 318D.
Same as L34 French 325

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3257 Introduction to Arabic Literature

A survey of the major genres and themes in Arabic literature from the pre-Islamic era to the modern period. Texts will include pre-Islamic, classical and Sufi poetry, as well as popular tales and critical prose from the Umayyad and Abbasid empires and Andalusia. The modern sections of the course will interrogate political commitment in Arabic literature and introduce students to feminist and magical realist novels from North Africa and the Levant. All readings will be in English translation.
Same as L49 Arab 325

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 325C African Civilization to 1800

Beginning with an introduction to the methodological and theoretical approaches to African history, this course surveys African civilization and culture from the Neolithic age until 1800 AD. Topics include African geography and environmental history, migration and cross-cultural exchange, the development of Swahili culture, the Western Sudanese states, the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the historical roots of Apartheid.
Same as L90 AFAS 321C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS


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L97 IAS 3262 French Literature II: Narrative Voices: Fiction and Nonfiction

An investigation of cultural, philosophical and aesthetic issues as presented in influential works of French prose from the Middle Ages to the present. May be taken before or after French 325. Prerequisite: French 308D or French 318D.
Same as L34 French 326

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3264 Topics in East Asian Studies

A topics course on a variety of East Asian subjects.
Same as L03 East Asia 3263

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3265 Samurai, Rebels, and Bandits: The Japanese Period Film

Tales of heroism, crime, revolt and political intrigue. Bloody battles, betrayal, madness and flashing swords. This is the world of jidaigeki eiga, the Japanese period film. In this course, we analyze the complex (and often flamboyant) narrative, visual and thematic structures of films about the age of the samurai. We discuss jidaigeki representations of violence and masculinity, self-sacrifice and rebellion, and the invention of tradition as well as critical uses of history. In addition to the historical content of the films, we study the historical contexts that shaped jidaigeki film production and discuss relevant transformations in Japanese cinema and society. Period films have been shaped by and exert strong influences on Japanese theater, oral storytelling, popular literature, comics, and international film culture, all of which are helpful for understanding the films. As we track changes in jidaigeki style and subject matter, the course introduces theories for interpreting narrative structure, genre repetition and innovation, intertextuality, and representations of "the past." All readings are in English. No knowledge of Japanese required. No prerequisites. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 326

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3266 "East" and "West" in Jewish Imagination and Politics

How have Jews, as a paradigmatic diasporic people, understood their place between "East" and "West," and their relationships with other Jews and non-Jews within, across, and beyond the vast territorial expanse of Eurasia? What has it meant to identify, to be identified, and to live as Jews in Eurasia and beyond — both before and after the State of Israel? We begin with the origin of world Jewry, follow the various and interrelated experiences of Jews under Christendom and Islam, and, through carefully chosen vignettes, trace how the modern concepts of "East" and "West" have shaped the course of Jewish history, politics and imagination for millennia.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 326B Latin American Politics

This course is an introduction to the politics in Latin America, focusing on the trend toward the establishment of democracy. We examine the impact of political culture, economic development, and the legacy of authoritarian regimes on contemporary politics. The course also reviews many of the most pressing challenges confronting Latin American governments: the role of the military in politics; the reform of political institutions; threats from radical guerrillas and drug traffickers; debt and economic restructuring; and relations with the United States. Country studies focus on Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Mexico and Nicaragua. Prerequisite: 100-level introductory course in political science or its equivalent in history or international and area studies.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 326B

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3273 Introduction to Israel Studies

An exploration of Israel in the Jewish experience from antiquity to modernity and in the history and culture of the Middle East. Special attention will be paid to the modern state of Israel and current issues in its politics, economy and society. L75 5273 is intended for graduate students only.
Same as L75 JINE 3273

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 327B African Politics

A survey of politics in the states of sub-Saharan Africa. Major themes include the givens of African politics; the colonial inheritance; ethnicity, race and politics; religion and politics; forms and styles of rule and governance; pathologies and nonformal politics; and the international relation of African states. Requirements include two short papers and a written briefing on an assigned country.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 327B

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3282 Sexuality in Africa

An examination of various themes of African sexuality, including courtship, marriage, circumcision, STDs and AIDS, polygamy, homosexuality, child marriages, and the status of women. Course materials include ethnographic and historical material, African novels and films, and U.S. mass media productions. Using sexuality as a window of analysis, students are exposed to a broad range of social science perspectives such as functionalist, historical, feminist, social constructionist, Marxist and postmodern.
Same as L90 AFAS 3282

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD Art: SSC BU: BA


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L97 IAS 3283 Introduction to Global Health

This course provides a general introduction to the field of public health. It examines the philosophy, history, organization, functions, activities and results of public health research and practice. Case studies include infectious and chronic diseases, mental health, maternal and reproductive health, food safety and nutrition, environmental health, and global public health. Students are encouraged to look at health issues from a systemic and population level perspective, and to think critically about health systems and problems, especially health disparities and health care delivery to diverse populations. No background in anthropology or public health is required.
Same as L48 Anthro 3283

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 328B Gateway to Development

Why do some nations develop while others languish? What accounts for disparities in wealth and opportunity in the world? These are far more than simply economic questions because development creates economic, political, and social surpluses, skills and capabilities that can be allocated to other tasks. Societies that attain development become more capable actors in world affairs and are better able to address problems confronting their domestic societies. This seminar explores what governments and societies do to promote or hinder growth and development, and how those actions influence social arenas.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3290 Italian Neorealism

This course explores the visual language of one of the most influential film movements of the 20th century. We concentrate on the origins of neorealism in Italian post-war cinema and history, and focus on the works of filmmakers such as Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica and Luchino Visconti. We also consider the longer-term influence of the movement both in Italy and elsewhere. Throughout this course, we reflect on the possibilities of mimesis in cinema, on the social and political engagement of neorealist film, and on the factors that caused its decline.
Same as L53 Film 329

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3291 History of German Cinema

This course explores the major developments of German cinema throughout the 20th century. More specifically, this course engages with issues relating to German film culture's negotiation of popular filmmaking and art cinema, of Hollywood conventions and European avant-garde sensibilities. Topics include the political functions of German film during the Weimar, the Nazi, the postwar, and the postwall eras; the influence of American mass culture on German film; the role of German émigrés in the classical Hollywood studio system; and the place of German cinema in present-day Europe and in our contemporary age of globalization. Special attention is given to the role of German cinema in building and questioning national identity, to the ways in which German feature films over the past hundred years have used or challenged mainstream conventions to recall the national past and envision alternative futures. Films by directors such as Murnau, Lang, Fassbinder, Herzog, Tykwer and many others. All readings and discussions in English. May not be taken for German major or minor credit. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 328

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3292 Topics in Politics: Modern South Asian Politics

This course focuses on the recent political history and development of South Asia. It begins with a review of the British colonial period and the Independence movement. The remainder of the course examines different political issues in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Topics include political mobilization; land reform; law and politics; social movements; religious and caste politics; the rise of religious nationalism; and political control of the economy.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3292

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3293 Religion and Society

We take a broad and practice-oriented view of "religion," including uttering spells, sacrificing to a god, healing through spirit possession, as well as praying and reciting scripture. We consider religious practices in small-scale societies as well as those characteristic of forms of Judaism, Islam, Christianity and other broadly based religions. We give special attention to the ways religions shape politics, law, war, as well as everyday life in modern societies.
Same as L48 Anthro 3293

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L97 IAS 3301 Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture

A topics course on Chinese literature and culture; topics vary by semester.
Same as L04 Chinese 330

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3313 Women and Islam

An anthropological study of the position of women in the contemporary Muslim world, with examples drawn primarily from the Middle East but also from Asia, Africa, Europe and the United States. Students examine ethnographic, historical and literary works, including those written by Muslim women. Topics having a major impact on the construction of gender include Islamic belief and ritual, modest dress (veiling), notions of marriage and the family, modernization, nationalism and the nation-state, politics and protest, legal reform, formal education, work, and Westernization. The course includes a visit to a St. Louis mosque, discussions with Muslim women, and films.
Same as L48 Anthro 3313

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L97 IAS 3317 Hispanic Art/Arte Hispano

This course focuses on the most important movements, artistic expressions and its representatives of the art history of Latin America and Spain. From the Pre-Columbian art of the Mayas, Aztecs and Incas, to the syncretism of Postcolonial Latin American art, the Mexican Muralism and the self-reconstruction portraits of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo to the Chicano Art in the USA. From the Medieval paintings of religious Spain, to the criticism of the Spanish nobility by Diego Velazquez, the Spanish Civil War of Guernica by Pablo Picasso, to the Surrealism of Salvador Dalí and Antonio Gaudi. The students visit the St. Louis and the Kemper Art Museums. Prerequisite: Span 308E. May be used for elective credit in the Spanish major or minor. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 331

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: AH, GFAH, HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3318 Topics in Holocaust Studies

This course will approach the history, culture and literature of Nazism, World War II and the Holocaust by focusing on one particular aspect of the period — the experience of children. Children as a whole were drastically affected by the policies of the Nazi regime and the war it conducted in Europe, yet different groups of children experienced the period in radically different ways, depending on who they were and where they lived. By reading key texts written for and about children, we will first take a look at how the Nazis made children — both those they considered "Aryan" and those they designated "enemies" of the German people, such as Jewish children — an important focus of their politics. We will then examine literary texts and films that depict different aspects of the experience of European children during this period: daily life in the Nazi state, the trials of war and bombardment in Germany and the experience of expulsion from the East and defeat, the increasingly restrictive sphere in which Jewish children were allowed to live, the particular difficulties children faced in the Holocaust, and the experience of children in the immediate postwar period. Readings include texts by Ruth Klüger, Harry Mulisch, Imre Kertész, Miriam Katin, David Grossman and others. Course conducted entirely in English. Open to freshmen. Students must enroll in both main section and one discussion section.
Same as L21 German 331

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3319 Health, Healing and Ethics: Introduction to Medical Anthropology

A cross-cultural exploration of cultures and social organizations of medical systems, the global exportation of biomedicine, and ethical dilemmas associated with medical technologies and global disparities in health.
Same as L48 Anthro 3310

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L97 IAS 332 Topics in Politics: Constitutionalism and Democracy

An introductory analysis of a range of issues related to constitutions and democratic government. The main focus is on such theoretical questions as: Why do societies produce constitutions? Why do subsequent generations abide by them? What is the relationship between constitutional principles and democratic decision making? Who benefits from constitutional constraints?
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3321

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS BU: BA


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L97 IAS 3320 19th-Century China: Violence and Transformation

This course traces the history of China over the course of the 19th century, with an emphasis on social and cultural history. This was one of the most tumultuous centuries in Chinese history, during which China faced threats from abroad in the form of Western and Japanese imperialism, and from within, in the form of environmental degradation and rebellions resulting in an unprecedented loss of human life. The 19th century has thus often been portrayed as a period of sharp decline for China. At the same time, we explore the ways in which the origins of the dynamic society and economy found in China today, as well as the worldwide influence of overseas Chinese, can be traced to this century of turmoil.
Same as L22 History 331

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM, HUM BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3321 Topics in Film Studies: Italian Cinema

Among the great European- and world-cinematic traditions, Italian cinema ranks near the top. Making its breakthrough around 1945, it has continued to surprise and challenge audiences in the decades that followed. After a brief review of the early decades of Italian film, we focus on the first two decades of postwar cinema, beginning with neorealism, continuing through the boom years of the 1950s, and ending with the new introspection of the 1960s. Looking at the movies of five great directors — Rossellini, De Sica, Fellini, Antonioni and Visconti — we consider their evolving aesthetic and their engagement with both history writ large and the social and political issues that inform Italian life as the nation struggles to reconstruct an identity shattered by fascism and war. Course conducted in English; Italian majors must read in Italian, others in English translation. Three class hours per week plus a three-hour film viewing.
Same as L36 Ital 332

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3323 Japanese Literature: Beginnings to 19th Century

This survey of Japanese literature covers antiquity to the early 19th century. Emphasis on the ideological and cultural contexts for the emergence of a variety of traditions, including poetry, diaries, narrative and theater. Required of all Japanese majors and recommended for all Chinese majors. No knowledge of Japanese language is required. Sophomore standing and above recommended.
Same as L05 Japan 332C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 333 The Holocaust: History and Memory

Origins, causes and significance of the Nazi attempt to destroy European Jewry within the context of European and Jewish history. Related themes: the Holocaust in literature; the psychology of murderers and victims, bystanders and survivors; contemporary implications of the Holocaust for theology and politics.
Same as L22 History 333

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: ETH, HUM, IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3331 The Modern Voice in Japanese Literature

This survey explores the emerging modern voice in Japanese literature, with emphasis on prose fiction. After a brief introduction to earlier centuries, we focus on the short stories and novels of the 20th century. Among the authors considered are Natsume Soseki, Nagai Kafu, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, and Nobel laureates Kawabata Yasunari and Oe Kenzaburo. Discussions center on issues of modernity, gender, and literary self-representation. Required of all Japanese majors and recommended for all Chinese majors. No knowledge of Japanese language required.
Same as L05 Japan 333C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L97 IAS 3332 Culture and Health

This course will explore culture and health, with a focus on global health. Assigned readings explore cross-cultural perspectives on health, healing, and the body, as well as important concepts in medical anthropology. Through class discussions and close examination of ethnographies of health and illness, students will develop an understanding of how cultural and political-economic forces articulate with the emerging field of global health.
Same as L48 Anthro 333

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L97 IAS 3341 Gender, Health and Resistance: Comparative Slavery in the African Diaspora

Slavery is a field of historical study that continues to undergo considerable transformation within scholarly investigation. As such, scholars have sought to initiate much broader understandings of the evolution of slavery across both time and geographical space. This course will utilize a comparative approach to examine the experiences of enslavement common throughout the African diaspora, particularly within the United States, the Caribbean, and parts of Latin America. Some themes briefly covered within this course include: gender, sexuality, community, resistance, medicine, labor and culture.
Same as L22 History 3340

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 3350 Becoming "Modern": Emancipation, Antisemitism and Nationalism in Modern Jewish History

This course offers a survey of the Jewish experience in the modern world by asking, at the outset, what it means to be — or to become — modern. To answer this question, we look at two broad trends that took shape toward the end of the 18th century — the Enlightenment and the formation of the modern state — and we track changes and developments in Jewish life down to the close of the 20th century with analyses of the (very different) American and Israeli settings. The cultural, social, and political lives of Jews have undergone major transformations and dislocations over this time — from innovation to revolution, exclusion to integration, calamity to triumphs. The themes that we will be exploring in depth include the campaigns for and against Jewish "emancipation"; acculturation and religious reform; traditionalism and modernism in Eastern Europe; the rise of political and racial anti-Semitism; mass migration and the formation of American Jewry; varieties of Jewish national politics; Jewish-Gentile relations between the World Wars; the destruction of European Jewry; the emergence of a Jewish nation-state; and Jewish culture and identity since 1945.
Same as L22 History 335C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH, HUM


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L97 IAS 3351 Spanish-American Literature I

A survey of major figures and literary trends in Spanish America from 1492 to Modernismo (1880). Emphasis on the writings of either Colón or Columbus, Cortés, Bernal Diaz, Las Casas, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega; and Aztec reactions to the Conquest in the early period and on Sor Juana in colonial times. After the period of independence from Spain (1810–1824), the focus is on the literary representation of the making of the new nations and cultural autonomy. Readings include chapters of a picaresque novel, the representation of dictatorship, civilization vs. barbarism, the gaucho epic, and 19th-century fiction. Lectures and class discussions of the readings; exams, papers and short reports. Prerequisites: Span 307D; concurrent registration in Span 308E is allowed; completion of Span 308E is recommended. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 335C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3354 The Ancient Maya: Archaeology and History

This course focuses on the ancient Maya civilization because there are many exciting new breakthroughs in the study of the Maya. The Olmec civilization and the civilization of Teotihuacan in the Valley of Mexico are considered as they related to the rise and development of the Maya civilization. The ancient Maya were the only Pre-Columbian civilization to leave us a written record that we can use to understand their politics, religion and history. This course is about Maya ancient history and Maya glyphic texts, combined with the images of Maya life from their many forms of art. The combination of glyphic texts, art and archaeology now can provide a uniquely detailed reconstruction of ancient history in a New World civilization.
Same as L48 Anthro 3351

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3355 Spanish-American Literature of the Long 19th Century: From Empire to Nation

This survey examines the changing roles of literature and its creators during the period that saw the end of the powerful Spanish empire and the emergence of the political framework of independent nations we are familiar with today. Students are introduced to prominent themes such as independence writing, the experience of race in literature, romanticism, civilization vs. barbarism, the appeal of literature to popular classes, modernismo, the place of literature in nation building and in shaping national identity, and the idea of the past as present. Prerequisites: Span 307D or permission of instructor; concurrent enrollment in Span 308E is allowed; completion of Span 308E is recommended. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 3352

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3357 China's Urban Experience: Shanghai and Beyond

The course studies the history of Chinese cities from the mid-19th century to the late 20th century. It situates the investigation of urban transformation in two contexts: the domestic context of modern China's reform and revolution; and the global context of the international flow of people, products, capitals and ideas. It chooses a local narrative approach and situates the investigation in one of China's largest, complex, and most dynamic and globalized cities — Shanghai. The experience of the city and its people reveals the creative and controversial ways people redefined, reconfigured and reshaped forces such as imperialism, nationalism, consumerism, authoritarianism, liberalism, communism and capitalism. The course also seeks to go beyond the "Shanghai model" by comparing Shanghai with other Chinese cities. It presents a range of the urban experience in modern China.
Same as L03 East Asia 3352

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3358 Vienna, Prague, Budapest: Politics, Culture, and Identity in Central Europe

The term Central Europe evokes the names of Freud and Mahler; Kafka and Kundera; Herzl, Lukács, and Konrád. In politics, it evokes images of revolution and counter-revolution, ethnic nationalism, fascism and communism. Both culture and politics, in fact, were deeply embedded in the structures of empire (in our case, the Habsburg Monarchy) — structures which both balanced and exacerbated ethnic, religious, and social struggles — in modern state formation, and in the emergence of creative and dynamic urban centers, of which Vienna, Budapest and Prague were the most visible. This course seeks to put all of these elements into play — empire, nation, urban space, religion and ethnicity — in order to illustrate what it has meant to be modern, creative, European, nationalist or cosmopolitan since the 19th century. It engages current debates on nationalism and national identity; the viability of empires as supranational constructs; urbanism and modern culture; the place of Jews in the social and cultural fabric of Central Europe; migration; and authoritarian and violent responses to modernity.
Same as L22 History 3354

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3360 The Floating World in Japanese Literature

This survey of Japanese literature covers the 17th to the 19th century. Primary focus is on the Genroku era (1688-1703), which witnessed the growth of lively urban centers and the emergence of a robust literary voice. Emphasis on the ideological and cultural contexts for the development of a variety of new innovations in the genres of poetry (haiku), theater (kabuki and bunraku) and prose (kana zoshi). Recommended for both Japanese and Chinese majors. No knowledge of Japanese language is required. Sophomore standing and above recommended.
Same as L05 Japan 336

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 3361 Spanish-American Literature II

A survey of major Latin American literary works focusing on canonical works of the 20th and 21st centuries in their cultural and historical contexts. The course includes discussions of major literary movements such as the avant-garde, the Boom and the post-Boom. Other topics may include the literary and cultural responses to revolution, dictatorship and the evolving definitions of Latin America. Authors may include Quiroga, Neruda, Guillén, Vallejo, Borges, Cortázar, Rulfo, Carpentier, García Márquez, Poniatowska, Fuentes, Ferré and others. Prerequisites: Span 307D; concurrent enrollment in Span 308E is allowed; completion of Span 308E is recommended.
Same as L38 Span 336C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3365 Cinema and Ireland

Like many other Anglophone and Francophone countries, Ireland only even started to develop a robust national cinema in the 1970s. As in, for instance, Australia and New Zealand, growth had previously been blocked by the dominance of local screens by films from, on the one hand, the overbearing "imperial" power, Britain, and, on the other, Hollywood, center of an even stronger cultural imperialism. Increased national self-assertion coincided with the weakening of the grip of those two cinemas in the post-classical period. A major focus of the class is on some of the key works of the filmmakers who established themselves in the 1980s, notably Neil Jordan and Jim Sheridan. But, as the title indicates — not simply Irish Cinema — it deals with more than this. Like Ireland itself, Irish cinema is deeply marked by, and preoccupied with, the political and cultural struggles of the past, and recent cinema is illuminated by seeing it in the context of earlier films: Hollywood and British versions of Ireland, whether shot on location or in the studio, as well as the isolated earlier landmarks of an indigenous Irish cinema. We also look at the rich topic of the representation of Irish immigrants in Hollywood films. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 336

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA, CD A&S IQ: LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3373 Law and Culture

We live in an age when social policy is increasingly displaced into the realm of law, when justice and equality are matters of courtroom debate rather than public discussion. Legal language has become a key resource in all kinds of struggles over livelihood and ways of life. In this course, we study the cultural dimensions of law and law's changing relationship to state power, the global economy, social movements and everyday life. We approach law as a system of rules, obligations and procedures, but also a cultural practice, moral regime and disciplinary technique. How are relationships between legal, political and economic realms structured and with what consequences? How does law provide tools for both social struggle and social control? What does anthropology contribute to research on these issues? In exploring these questions, we combine readings from classical legal anthropology with recent ethnographic work from around the globe.
Same as L48 Anthro 3373

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L97 IAS 3392 Topics in South Asian Religions

The topic for this course varies. The topic for fall 2017 is Hinduism and the Hindu Right.
Same as L23 Re St 3392

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3400 History of World Cinema

The course surveys the history of cinema as it developed in nations other than the United States. Beginning with the initially dominant film-producing nations of Western Europe, this course considers the development of various national cinemas in Europe, Asia and Third World countries. The course seeks to develop an understanding of each individual film both as an expression of a national culture as well as a possible response to international movements in other art forms. Throughout, the course considers how various national cinemas sought ways of dealing with the pervasiveness of Hollywood films, developing their own distinctive styles, which could in turn influence American cinema itself. Priority given to majors. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 340

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM, IS


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L97 IAS 3402 German Literature and the Modern Era

Introduction in English to German writers from 1750 to the present. Discussion focuses on questions like the role of outsiders in society, the human psyche, technology, war, gender, the individual and mass culture, modern and postmodern sensibilities as they are posed in predominantly literary texts and in relation to the changing political and cultural faces of Germany over the past 250 years. Readings include works in translation by some of the most influential figures of the German tradition, such as Goethe, Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, Thomas Mann, Brecht, and Christa Wolf. Open to first-year students, nonmajors and majors. Required for admission to 400-level courses (except 401, 402, 403, 404 and 408D). Qualifies for major or minor credit when taken in conjunction with a one-hour discussion section in German. The discussion section provides an introduction to critical German vocabulary and is open to students with prior knowledge of German (German 210D or equivalent, or placement by examination).
Same as L21 German 340C

Credit variable, maximum 4 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH, IS


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L97 IAS 3410 Early and Imperial Chinese Literature

An introduction to important genres and themes of Chinese literature through the study of major writers. Brief lectures on the writers' personal, social, intellectual, and historical contexts; most class time is devoted to student discussions of masterworks as an avenue for understanding Chinese culture during selected historical periods. Required for all Chinese majors, and recommended for all Japanese and East Asian Studies majors. No prerequisites; all readings available in English translation.
Same as L04 Chinese 341

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3414 Transnational Cinema(s): Film Flows in a Changing World

Across a century of extreme nationalism, Cold War imperialism and increased globalization, moving image culture remains deeply tied to the evolution of global economics, shifting notions of local identity, and human migration. Recent changes in the dynamic of international economics and cultural flow have led to new critical approaches that reassess international cinema as being constructed by relationships that transcend national borders. This course examines multiple ways in which cinema works "transnationally," focusing on recent theories of modernism, globalization and borderless cultures. Exploring a range of contexts from American domination of the early international market, to the recent evolution of Chinese blockbuster action films, to contemporary Palestinian video art, this course looks at the way in which material developments, narrative and aesthetic conventions, and film professionals have circulated over the past century. We also look at how new technologies of production, distribution and exhibition challenge traditional notions of cultural borders. Required screenings and in-class textual analysis are used to complement industrial studies of how transnational flows have come to define contemporary audiovisual media practices. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 341

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3415 Early Chinese Art: From Human Sacrifice to the Silk Road

This course examines Chinese art and material culture from the prehistoric period through the end of the medieval Tang dynasty, when the Chinese capital boasted a cosmopolitan population of more than 1 million people. Topics covered include Neolithic ceramics and jades, the bronzecasting tradition, funerary art and architecture, the Terracotta Army, the origins of Chinese brush arts, Buddhist painting and sculpture, and the varied exotica of the Silk Road. Each class teaches recent works together with the ancient to demonstrate how the origins of Chinese art and architecture continue to influence contemporary works. Prerequisite: Art-Arch 111 Introduction to Asian Art or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3415

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: AH, GFAH, HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3416 German Thought and the Modern Era

In this introduction to the intellectual history of the German-speaking world from roughly 1750 to the present, we will read English translations of works by some of the most influential figures in the German tradition, including Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Adorno, Heidegger, Arendt, Habermas and others. Our discussions will focus on topics such as secularization, what it means to be modern, the possibility of progress, the role of art and culture in social life, the critique of mass society, and the interpretation of the Nazi past. We will consider the arguments of these thinkers both on their own terms and against the backdrop of the historical contexts in which they were written. Open to first-year students, nonmajors and majors. Admission to 400-level courses (except 401, 402, 403, 404, and 408D) is contingent on completion of this course or 340C. Qualifies for major or minor credit when taken in conjunction with one-hour discussion section in German. The discussion section provides an introduction to critical German vocabulary and is open to students with prior knowledge of German (German 210D or equivalent, or placement by examination).
Same as L21 German 341

Credit variable, maximum 4 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L97 IAS 3417 Literary and Cultural Studies in Spanish

This course is an introduction to cultural and literary analysis within Iberian and Latin American cultures. The course covers a wide variety of materials that span different countries, historical periods, and various cultural and literary forms. The main objective of the course is to introduce students to key historical, geographical and political aspects of these cultures, while at the same time applying different approaches of cultural analysis. The course is structured upon key central concepts as they are particularly related to the cultures of the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America, such as nation, colonialism/postcolonialism; modernity and postmodernity; popular and visual media; gender, race, migration and social class. The course combines the reading of literary texts, films and other cultural forms, with the examination of introductory critical works related to the key concepts that are explored throughout the semester. Prerequisites: Span 308E or concurrent enrollment in 308E. Taught in Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 341

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3418 War, Genocide and Gender in Modern Europe

This course explores the way in which gender and gender relations shaped and were shaped by war and genocide in 20th-century Europe. The course approaches the subject from various vantage points, including economic, social and cultural history, and draws on comparisons between different regions. Topics covered will include: new wartime tasks for women; soldiers' treatment of civilians under occupation, including sexual violence; how combatants dealt with fear, injury and the loss of comrades; masculine attributes of soldiers and officers of different nations and in different wartime roles; survival strategies and the relation to expectations with regard to people's (perceived) gender identity; the meanings of patriotism for women and men during war; and gender-specific experiences of genocide.
Same as L22 History 3416

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: BA, IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 342 Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature

An introduction to the major writers and works of Chinese literature from the turn of the 20th century to the present, including fiction, poetry and film. We look at these works in their relevant literary, sociopolitical and cultural contexts (including Western influences). Required for all Chinese majors, and recommended for all Japanese and East Asian Studies majors. No prerequisites; all readings in English translation.
Same as L04 Chinese 342

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L97 IAS 3421 Iberian Literatures and Cultures

Which are the cultures that shape what Spain is today? This course explores the diversity of the Iberian Peninsula through its literatures and cultures. As part of both the Mediterranean and Western Europe, the Iberian Peninsula has been shaped through a dynamic of conflict and negotiation between various cultures, languages and religions. Students engage themes such as internal colonization, imperialism, multiculturalism, regional identities, nation formation, migration, media and popular culture, modernization, and gender and race relations, as they relate to our understanding of the country today. Focuses may include but are not limited to the following: multiculturalism of the Middle Ages, the Muslim and Jewish presence in Spain, identity narratives and power relations, stage and performance traditions, as well as authors and artists like Cervantes, Galdós, García Lorca, Picasso, Almodóvar. Prerequisites: Span 308E or concurrent enrollment in 308E. Taught in Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 342

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3424 The World Is Not Enough: Europe's Global Empires, 1400-1750

"Non sufficit orbis" (the world is not enough) became the motto for King Philip II of Spain, whose empire touched nearly every part of the globe. Europe's expansion to Africa, Asia and the Americas was a transforming event for world history and for its willing and unwilling participants. This course examines the religious, political, and economic forces driving the overseas expansion of Europe, compares the experience of European sailors, soldiers and merchants in different parts of the world, and analyzes the effect of empire on the colonizers, the colonized, and the balance of world power. Topics covered include: Portuguese and Spanish conquests in the East and West Indies, religious conversion and resistance, trade routes and rivalries, colonial practices and indigenous influence, the establishment of Atlantic slavery, and the rise of the Dutch and English empires.
Same as L22 History 3414

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3425 Classical to Contemporary Chinese Art

Surveying Chinese art and architecture from the 10th century through today, this course examines classical and imperial works as the foundation for modern and contemporary art. Engaging with the theoretical issues in art history, we also pay particular attention to questions of gender, social identity, cultural politics and government control of art. No prerequisites.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3425

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: AH, GFAH BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 343 Text, Memory and Identity

This course explores issues of collective memory and identity through the study of texts such as national myths and official histories taught in schools. The focus is on texts themselves and how they are produced (e.g., by the state, popular culture) and consumed. The course has two components, methodological and analytical. In the first, we read a number of theoretical works devoted to definitions of the text from a historical and structural point of view. In the second, we analyze various key works that have played a crucial role in the formation of communities of memory and identity and the borders that separate them. The course is comparative, multidisciplinary and international in its scope.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L97 IAS 3430 Capitalism, Exchange and Inequality in Africa

This course explores issues of power and inequality related to exchange and the emergence of market economies in Africa. Case studies include examinations of cattle and bride wealth among pastoralists in Sudan, welfare policies in contemporary South Africa, and sex work in West Africa. In each of these cases there is a complex balance between the value placed on maintaining social relationships and accumulating private property. We investigate the implications of this balance for the production of local and international forms of inequality. The course also introduces students to key ideas in economic anthropology such as the formalist-substantivist debate, rational choice theory and neo-Marxist approaches to power and stratification. By the end of the course, students should be able to critically assess the value of these theories in understanding day-to-day economic activities in Africa. This class is a discussion-based seminar and in-class participation is highly encouraged. Students are graded on a series of analytical essays, a final paper and in-class participation.
Same as L90 AFAS 343

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L97 IAS 3431 Latin American Literatures and Cultures

How did Latin America become Latin America? This course explores the different inventions and reinventions of the region through its literatures and cultures. Beginning with the encounter of Europeans with America, students will engage themes like colonization and colonialism, urban and rural cultures, nation formation, modernization, media and popular culture, as well as gender and race relations. Authors studied may include Colón, Sor Juana, Sarmiento, Neruda, Borges, García Márquez, or Morejón. Prerequisites: Spanish 308E or concurrent enrollment in 308E. Taught in Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 343

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3445 Riots and Revolution: A History of Modern France from 1789 to the Present

This course surveys the history of France in the 19th and 20th centuries, from the French Revolution through the European Union. The focus in this course will be on the relationship between Paris and the provinces and how the dynamic between the seemingly all-powerful capital and its periphery, both colonial and metropolitan, played into the history of modern France. Major topics include: the legacy of the French Revolution; the development of French nationalism; popular political uprisings; the meaning of modernity; colonialism; French cultural capital; and the changing fortunes of France on the international stage.
Same as L22 History 3445

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3453 Modern Germany

This course surveys the political, social, economic, and cultural forces that have shaped German history since 1800. After examining the multiplicity of German states that existed in 1800, we will identify the key factors that resulted in unification in 1871. We then turn to a study of modern Germany in its various forms, from the Empire through the Weimar Republic and Third Reich, to post-war division and reunification. A major focus will be the continuities and discontinuities of German history, particularly with regard to the historical roots of Nazism and attempts to "break with the past" after 1945.
Same as L22 History 3450

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3460 British Enlightenment Culture

To capture the range and vibrancy of British enlightenment culture, this class invites students to read broadly and imaginatively in the most influential literary, economic, and philosophical texts of the time.
Same as L14 E Lit 346

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3465 Japanese Literature in Translation II

This topics course explores Japanese literature in translation. Topics vary by semester.
Same as L05 Japan 346

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3482 Masterpieces of Literature II

Masterpieces of Western literature in English translation: the 17th century through the 20th century.
Same as L14 E Lit 348

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3490 Yidishkayt: Yiddish Literature in English Translation

This course will trace the emergence, development, flourish, and near-decline of Yiddish literature, beginning with some of the earliest writings to appear in Yiddish in the late middle ages and early modern period, continuing with 19th-century attempts to establish a modern Yiddish literature and the 20th-century emergence of both a classical canon and a literary avant-garde, and ending with post-Holocaust attempts to retain a Yiddish literary culture in the near absence of Yiddish-speaking communities. Focusing on the role of Yiddish as the "national" language of Ashkenaz, the course will examine the ways in which Yiddish literature has responded to the social conditions of European Jewish life, exploring among others the relationship between Yiddish and the non-Jewish cultures in which it existed, the tensions between secular trends versus religious tradition, life in the shtetl and in the metropolis, immigration from the old world to the new, and Yiddish literary responses to the Holocaust.
Same as L75 JINE 349

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 350 Israeli Culture and Society

An examination of critical issues in contemporary Israeli culture and society, such as ethnicity, speech, humor, religious identity, and the Arab population, using readings in English translation from a variety of disciplines: folklore, literary criticism, political science, sociology, psychology, anthropology. Prerequisite: sophomore standing, or permission of instructor.
Same as L75 JINE 350

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS


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L97 IAS 3500 The 19th-Century Russian Novel (WI)

The 19th-century "realistic" novel elevated Russian literature to world literary significance. In this course we do close readings of three major Russian novels: Alexander Pushkin's Eugene Onegin, Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment and Lev Tolstoy's Anna Karenina. While we consider a variety of formal and thematic concerns, special emphasis is placed on the social context and on questions of Russian cultural identity. Readings and discussions are supplemented by critical articles and film. This is a writing-intensive course: workshops are required. All readings are in English translation. No prerequisites.
Same as L39 Russ 350C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD, WI Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 3510 Muhammad in History and Literature

This course intends to examine the life and representations of the Prophet Muhammad from the perspective of multiple spiritual sensibilities as articulated in various literary genres from medieval to modern periods. The course is divided roughly into two parts. One part deals with the history of Muhammad and the related historiographical questions. The second part deals with the representations of Muhammad in juristic, theological, Sufi, etc., literature. Because of the availability of primary sources in English translation, there is a healthy dose of primary source reading and analysis throughout the semester. Those students with advanced Arabic (and Persian and Turkish) skills are encouraged to engage sources in their original language.
Same as L75 JINE 351

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L97 IAS 3512 "Model Minority": The Asian-American Experience

As an introductory course to Asian-American Studies, this course explores key issues in the field revolving around the concept of "model minority." It explores the origins of this concept, analyzes the social discourses about Asian Americans as a model minority, and through interrogations of complex experiences and heterogeneity among Asian Americans (including Pacific Islanders), it aims to dismantle the model minority myth. This course is designed to respond to the students' interest in Asian-American Studies as well as to fit into the broader discussion on campus about race and ethnicity in the United States. It approaches race and ethnicity by focusing on one designated pan-ethnic group, and uses multidisciplinary inquiries inspired by the fields of history, sociology, anthropology, law and education, all of which are concerned with the conceptual framework of "model minority."

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3520 Literature of Modern and Contemporary Korea

This undergraduate course surveys the major writers and works of 20th-century Korean literature. During the 20th century, Korea went through a radical process of modernization. From its colonization by Japan, to its suffering of a civil war within the cold war order, to its growth into a cultural and economic powerhouse, Korea's historical experience is at once unique and typical of that of a third-world nation. By immersing ourselves in the most distinctive literary voices from Korea, we examine how the Korean experience of modernization was filtered through its cultural production. In class discussion, we pay special attention to the writers' construction of the self and the nation. How do social categories such as ethnicity, class, gender and race figure in the varying images of the self? And how do these images relate to the literary vision of the nation? Along the way, we observe the prominent ideas, themes and genres of Korean literature. This class combines discussion with lecture with students strongly encouraged to participate. All literary texts are in English translation and no previous knowledge of Korean is required.
Same as L51 Korean 352

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3521 Introduction to Postcolonial Literature and Theory

At its zenith, the British Empire encompassed almost a quarter of the globe, allowing the diminutive island nation unprecedented economic, military, and political influence upon the rest of the world. This course will introduce some of the foundational responses to this dominance, both literary and theoretical, by the colonized and their descendants. We will examine important critiques of colonialism by theorists such as Frantz Fanon, Aimé Césaire, Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, and Gayatri Spivak, as well as literary works that reflect a postcolonial critique by authors such as V.S. Naipaul, George Lamming, Doris Lessing, and N'gugi wa Thiong'o. The course will interrogate how literature could be said to help consolidate Empire as well as ways in which it might function as rebellion against imperial power, with a view toward teasing out the problematics of race, gender, language, nationalism and identity that postcolonial texts so urgently confront.
Same as L14 E Lit 3520

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3525 Topics in Literature

Topics course which varies by semester.
Same as L14 E Lit 3522

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3526 Iraqi Literature

This course introduces students to major works in Iraqi literature in the 20th and 21st centuries, with a focus on the post-World War Two period up to the present day.
Same as L49 Arab 352

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 353 Global Energy and the American Dream

This lecture course explores the historical, cultural and political relationship between America and global energy, focusing on oil, coal, natural gas, biofuels and alternatives. Through case studies at home and abroad, we examine how cultural, environmental, economic and geopolitical processes are entangled with changing patterns of energy-related resource extraction, production, distribution and use. America's changing position as global consumer and dreamer is linked to increasingly violent contests over energy abroad while our fuel-dependent dreams of boundless (oil) power give way to uncertainties and new possibilities of nation, nature and the future. Assuming that technology and markets alone will not save us, what might a culturally, politically and socially minded inquiry contribute to understanding the past and future of global energy and the American dream?
Same as L48 Anthro 3472

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH, IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3544 The Anthropological and Sociological Study of Muslim Societies

This course introduces students to anthropological and sociological scholarship on Muslim societies. Attention will be given to the broad theoretical and methodological issues which orient such scholarship. These issues include the nature of Muslim religious and cultural traditions, the nature of modernization and rationalization in Muslim societies, and the nature of sociopolitical relations between "Islam" and the "West." The course explores the preceding issues through a series of ethnographic and historical case studies, with a special focus on Muslim communities in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and Europe. Case studies address a range of specific topics, including religious knowledge and authority, capitalism and economic modernization, religion and politics, gender and sexuality, as well as migration and globalization.
Same as L75 JINE 354

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3550 Sexing Korea: Gender & Sexuality and Korean Popular Culture

A topics course in Korean literature and culture; topics vary by semester.
Same as L51 Korean 355

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 3554 Political Economy of Democracy

In the last few years a number of important books have appeared that combine elements of economics reasoning and political science, in an effort to understand the wide variation in economic development in the world. This course will deal with the logic apparatus underpinning these books. In addition, the course will introduce the student to the theoretical apparatus that can be used to examine democratic institutions in the developed world, and the success or otherwise of moves to democratization in the less developed world.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3552

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 3555 Revolution with an Accent: The Haitian and French Revolution, 1770-1805

How can politics enact fundamental changes? What makes those changes a "revolution"? How do we judge the legitimacy of such changes? When these questions arise over the course of ordinary political arguments, the example of the French Revolution often looms large, casting a shadow tinted with blood and Terror. Much less present in the collective political imagination is the Haitian Revolution. These two events are complex and complicated, and are filled with fascinating, chilling, inspired characters, enflamed rhetoric and challenging questions. This course examines both the unfolding of events and the rise and fall of protagonists within these two revolutions and explores the ways that issues such as religion, state finance, loyalty, race and slavery became politicized.
Same as L22 History 3554

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 3559 Socialist and Secular? A Social History of the Soviet Union

This class explores daily life and cultural developments in the Soviet Union, 1917 to 1999. Focusing on the everyday experience of Soviet citizens during these years, students learn about the effects of large-scale social and political transformation on the private lives of people. To explore daily life in the Soviet Union, this class uses a variety of sources and media, including scholarly analysis, contemporaneous portrayals, literary representations and films. Students will receive a foundation in Soviet political, social, and cultural history with deeper insights into select aspects of life in Soviet society.
Same as L22 History 3559

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 356 Andean History: Culture and Politics

Since pre-Columbian times, the central Andean mountain system, combining highlands, coastal and jungle areas, has been the locus of multiethnic polities. Within this highly variegated geographical and cultural-historical space, emerged the Inca Empire, the viceroyalty of Peru — Spain's core South American colony —  and the central Andean republics of Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. Taking a chronological and thematic approach, this course examines pre-Columbian Andean societies, Inca rule, Andean transformations under Spanish colonialism, post-independence nation-state formation, state-Indian relations, reform and revolutionary movements, and neoliberal policies and the rise of new social movements and ethnic politics. This course focuses primarily on the development of popular and elite political cultures, and the nature and complexity of local, regional and national power relations.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3575 U.S. Foreign Policy: Theory and Practice

In this class we focus on the procedures and institutions that shape U.S. foreign policy decisions. This is neither a course on international relations theory nor a history of U.S. foreign policy. Rather, this course examines the domestic politics surrounding U.S. foreign policy decisions. How do public opinion, electoral politics, and interest groups shape foreign policy? Which branch controls foreign policy — the president, Congress, the courts? Or is it ultimately the foreign affairs bureaucracy that pulls the strings? We examine these topics through reading and writing assignments, class discussion, and simulations to promote deeper understanding and build practical skills.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L97 IAS 3584 Music in the Holocaust: Portrayals in Sound from Past and Present

The course explores Germany's road to totalitarianism through three different stages seen through its musical contexts: the embediment of "music libels" against Jews in 19th-century European culture in general and German culture in particular; the association of Jewish culture with the threat of modernism until World War II; and Nazi policies in the 1930s regarding music and their repercussion on musical activities in the different ghettos (especially Terezin and Lodz). The last segment of this class deals with the challenge of commemorating the holocaust through music.
Same as L75 JINE 3584

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3594 The Wheels of Commerce: From the Industrial Revolution to Global Capitalism

John Maynard Keynes once said, "The ideas of economists and political philosophers both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed the world is ruled by little else. Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences, are usually the slaves of some defunct economist." In this course we will focus our attention on the blind spot that Keynes so astutely identified. We will study seminal works in the history of political economy (Smith, Malthus, Marx, Keynes, Krugman, etc.) and explore the social, economic, and political histories in which they were grounded. We will begin with the Industrial Revolution in Britain, the works of Adam Smith, and the emergence of political economy as a field of inquiry. We will end with the globalization of the 1970s, the works of Joseph Stiglitz, and the challenges that a more interconnected world has posed for both the organization of the economy and the practice of economics as a discipline.
Same as L22 History 3593

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 3598 The First World War and the Making of Modern Europe

The First World War ushered our age into existence. Its memories still haunt us, and its aftershocks shaped the course of the 20th century. The Russian Revolution, the emergence of new national states, Fascism, Nazism, the Second World War, and the Cold War are all its products. Today, many of the ethnic and national conflicts that triggered war in 1914 have resurfaced. Understanding the First World War, in short, is crucial to understanding our own era.
Same as L22 History 3598

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 360 Directed Readings in International and Area Studies

These courses are designed to offer a greater breadth for IAS majors in disciplines that typically require prerequisites at the advanced level. To be granted credit toward the IAS major, students must complete additional work as determined by the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH EN: H


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L97 IAS 3601 The Traffic in Women and Contemporary European Cinema

What binds society together? One of the most influential answers to this question was offered by French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss. He argued that the fabric of a society is formed by a network of exchanges among kinship groups, which circulate three kinds of objects: economic goods, linguistic signs and women. In this course, we inquire into the place of women in this argument. We trace rudiments of the traditional marriage system (a father figure still "gives away" the bride in the marriage ceremony), its range of displacements in a global economy (transnational wives, nannies and domestic servants), the role of new media in the formation of new systems of trafficking (internet brides), and the place of the debate on gay marriage within the larger conversation. We read texts by Friedrich Engels, Sigmund Freud, Marcel Mauss, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Gayle Rubin, Luce Irigaray, Judith Butler, Barbara Ehrenreich and Arlie Russell Hochschild; and we watch a number of films that dramatize the traffic in women in the context of contemporary Europe: Coline Serreau's Chaos, Lukas Moodisson's Lilja 4-ever, Cristian Mungiu's Occident, Nilita Vachani's When Mother Comes Home for Christmas, Fatih Akin's Head-on, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne's The Silence of Lorna.
Same as L93 IPH 360

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3602 Borders, Checkpoints and the Frontiers of Literature

Borders are some of the most strange, dangerous, and changeable places in the world. They help define not only where we are but also who we are. This course reads literature from and about border regions around the world: the Mexican-American frontera, the Indian and Pakistani Partition line, the German Iron Curtain, the African colonial borders, and the Israeli-Palestinian divisions. Even if we live far from any international boundary, the notion of the border shapes our thinking about the world. Literature is a place where borders are vividly imagined, marked and debated in ways that both affect preexisting frontiers and help draw new ones on the ground. We read all texts in English.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3603 Beyond Sea, Sunshine and Soca: A History of the Caribbean

This course examines major themes in the history of the Caribbean from the 15th to the 20th century. The first half of the course focuses on the 15th to the 19th century, exploring issues such as indigenous societies, European encounter and conquest, plantation slavery, the resistance of enslaved Africans and emancipation. The remainder of the course focuses on aspects of the cultural, economic, political and social experiences of Caribbean peoples during the 20th century. Major areas of inquiry include the labor rebellions of the 1930s, decolonization, diasporic alliances, Black Power, identity construction and the politics of tourism. While the English-speaking Caribbean constitutes the main focus, references are made to other areas such as Cuba and Haiti. Additionally, the Caribbean is considered in a multilayered way with a view to investigating the local (actors within national boundaries), the regional (historical events that have rendered the region a unit of analysis) and the global (larger globalizing forces such as capitalism, colonialism, migration and slavery that have made the Caribbean central to world history).
Same as L90 AFAS 3601

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3612 Population and Society

This review of population processes and their social ramifications begins with an introduction to the basic terminology, concepts and methods of population studies, followed by a survey of human population trends through history. The course then investigates biological and social dimensions of marriage and childbearing, critically examines family planning policies, deals with the social impacts of epidemics and population aging, and looks at connections between population movements and sociocultural changes. The overall objective of the course is to understand how population processes are not just biological in nature, but are closely related to social, cultural, political and economic factors.
Same as L48 Anthro 3612

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3622 Topics in Islam

Selected themes in the study of Islam and Islamic culture in social, historical, and political context. The specific area of emphasis will be determined by the instructor.
Same as L75 JINE 3622

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 363 Russian Literature and Opera: Transpositions and Transgressions

This interdisciplinary course surveys the intersections between Russian literature and opera from the 19th century to the present. Literary works in a variety of genres (short stories, narrative poems, plays and novels) by Russian authors (with Pushkin as a clear favorite) have inspired generations of leading Russian composers, resulting in significant operatic adaptations, including Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin, based on Pushkin, Prokofiev's The Gambler, based on Dostoevsky, and Shostakovich's The Nose, based on Gogol. For each pairing of author and composer, we read and discuss the literary text before considering the ways in which the original was refined, trimmed and generally transformed for the operatic stage. We frequently view opera productions and consider issues of staging, embodiment and fidelity to the original. The broader goal of the class is to consider the possibilities and limits of artistic media, specifically the points of agreement or dissonance between literature and music.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 364 Anarchism: History, Theory and Praxis

This course analyzes the origins, historical trajectories and influence of anarchism from its classical period (1860s-1930s) until the present. It examines the major personalities, complex ideas, vexing controversies and diverse movements associated with anarcho-collectivism, anarcho-communism, individualist anarchism, anarcho-syndicalism, anarchist feminism, green anarchism, lifestyle anarchism and poststructuralist anarchism. In doing so, it explores traditional anarchist concerns with state power, authority, social inequality, capitalism, nationalism, imperialism and militarism. It also analyzes anarchism's conception of individual and collective liberation, mutual aid, workers' organization, internationalism, direct democracy, education, women's emancipation, sexual freedom and social ecology. Special attention is given to past and contemporary globalizing processes and their relation to the dissemination and reception of anarchism in the global South.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L97 IAS 3640 Literature and Ethics


Same as L16 Comp Lit 364

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L97 IAS 365 Theatre Culture Studies III: Melodrama to Modernism

The third of three historical survey courses in theater and performance studies, this course traces the origins of the modern theater. Beginning with Romanticism's self-conscious break with the past, we study the rise of bourgeois melodrama with its intensely emotional rendering of character and spectacular visual effects. We consider how those effects were made possible by advances in industrial stage technology which reproduced the everyday world with unprecedented realism, and how playwrights responded to those technologies by calling for the theatre to become either a "total work of art" which plunged its spectators into a mythical realm, or a petri dish which analytically presented the struggles of the modern individual within their modern milieu. Exploring a range of aesthetic modes (including melodrama, Realism, Naturalism, Aestheticism, Symbolism, Expressionism, the Epic theatre, and the Theatre of the Absurd), we read classic plays by modern playwrights such as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Pirandello, Brecht, and Beckett to consider how the modern theatre helped its audiences understand as well as adapt to the rapidly changing conditions of modernity.
Same as L15 Drama 365C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L97 IAS 3650 Topics in Modern Korean Literature

A topics course on modern Korean literature.
Same as L51 Korean 365

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 366 Women and Film

The aim of this course is primarily to familiarize students with the work of prominent women directors over the course of the 20th century, from commercial blockbusters to the radical avant-garde. Approaching the films in chronological order, we consider the specific historical and cultural context of each filmmaker's work. In addition we discuss the films in relation to specific gender and feminist issues such as the status of women's film genres, representations of men and women on screen, and the gender politics of film production. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 366

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3662 Experts, Administrators, and Soldiers: Governance and Development in Postcolonial Africa

Between 1957 and 1975, one African territory after another made the transition from European colony to independent nation-state. Widespread optimism that these "transfers of power" would bring a new era of prosperity and dignity dissipated quickly as the new nations struggled with political instability, military coups, social unrest, and persistent poverty. Consequently many western observers and development specialists are certain that they have become "failed states" requiring foreign assistance to develop properly. This course challenges these assumptions by tracing the origins of African governance and economic development from their imperial origins into the independence era. By exploring nation building, economic planning, and public administration from the perspective of political elites, foreign experts, and ordinary people, the class takes an intimate look at how colonies became nation-states. These new perspectives offer students a historical grounding in international public administration and development by exploring how imperial ideas and concepts continue to influence contemporary social planning and development policy in both Africa and the wider world.
Same as L22 History 3662

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3670 Gurus, Saints, and Scientists: Religion in Modern South Asia

Many long-standing South Asian traditions have been subject to radical reinterpretation, and many new religious movements have arisen, as South Asians have grappled with how to accommodate their traditions of learning and practice to what they have perceived to be the conditions of modern life. In this course we consider some of the factors that have contributed to religious change in South Asia, including British colonialism, sedentarization and globalization, and new discourses of democracy and equality. We consider how new religious organizations were part and parcel with movements for social equality and political recognition; examine the intellectual contributions of major thinkers like Swami Vivekananda, Sayyid Ahmad Khan and Mohandas Gandhi; and explore how Hindu, Islamic and other South Asian traditions were recast in the molds of natural science, social science and world religion.
Same as L23 Re St 3670

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L97 IAS 3672 Medicine, Healing and Experimentation in the Contours of Black History

Conversations regarding the history of medicine continue to undergo considerable transformation within academia and the general public. The infamous Tuskegee syphilis experiment serves as a marker in the historical consciousness regarding African Americans and the medical profession. This course taps into this particular evolution, prompting students to broaden their gaze to explore the often delicate relationship of people of African descent within the realm of medicine and healing. Tracing the social nature of these medical interactions from the period of enslavement through the 20th century, this course examines the changing patterns of disease and illness, social responses to physical and psychological ailments, and the experimental and exploitative use of black bodies in the field of medicine. As a history course, the focus is extended toward the underpinnings of race and gender in the medical treatment allocated across time and space — the United States, Caribbean and Latin America — to give further insight into the roots of contemporary practice of medicine.
Same as L22 History 3672

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 3680 The Cold War, 1945-1991

This course presents an assessment of the Cold War from the perspective of its major participants. Topics include: the origins of the Cold War in Europe and Asia; the Korean War; the Stalin regime; McCarthyism and the Red Scare; the nuclear arms race; the conflict over Berlin; Cold War film and literature; superpower rivalry in Guatemala, Cuba, Vietnam, Africa and the Middle East; the rise and fall of detente; the Reagan years and the impact of Gorbachev; the East European Revolutions; and the end of the Cold War.
Same as L22 History 3680

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3682 The U.S. War in Iraq, 2003-2011

This course presents a historical assessment of the United States' eight year war in Iraq from its inception on March 20, 2003, to the withdrawal of all combat troops on December 15, 2011. Topics to be covered include: the Bush Administration's decision to make Iraq part of the "War on Terror" and the subsequent plan of attack; the combat operations; losing the victory; sectarian violence; torture; the insurgency; battling Al-Qaeda in Iraq; reassessment; the surge; the drawdown; and the end of the war. The course will conclude with an assessment of the war's effectiveness regarding the Global War on Terrorism and U.S. policy in the Middle East.
Same as L22 History 3681

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3690 Politics of International Trade

In this course we study the relationship between international trade and domestic politics. We cover the basic models of international trade, the distributional consequences of international trade, the relationship between trade and economic development, an analysis of the trade protectionism (causes and consequences) and an analysis of international organizations related to international trade (special focus on the World Trade Organization). Prerequisite: Pol Sci 103B.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3690

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 370C Islamic Movements: Reform, Revival, Revolt

As a religion and a social/intellectual and political movement, Islam has undergone constant reassessment since its inception 14 centuries ago; thus modern fundamentalist movements are the latest manifestation of long-term trends. An overview of this historical process, concentrating on contemporary Islamic movements and works by seminal thinkers.
Same as L75 JINE 370C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3721 Dostoevsky's Novels

In this discussion-based course we focus on two of Dostoevsky's major novels: Demons (also translated as The Possessed and Devils) and The Brothers Karamazov. Our close readings of the novels are enriched by literary theory and primary documents providing socio-historical context. All readings are in English translation. No prerequisites.
Same as L39 Russ 372

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI


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L97 IAS 373 International Political Economy

Analysis of the interplay of economics and politics in the world arena, focused primarily on the political basis of economic policies in both advanced and less developed societies. Treating differing perspectives on the international economy, production, trade and finance, and international economic relations. Prerequisite: junior standing, or permission of instructor.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 373

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3730 Topics in Near Eastern Cultures

The topic for this course will change each semester; the specific topic for each semester will be given in Course Listings.
Same as L75 JINE 373

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3731 History of U.S. Foreign Relations to 1914

This course explores the major diplomatic, political, legal, and economic issues shaping U.S. foreign relations in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries, up until the U.S. entry into the First World War.
Same as L22 History 373

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 374 Russian Literature at the Borders: Multiculturalism and Ethnic Conflict

In this course we explore Russian literary works (from the 19th century to the present day) that address issues of multiculturalism and ethnic conflict. The course is structured as a virtual tour of culturally significant places. Our readings take us to Ukraine/Belarus, the Caucasus, Siberia, and Central Asia. Some of the topics we discuss include national narratives and metaphor, authority and rebellion, migration and mobility, empire, orientalism, religious identities, gender roles, memory, and the poetics of place. Materials include poetry, drama, novels, short stories, critical articles, and oral history.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3741 History of U.S. Foreign Relations: 1920-1989

This course explores the major diplomatic, political, legal, and economic issues shaping U.S. foreign relations with the wider world from the 1920s to the "fall of communism" in 1989.
Same as L22 History 3741

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS


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L97 IAS 3743 History of U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1920

This course explores the major diplomatic, political, legal, and economic issues shaping U.S. relations with the wider world from the 1920s through the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks.
Same as L22 History 3743

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3750 Topics in Russian Lit and Culture: Madmen or Visionaries? (WI)

Where is the borderline between "insanity" and the "visionary" experience? What is the correlation between madness and creativity? How does the Russian conception of madness compare to the Western one? In general, how do our cultural experiences shape our perception of madness? These are some of the questions we address in this course as we explore the role and representation of madness in Russian culture and literature. Class discussions focus on close readings of formative works by Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Gippius and Nijinsky. These primary literary texts are supplemented by critical and theoretical articles as well as film. This is a writing-intensive course: workshops are required. All readings are in English translation. No prerequisites.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3751 Topics in Comparative Literature: Paris and New York


Same as L16 Comp Lit 375

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: IS


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L97 IAS 376 International Economics

This course provides an analysis of the international economy, the economic theories that help explain it, and analysis of important current issues of international economic policy. The course covers both trade and monetary issues. Prerequisites: Econ 1011 and Econ 1021.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3762 Cinema and Society

This course explores the history of French cinema through a lens that has long aroused passionate feelings in the francophone world: the social and psychological role of the (post)-industrial workplace. Exploring why the workplace has proved an engaging setting for French cinema, the class will study the Chaplinesque antics of the heroes of René Clair's À nous la liberté and the slapstick pathos of Jacques Tati's maladapted Monsieur Hulot. Students will also consider how film uses the workplace to dramatize society's differences and tensions, analyzing the tragic drama of social classes in Marcel Carné's La Règle du jeu and the sobering view of workplace reform in Laurent Cantet's Ressources humaines. The class will consider depictions of workers and bourgeois in the factories by the Lumière brothers (1895) and compelling performances of modern-day workers by Marion Cotillard (Deux jours, une nuit) and Omar Sy (Samba) in award-winning films from 2014. Our study of film will also address cultural differences between the U.S. and France as we consider the workplace in the context of globalization. There will be an optional extra session for group film viewing. Films will be on reserve in Olin. Prerequisite: French 307D. Taught in French.
Same as L34 French 376C

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3763 Warriors, Merchants, Monks and Courtesans: Ancient Narratives of Globalization in Google Earth

This introductory seminar-style course examines the history of globalization through the narrative accounts of those who lived along some of the great trade routes of the Old World. Through a combination of in-class discussion and hands-on tutorials and projects in Google Earth, we examine how day-to-day local interactions and the experiences of individuals contributed to broader cultural exchanges and the shaping of ancient cosmopolitan centers. We use a bottom-up approach to understand the process of globalization, and why it is not only a phenomenon of the modern world. This course covers a large geographic and temporal span, but it is not about memorizing lists of dates and places or putting dots on a map — it is about learning how to interpret multiple strands of knowledge and put them together into a cohesive narrative of history. The course covers four broad anthropological themes related to Old World history and globalization in conjunction with weekly lessons in Google Earth; there are no prerequisites for either. The knowledge and skills gained in the course lead to a final independent research project consisting of a short paper and an interactive digital map that can be shared online through the Google Earth community.
Same as L48 Anthro 376

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 3775 Ancient Eurasia and the New Silk Roads

This course will explore the rise of civilization in the broad region of Eurasia, spanning from the eastern edges of Europe to the western edges of China. The focus of the course is the unique trajectory of civilization that is made evident in the region of Central Eurasia from roughly 6000 BC to the historical era (ca. AD 250). In addition to this ancient focus, the course aims to relate many of the most historically durable characteristics of the region to contemporary developments of the past two or three centuries. Fundamentally, this course asks us to reconceptualize the notion of "civilization" from the perspective of societies whose dominant forms of organization defied typical classifications such as "states" or "empires" and, instead, shaped a wholly different social order over the past 5000 years or more. This class provides a well-rounded experience of the geography, social organization, and social interconnections of one of the most essential and pivotal regions in world history and contemporary political discourse.
Same as L48 Anthro 3775

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 3781 Topics in Politics: Israeli Politics

This course is intended primarily for sophomores and juniors. The topic of this course varies by semester, dependent on faculty and student interests.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3781

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 3782 Topics in Comparative Politics: Terrorism and Political Violence

This course is intended primarily for sophomores and juniors. The topic of this course varies by semester, dependent on faculty and student interests.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3782

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L97 IAS 3783 Modern Art 1905-1960

This course investigates topics in European painting, sculpture, architecture, photography and film. Lectures and readings address major artistic developments, including Cubism, De Stijl, Futurism, Expressionism, Dadaism, Constructivism, Surrealism, the Bauhaus and Art Brut. Prerequisite: Art-Arch 211 or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3782

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 3784 The Modernist Project: Art in Europe and the United States, 1905-1980

The course surveys major tendencies in painting and sculpture from Fauvism in France and Expressionism in German to the beginnings of Postmodernism in photo-based work in the U.S. About two-thirds of the course treats European art, about one-third treats American art. Photography, architecture and work in other forms are considered selectively when pertinent to the individual class topics. Within the lecture topics, emphasis is on avant-garde innovation; the tension in modernist art between idealism and critique; reaction by artists to current events; relationship between art and linguistics, philosophy, literature, economics and science; the role of geopolitics in art production; intersections of art and society; the role of mass culture; issues of race and gender in the production and reception of art; the challenge to the concept of authorship and creativity posed by Postmodernism at the end of this period. Prerequisites: Art-Arch 112, Art-Arch 113, Art-Arch 211 or Art-Arch 215; one 300-level course in art history preferred; or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3783

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 379 Russians Abroad: Literature, Migration, Identity

This course focuses on several waves of Russian emigration in the 20th century: the so-called "White Russian" emigration in the wake of the 1917 Revolution; the exile of dissidents and defectors from behind the "Iron Curtain"; Jewish emigration in the 1980s; and migrations and displacements after the disintegration of the Soviet Union. Through our exploration of novels, short stories, poetry, memoirs, literary essays and film, we "travel" to China (Harbin), Turkey, Europe (Paris, Berlin, Prague), America (Mexico City, New York), Central Asia and Israel. We read works by Nabokov, Tsvetaeva, Bunin, Brodsky, Ulitskaya and others. Main topics discussed include memory, place, nostalgia, alienation, citizenship, and various constructs of personal and cultural identity. All assignments are in English and English translation. There are no prerequisites.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3800 Topics in Hispanic Cultures

This course surveys cultures in specific contexts (Latin America and Spain) and in different historical periods, from the Middle Ages to the present. The course provides students with critical and methodological tools in order to carry out an articulate and informed cultural analysis. Prerequisites: Span 307D; concurrent registration in Span 308E is recommended. In Spanish. Topics vary from semester to semester. Consult section description for current offering.
Same as L38 Span 380

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L97 IAS 3801 Labor and the Economy

Economic analysis of labor markets. Theory and policy applications of labor supply and labor demand; explanations of wage and income differentials; migration and immigration; discrimination; labor unions; unemployment. Prerequisite: Econ 1011.
Same as L11 Econ 380

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 3822 From McDonald's to K-Pop: New Movements in East Asia

This course aims to help students to obtain competent knowledge about contemporary East Asian cultures and societies. We explore a broad set of topics in a transregional setting, from gender, filial piety and kinship to the upsurge of new waves, including consumer and pop cultures, the "cuteness" culture, and individualization. Our interrogation examines cultural variables, transregional dynamism, local receptions of "Western" influences, and the global impact of cultural movement in East Asia.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3831 Art in the Age of Revolution: 1789-1848

European painting, sculpture and printmaking from the French Revolution to the mid-19th century; French, English, German and Spanish artists discussed in social and aesthetic context, with a focus on links between art and ideology in times of political turmoil. The styles of classicism and romanticism, the rise of history painting, and the development of realism in both landscape and genre painting. Prerequisite: Art-Arch 112 or permission of the instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3831

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: AH BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 3833 Realism and Impressionism

An examination of the development of European art from approximately 1848 to the mid-1880s, with a focus on the development of Realism and Impressionism in England and France. Issues explored include the breakdown of academic art, the rise of landscape and naturalist themes, the emergence of alternative exhibition spaces and new dealer systems, and the relationship between gender and avant-garde practice. Prerequisite: Art-Arch 112 or Art-Arch 211 or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3833

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: AH BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 3838 Modern Art in Fin-de-Siècle Europe, 1880-1907

This course examines artistic production at the turn of the century in France, Belgium, England and Scandinavia. Beginning with the re-evaluation of impressionism and naturalism in France, we examine Neo-Impressionism (Seurat and Signac) and Symbolism (Moreau, Van Gogh, Gauguin, the Nabis, Rodin, Munch), as well as later careers of Impressionists (Cassatt, Monet, Degas, Renoir). Considers cross-national currents of Symbolism in Belgium and Scandanavia; the Aesthetic Movement in Britain; the rise of expressionist painting in French art (particularly with the Fauvism of Matisse and Derain), and the juncture of modernist primitivism and abstraction in early Cubism (Picasso). Prerequisite: Art-Arch 112 or permission of the instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3838

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 384 Migration and Modernity: Human Mobility, Identity and State Formation — Russian/Soviet/Post-Soviet Context

This class introduces students to a broad history of 19th- and 20th-century Russia and the Soviet Union alongside problems of migration. In this class, students are introduced to the historical, social and political dimensions of migration within, to and from the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union and its successor states. We look at the intersection of the movement of people with long-term economic, social and political transformations, but also pay attention to crucial events and phenomena of Soviet history that set large-scale migrations in motion. Course materials, for instance, address mass movements related to modernization and internal colonization, analyze the role of revolutionary change and warfare for forced displacement, and study the implications of geopolitical changes in the aftermath of the breakdown of the USSR for human rights discourses. Alongside the historically grounded overview, the class explores concepts of citizenship, diaspora, nationality policy, gender specific experiences of migration, and the ethics and political economy of migration politics, thereby highlighting how current trends in Russian society are indicative of broader discourses on difference and social transformation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 3850 Topics in Comparative Literature

Topics in Comparative Literature. Subject matter will vary from semester to semester.
Same as L16 Comp Lit 385

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 386 Empire in East Asia: Theory and History (WI)

An introduction to how historians and anthropologists incorporate theoretical insights into their work, this course first "reverse engineers" the main arguments in several insightful books and articles on empire in Asia, all of which are informed by the work of Michel Foucault. Retaining our theoretical knowledge, we then focus on the more empirical aspects of the Japanese empire in Korea, including settler colonialism, the colonial economy, representations of colonialism and the long-term ramifications of empire. We conclude with a general assessment of the history of empire. In these ways, this course seeks to equip students with a knowledge of empire in East Asia in the late 19th and 20th centuries while simultaneously investigating the nature of that knowledge.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3866 Interrogating "Crime and Punishment"

Whether read as psychological thriller, spiritual journey, or social polemic, Dostoevsky's 1866 novel Crime and Punishment has inspired diverse artistic responses around the world. From the 19th century to the present day, writers and filmmakers have revisited (and often subverted) questions that Dostoevsky's novel poses: What internal and external forces cause someone to "step over" into crime? What are the implications of a confession? To what extent can the legal system provide a just punishment? Are forgiveness and redemption possible, or even relevant? What role does grace — or luck — play in the entire process? This course begins with our close reading of Dostoevsky's novel and then moves on to short stories, novels, literary essays and movies that engage in dialogue with the Russian predecessor. A central concern of our intertextual approach is to explore the interplay between specific socio-historical contexts and universal questions. All readings are in English. No prerequisites.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 3875 Rejecting Reason: Dada and Surrealism in Europe and the United States

In this multimedia, interdisciplinary course, we consider the history, theory and practice of Dada and Surrealism, from its Symbolist and Expressionist roots at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries through its late expressions in Beat culture and Pop art of the 1950s and 1960s. Dada's emergence in Zurich and New York in the midst of the First World War set the tone for its stress on irrationality as an oppositional strategy. Surrealist research into the domain of the unconscious continued this extreme challenge to dominant culture, but in a revolutionary spirit that proposed new possibilities for personal and collective liberation. The international character of the movements, with substantial cross-transmission between Europe and the United States, are emphasized. Prerequisite: Art-Arch 112 Intro to Western Art or Art-Arch 211 Intro to Modern Art or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3875

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3881 Women, Men, and Gender in Africa (WI)

This seminar explores the ways in which gender relations have been produced, reproduced and transformed through the everyday actions of women and men in Africa. The focus is both on agency and on structures of power, as we move from a consideration of gender relations during the 19th-century jihads in West Africa to problems of love, sexuality and marriage in contemporary South Africa.
Same as L22 History 38A8

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 3883 Religion and Politics in South Asia (WI)

The relationship between religion, community and nation is a topic of central concern and contestation in the study of South Asian history. This course will explore alternative positions and debates on such topics as: changing religious identities; understandings of the proper relationship between religion, community and nation in India and Pakistan; and the violence of Partition (the division of India and Pakistan in 1947). The course will treat India, Pakistan and other South Asian regions in the colonial and postcolonial periods.
Same as L22 History 38C8

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3884 Terror and Violence in the Black Atlantic

From the period of bondage through the 21st century, terror and racialized violence have consistently been used as a form of social control. This course is constructed to explore the historical foundations of extreme threats of violence inflicted among populations of African descent. The fabric of American culture has given birth to its own unique brand of terrorism, of which this class spends considerable time interrogating. Yet, in recognizing that these practices are commonly found in other parts of the Black Atlantic, students are encouraged to take a comparative view to better tease out the wider strands of violence operative in places like England, the Caribbean and Latin America. Within this course, we explore the varied ways in which music, films, newspapers and historical narratives shed light on these often life-altering stories of the past. Some of the themes touched upon include: the use of punishment/exploitation during the era of slavery, lynching, sexual violence, race riots, police brutality, motherhood, black power and community activism.
Same as L90 AFAS 3880

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 3891 East Asia Since 1945: From Empire to Cold War

This course examines the historical forces behind the transformation of East Asia from war-torn territory under Japanese military and colonial control into distinct nations ordered by Cold War politics. We begin with the 1945 dismantling of the Japanese empire and continue with the emergence of the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China (Taiwan), the two Koreas and Vietnam, all of which resulted from major conflicts in post-war Asia. We conclude with a look at East Asia in the post-Cold War era.
Same as L22 History 3891

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD EN: H


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L97 IAS 3892 Modern Sculpture: Canova to Koons

This course surveys sculpture in Europe and the United States from about 1800 to the present, with an emphasis on the period 1890–1980. A rapid traverse of Neoclassicism, Realism and the rage for statuary in the later 19th century take us to the work of Rodin and a more systematic exploration of developments in sculpture of the 20th century. Particular emphasis also is given to the work of Brancusi, Picasso, Matisse, Duchamp, Giacometti, Oppenheim, David Smith, Serra, Morris, Judd, Hesse and Bourgeois. An important theme running through the course as a whole, from an age of nationalism and manufacturing to our own time of networks and information, is the changing definition of sculpture itself within its social and political context. We also explore various new artistic practices — video, performance, installations and body art, for instance — and interrogate their relationship to sculptural tradition and innovation. Prerequisite: Art-Arch 112 Intro to Western Art or Art-Arch 211 Intro to Modern Art, or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3892

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 390 Topics in Migration and Identity

The course examines migration movements that are related to the Nazi genocide in Europe. Grounded in a study of the Nazi project to reshape the European geopolitical map, students explore how the mass movement of people is impacted by geopolitics, political violence, and economical considerations. Class materials address the relationship between identity formation and social exclusion, thus opening up a critical investigation of concepts of citizenship, human rights, and their institutional frameworks (states, international organizations, etc.) more generally. Students work with a variety of sources, including primary sources, scholarly analyses, podcasts, literary works and film to study migrations related to the prehistory, policies and aftermath of the Nazi regime. The class provides insights into issues of expulsion, refuge, forced migration, settlement projects, ethnic cleansing and others, but also demonstrates the global impact and long-term repercussions of political and genocidal violence. Looking at the Nazi regime through the lens of migration shows that the Nazi genocide is embedded in a history of racism, colonialization and mass violence.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3921 Imperialism and Sexuality: India, South Asia and the World (WI)

What is the connection between the appropriation of other people's resources and the obsession with sex? Why is "race" essential to the sexual imperatives of imperialism? How has the nexus between "race," sexuality and imperial entitlement reproduced itself despite the end of formal colonialism? By studying a variety of colonial documents, memoirs produced by colonized subjects, novels, films and scholarship on imperialism, we seek to understand the history of imperialism's sexual desires and its continuation in our world today.
Same as L22 History 39SC

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3922 Secular and Religious: A Global History

Recent years have seen a dramatic rethinking of the past in nearly every corner of the world as scholars revisit fundamental questions about the importance of religion for individuals, societies and politics. Is religion as a personal orientation in decline? Is Europe becoming more secular? Is secularism a European invention? Many scholars now argue that "religion" is a European term that doesn't apply in Asian societies. This course brings together cutting-edge historical scholarship on Europe and Asia in pursuit of a truly global understanding. Countries covered vary, but may include Britain, France, Turkey, China, Japan, India and Pakistan.
Same as L22 History 3921

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 3941 Worldwide Translation: Language, Culture, Technology

This course considers the crucial role played by translation across the world today: from new technologies and digital media, to the global demands of professionals working in fields as diverse as literature, law, business, anthropology and health care. We begin our exploration of the concept of translation as a key mechanism of transmission between different languages by looking at works of literature and film. Students then examine how different cultures have historically required translation in their encounter with each other, studying how translation constitutes a necessary transcultural bridge both from a colonial and postcolonial point of view. The course also analyzes from practical and real-world perspectives whether concepts such as war, human rights, democracy or various deadly illnesses have the same meaning in different societies by considering the diverse frames of reference used by linguists, lawyers, anthropologists and medical doctors across the world. Finally, we focus on translation from a technological perspective by examining various modes of transfer of information required for the functioning of digital media such as Google Translate, Twitter or various iPhone applications. Readings include works by Jorge Luis Borges, Talal Asad, Lawrence Venuti, Michael Cronin, Emily Apter and Gayatri Spivak, among others. This course offers students an optional CET (Community-Engaged Teaching) component in collaboration with a St. Louis-based community partner. Prerequisite: none.
Same as L16 Comp Lit 394

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 3951 Blacks, Latinos and Afro-Latinos: Constructing Difference & Identity (WI)

Dominant discourses on Black-Latino relations focus on job competition, while a few others celebrate the future of an America led by "people of color." What is at stake in these narratives? How did we come to understand what is "black" and "Latino"? Students taking this course examine the history of African Americans' and Latinos' racialization under British, Spanish, and American empires, paying attention to both the construction of the racial "Other" by European elites, the reclaiming of identities by the racially marginalized through the Black and Brown liberation movements of the 1960s and 1970s, and the movements' impacts on black-Latino electoral and grassroots coalitions, mass incarceration of youth, and Afro-diasporic productions of hip-hop.
Same as L22 History 39SL

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD, WI BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 396 Comintern: The Communist International's Global Impact

The Communist International was the third of the global left-wing organizations aimed to develop communist organizations around the globe to aid the development of a proletarian revolution. Begun in 1919, hosted in Moscow, and closely tied to the developing USSR, the Comintern hosted seven World Congresses and 13 Enlarged Plenums before Stalin dissolved it in 1943. This course examines the history of the nearly 25 years of the Comintern, paying particular attention to engagement with countries outside of the Soviet sphere. Class texts provide a general historical overview and interrogate central ideological arguments/debates across several countries and political systems. Course materials look at the Comintern's engagement with Fascism and the Spanish Civil War, ideas of Nationalism and Internationalism, and Self-Determination in the Colonial World. Class units are designed to highlight regional similarities and differences, taking a global approach to the study of Communism. Students gain an understanding of the global political complexities developing after World War I and leading to World War II. Reflecting on the critique of imperialist capitalism offered by the Comintern, students explore liberation struggles and ideological dictatorships around the globe.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 398 Rivers: A Comparative Approach to Chinese and World History (WI)

This course uses rivers as geographical frames of reference to address a variety of issues, including physical and social mobility, agriculture and commerce, the state, environmental history, and construction of cultural meanings. Each week begins with a focus on the West River, which flows through two provinces in southern China. Readings on the West River are matched with readings that address similar topics but focus on other important rivers in the world. The temporal focus is approximately 1500-1900, a period that witnessed the zenith of rivers as modes of transportation and commerce.
Same as L22 History 39S8

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI


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L97 IAS 39CJ The City in Early Modern Europe: Writing-Intensive Seminar

From the city-states of Renaissance Italy to the 18th-century boomtowns of London and Paris, cities functioned as political, economic, and cultural centers, creating unique opportunities and challenges for their diverse inhabitants. Their conflicting experiences and expectations created not only social and economic unrest, but also a resilient social infrastructure, a tradition of popular participation in politics, and a rich legacy of cultural accomplishment.
Same as L22 History 39CJ

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 400 Independent Study

Prerequisite: permission of the director of the International and Area Studies program. All concentrations.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L97 IAS 4001 Urban Education in Multiracial Societies

This course offers students an analysis of the historical development and contemporary contexts of urban education in English-epeaking, multiracial societies. It examines legal decisions, relevant policy decisions, and salient economic determinants that inform urban systems of education in Western societies including, but not limited to, the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and South Africa. The course draws on quantitative, qualitative, and comparative data as an empirical foundation to provide a basis for a cross-cultural understanding of the formalized and uniform system of public schooling characteristic of education in urban settings. Given the social and material exigencies that shape urban school systems in contemporary societies, special attention is given in this course to the roles of migration, immigration urbanization, criminal justice, industrialism, de-industrialism, and globalization in shaping educational outcomes for diverse students in the aforementioned settings. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.
Same as L18 URST 400

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: SSC, WI EN: S


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L97 IAS 4005 Directed Research in IAS

Students in Directed Research will be part of the IAS Undergraduate Research Assistant Group. Research assistants learn valuable skills and gain practical experience working on IAS-affiliated faculty research projects. All IAS students are encouraged to apply, but the program will be especially beneficial for sophomores and juniors who are planning to write a senior thesis. Students will be assigned to work on a faculty research project and will be expected to provide five hours of research work per week to the project. In addition, students will meet for weekly workshops where we will introduce multidisciplinary research perspectives, skills and resources. Students must complete a separate application and be approved by the instructor to enroll.

Credit 3 units.


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L97 IAS 4011 Popular Culture and Consumption in Modern China

This writing-intensive seminar explores transformations in popular culture and everyday life in Chinese society since 1949 through an analytical focus on political economy and material culture. Drawing upon ethnographic texts, films and material artifacts, we investigate how the forces of state control and global capitalism converge to shape consumer desires and everyday habits in contemporary China. Case studies include eating habits, fashion standards, housing trends, entertainment, sports and counterfeit goods. Prerequisite: previous course in China studies (anthropology, economics, history, literature, philosophy or political science) required. Enrollment by instructor approval only.
Same as L48 Anthro 4011

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, WI A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 402 The Meaning of National Security in the 21st Century

The 21st century has brought with it new challenges to national security. Standard assumptions about nations and the borders that separate them have been brought into question, and one of the results of this is that the very meaning of national security is undergoing change. Instead of threats to security coming from outside national boundaries, they now often exist within and across borders. This course focuses on contemporary ideas about these issues. It includes a brief overview of current discussions of national security, but it is primarily devoted to examining the conceptual resources we have for making sense of national security in a new world.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4021 Transnational Reproductive Health Issues: Meanings, Technologies, Practices

This course covers recent scholarship on gender and reproductive health, including such issues as reproduction and the disciplinary power of the state, contested reproductive relations within families and communities, and the implications of global flows of biotechnology, population and information for reproductive strategies at the local level. We also explore how transnational migration and globalization have shaped reproductive health, the diverse meanings associated with reproductive processes, and decisions concerning reproduction. Reproduction serves as a focus to illuminate the cultural politics of gender, power and sexuality.
Same as L48 Anthro 4022

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L97 IAS 4033 Topics in East Asian Religion and Thought

Topics in East Asian Religions is a course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students on specific themes and methodological issues in East Asian religions.
Same as L23 Re St 403

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4034 Culture, Illness and Healing in Asia

This course examines the place of health, illness and healing in Asian societies. We explore how people experience, narrate and respond to illness and other forms of suffering — including political violence, extreme poverty and health inequalities. In lectures and discussions we discuss major changes that medicine and public health are undergoing and how those changes affect the training of practitioners, health care policy, clinical practice and ethics. The course familiarizes students with key concepts and approaches in medical anthropology by considering case studies from a number of social settings including China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Tibet, Thailand, Vietnam and Asian immigrants in the United States. We also investigate the sociocultural dimensions of illness and the medicalization of social problems in Asia, examining how gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability and other forms of social difference affect medical knowledge and disease outcomes. This course is intended for anthropology majors, students considering careers in medicine and public health, and others interested in learning how anthropology can help us understand human suffering and formulate more effective interventions.
Same as L48 Anthro 4033

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4036 Children of Immigrants: Identity and Acculturation

This seminar examines two subgroups: child immigrants and the native-born children of immigrants. It interrogates cultural/ethnic identity, cultural adaptation, bilingualism and biculturalism, and challenges and achievements of this young generation through ethnography, literature and sociological accounts. We aim to scrutinize the studies of the "1.5" generation and the second generation, and theories such as "segmented assimilation," across a wide range of ethnic groups, from people of East Asian origins to those with Latin American ancestries, by mainly focusing on their experiences in the United States.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4041 Islam and Politics

Blending history and ethnography, this course covers politics in the Islamic world in historical and contemporary times. Topics include history of Islam, uniformity and diversity in belief and practice (global patterns, local realities), revolution and social change, women and veiling, and the international dimensions of resurgent Islam. Geographical focus extends from Morocco to Indonesia; discussion of other Muslim communities is included (Bosnia, Chechnya, sub-Saharan Africa, U.S.).
Same as L48 Anthro 4041

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 4042 Islam Across Cultures

In this seminar we examine the variety of historical and contemporary ways of interpreting and practicing Islam, with special attention to issues of ritual, law and the state, and gender. Cases are drawn from Asia, Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and students engage in fieldwork or library research projects.
Same as L48 Anthro 4042

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC


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L97 IAS 4043 Competing Ideologies and Nationalisms in the Arab-Israeli Arena

We will trace the roots of modern ideologies and nationalisms in the Middle East and analyze how they have developed in modern times under the influence of both secular and religious ideas. We will examine how international politics have exerted their influence and how Arab and Israeli nationalism have affected one another. Among the topics to be discussed will be Shi'ism, Nasserism, Zionism and fundamentalism.
Same as L75 JINE 4042

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 4050 Diaspora in Jewish and Islamic Experience

The polarities of diaspora and home — periphery and center, wandering and rest, exile and return — have played important roles in the historical experience and religious culture of both Jews and Muslims. For long stretches of time, Jewish culture has been marked by the historical condition of statelessness combined with a theology of redemptive return. Paradoxically, it was the significant political and military success of Islam in its first millennium that helped to create a far-flung diaspora well removed from its center in Arabia. The institution of pilgrimage to Mecca counterbalanced a sense of distance and remove. More recently, modern nationalisms, war, and postcolonial politics — including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict — have done much to underscore the continuing dilemmas of diaspora and home in both Jewish and Islamic identity. The goal of the seminar is to offer a comparative, historical perspective on this theme and to encourage students to examine an aspect of the diaspora experience in depth. (Note: This course fulfills the capstone requirement for Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies. It also qualifies as a history department advanced seminar.)
Same as L75 JINE 405

Credit 4 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4052 Topics in Political Thought


Same as L32 Pol Sci 405

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH


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L97 IAS 4062 The Art of Borrowing: The "West" in Japanese Life

This course aims to examine Western influences in Japan and Japan's reconceptualizing the "West" in various aspects of popular culture, including cuisine, sports, music, language, advertising, entertainment and domesticity. It is primarily an anthropological survey with historical references on Japan's turn to Western civilization in the modern era. The course explores Japanese perceptions of the "West," and how Japanese consume the "West" by attaching meanings to "Western" symbols and practices, and making them part of Japanese culture and life. Rather than explicating Japan's relationship with the West, the course scrutinizes the "West" constructed within Japanese discourse, as both a racial/ethnic other and a cultural fantasy. Course assignments include a round-table discussion on specific topics relating to cultural integration and internationalization, and globalization and localization.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4070 Global Justice

This course examines contemporary debates and controversies regarding global justice. Seminar discussions are arranged around significant issues in the current literature. For example: What (if anything) do we owe to the distantly needy? Do we have special obligations to our compatriots? Do political borders have normative significance? And so on. This course is of interest not only to political theorists, but also students in other fields interested in social justice or international relations generally.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 4070

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4090 Gender, Sexuality and Change in Africa

This course considers histories and social constructions of gender and sexuality in sub-Saharan Africa during the colonial and contemporary periods. We examine gender and sexuality both as sets of identities and practices and as part of wider questions of work, domesticity, social control, resistance and meaning. Course materials include ethnographic and historical materials and African novels and films. Prerequisite: graduate students or undergraduates with previous AFAS or upper-level anthropology course.
Same as L90 AFAS 409

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD, WI A&S IQ: SSC, SD, WI Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4092 Beyond Geography: The Meaning of Place in the Near East

This course considers the importance of place in the Middle East with particular reference to Jewish and Islamic traditions. Topics include the creation of holy sites, the concept of sacred space, the practice of pilgrimages, and the tropes of exile and return. Texts range from analytical essays to novels, memoirs and films by authors such as Edward Said, Naguib Mahfouz, Taher Ben Jelloun, Elif Shafak, A.B. Yehoshua, Shulamit Hareven and Hanan Al-Shaykh. Requirements include participation, short assignments and a seminar paper. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for students majoring in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, but is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Prerequisites: course work in JINES and senior standing or permission of instructor.
Same as L75 JINE 409

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4101 German Literature and Culture, 1750-1830

Exploration of the literature and culture of the Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, Weimar Classicism, and Romanticism within sociohistorical contexts. Genres and themes vary and may include the representation of history, absolutism and rebellion, the formation of bourgeois society, questions of national identity, aesthetics, gender, romantic love, and the fantastic. Reading and discussion of texts by authors such as Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Kant, Novalis, Günderode, the Brothers Grimm, Kleist, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Eichendorff, Bettina von Arnim. Discussion, readings and papers in German. Prerequisite: Refer to German Majors section.
Same as L21 German 4101

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, WI Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4102 German Literature and Culture, 1830-1914

Exploration of 19th-century literature and culture within sociohistorical contexts. Genres and themes vary and may include the representation of history, liberalism and restoration, nationalism, industrialization, colonialism, class, race and gender conflicts, materialism, secularization and fin-de-siècle. Reading and discussion of texts by authors such as Büchner, Heine, Marx, Storm, Keller, Meyer, Fontane, Droste-Hülshoff, Nietzsche, Ebner-Eschenbach, Schnitzler, Rilke. Discussion, readings and papers in German. Prerequisite: Refer to German Majors section.
Same as L21 German 4102

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, WI Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4103 German Literature and Culture, 1914 to the Present

Exploration of modern and contemporary literature within sociohistorical contexts. Genres and themes vary and may include the representation of history, the crisis of modernity, the two World Wars, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, generational conflicts, the women's movement and postmodern society. Reading and discussion of texts by authors such as Wedekind, Freud, Mann, Kafka, Brecht, Seghers, Böll, Bachmann, Grass, Wolf. Discussion, readings and papers in German. Prerequisite: Refer to German Majors section.
Same as L21 German 4103

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, WI Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 4104 Studies in Genre

Exploration of the definition, style, form and content that characterize a specific genre. Investigation of the social, cultural, political and economic forces that lead to the formation and transformation of a particular genre. Examination of generic differences and of the effectiveness of a given genre in articulating the concerns of a writer or period. Topics and periods vary from semester to semester. Discussion, readings and papers in German; some theoretical readings in English. Prerequisite: Refer to German Majors section.
Same as L21 German 4104

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, WI Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4105 Topics in German Studies

Focus on particular cultural forms such as literature, film, historiography, social institutions, philosophy, the arts, or on relationships between them. Course examines how cultural meanings are produced, interpreted, and employed. Topics vary and may include national identity, anti-semitism, cultural diversity, construction of values, questions of tradition, the magical, the erotic, symbolic narrative, and the city. Course may address issues across a narrow or broad time frame. Discussion, readings and papers in German. Prerequisite: Refer to German Majors section.
Same as L21 German 4105

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, WI Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4107 Latin America and the Rise of the Global South

The rise of the global south — and the reordering of global geopolitics, economics and cultural imaginaries — is characterized by progressive change and intense conflict. Economic growth coincides with the impacts of global warming, the assault on natural resources, the rise of new consumers and the entrenchment of deep inequalities. We also see the emergence of cultural and political formations that range from the horrific to the inspiring. Latin America is a central node of the new global south. Here history takes unpredictable turns in the face of declining U.S. hegemony, the economic growth of Brazil, legacies of militarism and political violence, a feverish attack on nature, resurgent economic nationalism, and defiant "anti-globalization" movements. Through close reading of contemporary ethnographies of Latin America we explore emergent cultural and political-economic processes in the region; we consider south-south articulations (theoretical, cultural, political-economic) between Latin America, China, Africa and India; and we reflect on the changing role, meaning and relationships of the United States in the region.
Same as L48 Anthro 4102

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4134 The AIDS Epidemic: Inequalities, Ethnography, and Ethics

In the year 2000, HIV became the world's leading infectious cause of adult death, and in the next 10 years, AIDS was expected to kill more people than all wars of the 20th century combined. As the global epidemic rages on, our greatest enemy in combating HIV/AIDS is not lack of knowledge or resources, but global inequalities and the conceptual frameworks with which we understand health, human interaction and sexuality. This course emphasizes the ethnographic approach for cultural analysis of responses to HIV/AIDS. Students explore the relationship between local communities and wider historical and economic processes, and theoretical approaches to disease, the body, ethnicity/race, gender, sexuality, risk, addiction, power and culture. Other topics covered include the cultural construction of AIDS and risk, government responses to HIV/AIDS, origin and transmission debates; ethics and responsibilities; drug testing and marketing; the making of the AIDS industry and "risk" categories; prevention and education strategies; interaction between biomedicine and alternative healing systems; and medical advances and hopes.
Same as L48 Anthro 4134

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4140 Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy

In this course we study Chinese philosophical texts from the classical period (ca. sixth through third centuries BCE). We read selections from the Analects, the Mengzi, the Xunzi, the Zhuanqzi, the Daodejing, and the Hanfeizi, in addition to commentaries on these primary texts. The readings are in classical Chinese with occasional supplemental readings in English and modern Chinese. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the language and grammar of Chinese philosophical texts, introduce students to the tradition of scholarly commentary, and explore a set of influential Chinese texts in the original language. Prerequisite: Chinese 411 or instructor's permission.
Same as L04 Chinese 414

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4150 The 19th-Century French Novel: from Realism to Naturalism to Huysmans

In this seminar we read some of the great realist novels of the 19th century, by the four masters of the genre: Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Zola. We also examine Huysmans' A Rebours, which was written in reaction to the excesses of Realism. We determine what characterizes the realist novel and how it has evolved from Balzac to Zola. We consider its theoretical orientation, but we also focus on the major themes it addresses: the organization of French society throughout the 19th century, Paris vs. the province, love, money, ambition, dreams, material success, decadence, etc. Prerequisites: French 325 and 326 or one of these courses and the equivalent Washington University transfer literature course from Toulouse or Paris. One-hour preceptorial required for undergraduates.
Same as L34 French 415

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4154 From Decolonization to Globalization: Postcolonial South Asia

Independence from European colonialism was a victory for some people, although for the majority, the experience of nation-building and the Cold War only sanctioned further inequities. A further set-back arrived in the guise of globalization. The countries of Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri-Lanka have grappled differently with the many varieties of 20th-century transnational power. This course studies the histories of decolonization, nation-building and the Cold War for those South Asian countries created since the 1940s and traces the manner by which ordinary people have interrogated the multiple levels of state power unleashed upon them since the formal end of European colonialism.
Same as L22 History 4154

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 417 Topics in African History: Middle Passages: African Americans and South Africa

This upper-division seminar explores the fascinating transnational relationship between African Americans and black South Africans during the 20th century. These two populations became intimately familiar with each other as African-American missionaries, sailors, musicians, educators and adventurers regularly entered South Africa while black South African students, religious personnel, political figures, writers and entertainers found their way to America. This course details why these two populations gravitated toward each other, how they assisted each other in their respective struggles against racial segregation and apartheid, and how these shared histories influence their relationship today. Readings for this course draw from key books, articles and primary documents within this exciting new field of intellectual inquiry.
Same as L90 AFAS 417

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM BU: BA


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L97 IAS 4180 Gender and Sexuality in East Asian Religions

In this course we explore the role of women in the indigenous religious traditions of China, Japan and Korea (Confucianism, Daoism, Shamanism and Shinto), as well as Buddhism, Christianity and Islam. We begin by considering the images of women (whether mythical or historical) in traditional religious scriptures and historical or literary texts. We then focus on what we know of the actual experience and practice of various types of religious women — nuns and abbesses; shamans and mediums; hermits and recluses; and ordinary laywomen — both historically and in more recent times. Class materials include: literary and religious texts; historical and ethnological studies; biographies and memoirs; and occasional videos and films. Prerequisites: This class is conducted as a seminar, with minimal lectures; substantial reading and writing; and lots of class discussion. For this reason, students who are not either upper-level undergraduates or graduate students, or who have little or no background in East Asian religion or culture, need to obtain the instructor's permission before enrolling.
Same as L23 Re St 418

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4191 The French Islands: From Code Noir to Conde

The French have been dreaming about the tropics ever since transatlantic trade became possible in the 16th century, and literature in French has reflected these dreams ever since. Closer to our own period, writers from the French Caribbean have written themselves into the French canon, winning prestigious literary prizes. This course links these two phenomena by studying literature from and about the tropics from the 18th century to the present. In our readings, we attempt to see the ways in which the literature from and about France's island possessions has contributed to the forming of cultural and political relations between France and the islands, but also among the islands and within the Americas. Almost all texts available in English for students not majoring in French; main seminar session taught in English with weekly undergraduate preceptorial in French. Prerequisite: French 325 and French 326. One-hour preceptorial for required for undergraduates.
Same as L34 French 4191

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4192 Tragedy and Farce in African Francophone Literature

In 1960, most of the French colonies in Africa gained independence in a largely peaceful transfer of power. Since then, this development has been viewed alternatively as the triumph of self-determination and as a hollow act undermined by neocolonial French ministries, multinational companies and corrupt governments. Reading authors such as Chraibi, Kourouma, Kane, Tansi, and Lopes, we consider the ways that literature enters into dialog with political discourses that seem to call for tragic or farcical portrayal. This course explores the literary construction of nationalist opposition in colonial Africa and the subsequent disillusionment with its artificiality in tragic or farcical literature from the independence era to the present. Taught in French. Prerequisites: French 325 and French 326 or one of these courses and the equivalent Washington University transfer literature course from Toulouse or Paris. One-hour preceptorial required for undergraduates.
Same as L34 French 4192

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 420 Islam, Immigrants and the Future of European Culture

Coming from Turkey, North and West Africa, Pakistan and elsewhere, Muslim immigrants in Europe are changing what it means to be a European. In the process, they have brought questions of cultural identity into the international media. Examining literature, the press, and secondary studies, this writing-intensive course studies the ways in which national governments and institutions have chosen to deal with the arrival of large numbers of Muslims as permanent residents. We consider what the various controversies and prejudices surrounding their presence mean for the future of European culture. Such issues as citizenship, assimilation, the right to cultural difference, and the use of cultural and religious symbols are among our major interests. No foreign language background is assumed. Priority is given to IAS majors for this WI course.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI EN: H


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L97 IAS 4201 International Relations of Latin America

This course examines Latin American foreign relations in the world from the 1820s to the present with a primary emphasis on the period since 1945. Focusing on inter-state and transnational relations, it seeks to historically contextualize and analyze long term patterns and trends between Latin American states and between Latin America and the United States, Europe, and the global South. Given Latin America's shared experience with imperialism and more recently with neo-imperialism, special attention is paid to the ways Latin America has sought to manage and/or resist foreign domination, especially U.S. hegemonic pretensions. To this end it analyzes patterns of inter-American conflict and cooperation. When, why, and under what conditions Latin America articulated an independent foreign policy, forged anti-imperialist blocs, embraced U.S. sponsored diplomatic efforts and military alliances, and pursued Latin American unity and solidarity are closely examined. To better understand the continuities, discontinuities, contradictions and complexities of Latin American foreign policy, this course also assesses the influence of changing regional and national political cultures from both a theoretical and a historical perspective. In doing so, it explores how elite culture, the balance of domestic social forces, ideological and economic development, and shared cultural identities and meanings informed national political cultures and how these in turn shaped Latin American foreign policies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4202 Civic Scholars Study Abroad Semester Three: Application and Integration of Civic Projects and Values

This is the third-semester course for students in the Civic Scholars program of the Gephardt Institute. The Civic Scholars program recognizes Washington University undergraduate students who exemplify future potential for civic leadership. Rising juniors are selected for the program based on their commitment to community service and civic engagement. Through this four-semester program, cohorts receive intensive leadership training and mentorship to prepare them for a life dedicated to public service, and a scholarship of $5,000 to support a substantial civic project or internship. The program begins with a cohort retreat, and students will complete a course each semester in the program. Students will apply their $5,000 scholarship toward a civic project during the summer between junior and senior year. This seminar-style course provides students with the opportunity to evaluate their civic projects and explore implications of their work.

Credit 1 unit.


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L97 IAS 4203 Civic Scholars Study Abroad Semester Four: Civic Engagement Across the Lifespan

This is the fourth-semester course for students in the Civic Scholars program of the Gephardt Institute. The Civic Scholars program recognizes Washington University undergraduate students who exemplify future potential for civic leadership. Rising juniors are selected for the program based on their commitment to community service and civic engagement. Through this four-semester program, cohorts receive intensive leadership training and mentorship to prepare them for a life dedicated to public service, and a scholarship of $5,000 to support a substantial civic project or internship. The program begins with a cohort retreat, and students will complete a course each semester in the program. Students will apply their $5,000 scholarship toward a civic project during the summer between junior and senior year. This culminating course provides students with the opportunity to integrate the Civic Scholars experience, explore civic engagement opportunities post-college, and discuss ethics and civic engagement.

Credit 1 unit.


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L97 IAS 4213 Sufism and Islamic Brotherhoods in Africa

Muslim societies are prevalent in Africa — from the Horn, the North, the East to the West, with smaller conclaves in Central and South Africa. Islam has played an influential role in these diverse societies, particularly through its Sufi form. Even though Sufism originated in the Arabian Peninsula, it has fit well with African beliefs and cultures. This course aims to explore Sufi beliefs, values and practices in Africa. It reconsiders the academic constructions of "African Islam" by exploring education, intellectual life, economics, gender roles, social inequalities and politics. The goal is to show that Africa is a dynamic part of the Muslim world and not a peripheral one, as it is most often portrayed by the international media or historically, through travelers and colonial accounts. African Muslim brotherhoods have served as political mediators between countries and people (i.e., the role of the Tijaniyya in the diplomatic rivalry between Morocco and Algeria, or its role in reconciliation of clanic rivalries in Sudan). In addition, the course pays attention to hierarchy in particular tariqa. Finally, the course examines how African Sufi orders have shaped their teachings to fit transnational demands over the 20th and 21st century. We explore these issues through readings, current media, lectures and special guest speakers.
Same as L90 AFAS 4213

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4215 Anthropology of Food

The rising interest in food research crosscuts various academic disciplines. This seminar focuses on aspects of food of particular interest in anthropology. The first two-thirds of the course is reading-intensive and discussion-intensive. Each student writes short review/response papers for major readings. For the final third, we still are reading and discussing, but the reading load is lighter (and we have a field trip) as students devote more time to their research papers. The research paper is a major effort on a topic discussed with and approved by the professor. In most cases it has to deal with cultural and historical aspects of a food, set of foods, form of consumption or aspect of food production. Papers are critiqued, assigned a provisional grade, revised and resubmitted.
Same as L48 Anthro 4215

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 422 Europe, Questions of Identity and Unity

Nation-states and their cultures have been changed by globalization. Within this process, continentalisation has played an important role. The European Union is only half a century old, but continental unity has been discussed and demanded by European writers and thinkers for hundreds of years. We will read essays on Europe (its identity, its cultural diversity and its cultural roots, contemporary problems, and future goals) by writers like Coleridge, Madame de Staël, Novalis, Chateaubriand, Heine, Nerval, Hugo, Thomas Mann, Ernst Jünger, T.S. Eliot, Klaus Mann, de Madariaga, Kundera, Enzensberger, Frischmuth, and Drakulic; we will discuss studies reinventing Europe by philosophers like the Abbé de Saint-Pierre, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, and Ortega y Gasset; we will deal with the mythological figure of Europa and her resurrections in the world of art; we will study the Nazarene painters of the early 19th century in Rome and will discuss portraits of Bonaparte by French painters of the time. Comparative Literature students will meet with the instructor for an additional two hours per month.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 4224 The 1904 St. Louis World's Fair: German and Austrian Art Exhibited

The St. Louis World's Fair of 1904 (The Louisiana Purchase Exposition) was one of the greatest events of its time. At the beginning we will deal with the historical development that lead to the purchase of the Louisiana Territory in 1803, will review the developments of World's Fairs since 1851 and will have a look at the grand dimension of the 1904 World's Fair (connected with the Olympic Games). Of central importance are the Art Exhibits from Germany and Austria with their cultural-political implications. The German Emperor had a hand in selecting the German paintings to be sent to St. Louis, and his opposition against modern movements like Impressionism caused opposition in Germany. Austria was different: In their Art Nouveau Pavilion they included secessionists (Hagenbund). The Wiener Werkstaetten (Vienna's Workshops) attracted a lot of attention. Different from the paintings, German Arts and Crafts represented avant-garde movements. We will visit libraries, archives, and museums in St. Louis that have World's Fair holdings. The seminar is for advanced undergraduate students but beginning graduate students can take it with permission of the instructor. Course conducted in English. May not be taken for German major or minor credit. CET course.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4225 European Utopian Settlements in the American Midwest (1814-1864): Diversity and Antislavery

During the first part of the 19th century, a number of utopian visionaries from Europe (Germany, France and England) tried to establish communities in the American Midwest. These colonies were based either on religious or philosophical/social ideals which could be traced back to interpretations of the Old and the New Testament or to Enlightenment principles of freedom and equality that had been propagated during the revolutions in Europe of 1789, 1830 and 1848 which in turn had been influenced by the American war of independence. These groups showed strong antislavery convictions. The Midwest was chosen since the areas in the vicinity of the confluence of the Mississippi and the Missouri were seen as open to new social experiments. Part of the seminar are field trips to the St. Louis-based Missouri History Library as well as to the St. Louis Public Library and one-day excursions to New Harmony in Indiana, Nauvoo in Illinois, and to small towns in Warren County, Missouri.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4232 Contemporary Issues in Latin America

How do the institutional designs of contemporary democratic governments help us understand the nature and quality of representation? We will concentrate on variations in the powers granted presidents by constitutions as well as the institutional determinants of whether executives are likely to find support for their policies in the legislature. In addition, we will explore how incentives established by electoral laws influence the priorities of members of congress. Given all these variations in democratic institutional design, can voters go to the polls with the confidence that politicians will implement the economic policies for which their parties have long stood or which they promised in their campaigns?
Same as L32 Pol Sci 4231

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 4240 Latin American Literature and Theory: Reading the State, Culture and Desire

In this course, we pair literary and theoretical texts in order to hone a way of reading in which theory and literature are mutually informative, provocative and inspiring. The idea of these loose groupings is not to prescribe a particular relationship between given literary and theoretical texts but rather is a way to begin negotiating the necessarily multiple relationships of theory and literature. These pairings come to seem more artificial over the course of the semester as we trace a network of relations that begins to look more and more like the Borgesian map that covered up the entire territory it described. The object of the course is, thus, not to define or prioritize a particular set of relations but rather to practice a way of reading literature theoretically and theory literarily, by which the strengths of both are allowed to come to the forefront in their complexity. Thematically, the course has several nuclei: the triangulation of State, culture and art (Piglia/Foucault, Burman/Agamben); a psychoanalytic approach to art as desire (Lispector/Lacan/Cixous); and finally, a third nucleus about which the first two commingle completely: "post-State," proliferating desire, libidinal economies wherein the State is anachronism and failure (Arlt/Deleuze; Sorín/Virilio/Sitrin, Sassen; Bolaño/Zizek). Readings may include: Piglia, Foucault, Agamben, Arlt, Deleuze, Virilio, Sassen, Borges, Benjamin, Bolaño, Zizek, Lispector, Lacan, Cixous, as well as the films Garage Olimpo and Historias mínimas. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only; in Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 424

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4244 19th- and 20th-Century French Poetry

Prerequisites: French 325 and French 326 or one of these courses and the equivalent Washington University transfer literature course from Toulouse or Paris. One-hour preceptorial for required for undergraduates.
Same as L34 French 424

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4245 Culture and Politics in the People's Republic of China: New Approaches

This course inquires into the political, ideological and social frameworks that shaped the cultural production and consumption in the People's Republic of China (PRC). In the realm of literature, film, architecture, and material culture and everyday life, this course pays a close attention to the contestation and negotiation between policy makers, cultural producers, censors and consumers. Understanding the specific contour of how this process unfolded in China allows us to trace the interplay between culture and politics in the formative years of revolutionary China (1949-1966), high socialism (1966-1978), the reform era (1978-1992), and post-socialist China (1992 to present). The course examines new scholarship in fields of social and cultural history, literary studies, and gender studies; and it explores the ways in which new empirical sources, theoretical frameworks, and research methods reinvestigate and challenge conventional knowledge of the PRC that have been shaped by the rise and fall of Cold War politics, the development of area studies in the U.S., and the evolving U.S.-China relations. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate students must have taken no fewer than two China-related courses at the 300 level or higher. Graduate students should be proficient in scholarly Chinese, as they are expected to read scholarly publications and primary materials in Chinese.
Same as L03 East Asia 4242

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4246 State Failure, State Success and Development

Why do some nations develop while others languish? This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining the role governments play in development and economic outcomes. Knee-jerk ideologues from all parts of the political spectrum make competing arguments, most of which are overly simplistic and ignore good social science. Some argue that state involvement in the economy hinders economic activity and development, while others argue for greater state involvement. Such arguments are often poorly informed by systematic rigorous research. We look at some of the competing arguments about governments in failed and successful states and compare those arguments to the empirical world or data. In so doing we recognize that how governments affect development and economic outcomes in society is neither straightforward nor consistent with any of the simplistic ideological screeds that often dominate public discourse.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4250 Zen Buddhism

This course is designed as an exploration of the history, teachings, practices and literature of Zen Buddhism in China (Chan), Korea (Sôn), Japan (Zen), and the United States. We discuss how Zen's conception of its history is related to its identity as a special tradition within Mahayana Buddhism, as well as its basic teachings on the primacy of enlightenment, the role of practice, the nature of the mind, and the limitations of language. We also look at Zen Buddhism and its relation to the arts, including poetry and painting, especially in East Asia. Finally, we briefly explore the response of Zen teachers and practitioners to questions of war, the environment and other contemporary issues. Open to seniors and graduate students. Prerequisites: L23 Re St 311 Buddhist Traditions or instructor's permission.
Same as L23 Re St 425

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4253 Researching Fertility, Mortality, and Migration

Students undertake research projects centering on the most fundamental demographic processes — fertility, mortality and migration. The first section covers basic demographic methodology so that students understand how population data is generated and demographic statistics analyzed. Then, course readings include seminal theoretical insights by anthropologists on demographic processes. Meanwhile, students work toward the completion of a term paper in which they are expected to undertake some original research on a topic of their choice (e.g., new reproductive technologies; cross-cultural adoption; ethnicity and migration). Each assignment in this course is a component of the final term paper. Prerequisite: Anthro 3612 Population and Society or permission of instructor.
Same as L48 Anthro 4253

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, WI Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4260 Latin American Theater

Survey of dramatic and theatrical currents from the late 19th century to the present. The course focuses on tracing the themes of nationalism, cultural identity, immigration, class displacement and the effects of consumerism in representative plays from the Rio de la Plata, Chile, Colombia and Mexico. The course studies manifestations of the sainete, the grotesco criollo, theater of the absurd, as well as the popular independent theater movements of the 1960s and '70s. Theoretical works studied include those of Brecht, Piscator, Esslin. Authors studied: Dragún, Payró, Cossa, Wolff, Sánchez, Díaz, Carballido, Gambaro, Buenaventura. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only; in Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 426

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD


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L97 IAS 4263 The Erotics of Violence in Latin America

The course is based on a combined analysis of theories on violence, nation and urban spaces, and the study of literary texts pertaining to the Latin American post-Boom. Some of the authors be studied are Ricardo Piglia, Fernando Vallejo, Joge Franco, Roberto Bolaño, Mario Mendoza, Laura Restrepo, Evelio Rosero, Santiago Roncagliolo, Alonso Cueto, Martin Kohan, Guillermo Arriaga, Daniel Alarcón, Paulo Lins, etc. The course is conducted in Spanish and focuses on the interconnections between sexuality, violence and political issues, and on the discursive strategies used for the representation of collective subjectivities and social conflict in Latin American societies.
Same as L38 Span 4261

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4274 Palestine, Israel, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict

This course examines the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict from the mid-19th century to the present. Topics include: Palestine in the late Ottoman period; the development of modern Zionism; British colonialism and the establishment of the Palestine Mandate; Arab-Jewish relations during the Mandate; the growth of Palestinian nationalism and resistance; the establishment of the state of Israel and the dispersion of the Palestinians in 1948; the Arab-Israeli wars; both Palestinian uprisings; and the peace process.
Same as L22 History 4274

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 4280 Creative Difference: Reclaiming Spanish-American "Traditional" Novel

This class focuses on a selection of aesthetically and socially representative 19th- and early 20th-century Spanish-American novels. Integrating a wide range of sources (critical essays, paintings, film), we explore abolitionist issues in Sab (Cuba), the reinvention of Amerindian legacies in Aves sin nido (Peru), and the different facets of modernization and nation-building in Los de abajo (Mexico) and La vorágine (Colombia). Students should finish the course with a broader knowledge of Spanish-American literary history, a deeper understanding of textual representations of gender, class and multiethnic identities, and a sharper awareness of their potential as reader and critic. Significant selections of pertinent criticism and theory are required of graduate students. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates; in Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 4281

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4281 Comparative Political Parties

An introduction to theories and concepts used in the analysis of political parties in democratic regimes, with emphasis on the classic literature covering West European advanced industrial democracies and the more recent scholarship on Latin American party systems. The course illuminates the complex aims, consequences and characteristics of modern party politics.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 4281

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L97 IAS 4282 Political Ecology

An exploration of how the interactions between culture and environment are mediated by local, national and global politics. Topics include "overpopulation," agricultural intensification, Green Revolution, biotechnology, corporate agriculture, green movements and organic farming. Each student prepares an in-depth research paper that may be presented to the class. Prerequisites: graduate standing, Anthro 361 or permission of instructor.
Same as L48 Anthro 4282

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4284 The New Sicilian School

The unification of Italy in the mid-19th century led to the creation of a new "Sicilian School," the first since that of the court poets associated with Frederick II in the 13th century. These new Sicilian writers have given us many narrative masterpieces, focusing on common concerns such as the island's identity over two millenia and the impact of Italian nationalism; the rise of bourgeois culture and the decline of indigenous patriarchal structures; the rule of law and the role of the Mafia; and the politics of language. We will read novels by Verga, Pirandello, Vittorini, Brancati, Tomasi di Lampedusa and Sciascia. Course taught in Italian or English.
Same as L36 Ital 428

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 430 Latin American Essay

Study of the principal movements and outstanding figures in the Spanish-American essay from the colonial period to the present. Sor Juana, Sarmiento, Alberdi, Marti, Rodo, Paz, Freire, Ortiz, Sabato, H.A. Murena. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 430

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4301 Print and Power in 19th-Century Latin America

Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students, this seminar covers one of the most fascinating periods in Latin American history and cultural production, spanning from the eve of the wars for independence to eve of the Mexican Revolution (1800-1910). Several reasons make this period and the connections between print media or print culture and power worthwhile. This long century was the most war-torn in the region's history. Not only did writers engage issues of war on what was almost a daily basis, but war generated a wealth of new modes of literature. Debates on the slave trade and abolition also occurred during the 1800s, and largely in writing. And while places such as Lima, Peru and Mexico City were established printing centers during the Iberian occupation of the Americas, true printing revolutions were not widespread until during and after the wars for independence. One of the results to emerge during the first third of the century was that writing and print media gave legitimacy to incipient republican states, wedding print to power in new ways. And by the end of the century, educators and state bureaucrats teamed up to push for public primary education and literacy as components of progressive, "civilized" nations. Add to this the visual technologies and an overall surge in new forms of symbolic communication through print, and it is easy to see why this period offers such a rich backdrop for observing how print and power fit into the landscape we now know as Latin America. We pay special attention to themes including writing as a legitimizing force, writing and nation building, and the intersection of print with war, race, identity formation, modernity and ideologies. Readings include archival materials, wartime and popular poetry, novels by authors such as Jorge Isaacs and Ignacio Altamirano, writings by Simon Bolivar and Domingo Sarmiento, and modernista poetry and prose. Historical and theoretical selections guide our analysis of primary sources. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates.
Same as L38 Span 4301

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4302 Divergent Voices: Italian Women Writers

This course engages the fictional and political works of Italian women writers from the 17th century to the present day. We will read one of the acclaimed Neapolitan novels of Elena Ferrante, who is considered by many to be the most important Italian fiction writer of her generation. We will examine a cloistered Venetian nun's defiant 1654 indictment of the misogynist society that forced her into the convent. We will confront the reality of a woman writer who in 1901 was compelled to choose between her child and her literary career. Among other contemporary writers, we will study the humorous and radical feminist one-acts of playwright Franca Rame. Taught in English. No final.
Same as L36 Ital 430

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 431 Latin American Poetry I

Survey of the major figures of Latin American poetry from the colonial period to modernism. Poets studied include Sor Juana, Caviedes, Avellaneda, Marti, Dario, Silva, Najera. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 431

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4311 Renegades and Radicals: The Japanese New Wave

In 1960, the major studio Shochiku promoted a new crop of directors as the "Japanese New Wave" in response to declining theater attendance, a booming youth culture, and the international success of the French Nouvelle Vague. This course provides an introduction to those iconoclastic filmmakers, who went on to break with major studios and revolutionize oppositional filmmaking in Japan. We analyze the challenging politics and aesthetics of these confrontational films for what they tell us about Japan's modern history and cinema. The films provoke as well as entertain, providing trenchant (sometimes absurd) commentaries on postwar Japanese society and its transformations. Themes include: the legacy of WWII and Japanese imperialism; the student movement; juvenile delinquency; sexual liberation; and Tokyo subcultures. Directors include: Oshima Nagisa, Shinoda Masahiro, Terayama Shuji, Masumura Yasuzo, Suzuki Seijun, Matsumoto Toshio and others. No knowledge of Japanese necessary. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 431

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4323 Latin American Poetry II

Survey of contemporary Latin American poetry, "postmodernismo" to the present. Poets studied include González Martinez, Vallejo, Neruda, Huidobro, Paz, Parra, Orozco, Pizarnik, Cardenal, Belli. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 432

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4324 Divergent Voices: Italian Women Writers

This course will examine select novels, poetry, and political writings by such noted authors as Sibilla Aleramo, Dacia Maraini, Luisa Muraro, and Anna Banti. Special attention will be paid to the historical, political, and cultural contexts that influenced authors and their work. Textual and critical analysis will focus on such issues as historical revisionism in women's writing, female subjectivity, and the origins and development of contemporary Italian feminist thought and practice. Taught in English.
Same as L36 Ital 432

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4325 Global Art Cinema

How do art films tell stories? The dominant storytelling genre of the contemporary festival circuit, the art film has since World War II combined "realist" and "modernist" impulses. Influenced by Italian neorealism, art films grant priority to characters from working class, sexual and other exploited and imperiled minorities. Drawing on the fine arts, literature and music, art films also experiment with modernist themes and formal principles, such as subjectivity, duration serial structure, denotative ambiguity and reflexivity. This course explores art cinema from a variety of national contexts, analyzing storytelling techniques and themes that challenge the "economical" and diverting forms associated with mainstream commercial filmmaking. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 432

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4330 Literature of the Italian Enlightenment

This course aims to explore the spectrum of intellectual and literary discourse of the Italian Enlightenment by examining a wide array of texts and genres. Readings include selections from Enlightenment and popular periodicals, scientific tracts on human anatomy, women's fashion magazines, the reformed theater of Carlo Goldoni, as well as Arcadian poetry, and literary criticism. We study the rise and characteristics of "coffee culture" during this age. We pay special attention to the "woman question," which stood at the center of 18th-century Italian intellectual discourse, and which was critical to the contemporary drive to define the enlightened nation-state. The class is conducted as a workshop in which students and instructor collaborate in the realization of course goals. Readings in Italian or English; discussion in English. Prerequisite: Ital 323C or Ital 324C.
Same as L36 Ital 433

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4331 Topics in Comparative Politics


Same as L32 Pol Sci 4331

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC


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L97 IAS 4352 Open Economy Macroeconomics

This course will begin with a review of international trade theory, of the balance of payment accounts and their relationship to international borrowing and lending. We will then study the asset approach to exchange rates determination, exchange rate behavior in the short and in the long run, and the relationship of exchange rates with prices and output. The course will also explore monetary and fiscal policy under both fixed and floating exchange rates, macroeconomic policy coordination and optimum currency areas, international debt problems of developing countries and their relation to stabilization program. Prerequisite: Econ 4021.
Same as L11 Econ 435

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4357 The Holocaust in the Sephardic World

The course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the Holocaust, of its impact on the Sephardic world, of present-day debates on the "globalization" of the Holocaust, and of the ways in which these debates influence contemporary conflicts between Jews, Muslims and Christians in Southern Europe and North Africa. We will turn to the history of these conflicts, and study the Sephardic diaspora by focusing on the consequences that the 1492 expulsion had within the Iberian Peninsula, in Europe, and in the Mediterranean world. We will study Sephardic communities in Europe and North Africa and their interactions with Christians and Muslims before World War II. Once we have examined the history of the Holocaust and its impact on the Sephardic world in a more general sense, our readings will focus on the different effects of the Holocaust's "long reach" into Southeastern Europe, the Balkans, and North Africa, paying close attention to interactions among Jews, local communities, and the Nazi invaders. Finally, we will address the memory of the Sephardic experience of the Holocaust, and the role of Holocaust commemoration in different parts of the world. We will approach these topics through historiographies, memoirs, novels, maps, poetry and film.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4371 Caffe, Cadavers, Comedy, and Castrati: Italy and the Age of the Grand Tour

Taught in English. With French libertine philosopher the Marquis de Sade, German novelist Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Romantic poet Lord Byron and other illustrious travelers of high birth and good fortune who sought finishing enrichment by making their Grand Tour to Italy from the mid-18th through the early 19th centuries, we explore the richness and variety of Italian life and culture as depicted by both Grand Tourists as well as their Italian interlocutors. Chief among our destinations are Venice, Bologna, Florence and Rome. Attractions typical of the early modern Tour circumscribe our journey. Coffee houses first appeared in the 18th century and, in ways strikingly similar to their function today, became the real and symbolic centers of social, intellectual and civil exchange. We explore 18th-century coffee culture through comedies and Enlightenment and popular journals that took them as their theme, as well as through a study of the coffee houses themselves, a number of which are still in existence. Theaters, concert halls, gaming houses, literary and scientific academies, galleries, churches and universities are part of the standardized itinerary we follow. During the period, anatomy and physiology attained new legitimacy as crucial scientific disciplines and we visit both the anatomical theater at the University of Bologna, where the annual Carnival dissection took place, as well as the first museum of anatomy and obstetrics founded in the Bolognese Institute of Sciences in 1742 by Pope Benedict XIV. We visit archeological excavation sites, in particular Pompeii, first unearthed in 1748. Fashion, an obsessive preoccupation of the day, also is a point of interest in our travels. Through primary and recently published secondary sources we also encounter the remarkable authority of Italian women unmatched anywhere else in Europe at the time. Prerequisite: at least one 300-level literature course. Readings in Italian or English.
Same as L36 Ital 437

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4372 Contemporary Korean I: Topics in Korean Literature and Culture

Advanced- to high advanced-level Korean course in standard modern Korean. Emphasis is placed on developing an advanced level of reading proficiency in Korean and writing ability in Korean for an academic or professional purpose. This course to be taken in the fall semester. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Korean 418 or placement by examination with instructor's permission.
Same as L51 Korean 437

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 4382 Aesthetics


Same as L16 Comp Lit 438

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4392 Capitalism and Culture

Capitalism is perhaps the most important historical and social phenomenon in the modern world. In tribal settings and major cities alike, its complex impacts are evident. Through rich case studies of how capitalism touches down in diverse cultures, this course provides an introduction to anthropological perspectives on the economy and economic development. Themes covered include the history of capitalism and globalization, the cultural meanings of class and taste, the relationship between capitalism and popular culture, major artistic responses to capitalism, social movements such as environmentalism, and the field of international development. No background in anthropology or economics is required.
Same as L48 Anthro 4392

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4408 Trauma and Memory

A thorough investigation of the effects of trauma on memory in both individuals and collective groups. Topics include flashbulb memories; forgetting and repression; post-traumatic stress and memory; and effects of trauma on individual and group identity. Prerequisites: Psych 100B and 6 units of advanced-level psychology or anthropology course work.
Same as L33 Psych 4408

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4420 Oil Wars: America and the Cultural Politics of Global Energy

This seminar explores the historical, cultural, and political relationship between America and global energy, focusing specifically on oil and natural gas. Our central objective is to examine how oil and natural gas shape our own lives and entangle us in the cultural, political, and economic lives of the rest of the world. We ask what anthropological and social science approaches might contribute to our understanding of a situation that has become, in most popular terms, a national "crisis" of global dimensions.
Same as L98 AMCS 442

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4434 The Inconvenient Indio: Imagining Indigenous Cultures in Peru and Bolivia

In the cultural history of the Andean nations, the Indio has always been a powerful yet perpetually unstable signifier, whose meaning is constantly redefined by non-Indians. An archaic residue for some, the bedrock of a new society for others, the Indio conjures contradictory imaginaries of articulation, combination, disjunction and metamorphosis that have shaped a wide range of debates: from assimilation and mestizaje in the context of nation-building and modernity, to the politicizing of ethnic identities in the context of immigration and globalization. Focusing on Peru and Bolivia, this course examines these cultural imaginaries and the debates in which they appear, as well as the models of community and identity they suggest. In doing so, we discuss topics such as the discourse of illness, indigenismo, transculturation, heterogeneity, violence and memory. Materials analyzed include poetry by César Vallejo and Carlos Oquendo de Amat; essays by José Carlos Mariátegui and Ángel Rama; José María Arguedas's novel Los ríos profundos; Jorge Sanjinés's film El Coraje del pueblo; and theatrical performances by Grupo Yuyachkani. Prerequisites: Span 307D and Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates; in Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 443

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4435 Memory, Tears and Longing: East Asian Melodrama Film

Excessive emotion, unreasonable sacrifice, hidden truth, untimely knowledge, and forbidden desire — the power of melodrama and its moving representations have fueled the popularity of hundreds, if not thousands, of books, plays and films. Melodrama has variously been defined as a genre, a logic, an effect and a mode, applied to diverse media, divergent cultural traditions, and different historical contexts. The course provides a survey of East Asian melodrama films — as well as films that challenge conventional definitions of melodrama — by pairing Japanese-, Korean-, and Chinese-language productions with key critical texts in melodrama studies. We see classics such as Tokyo Story, Two Stage Sisters, and The Housemaid. We examine melodrama's complex ties to modernity, tradition and cultural transformation in East Asia; special emphasis is placed on representations of the family, historical change, gender and sexuality. In addition to historical background and film studies concepts, we also consider a range of approaches for thinking about the aesthetics and politics of emotion. No prerequisites. No prior knowledge of East Asian culture or language necessary. Mandatory weekly scheduled screening.
Same as L53 Film 443

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4440 Topics in Chinese Language Cinema

Variable topics associated with the shaping of Chinese-language cinema, whether originating from the PRC, Hong Kong or Taiwan. This course may take up themes, directors, film genres, special subjects (such as independent film), formal elements (such as cinematography or sound) or issues (the relationship of film to literature, specific cultural movements or political events). Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 444

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4442 The Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe

A study of Jewish culture, society and politics in Poland-Lithuania, Hungary, the Czech lands, Russia, Romania and the Ukraine, from the 16th century through the 20th century. Among the topics covered are: economic, social and political relations in Poland-Lithuania; varieties of Jewish religious culture; Russian and Habsburg imperial policies toward the Jews; nationality struggles and anti-Semitism; Jewish national and revolutionary responses; Jewish experience in war and revolution; the mass destruction of East European Jewish life; and the transition from Cold War to democratic revolution.
Same as L22 History 4442

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD


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L97 IAS 4450 Japanese Fiction (WI)

A study of the themes, styles and genres of Japanese fiction as revealed in representative works of major authors such as Soseki, Tanizaki, and Kawabata. Topics include the question of the Japanese literary canon, the varieties of Japanese literary selfhood, literature by and about women, and tradition versus modernity. All works read in English translation. Prerequisites: junior standing and 6 units of literature.
Same as L05 Japan 445

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4451 Contemporary Politics in India

This seminar will examine current topics and controversies in contemporary Indian politics. The course will have three main foci: the links between politics and economic liberalization over the last two decades; the links between ascriptive identities such as religion, caste and gender and contemporary political processes, including ethnic and gender quotas; and the changes in party politics at the national and state levels that have accompanied the decline of Congress party dominance. Specific topics include the role of caste and religion in contemporary politics; the rise of state parties and its effects on federal relations; the effects of economic reform and globalization on economy and society; urbanization and migration flows; the rise of modern Hindu nationalism; and the links between collective violence and electoral politics.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 4451

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 4452 Topics in Modern Japanese Literature

A topics course on modern Japanese literature; topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: Junior standing and 6 units of literature.
Same as L05 Japan 4451

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4453 Topics in Islam

Fall 2017 Topic: History of Political Thought. This course aims to study political thought and practice in Islamic history (circa eighth through 13th centuries) through a close reading of a selection of primary sources in translation (and in their original language if language proficiency is satisfactory). Particular attention will be given to historical contexts in which thoughts are espoused and texts written. We plan to examine the development of political concepts and themes as articulated in diverse literary genres (legal, theological, political) from the eighth through the 13th century. We hope to engage various theoretical models to analyze the relationship between politics and religion and tease out the role of power in determining sociopolitical relations, distinctions and structures. We hope to have a better grasp on the historicity of ideas presented in timeless categories in political discourse. Prerequisite: advanced knowledge of Arabic preferred but not required.
Same as L75 JINE 445

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 4471 Spanish-American Women Writers I

A study of women's writing from the turn of the century to 1970. Readings include novels, short stories, poetry, essays and autobiographical texts. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature course taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 4471

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4472 Spanish-American Women Writers II

A study of contemporary women's writing from 1970 to the present within a feminist theoretical framework. Topics include the construction of gender, female subjectivity, love and power, women and politics, literary strategies, etc. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 4472

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 448 Japanese Poetry

A comprehensive survey of Japanese poetry from the eighth century to the present day. Topics include the development of the great tradition of court poetry in the Heian period (ca. 800-1200) and its full flowering during the medieval period (ca. 1200-1600), the influence of the Zen aesthetic, the emergence of linked verse and haiku, and the transformation of the classical tradition with the advent of the modern era. All works are read in English translation, although knowledge of Japanese is useful. Graduate students and Japanese majors are expected to read original materials extensively. Prerequisites: junior standing and 6 units of literature course work.
Same as L05 Japan 448

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4481 Writing Culture

Different ways of writing about people, culture and society in past and present times. Readings include anthropological works as well as works of fiction that represent people and the times, places and circumstances in which they live. Students conduct and write about their own ethnographical observations.
Same as L48 Anthro 4481

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, WI Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4485 Topics in Irish Literature I

Topics course in Irish literature.
Same as L14 E Lit 4485

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4490 Modern Japanese Women Writers (WI)

Japanese women have been scripted by Western (male) imagination as gentle, self-effacing creatures. From their (re)emergence in the late 19th century to their dominance in the late 20th, Japanese women writers have presented an image of their countrywomen as anything but demure. Struggling to define their voices against ever-shifting expectations and social contexts, the women they create in their fiction are valiant, if not at times violent. This course examines the various manifestations of the female image in female-authored modern Japanese fiction. Writers to be considered are Higuchi Ichiyo, Hirabayashi Taiko, Uno Chiyo, Enchi Fumiko, Yamada Eimi, and others. A selection of novels and shorter fiction will be available in English translation, and students need not be familiar with Japanese. Prerequisite: 6 units of literature/women's studies and junior standing, or permission of the instructor. Writing Intensive course.
Same as L05 Japan 449

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD, WI EN: H


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L97 IAS 4491 Modern Japanese Women Writers

Japanese women have been scripted by Western (male) imagination as gentle, self-effacing creatures. From their (re)emergence in the late 19th century to their dominance in the late 20th, Japanese women writers have presented an image of their countrywomen as anything but demure. Struggling to define their voices against ever-shifting expectations and social contexts, the women they create in their fiction are valiant, if not at times violent. This course examines the various manifestations of the female image in female-authored modern Japanese fiction. Writers considered are Higuchi Ichiyo, Hirabayashi Taiko, Uno Chiyo, Enchi Fumiko, Yamada Eimi, and others. A selection of novels and shorter fiction are available in English translation, and students need not be familiar with Japanese. Prerequisite: 6 units of literature/women's studies and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.
Same as L05 Japan 4491

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4492 The Irish Literary Revival

The class will study major writings by Oscar Wilde, W.B. Yeats, J.M. Synge, James Joyce, & Flann O'Brien within the contexts of the language movement, colonialism, cultural nationalism, the socialist movement and the 1913 Lockout, the Easter Rising and the War for Independence, the Civil War, the founding of the Irish Free State, the Partition, and the Irish Theocracy. Wilde's notions of the primacy of art with regard to politics and their elaboration by W.I. Thompson and Declan Kiberd will be an organizing principle in the course. The class will see two films, offer oral reports, and write papers.
Same as L14 E Lit 4492

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L97 IAS 4496 East, Meet West: Cross-Cultural Aesthetics in Chinese and Japanese Art

This seminar grounded in cross-cultural aesthetics examines East Asian visual responses to European art and science from the 16th through 19th centuries. First introduced by Jesuit missionaries, continued by merchants, and culminating with colonial enterprises, the same Western ideas and works left very different impressions on China and Japan. An introduction to cross-cultural aesthetics from both Western and East Asian perspectives lays the theoretical foundation to engage these works of art, before proceeding thematically through time to cover painting, cartography, woodblock prints, ceramics and photography within transregional and transcultural contexts. Prerequisites: at least one course in Asian art or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4494

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 4510 Environmental Policy

Course examines the relationship between environmental economics and environmental policy. The course focuses on air pollution, water pollution and hazardous wastes, with some attention given to biodiversity and global climate change. The course examines critically two prescriptions that economics usually endorses: (1) "balancing" of benefits against costs (e.g., benefit-cost analysis) and the use of risk analysis in evaluating policy alternatives; and (2) use of market incentives (e.g., prices, taxes or charges) or "property rights" instead of traditional command-and-control regulations to implement environmental policy. Prerequisite: Econ 1011.
Same as L11 Econ 451

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA, ETH


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L97 IAS 4511 Urban Culture in Modern China

The narrative of rural crisis and peasant revolution has dominated China's modern history for decades. But there has been a growing interest in China's urban past and present with the increased prominence of cities in China's breathtaking economic development and the opening of municipal archives in post-Mao era. The course aims to introduce students to "conventional wisdoms," new directions, and major debates in the urban history field. Topics include: the urban political economy, the cultural dynamics of modernity, the reconstruction of traditions in the making of modernity, the cultural production and consumption, colonialism and imperialism in the urban setting, nationalism, and reform and revolution. Acknowledging and understanding the nuance and difference in views and interpretations in historical writings (historiography) are essential. The course seeks to develop students' research and analytical skills, such as locating secondary sources, incorporating scholarly interpretations, and developing and sustaining a thesis based on secondary and primary sources in student research. Prerequisites: This is an interdisciplinary seminar designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Advanced undergraduate students must have taken at least one China-related course at the 300-level or higher.
Same as L03 East Asia 4510

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4517 Anthropology and Development

What is "development"? Economic progress for all? A slow and gradual "improvement" in the human condition? Helping people with "projects"? Westernization? Modernization? The sorting out of bodies that are useful and can be put to work from those less useful bodies that must be contained, imprisoned or killed? The militarized accumulation of capital? The commodification of labor? The exhaustion of nature? In this advanced seminar we will consider how anthropologists — as writers, analysts, and theorists — have engaged the theories, meanings, practices and consequences of (sometimes externally directed) economic and political change. We focus on issues of the contemporary moment: oil; urban poverty and inequality (sex work, migration, water, debt, and cash transfer programs); and cultures of militarism. The course is designed to provide a graduate-level introduction to theory and ethnography based on intensive reading, discussion, critique and writing, with revision. It is open to advanced undergraduates and fulfills writing-intensive (WI) requirements, as well as capstone requirements for some majors.
Same as L48 Anthro 4517

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, WI Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L97 IAS 452 Immigration, Identity and New Technology

This course examines how immigration is being transformed by changes in information and communication technology. With these new technologies, immigrants can stay in contact with family and friends much more easily, travel to and maintain relationships in their home countries, and form bonds with other immigrants in the new country. How do these changes affect how immigrants view themselves in their new countries? Are they more or less likely to settle permanently? Do they change their patterns of political participation? We answer these and other questions using literature from sociology, communication, psychology, anthropology and political science. Students are expected to explore internet sources as well as traditional materials.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD EN: S


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L97 IAS 4520 International Climate Negotiation Seminar

This course is a 3-credit advanced seminar for students who will represent Washington University at the annual United Nations Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). COP22 will be held in Marrakech, Morocco, in November of 2017.
Same as L82 EnSt 452

Credit variable, maximum 6 units. A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4533 Narratives of Fear: Violence in Latin American Literature

This course analyzes different representations of violence in Latin American literature. Based on a critical analysis of 19th- and early 20th-century texts, we study how the recognition and legitimization of violence occurs in the context of hierarchical relationships in the society. Also we study how the literary images of bandits, pirates, thieves and assassins become the counter-discourse of the views of progress sustained by the hegemonic powers. The role of power and ideology is discussed in texts that define different levels of violence as a cultural manifestation.
Same as L38 Span 4533

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 455 Topics in Korean Literature and Culture

Varied topics in Korean literature and culture. Subject matter varies by semester; consult current semester listings for topic.
Same as L51 Korean 455

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA, CD A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4560 English Novel of the 19th Century

Prose fiction by such writers as Jane Austen, Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, the Brontæs, and Hardy.
Same as L14 E Lit 456

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4582 Major Film Directors

What does the film director do? In the earliest movies, film directors modeled themselves on their theatrical counterparts: they chiefly focused on how to stage an action in a confined space for a stationary camera that represented an ideal member of the audience. As the camera began to be used to direct audience attention, first through cutting, then through actual movement, the film director evolved from a stager of events to a narrator. By analyzing the work of one or more major film directors, this course explores the art of film direction. We learn how film directors may use the camera to narrate a scene, to provide their own distinctive view of the actions playing out on the movie screen. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 458

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 4590 Writing North Africa

This seminar studies French travel writing related to North Africa, as well as the major works of literature from and about Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia, as a prelude for reading the texts of those countries' Francophone literature now considered canonical. We consider how colonial-era writing by authors such as Eugène Fromentin and Pierre Benoît defined the colonial "exotic." We then examine the way the former empire wrote its own literature in the language of the former colonizer, in the works of post-independence authors such as Kateb Yacine, Assia Djebar and Abdelkebir Khatibi, who both observe and revise the conventions of postcolonial literature. Prerequisites: French 325 and French 326 or one of these courses and the equivalent Washington University transfer literature course from Toulouse or Paris. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates.
Same as L34 French 459

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4611 Latin American Populism and Neo-Populism

A salient feature of Latin America in the 20th and early 21st centuries has been the recurrence of populism. Mass-based political and social movements animated by nationalist and reformist impulses dominated Latin American politics in the 1920s, 1930s-'60s, and 1980s to the present. This course provides a general historical and theoretically informed analysis of the origins, internal dynamics and outcomes of classical populist and neopopulist governments and parties. Among the notable populist and neopopulist cases examined include: Peronism in Argentina, Velasquismo in Ecuador, Cardenismo in Mexico, APRA in Peru, Varguismo in Brazil, Garcia/Fujimori in Peru, Menen/Kirchners in Argentina, and Hugo Chavez in Venezuela. Issues pertaining to leader-follower relations, populist discourses, citizenship rights, populist gender and racial policies, labor and social reforms, and mass mobilization politics also are explored.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4615 Caricature: The Culture and Politics of Satire

This course examines the golden age of caricature. Beginning with the prints of William Hogarth, we look at the caricatural traditions in France and England from the late 18th-century through the early 20th century. Special emphasis is placed on visual satire as a vehicle for social and political critique, on theories of humor (particularly Baudelaire and Bakhtin), and the development of a mass market for this imagery. Other figures discussed include Rowlandson, Cruikshank, Daumier, Gavarni, Philipon, and Gil. We take advantage of a major collection of French caricature in the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University, as well as collections available for study in Olin Library and at the St. Louis Art Museum. Prerequisites: Art-Arch 112 or Art-Arch 211, or a 300-level course in modern European history or literature, or permission of the instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4615

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 4620 Topics in English Literature II

Variable topics, such as Travel and Colonization in the Renaissance; Renaissance Skepticism and the Literature of Doubt.
Same as L14 E Lit 462

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4622 Labor and Labor Movements in Global History

Focusing on the period from mid-19th century (industrial revolution) until the present neoliberal capitalist era, this course analyzes working class formation, organization, collective action, and politics on a worldwide scale. It seeks to explore the connections between historical and contemporary workers' movements in the global North and global South, eschewing national perspectives and global/local dichotomies. Special attention is given to Latin American workers and labor movements. In particular, it examines the influence of immigration, the role of export workers, the impact of radical ideologies, the development of labor relations systems, the nature of informal work, and recent struggles for workers' control. The principal aim of this course is to introduce students to the key topics and themes pertaining to global labor history. These themes are varied and complex and range from workers' struggles.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4633 20th-Century Latin American Revolutions

Latin America was arguably one of the most "revolutionary" regions of the world in the 20th century. It registered four "great revolutions": Mexico 1910, Bolivia 1952, Cuba 1959, and Nicaragua 1979. These social revolutions entailed a substantial, violent, and voluntarist struggle for political power and the overthrow of the established political, economic, social and cultural orders. In the wake of these successful revolutions, new revolutionary institutions of governance were founded, radical structural changes were implemented, and a new revolutionary ethos was adopted. With the exception perhaps of the Bolivian Revolution, these revolutions had a profound impact on Latin American and world politics. The primary aim of this course is to analyze and compare the causes, processes and outcomes of the Mexican, Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD EN: S


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L97 IAS 4641 Japanese Textual Analysis

This course introduces the advanced student of Japanese to a variety of prose narratives in the modern language. Readings, which include literary texts and topical essays on aspects of Japanese society and culture, reflect the needs and interests of the enrolled students. Focus is on close reading and syntactic analysis of the selected texts. Regular translation exercises gauge the mastery of grammar, syntax, and idiomatic usages. All readings are in Japanese, with class discussion conducted predominantly in English. A final translation project, to be chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor, is required. Prerequisite: Japan 458, or instructor's permission.
Same as L05 Japan 464

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD


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L97 IAS 4650 Cities, Race and Development in Latin America

This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the Latin American city: its history, development and inherent economic, social, cultural, ethnic and political tensions. Lectures, readings and class debates will explore interactions between the materiality and structure of Latin American modern cities and the social and cultural phenomena related to urban life in multicultural societies. Particular attention will be devoted to the effects of internal/external migration, and to the development of public spaces and sites of memory. Patterns of social segregation, marginalization, inequality and the like, will be analyzed in order to elaborate on the contemporary challenges of the city in a globalized yet traditional world. In addition to the analysis of living, institutional and commercial spaces, the course will cover social dynamics that break the discipline of the city through different forms of transgression, including crime, informal housing and underground movements. The goal of the course is to expose students to historical and social developments as exemplified in a variety of urban environments, and to encourage reflection on issues of social justice related to the living conditions of rural, disadvantaged and indigenous populations. The course will be conducted in English. Mandatory readings will be in English. Additional readings in Spanish will be required for those students fluent in the language. Prerequisites: none.
Same as L45 LatAm 465

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4660 Geographies of Development in Latin America: Critical Perspectives and Contemporary Challenges

This course provides an overview to the geographies of development throughout Latin America. We begin by examining a variety of theoretical perspectives, definitions and critiques of "development." We highlight the uneven processes of development at multiple, overlapping scales and the power imbalances inherent in much of development discourse. In the second half of the course we focus our considerations toward specific contemporary trends and development issues, utilizing case studies drawn primarily from Latin America. These themes include sustainability, NGOs, social movements, social capital, security and conflict, identity, ethnicity and gender issues, participatory development, and micro-credit and conditional cash transfers. Students acquire the critical theoretical tools to develop their own perspectives on how development geographies play out in Latin America.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD EN: S


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L97 IAS 4662 Central American Geographies of Violence

This course provides an in-depth examination of the geographies of violence in Central America. As a region frequently characterized as endemically prone to violence, it is vital to analyze and contextualize the violence. Approaching violence in Central America from a geographic perspective involves not only locating and "placing" the violence, but also thinking relationally about the multiple, overlapping scales of activity, both within and beyond the region. The course is divided into five parts. In the first two sections of the course, we begin with an overview of the physical and human geography of the region and outline key historic moments and their legacies, including colonization, international relations (with an emphasis on U.S. interventions), civil war, genocide and torture. Simultaneously, we delve into various theoretical approaches for understanding the nature of multiple types of violence. In the third section of the course, we focus on neoliberal violence, insecurity and development and address issues such as urbanization, violent crime, issues with free trade and labor, and environmental issues. For the final two sections, we draw from contemporary case studies in the region. We will address identity and violence (discussing indigenous issues, racism, genocide and gender) and in the last section we will cover migration, gangs, drug-trafficking, U.S. security responses and re-militarization. While we will continue to consider these types of violence through the various theoretical frameworks introduced in the first part of the course, we will also examine and analyze reports on contemporary violence and policy recommendations from multiple sources (multilateral organizations, governments, think tanks, and other nongovernmental organizations). Throughout the course we will also discuss current events occurring in Central America and how they directly or indirectly relate to the topic of geographies of violence.

Credit 3 units. A&S: CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4664 Popular Culture and the Representation of Youth in Latin America

The objective of the course is to introduce students to different aspects related to the representation of youth in Latin America, particularly through the depiction this sector receives in the realm of popular culture. The course will focus on the relationship between youth and social/political conflict and on the literary and cinematic representation of juvenile sectors in cultural production, in different Latin American countries. The role of music, melodrama and the media will be studied in connection to the construction of subjectivity and collective identity. The course will also analyze the involvement of juvenile sectors in narco-culture, gangs, maras, and the like, as well as the impact of violence, fear and social inequality in early life. The analysis of films, literary texts, and cultural practices will be approached through a combination of biopolitical analysis and the study of representational strategies utilized in the elaboration of symbolic materials. This course fulfills the "Latin American Seminar" requirement for majors and minors in Latin American Studies. Prerequisite: 165D or another Latin American Studies course.
Same as L45 LatAm 466

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L97 IAS 467 The Chinese Theater

Survey of the performance and literary traditions of the Chinese theater from their pre-Tang origins to the present day. The course focuses on three forms: 14th-century zaju plays, 16th- and 17th-century chuanqi plays, and recent films from China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Background in either China studies or theater in other cultures recommended.
Same as L04 Chinese 467

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4675 Beyond the Harem: Women, Gender, and Revolution

This course examines the history and current situations of women in Middle Eastern societies. The first half of the course is devoted to studying historical changes in factors structuring women's status and their sociopolitical roles. The second half of the course will focus on several case studies of women's participation in broad anti-colonial social revolutions and how these revolutions affected the position of women in those societies.
Same as L22 History 4675

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: BA EN: H


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L97 IAS 4700 Readings in Chinese Literature

Selected literary masterpieces in Chinese, including examples of poetry and prose. All readings and discussion in Chinese. Open to both graduate and undergraduate students. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Same as L04 Chinese 470

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4710 Topics in Modern Arabic Literature in Translation

Modern Arabic narratives read in English translation foregrounding themes such as the conflict between tradition and modernity, civil war, poverty, alienation, religion and politics, and changing gender roles.
Same as L49 Arab 471

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L97 IAS 4711 Topics in Japanese Culture

A topics course on Japanese culture; topics vary by semester.
Same as L03 East Asia 471

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4712 Topics in Religious Studies: Gender and Religion in China

In this course, we explore the images, roles and experience of women in Chinese religions: Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, and so-called "popular" religion. Topics discussed include: gender concepts, norms and roles in each religious tradition; notions of femininity and attitudes toward the female body; biographies of women in Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist literature; female goddesses and deities; and the place of the Buddhist and Daoist nun and laywoman in Chinese society. All readings are in English or in English translation. Prerequisite: senior/graduate standing. Students with no previous background in Chinese religion, literature or culture need to obtain instructor's permission before enrolling.
Same as L23 Re St 4711

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD


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L97 IAS 4720 Spanish 19th-Century Novel

Departing from writings on realism by both 19th-century European writers and more contemporary literary theorists, the course carries out a critical reappraisal of the notion of "realism" in the 19th-century Spanish novel. Texts covered include selected works of Benito Pérez Galdós, Leopoldo Alas (Clarín), and Emilia Pardo Bazán that represent different periods of their literary trajectory. Daily readings and discussions focus on issues such as: the "reality effect"; the poetics of detail; naturalism in the Spanish context; the aesthetics of beginnings and endings; gender and consumption; fin-de-siècle crisis of gender ("New Women" and emasculated men); the problem of modernity; and the intersections of gender, class and national identity. These critical issues are situated in the context of theoretical discussions on the complex, and often ambivalent, function of realist discourse in Spanish fin-de-siècle culture and society. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 472

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4730 Political Economy of Multinational Enterprises

In this class we explore the literature in political science and economics on the relationship between multinational enterprises and domestic governments. The four main themes of the course are: 1) defining and understanding multinational enterprises, 2) governments attracting and competing for multinationals, 3) the impact of multinationals on economic development and groups within society, and 4) attempts to regulate multinationals both domestically and internationally. Prerequisite: Pol Sci 102 or 103B.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 4730

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 4731 Global Political Economy

This course will borrow on the insights of international relations scholarship and economic theory to develop a broad understanding of international economic relations. Specifically, this course attempts to address the following two sets of questions: 1) How do global economic relations fit into the broader category of international relations? How do the existing theories in international relations (liberalism, realism and Marxism) help us understand international economic relations between nation-states? 2) What are the effects of these international economic forces (trade, finance and multinational production) on domestic governments and societies?
Same as L32 Pol Sci 4731

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L97 IAS 474 National Narratives and Collective Memory

This course examines how national narratives shape the ideas of nation-states about themselves and others. It considers cultural, psychological and political aspects of narratives used to interpret the past and understand the present. In addition to reviewing conceptual foundations from the humanities and social sciences, particular national narratives are considered as case studies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4741 Mexican Film in the Age of NAFTA (1990-2010)

Starting in the 1990s, as NAFTA came into effect, Mexico revitalized its film industry and managed to produce not only a somewhat sustainable market within the country, but also a set of recognized figures in acting (Salma Hayek, Gael García, Diego Luna), directing (Guillermo del Toro, Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro González Iñarritu), and moviemaking in general (Emmanuel Lubezki, Rodrigo Prieto, and others). This course explores the underlying processes that allowed for such a rebirth. The main focus of the course is to understand the contradictory impact of neoliberalism in film, understanding neoliberalism as the economic doctrine of unbridled free markets, and its social and cultural consequences. Paradoxically, neoliberalism allowed the industry to become financially and aesthetically viable, while becoming inaccessible to the lower classes in Mexico. The course mostly develops four of these processes: the undermining of nationalism as the main topic; the displacement of the target audience from the working classes, both rural and urban, to the urban middle class; the transformation of political cinema from the leftist films of the '70s to the conservative ideologies of neoliberal politics; and the intersection of Mexican film to the global market of so-called "art house cinema." Students compare films that have reached an international market with those viewed only within Mexico. In addition, students are introduced to critical approaches that allow them to appreciate these movies in the context of film aesthetics, social identities, and the relationship between film and economic development. Movies are shown outside of class in Spanish with English subtitles. The class is conducted in English. Written course work may be pursued in English or Spanish. No prerequisites.
Same as L38 Span 474

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4750 Screening the Holocaust

This course surveys the history of Holocaust representation on film, examining a wide range of documentary and fictional works from 1945 to the present day. Discussions consider a number of key questions, including: What challenges does the Holocaust pose to cinematic representation, and how have filmmakers grappled with them? How have directors worked within and against notions of the Holocaust as unrepresentable, and how have they confronted the challenge of its association with a limited set of highly iconic images? What are the more general ethical and political dimensions of representing the Holocaust onscreen — its victims as well as its perpetrators, the systematic genocidal violence that characterized it, and the sheer absence of so many dead? We also probe the changing significance of cinematic representation of the Holocaust, exploring the medium's increasingly memorial function for audiences ever further removed from the historical moment of its occurrence. Screenings may include The Last Stage; Distant Journey; Night and Fog; Judgment at Nuremberg; Shoah; Europa, Europa; Schindler's List; Train of Life; The Specialist; Photographer; A Film Unfinished. Critical readings by figures such as Giorgio Agamben, Jean Amery, Shoshana Felman, Geoffrey Hartman, Marianne Hirsch, Sidra Israhi, Dominick LaCapra, Alison Landsberg, Berel Lang, Michael Rothberg, and James Young. Required screenings.
Same as L53 Film 475

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4752 Topics in International Politics

This course is intended primarily for sophomores and juniors. The topic of this course varies by semester, dependent on faculty and student interests.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 475

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L97 IAS 476 Reading Seminar in Chinese Traditional Fiction

Extensive readings in major critical works in Chinese and English concerning fiction of imperial China, with emphasis on vernacular fiction of the Ming and Qing periods. Weekly discussions and short reading reports. Knowledge of Chinese language and literature normally required, but arrangements can be made for graduate students in such programs as East Asian Studies and Comparative Literature.
Same as L04 Chinese 476

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4761 Politics of Global Finance

Global finance underwent stunning transformations over the past 30 years. The changes contribute to interdependence, challenge national sovereignty, alter state-society relations, affect economic development, and influence the distribution of wealth and power in the global political economy. The seminar examines the political economy of monetary relations, the globalization of capital markets, and their effects upon domestic and international affairs.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L97 IAS 4762 Money, Exchange and Power: Economy and Society in the Ancient Mediterranean World

From seaborne trade and banking to slavery and the impact of new technology, the economy of the ancient Mediterranean world constitutes a particularly dynamic field of study. To examine a society's underlying economics is to gain critical insight into those historical phenomena that are themselves the product of multiple, overlapping dimensions of human action and thought. This course engages directly with a fascinating array of primary evidence for economic behaviors, beliefs, structures and institutions among the Romans, Greeks, and their neighbors. We will also explore the methodological challenges and implications of that evidence as well as a variety of modern theoretical approaches. This year our focus is mainly upon developments among the Greeks, ranging from the transformative invention of coinage to the rise of commercial networks centered around religious sanctuaries like Delos. Prerequisites: Classics 341C or 342C or 345C or 346C or permission of instructor.
Same as L08 Classics 476

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 477 Cultures of Memory in Post-War Germany and Japan

Post-war German and Japanese societies have long grappled with the issue of how to confront and commemorate World War II. This interdisciplinary course, team-taught by specialists in these fields, explores key aspects of post-war culture under four central rubrics: defeat, guilt, memory and renewal. We examine constructions of memory in a diverse range of texts, including historical, literary and cinematic narratives. Several key questions guide our discussions. What is the relationship between perpetration and suffering? How do different cultures represent and repress wartime experience and how do these articulations and omissions shape memory? How are memories of war participation and trauma shared and transmitted across generations? What do we remember and why?

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4770 Reading Seminar in Chinese Traditional Poetry

A seminar on Chinese traditional poetry with varying topics. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.
Same as L04 Chinese 477

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4771 Cosmopolitan and Native Modernisms: The U.S. and Europe Between the Wars

This seminar focuses on two contrasting currents within American and European modernism between the two world wars: native and cosmopolitan. Alternating between the United States and France, it begins in the years before World War I and concludes with the rise of virulent forms of cultural nationalism in the late 1930s. We consider the subjects, personalities, aesthetic strategies, and political and social investments associated with these alternative modernisms, linked to a search for roots, on the one hand, and on the other, to a desire for forms of spatial and social mobility. Comparing "homegrown" and expatriate experience, we consider divergent attitudes toward identity, gender, nation, time and nature, analyzing these two fundamental responses to modernity in relation to one another. Prerequisites: Art-Arch 112 Introduction to Western Art or Art-Arch 211 Introduction to Modern Art; one 300-level course in art history preferred; or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4770

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 479 Reading Seminar in Modern Chinese Literature

A seminar on modern Chinese literature with varying topics. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.
Same as L04 Chinese 479

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4790 Senior Seminar in Religious Studies

The topic for this seminar differs every year. Previous topics include Saints and Society; Religion and the Secular: Struggles over Modernity; and Pilgrimage and Sacred Space in Antiquity. The seminar is offered every spring semester and is required of all religious studies majors, with the exception of those writing an honors thesis. The class is also open, with the permission of the instructor, to other advanced undergraduates with previous course work in Religious Studies.
Same as L23 Re St 479

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4792 Globalization and National Politics

This seminar examines globalization and its interaction with national politics; the movement of ideas, capital, goods, services, production and people across national borders; and provides a skeletal framework for the global political economy. Politicians, policymakers and societies discover new opportunities, but also dilemmas as expanding interdependence challenge traditional notions of sovereignty and national policy autonomy.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L97 IAS 4800 Topics in Buddhist Traditions

The topic for this course varies.
Same as L23 Re St 480

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4801 Reading Seminar in Chinese Popular Literature and Culture

A seminar on Chinese popular literature and culture with varying topics. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.
Same as L04 Chinese 480

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 481 Reading Seminar in Religion and Chinese Literature

A seminar on religion and Chinese literature with varying topics. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.
Same as L04 Chinese 481

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4816 Art and Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Europe

An examination of painting, photography and the decorative arts in France during the period between the two World’s Fairs of 1889 and 1900. Artistic movements include Symbolism (Van Gogh, Gauguin, Redon), later Impressionism (Monet and Morisot), Neo-Impressionism (Seurat and Signac) and Art Nouveau. Thematics include urban leisure and cafe culture; the agrarian ideal; the promises and threats of science and technology; the lure of the primitive; and the impact of nationalism and feminism on the arts. Prerequisites: Art-Arch 211; any 300-level course in 19th-century art, literature or history; or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4816

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: AH


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L97 IAS 482 Reading Seminar in Gender & Chinese Literature

A seminar on gender and Chinese literature with varying topics. Prerequisite: Chinese 341 or instructor's permission.
Same as L04 Chinese 482

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 484 Core Seminar in East Asian Studies: A Consideration of Scholarship on East Asia

Introduction to problems and approaches in East Asian Studies.
Same as L03 East Asia 484

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4842 The Japanese Empire in Asia, 1874-1945

This course examines the expansion of the Japanese Empire in Asia from 1874-1945, focusing on Japan's acquisition of neighboring territory and the subsequent building of colonies in Taiwan, Korea and Manchuria. The course will explore the concepts of imperialism and colonialism, how they functioned in East Asia, and how they intersect with other major developments in Asia, including ideas of civilization and race, the formation of the nation, and the growth of capitalism.
Same as L22 History 4842

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD


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L97 IAS 4844 Women and Confucian Culture

This course explores the lives of women in East Asia during a period when both local elites and central states sought to Confucianize society. The course will focus on Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) China, but will also examine these issues in two other early modern East Asian societies: Yi/Choson (1392-1910) Korea and Tokugawa (1600-1868) Japan. Course readings are designed to expose students both to a variety of theoretical approaches and to a wide range of topics, including: women's property rights; the medical construction of gender; technology, power and gender; and state regulations on sexuality.
Same as L22 History 4844

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L97 IAS 485 Preparation for IAS Honors Thesis

This course (which meets regularly and earns 3 credits toward IAS major requirements) prepares students for writing an original research paper. In addition to working with their thesis adviser independently, the seminar provides structure, feedback and guidance. Students identify and develop a thesis proposal. Their research question, theory and methods of analysis will be examined, and they develop and refine presentation skills through the presentations of their proposals and results at various stages of progress. Prerequisites: 1) a GPA of 3.65 at the time of application to the thesis program; 2) the identification of a thesis supervisor; and 3) the approval of the IAS Honors Program Director. Attendance is mandatory.

Credit 3 units.


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L97 IAS 4850 Topics in Jewish Studies

Consult Course Listings for current topic. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Same as L75 JINE 485

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH EN: H


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L97 IAS 4854 Gauguin in Polynesia: the Late Career

This seminar focuses on the late career of Paul Gauguin, in Tahiti and the Marquesas. This course examines closely the colonial context of fin-de-siècle French Polynesia, Gauguin's response to indigenous culture, his ongoing interests in European currents of theosophy and anarchism, the development of his primitivist style in response to the French avant-garde, and Gauguin's legacy to modern art and culture in the early 20th century. Readings range from primary texts (literature and journals read by the artist, his letters, his satirical articles and caricatures produced for a Tahitian newspaper, his treatises on religion), to postcolonial theory and recent critiques of primitivism. French reading skills are useful, but not required for the course. We visit the Saint Louis Art Museum to view both the Oceanic collection, and prints and paintings by Gauguin. Prerequisite: at least one upper-level course in modern art history, or permission of the instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4854

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 4856 French Art and Politics in the Belle Epoque

This interdisciplinary seminar addresses the rich intersection of politics, fine arts and visual culture in modern France from the Franco-Prussian War (1870) to the First World War (1914). We will study the political trends, historical events, and cultural conditions of the era, and their direct influence on the production and reception of a wide range of visual arts, ranging from official paintings and monuments to popular culture such as tourist and documentary photography, commercial posters and political caricature. We also examine the question of what it meant in the Belle Epoque to be an avant-garde artist, and how such artists expressed political sentiment in their work. Prerequisites: permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4856

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 4859 Visualizing Orientalism: Art, Cinema and the Imaginary East 1850-2000

This seminar examines film and modern art within the framework of "Orientalism." Reading foundational texts by Said, and incorporating theory and historical discourse concerned with race, nationalism and colonialism, we explore artistic practice in European photography, painting and decorative arts from 1850 to recent times and European and Hollywood film. We study how power and desire have been inscribed in Western visual culture across the bodies of nations and peoples through conventions such as the harem, the odalisque, the desert and the mysteries of ancient Egypt. To that end, we look at artists such as Delacroix, Ingres, Gérôme, Beardsley and Matisse and screen films such as The Sheik, The Mummy, Salome, Cleopatra, Pepe le Moko, Naked Lunch, Shanghai Gesture, Thief of Baghdad, Princess Tam Tam and The Sheltering Sky. Subjects include the representation of gender, sexuality, desire, race and identity as well as the cultural impact of stereotype and "exotic" spectacle. Students study methods of visual analysis in film studies and art history. All students must attend film screenings.
Same as L53 Film 485

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 486 IAS Senior Honors Thesis

Second semester of the IAS Senior Honors Thesis. Student enrolls in the section number that is unique to their thesis adviser. While this course earns a student 3 credits, those may not be counted toward the IAS major requirements. The course involves intensive research leading to the completion of an IAS honors thesis conducted under the supervision and guidance of a faculty sponsor.

Credit 3 units.


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L97 IAS 4860 20th-Century Spanish Novel

A study of the novel in 20th-century Spain, focusing on the contemporary period. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 486

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4861 Paul Gauguin in Context

An examination of the art and career of Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) and the artistic, social, and political milieu in which he worked in France and Polynesia. Readings will include the artist's writings, studies of avant-garde culture and primitivism in fin-de-siècle France, and postcolonial theory. Special emphasis will be given to the relationship of the artist and his work to indigenous Polynesian and French colonial cultures of the 1890s. Prerequisite: Art-Arch 211, or any 300-level course in art history, or permission of instructor. Reading knowledge of French useful, but not required.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4861

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 4864 Exoticism and Primitivism in Modern Art

An interdisciplinary investigation of the development of exoticism and primitivism in European and American art from the Enlightenment to World War II. Topics include exoticist representations of non-Western cultures; the links between colonialism and orientalism; the intersection of discourses on race and gender with exoticism; and the anti-modernist impulse of fin-de-siècle primitivism. Sample artists and authors include Delacroix, Flaubert, Gauguin, LaFarge, Picasso and Matisse. Prerequisites: any 300-level course in art history and permission of the instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4864

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 4867 The Impressionist Landscape: Style, Place and Global Legacies 1870-1920

We will consider Impressionism as a dominant style of the Parisian art world, first undertaken as an extension of Barbizon naturalism, but soon expanded into an avant-garde style that objectified sensation and emotion in the name of truth in representation. We will examine the place of individual perception, the physiology of sight, and theories of the natural in the development of the Impressionist landscape, through the consideration of style, genre, artistic theory, and these artists' investment in particular sites. Furthermore, the social, commercial and critical networks that supported the movement will be analyzed. Particular attention will be given to Monet, and a special exhibition of his water lily paintings on view at the Saint Louis Art Museum. Other key artists include Degas, Morisot, Renoir and Cassatt. We will also discuss the relationship of the Impressionist landscape to the development of modernist abstraction, and the aesthetic and nationalist motivations for its appropriation across the globe. Prerequisite: Introduction to Western Art; Introduction to Modern Art, or permission of instructor. 
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4867

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 4869 Reading War and Peace

What is it like to enter into a fictional world for a semester? In this course we read Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace in its entirety. Set during the Napoleonic wars (1805-1812), War and Peace takes the reader on a panoramic journey from the battlefield to the hay field, from the war room to the ballroom. It is a vivid portrayal of 19th-century Russian society as well as a penetrating examination of the causes and consequences of violence and the nature of love and family dynamics. In our discussions, we explore philosophies of history, issues of social injustice and gender inequality, the psychology of human suffering and joy, questions of literary form and genre, and the very experience of reading a long work of fiction. We begin with a selection of Tolstoy's early works that laid the foundation for War and Peace and conclude with a few of Tolstoy's late works that had an enormous influence on, among others, Mahatma Gandhi. Primary texts are supplemented with literary theory and film. All readings are in English.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4872 Colonial Cities and the Making of Modernity

Massive urban growth has been a central result of the incorporation of many areas — both central and peripheral — into the global economy in the 19th and 20th centuries. Scholars have long theorized urbanization as a key component of modernity, but they have usually done so by looking at urbanization and modernization from the perspective of the West. This course investigates the character of cities in the colony and then uses these empirical and analytical entry points to examine critically some theories of modernity. The geographical focus of the course is primarily on cities in the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia.
Same as L22 History 4872

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4878 Cold War Cultures, U.S. and Europe, ca. 1945-1955

This seminar examines the art worlds that emerged in France and Germany after the end of World War II, and the ensuing dialogue with the United States, newly established as the most influential center for art and culture. We consider the social and political conditions of the postwar years, along with the aesthetic, cultural, and philosophical reactions to the devastating consequences brought about by World War II. We pay particular attention to the intellectual and ideological debates that would — by 1949 — give rise to the extreme polarities between East and West, democracy and communism — in short, the confrontations that distinguish the Cold War. Artists such as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning in the United States, Hans Hartung and K.O. Götz in Germany, and Jean Frautrier and Alberto Giacometti in France will be examined, as well as the broader artistic movements that are known under such labels as Abstract Expressionism, Informel, Tachisme, or Un art autre. Prerequisites: L01 Art-Arch 112 Intro to Western Art, L01 Art-Arch 211 Intro to Modern Art, or L01 Art-Arch 215 Intro to Modern Art, Architecture and Design; one 300-level course in Art History preferred; or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4878

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 4879 Marking History: Painting and Sculpture After World War II in the U.S., France and Germany

This seminar focuses on the aesthetic, cultural and philosophical reactions to the devastating events surrounding World War II and its later reception. We consider artistic developments within a network of international exchange — biennials, gallery and museum exhibitions — in which France, Germany, and the U.S. participated equally within a field of visually similar aesthetic responses to a seismic shift in historical consciousness. What distinctive artistic languages emerged after the war to express transformations in historical consciousness, and in older ideas about an unfettered subjectivity? In what ways did concepts of trauma with which we live today reshape collective memory and leave their trace on painting and sculpture? Looking at abstraction and semi-abstract works in painting and sculpture, we analyze the works of Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Alberto Giacometti and Jean Dubuffet, Wols, K.O. Götz, Emil Schuhmacher and Hans Hartung. Student research for this seminar will contribute to an exhibition being organized by the Kemper Museum of Art. Students with reading skills in German or French are encouraged. Prerequisites: L01 215 Intro to Modern Art, Architecture and Design or permission of the instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4879

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4880 Narrating Mexico City

The city has been one of the central topics of modern Mexican literature. Ever since the emergence of the modern capital at the end of the 19th century, urban culture became one of the central concerns of Mexican and Latin American intellectuals across the continent. With the emergence of the megalopolis and the new centrality of questions of violence, postmodernity and urban experience, Mexican literature and film have contributed, in the past 20 years, new ways to approach, discuss and narrate the city. This class seeks to tackle different meanings of Mexico City in the cultural discourse of Mexico, by exploring novels (Carlos Fuentes, José Emilio Pacheco, Juan Villoro), poems (Manuel Mapes Arce, Vicente Quirarte, Fabio Morábito), urban chronicles (Carlos Monsiváis, Elena Poniatowska, José Joaquín Blanco) and films (Amores perros, Todo el poder, Vivir mata). Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 488

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4882 Anthropology and Public Health

Anthropological approaches to public health practice and research; role of anthropology in public health systems; cross-cultural public health research; community vs. institutional bases of public health advocacy.
Same as L48 Anthro 4882

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH


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L97 IAS 4883 The Political Economy of Health

This course reviews social science contributions to understanding health as a function of political and economic influences. Considers the ways in which personal health is affected by macrosocial processes. Examines effects of globalization, international development and political instability on the health of individuals. Examples drawn from the U.S. and international contexts. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.
Same as L48 Anthro 4883

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L97 IAS 4885 Advanced Seminar: Medicine, Disease and Empire

This course examines the history of medicine in connection to the politics of colonialism and empire-building, spanning the 16th century through the 20th century. Topics covered include: epidemic disease outbreaks (e.g., smallpox, cholera, malaria); the role of science and medicine in endorsing the "civilizing missions" of empires; tropical climates and tropical diseases as western constructs; tensions between western medicine and indigenous healing practices and beliefs; ideas of race and racism in science and medicine; modern advancements in sanitation and public health and their implementation overseas; and the historical roots of the modern global health movement.
Same as L22 History 4885

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 489 Topics in Modern Chinese Literature

A topics course on modern Chinese literature; topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Same as L04 Chinese 489

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4894 Advanced Seminar in History: The U.S. in Vietnam: Origins, Developments and Consequences

This course will focus on America's involvement in Vietnam from the era of French colonialism through the collapse of United States intervention. Special attention will be given to political, military, economic, and cultural aspects, as well as to international relationships, and the significance of the experience and subsequent developments upon both American and Vietnamese societies.
Same as L22 History 4894

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD


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L97 IAS 4895 Cities of the Past Future: Literary Institutions & Peripheral Modernity in the Latin American Avant-Garde

This class proposes a study of the Latin American avant-garde as a phenomenon of "peripheral modernity" and as a critique of the "institution literature" developed by 19th century and modernista liberalisms. This reading, rather than merely proposing a one-by-one reading of canonic texts, seeks to engage the avant-garde as a global cultural phenomenon with impact in literature, art, society and ideology. To achieve this, the class focuses on four regional contexts of the avant-garde. First, we visit post-Revolutionary Mexico, to understand the way in which the avant-garde redefined notions of literature in Latin America by carefully analyzing the stakes of groups such as the estridentistas or the contemporaneos. Second, we analyze the reinvention of Buenos Aires as a literary city in the 1920s and 1930s to understand the impact of "peripheral modernity" in the constitution of the avant-garde as a specifically Latin American phenomenon. Third, we discuss the impact of the semana de arte moderno of São Paulo, to understand how the idea of "antropophagia" created an articulation of the avant-garde with debates of cultural identity and transculturation. Finally, we go to the Andes to understand how avant-garde phenomena dealt with the questions of "divergent modernities." Authors discussed include Arqueles Vela, Manuel Maples Arce, Jorge Cuesta, Xavier Villaurrutia, Jorge Luis Borges, Oliverio Girondo, Roberto Arlt, Mario de Andrade, Oswald de Andrade, Manuel Bandeira, César Vallejo, Pablo Palacio, César Moro and José Carlos Mariátegui. Scholarship includes Peter Bürger, Matei Calinescu, Renato Poggioli, Rubén Gallo, Pedro Angel Palou, Beatriz Sarlo, Fernando Rosenberg, Haroldo de Campos, William Rowe and Roland Forgues. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 489

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4896 Topics in Chinese Literature and Culture

A topics course on Chinese literature and culture; topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.
Same as L04 Chinese 4891

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: HUM EN: S


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L97 IAS 4906 Topics in Chinese Literature and History

A topics course on Chinese literature and history; topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: permission of the department.
Same as L04 Chinese 490

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4910 Topics in Islamic Thought

The topic for this course varies.
Same as L23 Re St 490

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD


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L97 IAS 4912 Modern Japan and the Invention of Tradition

A discourse of "uniqueness" has been a prominent feature of Japanese culture in the 20th century, both before and after the Pacific War. This course explores the domain of nativist expression in modern Japan. While focusing on literary texts by writers such as Kawabata and Tanizaki, we also consider a range of artistic, cinematic and cultural production. Considerable attention is paid to "Nihonjinron," an important — and best-selling — genre of "Japanese uniqueness" writing. Our goal is to make sense of the complex intersection of traditionalism and modernism in 20th-century Japan, and to consider the larger question of modern nationhood and the construction of national identity.
Same as L03 East Asia 4911

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4914 Advanced Seminar in History: Japan in World War II - History and Memory

This course examines the history of World War II in Asia and how it has been remembered in the postwar era. We trace the war, from the first Japanese military attack on China in 1931 through the U.S. atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. We also examine several postwar controversies concerning how the war has been forgotten and remembered in Japan, in the rest of Asia and in the United States. Goals include grasping the empirical history of the war as a step to becoming familiar with the theories and methods of memory studies in History.
Same as L22 History 4914

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4918 Postmodernism

This course explores the complex significance of Italian Postmodernism through an examination of the theoretical arguments and literary works that have shaped the cultural and political debate of the past 50 years. Students study, among others, the critical theories of "open work" (Umberto Eco), "literature as lie" (Manganelli), and "weak thought" (Gianni Vattimo) that developed from the neo–avant-garde movement of the 1960s. Analysis focuses on the novels of four authors who have had a defining influence on Italian postmodern thought and narrative forms: Carlo Emilio Gadda, Italo Calvino, Luigi Malerba and Umberto Eco. Course conducted in English; Italian majors read in Italian, others in English translation. Prerequisite for Italian majors: Ital 307D or permission of instructor.
Same as L36 Ital 491

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI


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L97 IAS 4920 The Italian Detective Novel

The detective novel has an unusual and exceptionally brief history in Italy. Only within the past 35 years has an Italian version or, more precisely, subversion of the genre emerged and come to dominate the Italian literary scene. Prominent Italian writers such as Italo Calvino, Umberto Eco, Leonardo Sciascia, and Luigi Malerba have deconstructed the conventions of the detective novel in order to portray the disorder and arbitrary meaning of the postmodern world. This course will explore the history of the "anti-detective" novel in Italy, and the philosophical and political questions the genre evokes. Readings in Italian and English. Conducted in English.
Same as L36 Ital 492

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4929 The Avant-Garde in Spain: Poetry/Visual Art/Cinema

This course examines the development of the avant-garde in Spain during the two decades prior to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) from an interdisciplinary perspective, including poetry, the visual arts and cinema. We first study the development of the historical avant-garde through a study of four key avant-garde movements either developed by Spanish artists or taking place in Spain: Cubismo (Pablo Picasso, Juan Gris), Creacionismo (Vicente Huidobro, Gerardo Diego), Ultraísmo (Gomez de la Serna, Cansinos-Assens, Pedro Salinas) and Surrealismo (Luis Buñuel, Salvador Dalí, Rafael Alberti, Luis Cernuda, Federico García Lorca and Joan Miró). We then analyze different connections with the historical avant-garde traceable in the work of a later generation of experimental Spanish poets and artists working under the strict censorship existing during Franco's fascist dictatorship, such as Jose Val del Omar, Joan Brossa, Antoni Tàpies, José Angel Valente, Pere Gimferrer, Jose Miguel Ullán and José Luis Guerin. We also incorporate in our discussion theoretical writings by various critics including Ortega y Gasset, Peter Burger, C. Brian Morris, and Román Gubern. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308D and at least two 300-level literature/culture courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only; in Spanish.
Same as L38 Span 4921

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 4936 The Unmaking and Remaking of Europe: The Literature and History of the Great War of 1914-1918


Same as L16 Comp Lit 493

Credit 3 units.


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L97 IAS 4945 Comparative Lit Seminar: Diverse Topics in Literature

This course may offer a variety of topics. Semester subtitle varies. It has been offered as an in-depth study of the individual through autobiographies; and as a course on visual poetics from antiquity to the present. Consult the department for further details.
Same as L16 Comp Lit 494

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L97 IAS 4952 Seminar in Comparative Literature

Seminar in Comparative Literature Studies. Topics vary. Consult Course Listings for current semester's offering.
Same as L16 Comp Lit 495

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L97 IAS 4970 Guided Readings in Korean

This course normally is taken after successful completion of Korean 418 or by instructor's permission. May be repeated once. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.
Same as L51 Korean 497

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: LA EN: H


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L97 IAS 4975 Collecting Cultures: Taste, Passion and the Making of Art Histories

This seminar examines the theory and the cultural history of the collecting of art objects and artifacts from a range of cultures and periods, considering how and why both individuals and institutions create collections. What social and psychological factors drive this passion? What are the various cultural, political and aesthetic priorities that have driven this practice historically? How is cultural patrimony defined, and how do law, the art market and cross-cultural ethics impact the placement, study and display of a culture's material heritage? We build the seminar around the history of collecting in America, with a focus on Midwestern examples, and particularly, important case studies in St. Louis. We, for example, consider the significant local collections built by Joseph and Emily Rauh Pulitzer (modern art), and Morton May (modern and oceanic art), as well as the histories of both modern and non-Western collections now owned by the St. Louis area museums. This course is complemented by various local field trips (SLAM, Pulitzer, Kemper and Cahokia). Prerequisites: Art-Arch 112, Art-Arch 113, Art-Arch 211 or Art-Arch 215; one 300-level course in art history preferred; or permission of instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4975

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH EN: H


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L97 IAS 4979 Advanced Seminar in History: Gender, Race and Class in South Africa, 1880-Present

By focusing on the complex historical dynamics of race, gender and class in South Africa over the past 120 years, this course is aimed at understanding the development of segregation, apartheid and racial capitalism, as well as the emergence of multiple forms of resistance to counter white minority rule. Topics include: white settler expansion and the defeat of the African peasantry; the rise of mining capital and the emergence of a racially divided working class; the origins of African and Afrikaner nationalisms; migrant labor and the subordination of African women; and the prospects for a nonracial, nonsexist democracy in a unified South Africa.
Same as L22 History 4979

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L97 IAS 498 Guided Readings in Chinese

Prerequisites: graduate standing and permission of the instructor and the graduate adviser. Course normally taken after successful completion of Chinese 428. May be repeated once for credit.
Same as L04 Chinese 498

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: LA


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L97 IAS 4981 Advanced Seminar in History: Historical Perspectives on Human Rights and Globalization

This course offers a historical perspective on the modern international human rights regime, using materials drawn from diplomatic, legal, political and cultural studies. Successful completion of this seminar involves designing, researching, and writing a 25- to 30-page paper on a historically oriented, human rights-related topic of student's choice.
Same as L22 History 4981

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L97 IAS 4982 Advanced Seminar in History: Women and Confucian Culture in Early Modern East Asia

This course explores the lives of women in East Asia during a period when both local elites and central states sought to Confucianize society. We will focus on Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) China, but will also examine these issues in two other early modern East Asian societies: Yi/Choson (1329-1910) Korea and Tokugawa (1600-1868) Japan.
Same as L22 History 4982

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L97 IAS 499 Guided Readings in Japanese

Prerequisites: senior standing and permission of the instructor and the department chair. Course usually taken after successful completion of Japan 459. May be repeated once.
Same as L05 Japan 499

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: LA


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L97 IAS 4995 Advanced Seminar in History: Incredible India!

Yoga, the Kamasutra, nonviolence, poverty, royalty, population, asceticism, vegetarianism, anticolonialism, democracy, Hinduism: All these and more signify the idea of India. This course uncovers the history by which "India" has come to occupy a privileged position in the global imaginary. We view the circulation of India as a cultural resource over the centuries and ask what popular assumptions are made about it at a time of heightened globalization; how does the idea of India circulate and through what kinds of pathways; what political role does this seemingly cultural notion of India fulfill? Finally, what is the connection between such an idea of India and the rise of a new, U.S.-centered, imperial formation?
Same as L22 History 49SC

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 49BV Advanced Seminar in History: Topics in Environmental History

This course is an introduction to the study of environmental history. The semester begins with a general inquiry into the methods of the field and then we use what we have learned to move into a focused subtopic. Readings include seminal works in the field, as well as philosophical, scientific and science fiction texts that help us to explore more abstract questions dealing with the relationship between humankind and the natural world.
Same as L22 History 49BV

Credit 3 units.


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L97 IAS 49CA Advanced Seminar in History: Religion and the Secular: Struggles over Modernity

A generation ago, scholars and observers around the world felt assured that modernization would bring the quiet retreat of religion from public life. But the theory of secularization now stands debunked by world events, and a host of questions has been reopened. This course provides students with a forum to think through these issues as they prepare research papers on topics of their own choosing.
Same as L22 History 49CA

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L97 IAS 49MG Advanced Seminar in History: Planning Global Cities

This team-taught advanced seminar addresses the history and theory of a variety of metropolitan environments from the mid-19th century to the present. Readings move from the 19th-century state-centered urbanism of Paris or Vienna, through the colonial remaking of cities such as Manila or Caracas and their connections to urban reform and the City Beautiful movement in the U.S., then through the rise of planning, zoning, auto-centered cities, federal interventions such as urban renewal, the emergence of the preservation movement and new urbanism.
Same as L22 History 49MG

Credit 3 units.


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L97 IAS 49NR Advanced Sem in History: Egypt & the Arab Spring: Middle Eastern Revolution in Historical Perspective

The uprisings of the "Arab Spring" of 2011 captivated global media and observers. The movements brought down established regimes in Tunisia, Libya, Yemen and Egypt. The focus of this course will be to understand the historical background and primary contemporary issues that have shaped Egypt's Arab Spring, and to examine the huge popular effort to document Egypt's revolution. Each student will design, research and write a 25-page paper on a topic of their choice related to the Arab Spring.
Same as L22 History 49NR

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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Director, International and Area Studies

Andrew Sobel
Professor
PhD, University of Michigan
(IAS)

Program Faculty

Jeremy Caddel
Academic Coordinator
PhD, Washington University
(IAS)

Lingchei Letty Chen
Associate Professor
PhD, Columbia University
(East Asian Languages and Cultures)

Rebecca Clouser
Postdoctoral Fellow
PhD, Indiana University
(IAS)

Michael Frachetti
Associate Professor
PhD, University of Pennsylvania
(Anthropology, Archaeology)

Linling Gao-Miles
Lecturer
PhD, Nagoya University, Japan
(IAS)

Seth Graebner
Associate Professor; Director of Undergraduate Studies; Co-Director, European Studies
PhD, Harvard University
(Romance Languages and Literatures; IAS)

Steven Hirsch
Professor of the Practice
PhD, George Washington University
(IAS)

Sukkoo Kim
Associate Professor
PhD, University of California, Los Angeles
(Economics)

Tabea Linhard
Associate Professor
PhD, Duke University
(Romance Languages and Literatures; IAS; Comparative Literature)

Paul Michael Lützeler
Rosa May Distinguished University Professor in the Humanities
PhD, Indiana University
(German; Comparative Literature)

Rebecca Messbarger
Professor
PhD, University of Chicago
(Romance Languages and Literatures; History; Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies)

Steven B. Miles
Associate Professor
PhD, University of Washington
(History)

Jennifer Moore
GIS & Data Projects Manager/Anthropology Librarian
MLIS, University of Illinois

Mikhail Palatnik
Senior Lecturer
MA equivalent, University of Chernovtsy
MA, Washington University
(Russian)

Trevor Joy Sangrey
Lecturer; Assistant Dean, College of Arts & Sciences
PhD, University of California, Santa Cruz
(Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies)

Nicole Svobodny
Senior Lecturer; Assistant Dean, College of Arts & Sciences
PhD, Columbia University
(Russian Literature)

Lynne Tatlock
Hortense and Tobias Lewin Distinguished University Professor in the Humanities; Co-Director, European Studies
PhD, Indiana University
(Germanic Languages and Literatures; Comparative Literature)

Anika Walke
Assistant Professor
PhD, University of California, Santa Cruz
(History)

Lori Watt
Associate Professor
PhD, Columbia University
(History; IAS)

James V. Wertsch
David R. Francis Distinguished Professor
PhD, University of Chicago
(Anthropology; IAS)

Hayrettin Yücesoy
Associate Professor
PhD, University of Chicago
(Arabic and Islamic Studies [JINELC]; History)

Endowed Professors

John R. Bowen
Dunbar–Van Cleve Professor in Arts & Sciences
PhD, University of Chicago
(Anthropology)

Elizabeth Childs
Etta and Mark Steinberg Professor of Art History
PhD, Columbia University
(Art History and Archaeology)

Charles R. McManis
Thomas and Karole Green Professor of Law
JD, Duke University
(Law)

Elzbieta Sklodowska
Randolph Family Professor in Arts & Sciences
PhD, Washington University
(Romance Languages and Literatures)

Professors

Geoff Childs
PhD, Indiana University
(Anthropology)

Rebecca Copeland
PhD, Columbia University
(East Asian Languages and Cultures)

Brian Crisp
PhD, University of Michigan
(Political Science)

Matt Erlin
PhD, University of California, Berkeley
(Germanic Languages and Literatures)

Jeffrey G. Kurtzman
PhD, University of Illinois
(Music)

Marvin Marcus
PhD, University of Michigan
(East Asian Languages and Cultures)

Stamos Metzidakis
PhD, Columbia University
(Romance Languages and Literatures; Comparative Literature)

John H. Nachbar
PhD, Harvard University
(Economics)

Michael Sherberg
PhD, University of California, Los Angeles
(Romance Languages and Literatures)

Glenn Stone
PhD, University of Arizona
(Anthropology; Environmental Studies)

Akiko Tsuchiya
PhD, Cornell University
(Romance Languages and Literatures; Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies)

Carol Camp Yeakey
PhD, Northwestern University
(Education; American Culture Studies)

Associate Professors

J. Andrew Brown
PhD, University of Virginia
(Romance Languages and Literatures; Comparative Literature)

Jennifer Kapczynski
PhD, University of California, Berkeley
(Germanic Languages and Literatures)

Frank Lovett
PhD, Columbia University
(Political Science)

Nancy Reynolds
PhD, Stanford University
(History; Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; JINELC)

Guillermo Rosas
PhD, Duke University
(Political Science)

Corinna Treitel
PhD, Harvard University
(History)

Professors Emeriti

Milica Banjanin
PhD, Washington University
(Russian)

Henry W. Berger
PhD, University of Wisconsin
(History)

Robert L. Canfield
PhD, University of Michigan
(Anthropology)

Pedro C. Cavalcanti
PhD, University of Warsaw
(Anthropology)

Elyane Dezon-Jones
Doctorat de 3e Cycle, University of Paris
(Romance Languages and Literatures)

John F. Garganigo
PhD, University of Illinois
(Romance Languages and Literatures)

George C. Hatch Jr.
PhD, University of Washington
(History)

Steven C. Hause
PhD, Washington University
(History)

Gerald Izenberg
PhD, Harvard University
(History)

Wilhelm Neuefeind
PhD, Universität Bonn
(Economics)

Jerome P. Schiller
PhD, Harvard University
(Philosophy)

Laurence A. Schneider
PhD, University of California, Berkeley
(History)

James C. Shih
PhD, University of California, Berkeley
(East Asian Languages and Cultures)

Eugene B. Shultz Jr.
PhD, Illinois Institute of Technology
(Engineering and Policy)

Richard J. Walter
PhD, Stanford University
(History)