Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies is an interdisciplinary program whose purpose is to explore the historical experience; literary, religious and cultural expression; and political and material life of the Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern civilizations. Our program is unique in the United States because it integrates Islamic studies and Jewish studies. Whether students favor the study of language, literature, religion, history or politics, they will find in our courses a way to deepen their appreciation of these complex and diverse societies and cultures. Students also will be encouraged to explore the interaction of Jews and Muslims with neighboring societies and cultures in the Middle East, Europe, North Africa and other parts of the world.

Our majors and minors have gone on to do many diverse things after graduation. Many have entered professional schools in such fields as law, journalism, education, the ministry or rabbinate, government and communal or social work. Others have gone on to do graduate work in either Jewish or Islamic studies or related disciplines. Still others have combined their interest in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern studies with careers in business, medicine or scientific research. All have found the major to have been an intellectually and emotionally rewarding experience and an important component of their overall development.

Phone:314-935-5110 or 314-935-8567
Email:artsci-jinelc@wustl.edu
Website:http://jinelc.wustl.edu

The Major in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies

Students who wish to major in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern studies will select one of three tracks: comparative Jewish and Islamic studies, Islamic studies, or Jewish studies.

Prerequisites

  1. Two years language (Arabic, Hebrew) by course work or by placement
    • For comparative Jewish and Islamic studies majors: two years of one language (Arabic or Hebrew) and one year of the other language (Arabic or Hebrew).
  2. JINE 210C Introduction to Islamic Civilization and JINE 208F History, Text and Identity: Introduction to Jewish Civilization
    • Students with substantial prior course work may substitute an additional upper-level course with permission of adviser and the director of undergraduate studies (DUS).

Requirements

24 upper-level (3xx or 4xx) credits, including:

  • 3 credits in departmental capstone course to be taken senior year. (Students may take it junior year with permission of adviser and DUS.)

and

  • 21 credits as follows:

Islamic Studies or Jewish Studies Majors

  • 15-18 credits in the primary culture
  • 3-6 credits in another culture (for Islamic Studies – Jewish Studies; for Jewish Studies – Islamic Studies)

Comparative Jewish and Islamic Studies Majors

  • 9 credits in Jewish Studies
  • 9 credits in Islamic Studies
  • 3 credits elective units, chosen in consultation with the major adviser

Additional Information

  • Students are encouraged to take courses distributed in each of the following areas: literature and culture, history, and religion.
  • Senior thesis writers should sign up for an appropriate 3-credit course in the fall and in the spring. (The 6 credits can be applied to the primary area of study.)
  • Students enrolled in Washington University study abroad programs during the regular academic semester can earn a maximum of 9 credits subject to review by their adviser and the DUS. Summer programs and transfer courses can be granted as many as 6 credits subject to review by their adviser and the DUS. A limit of 9 credits in total can be applied to the major, whether the credits are earned in study abroad, summer programs, or transfer credit. For more information on preapproved study abroad programs, please visit the Overseas Programs website.
  • No credit will be given for courses taken outside the department other than those which are cross-listed.
  • To be eligible to write a senior thesis, a student must maintain a GPA of 3.65 through the sixth semester.
  • Students must maintain an average of B in all courses for the major. A grade of B- must be earned in each language course in order to advance to the next level.
  • No course taken pass/fail can count toward either the prerequisites or the major.

The Minor in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies

Students who wish to minor in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern studies will select one of three tracks: comparative Jewish and Islamic studies, Islamic studies, or Jewish studies.

Comparative Jewish and Islamic Studies

Required courses (18 units)

  • JINE 210C Introduction to Islamic Civilization
  • JINE 208F History, Text and Identity: Introduction to Jewish Civilization
  • 6 units from 300- or 400-level courses in Islamic studies and/or Arabic languages and literature
  • 6 units from 300- or 400-level courses in Jewish studies and/or Hebrew language and literature

Islamic Studies

Required courses (18 units)

  • JINE 210C Introduction to Islamic Civilization
  • 12 units from 300- or 400-level courses in Islamic studies and/or Arabic language and literature
  • 3 units from 300- or 400-level courses in Jewish studies or Hebrew language and literature

Jewish Studies

Required courses (18 units)

  • JINE 208F History, Text and Identity: Introduction to Jewish Civilization
  • 12 units from 300- or 400-level courses in Jewish studies and/or Hebrew language and literature
  • 3 units from 300- or 400-level courses in Islamic studies or Arabic language and literature

Additional Information

Regulations for minors in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern studies

  • Maximum of 3 units for language at any level (100- through 400-level) are allowed toward the minor.
    • Note that 300- or 400-level courses that include the study of texts in the original language may be considered courses about history, literature or religious studies rather than language courses.
  • Preapproved Washington University study abroad programs during the regular academic semester, summer programs, and transfer courses can earn a maximum of 3 units subject to review by the adviser and the DUS.
  • Back credit granted for language courses does not count for the minor.
  • No credit will be given to courses taken outside the department other than those which are cross-listed.
  • A minimum of 18 units is required for the minor.
  • Students have to maintain an average of B for the minor. A grade of B- must be earned in each language course in order to advance to the next language course.
  • No pass/fail course can count toward either prerequisites or the minor.

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for L75 JINE.


L75 JINE 101D Beginning Biblical Hebrew I

This course prepares the student to read Biblical literature in Hebrew.
Same as L74 HBRW 101D

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 105D Beginning Modern Hebrew I

For the student with no knowledge of Hebrew. Students with background in Hebrew are required to take the placement exam and encouraged to consider HBRW 151D. Foundation for modern conversational Hebrew. Skills for writing and speaking introduced. Five class hours a week plus laboratory work. Limit: 15 students per section.
Same as L74 HBRW 105D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 106D Beginning Modern Hebrew II

Foundation for modern conversational Hebrew. Skills for writing and speaking introduced. Three class hours a week plus laboratory work. Limit: 15 students per section.
Same as L74 HBRW 106D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM, IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 107D Beginning Arabic I

Introduction to modern Arabic; concentrates on rapidly developing basic skills in reading, writing, speaking and understanding. Five class hours, including one culture hour, and additional drill or laboratory hours. Students with previous Arabic language background must take a placement examination.
Same as L49 Arab 107D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 108D Beginning Arabic II

Continuation of Arab 107D. Emphasis on enhancing skills in reading, writing, speaking and aural comprehension of modern Arabic. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Arab 107D or placement by examination. Five class hours a week with additional drill or laboratory hours arranged by instructor.
Same as L49 Arab 108D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 111D Beginning Hindi I

An introduction to the most widely spoken language of South Asia. Along with an understanding of grammar, the course offers practice in all four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The Hindi (Devanagari) script is used for reading and writing. Note: Students with some previous Hindi language background must take a placement examination.
Same as L73 Hindi 111D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 112D Beginning Hindi II

Continuation of Hindi 101D, devoted to the further development of basic skills — listening, speaking, reading and writing — with a particular emphasis on the acquisition of speaking proficiency. Prerequisite: Hindi 111D or placement by examination.
Same as L73 Hindi 112D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 116D Beginning Persian I

Introduction to modern Persian; concentrates on rapidly developing basic skills in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding modern Persian. Five class hours a week and additional drill or laboratory hours as assigned by instructor.
Same as L47 Pers 116D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM, IS


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L75 JINE 117D Beginning Persian II

Introduction to modern Persian; concentrates on rapidly developing basic skills in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding modern Persian. Five class hours a week and additional drill or laboratory hours as assigned by instructor.
Same as L47 Pers 117D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM, IS


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L75 JINE 151D Advanced Beginning Modern Hebrew I

Designed for the student with some background in Hebrew. Emphasis will be on review of grammar, increased fluency and vocabulary enrichment. This course prepares students for HBRW 106D. Limit 15 students.
Same as L74 HBRW 151D

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 1550 Temple & Palace in World History: Approaches to Religion and Politics in the Middle East

This course aims to examine the ways in which temple and palace cooperated with and competed against each other in the Middle East from ancient to the present times. As sites of spiritual and political power, temples and palaces have played a major role in human history. They have been a source of cooperation and conflict by inspiring and regulating the spiritual and social lives of people, including how they enacted laws, developed cultures, established institutions, and interacted with each other as individuals, families and societies. The course will trace how their interactions produced various models of authority, law and social association and how they collectively and separately rationalized social hierarchy and diversity in human societies. Introductory course to the major and minor.
Same as L22 History 1550

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 175 Discovering the Other and the Self: Jewish Travel Literature and Autobiographical Writing, 1200-1800

Travel literature usually describes "other" places and peoples — otherness and the unfamiliar are its major themes. At the same time, travel writers reflect on notions of the Self and the home. Autobiography is a representation of one's self. However, the self can only be explored in relation to others. Reading early Jewish travel accounts and autobiographies from the Middle Ages to the 18th century, this class addresses questions such as: How did premodern Jews perceive themselves in a world dominated by Christians and Muslims? Where did they locate themselves between East and West? Did Jewish travelers going from the lands of Christendom to those of Islam share certain "Western" perceptions of the Islamic world? How did a Jew from Renaissance Italy negotiate between Jewish and Italian identities? Were Egyptian Jews to him distant relatives, or ultimately foreigners, "Orientals"? How did a German Jewish businesswoman view her role within a rapidly changing, yet male-dominated society? All primary sources are read in translation. In the course of their study, attention is paid to peculiarities of literary genre and the problem of how to differentiate between fact and fiction. Throughout the semester we devote time to discussing practical questions such as how to use the library's catalog and (electronic) reference sources, as well as techniques for structuring and writing students' essays.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L75 JINE 176 Freshman Seminar: A Nation Apart? Jewish Identity in an Age of Nationalism

This course invites students to explore the varieties and limits of Jewish identity in a world in which nations appear to be the driving forces of history. In the "age of nationalism," beginning in the second half of the 18th and continuing to the end of the 20th century, traditional forms of Jewish identity as well as the place of Jews within the social fabric became problematic. Who were the Jews as individuals and as a collective? A nation? A religious group? Neither exactly? And what was their relationship to the emerging, modern nations of Europe to be? Did the process of emancipation resolve the problem? To what extent was antisemitism a response to the dilemma of defining and situating Jews in the new European order? How has the existence of a Jewish nation state in the Middle East affected Jewish identity in other parts of the world? Finally, how has globalization altered the relationship of Jews to the state as well as toward other Jews?

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L75 JINE 1771 Freshman Seminar: The Exodus in the Jewish Experience

This course investigates how the Exodus has been, and continues to be, a crucial source of identity for both Jews and Judaism. We explore how the Exodus has functioned as the primary model from which Jews have created historical self-understanding and theological meaning. We investigate how and why this story continues to be vital to Jews throughout the unfolding of the Jewish experience. How does the Exodus remain pertinent? How has the Exodus been reimagined multiple times throughout the history of Judaism? Why has the Passover celebration been transformed radically in different Jewish communities? We analyze many types of expression: historical sources, liturgy, art, commentaries, theology, literature, film, mysticism and music.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 179 Freshman Seminar: Midrash: The Imaginative Interpretation of Biblical Texts

The aim of this seminar is to introduce students to Midrash, the highly fascinating literature of Rabbinic Biblical interpretation. Among the topics studied are: How did the classical Rabbis read the Bible? What is the relationship between the plain meaning of the Biblical text and the polyphone interpretations of Midrash? How can numerous, at times even contradictory interpretations of the same verse coexist? What is the function of imaginative narratives, parables and folklore in Midrash? Initially the Midrashic logic may seem elusive from the viewpoint of a modern Western reader, in turn its creative thinking proves to be smart, playful, at times even slippery, and yet substantial. Addressing the literary, historical and cultural context in which Rabbinic Midrash developed, we get to know a variety of Midrashic collections and styles covering a time span from late antiquity to the Middle Ages. All primary sources are read in translation. Throughout the semester we devote time to discussing practical questions such as how to use the library's catalog and (electronic) reference sources, as well as techniques for structuring and writing students' essays.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L75 JINE 180 Freshman Seminar: Jewcy: Jewish Culture in the 21st Century

This course examines cultural expressions of American Jewish identity within an ethnographic context. We analyze processes of assimilation, Americanization and innovation, as well as Jewish contributions to popular American culture and entertainment, from Irving Berlin to Madonna, and the The Joys of Yiddish to jewlicious.com. Moving from tradition to modernity, pluralism and transdenominationalism and back to tradition (sometimes with a vengeance) we explore challenges to Jewish identity and creative responses through the cultural lens.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L75 JINE 200 Internship

For students with at least one course in Jewish and Near Eastern Studies who wish to do an internship. Prerequisite: permission of the director of the program. A "learning agreement" must be submitted and approved prior to beginning internship work.

Credit 3 units.


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L75 JINE 2011 Intermediate Hindi I

Continuing practice in listening, speaking and grammatical understanding. The Hindi (Devanagari) script is used for reading and writing. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Hindi 112D, or placement by examination.
Same as L73 Hindi 201

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 201D Second Year Modern Hebrew

Reading and discussion on the intermediate level of selected topics pertaining to contemporary Israel. Review and further study of grammar and development of conversational skills. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Beginning/First Year Modern Hebrew or placement by examination. Limit: 16 students per section.
Same as L74 HBRW 2011

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 2021 Intermediate Hindi II

Continuation of Hindi 201. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Hindi 201, or placement by examination.
Same as L73 Hindi 202

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 207D Intermediate Arabic I

Study of grammar of literary Arabic and reading of annotated classical and modern prose texts; elementary composition; practice in speaking and comprehending modern Arabic. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Arab 108D or placement by examination. Five class hours a week with additional drill or laboratory hours set by instructor.
Same as L49 Arab 207D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 208D Intermediate Arabic II

Continuation of Arab 207D. Study of grammar of literary Arabic and reading of annotated classical and modern prose texts; elementary composition; practice in speaking and comprehending modern Arabic. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Arab 207D or placement by examination. Five class hours a week with additional drill or laboratory hours arranged by instructor.
Same as L49 Arab 208D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 208F History, Text and Identity: Introduction to Jewish Civilization

The anthropologist Clifford Geertz once famously invoked Max Weber in writing that "man is an animal suspended in webs of significance he himself has spun. I take culture to be those webs." The main goal of this course — designed as an introduction to Jewish history, culture and society — is to investigate the "webs of significance" produced by Jewish societies and individuals, in a select number of historical periods, both as responses to historical circumstances and as expressions of Jewish identity. Over the course of the semester we focus on the following historical settings: seventh-century BCE Judah and the Babylonian exile; pre-Islamic Palestine and Babylonia (the period of the Mishnah and the Talmud); Europe in the period of the Crusades; Islamic and Christian Spain; Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries; North America in the 20th century; and the modern State of Israel. For each period we investigate the social and political conditions of Jewish life; identify the major texts that Jews possessed, studied and produced; determine the non-Jewish influences on their attitudes and aspirations; and the explore the efforts that Jews made to define what it meant to be part of a Jewish collective.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH, IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 2091 Scriptures and Cultural Traditions

When we think of the word "scripture" in antiquity, we might think of the texts that have been compiled in the different holy books that we currently have today. Yet the function of "scriptures" within a community, and the status given to different texts treated as "scriptural," has changed in different times and places. In this course, we will consider texts that would eventually come to be part of the Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and the Qu'ran as well as several of the exegetes and reading communities that shaped their various interpretations. We will explore how non-canonical sources played a role in the formation of the various canons we have today, comparing the authoritative status given to these texts to that given to other works from antiquity, such as the epics of Homer. Special attention will be played to the role of the receiving community in the development of "scripture," and the variety of the contexts in which scripture can function in the construction of and opposition to religious authority.
Same as L93 IPH 209

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L75 JINE 210C Introduction to Islamic Civilization

A historical survey of Islamic civilization in global perspective. Chronological coverage of social, political, economic and cultural history are balanced with focused attention to special topics, which include: aspects of Islam as religion; science, medicine and technology in Islamic societies; art and architecture; philosophy and theology; interaction between Islamdom and Christendom; Islamic history in the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia and Central Asia as well as Africa; European colonialism; globalization of Islam and contemporary Islam.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH, IS


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L75 JINE 213D Intermediate Modern Hebrew I

Reading and discussion on the intermediate level of selected topics pertaining to contemporary Israel. Review and further study of grammar and development of conversational skills. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in HBRW 106D or placement by examination.
Same as L74 HBRW 213D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 214C Introduction to Comparative Literature

This course permits the close examination of a particular theme or question studied comparatively, that is, with a cross-cultural focus involving at least two national literatures. Topics are often interdisciplinary; they explore questions pertinent to literary study that also engage history, philosophy and/or the visual arts. Although the majority of works studied are texts, the course frequently pursues comparisons of texts and images (painting, photography, film). Requirements may include frequent short papers, response papers and/or exams.
Same as L16 Comp Lit 215C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 214D Intermediate Modern Hebrew II

Intermediate modern Hebrew reading and discussion of modern Hebrew fiction. Development of language skills in special drill sessions. Conducted in Hebrew. Prerequisite: HBRW 213D or equivalent.
Same as L74 HBRW 214D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 2157 Freshman Seminar: The Meaning of Pakistan: History, Culture, Art

Pakistan is the second largest Muslim nation and the sixth most populous country in the world. Flanked by two rapidly growing superpowers, and continually at the forefront of another global entanglement over Afghanistan, Pakistan has been forged through successive world historical epochs: colonialism, decolonization, the Cold War, neo-liberalism, and the War on Terror. This course situates Pakistan in the context of U.S. imperialism, Indian regional hegemony, Chinese globalization and then turns to the powerful and diverse struggles launched by its own citizens against these external forces.
Same as L22 History 2157

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 216D Intermediate Persian I

Rapid development of skills in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding modern Persian. Reading of annotated, classical, and modern texts; elementary composition. Prerequisite: Persian 117D or equivalent.
Same as L47 Pers 216D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM, IS


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L75 JINE 217D Intermediate Persian II

A continuation of Persian 216D. Emphasis on enhancing skills in speaking, reading, writing, and understanding modern Persian. Reading of annotated classical and modern texts; elementary composition. Prerequisite: Persian 216D, or equivalent. Five class hours a week with additional drill or laboratory hours as assigned.
Same as L47 Pers 217D

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: IS


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L75 JINE 225C Introduction to India Culture and Civilization

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: ETH


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L75 JINE 240 Representations of the Holocaust in Literature and Film

As the Holocaust recedes into the historical past, our knowledge of the event becomes increasingly dominated by literary and cinematic representations of it. This course focuses on such depictions of the Holocaust in literature and film and raises a number of provocative questions: What does it mean to represent the horror of the Holocaust? Can one effectively depict the event in realistic terms, or do unrealistic representations work better? What happens to the history of the Holocaust when it becomes the subject of a fictional text? Who is authorized to speak for the victims? Are representations of perpetrators appropriate? What types of representations help us to remember the Holocaust in the 21st century? We grapple with these challenging questions by examining both literary texts by American, European and Israeli authors from a range of genres, including survivor memoirs, fictional narratives, a graphic novel, drama and poetry, and a number of films that depict the Holocaust.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA, HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 250 Zionism

Zionism is often thought of as a commitment to the principle that the Jewish People, as a distinct "people," has a right to self-determination in its own historical land of the biblical Palestine. Yet the history of the term and the set of ideologies show a much more complex understanding. In this course we trace the emergence of a number of different "Zionisms" that would lead to the creation of the modern state of Israel. And we explore how the political principles at the core of these ideologies have fared in the 65 years since the founding of the modern Jewish state. The course is at its heart applied political theory: a case study of the way that ideas emerge from historical events, take on a life of their own, and then shape real outcomes in the world. The readings will weave together history, philosophy, literature and government.
Same as L57 RelPol 250

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L75 JINE 2850 Freshman Seminar: The Holocaust: A European Experience

Between 1939 and 1945, Nazi troops invaded, occupied and destroyed major parts of Europe. A central aim of the Nazi project was the destruction of European Jewry, the killing of people, and the annihilation of a cultural heritage. This course seeks to deal with questions that, some 60 years after what is now known as the Holocaust, still continue to perplex. Why did Germany turn to a dictatorship of racism, war and mass murder? Why did the Nazis see Jews as the supreme enemy, while also targeting Poles, Ukranians, Soviets, homosexuals, the Roma and the disabled? The course introduces students to issues that are central to understanding Nazi occupation and extermination regimes. Students will look at survival strategies in Western Europe including emigration, resistance movements in Eastern European ghettos, local residents' reactions to the murder in their midst, and non-European governments' reactions.
Same as L61 Focus 2850

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 300 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

A survey of the religious ideas and cultural history of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and its context in the ancient Near East. Traditional Jewish and Christian interpretation of the Bible is discussed. No knowledge of Hebrew required; no prerequisites.
Same as L23 Re St 300

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH, HUM


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L75 JINE 301 Advanced Hindi I

This course is designed to help students gain advanced proficiency in the oral and written use of Hindi through reading and discussion of short stories, newspaper articles, and other selected materials. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in L73 Hindi 202 or placement by examination.
Same as L73 Hindi 301

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 3012 Biblical Law and the Origins of Western Justice

This course explores how law developed from the earliest periods of human history and how religious ideas and social institutions shaped law. The course also illuminates how biblical law was influenced by earlier cultures and how the ancient Israelites reshaped the law they inherited. It further analyzes the impact of biblical law on Western culture and investigates how the law dealt with those of different social classes and ethnic groups, and we probe how women were treated by the law.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 301C Kings, Priests, Prophets and Rabbis: The Jews in the Ancient World

We trace Israelite and Jewish history from its beginnings in the biblical period (ca. 1200 BCE) through the rise of rabbinic Judaism and Christianity until the birth of Islam (ca. 620 CE). We explore how Israel emerged as a distinct people and why the rise of the imperial powers tranformed the political, social and religious institutions of ancient Israel. We illuminate why the religion of the Bible developed into rabbinic Judaism and Christianity and how rabbinic literature and institutions were created.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: BA, HUM


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L75 JINE 301M Historical Methods — Middle Eastern History

This is a small-group reading course in which students are introduced to the skills essential to the historian's craft. Emphasis is on acquiring research skills, learning to read historical works critically, and learning to use primary and secondary sources to make a persuasive and original argument. Consult Course Listings for current topics. Required for history majors. Preference given to history majors; other interested students welcome.
Same as L22 History 301M

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 302 Introduction to the History and Culture of Ancient Mesopotamia

This course introduces students to the first great human civilization, Ancient Mesopotamia. Combining textual evidence and material remains we survey all major facets of Mesopotamian culture: the environment, political history and "everyday life" including portraits of several material, social and economic aspects of society: religion, myth, art, science and medicine. The course focuses on helping the student to understand empathetically the Mesopotamian worldview, to interact with primary materials (in translation), and to evaluate the ideas of historians dedicated to investigating this culture. Because some of the practices of this ancient culture are quite different from our own (e.g., magic, divination, the gods), yet others have made important contributions to world civilization (including the West, e.g., writing and astronomy), the course also is an important experience in cross-cultural learning.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: ETH, HUM


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L75 JINE 3020 Advanced Hindi II

This course is a continuation of Hindi 301. It is designed to continue students' advanced proficiency in the oral and written use of Hindi through reading and discussion of short stories, newspaper articles and other selected materials. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Hindi 301 or placement by examination.
Same as L73 Hindi 302

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 3062 Islam, Culture and Society in West Africa

This course explores the introduction of Islam into West Africa beginning in the 10th century and explores its expansion and development in the region, placing emphasis on the 19th century to present day. It focuses on the development of West African Muslim cultural, social, religious and political life, to understand not only how the religion affected societies, but also how West African local societies shaped Islam. The course also aims to introduce students to a critical understanding of Islamic writing in West Africa. It also examines the organization of Muslim Sufi orders in West Africa through time and space. The course is organized around a series of lectures and readings as well as print and visual media.
Same as L90 AFAS 3062

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S UColl: NW


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L75 JINE 3070 The Writing of the Indian Subcontinent

The Indian subcontinent has in recent years yielded a number of writers, expatriate or otherwise, whose works articulate the postcolonial experience in the "foreign" English tongue. This course is designed as an introductory survey of such writing, drawing on select subcontinental writers. Covering both fiction and nonfiction by several authors, including R.K. Narayan, Salman Rushdie, Anita Desai, Amitav Ghosh, Sara Suleri, Micheal Ondaatjie and Romesh Gunesekera, we discuss such issues as the nature of the colonial legacy, the status of the English language, problems of translation (linguistic and cultural), the politics of religion, the expatriate identity and the constraints of gender roles.
Same as L14 E Lit 307

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 3073 The Global War on Terrorism

This course presents an historical assessment of the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) from the perspective of its major participants: militant Sunni Islamist jihadists, especially the Al-Qaeda network, and the nation states that oppose them, particularly the United States and its allies. The course then concludes by analyzing the current state and future of Islamist jihad and the GWOT.
Same as L22 History 3073

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 307D Advanced Arabic I

Continuation of Arab 208D. Competence in reading, writing, speaking, listening and culture is developed through intensive exposure to classical and modern standard Arabic in its written and audio-visual forms. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Arab 208D or placement by examination. Three class hours a week with one additional laboratory hour as assigned by instructor.
Same as L49 Arab 307D

Credit 4 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 3082 Introduction to Rabbinic Judaism

This course offers a survey of the historical, literary, social, and conceptual development of Rabbinic Judaism from its emergence in late antiquity to the early Middle Ages. The goal of the course is to study Rabbinic Judaism as a dynamic phenomenon — as a constantly developing religious system. Among the topics  explored are: How did Judaism evolve from a sacrificial cult to a text-based religion? How did the "Rabbis" emerge as a movement after the destruction of the Second Temple and how could they replace the old priestly elite? How did Rabbinic Judaism develop in its two centers of origin, Palestine (the Land of Israel) and Babylonia (Iraq), to become the dominant form of Judaism under the rule of Islam? How did Jewish ritual and liturgy develop under Rabbinic influence? How were the Rabbis organized and was there diversity within the group? What was the Rabbis' view of women? How did they perceive non-Rabbinic Jews and non-Jews? As Rabbinic Literature is used as the main source to answer these questions, the course provides an introduction to the Mishnah, the Palestinian and Babylonian Talmuds, and the Midrash collections — a literature that defines the character of Judaism down to our own times. All texts are read in translation.
Same as L23 Re St 3082

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 308D Advanced Arabic II

Continuation of Arab 307D. Continued integration of language development through reading, writing, speaking and listening activities centered around advanced authentic material. This semester proves critical for making the transition from Modern Arabic to Classical Arabic, including Qur'anic Arabic. Continued development of colloquial Arabic. Prerequisite: Arab 307D or equivalent.
Same as L49 Arab 308D

Credit 4 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 309 Classical Jewish Philosophy

The history of Jewish philosophy, from the ancient world through medieval thinkers such as Maimonides and Halevi, is surveyed in the context of the development of Western philosophy.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: ETH


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L75 JINE 310 Contemporary Jewish Thought

A study of the representative figures and problems of modern Jewish thought from Spinoza to the present. Other topics include: the impact of the European Enlightenment; Zionism; Buber; Rosenzweig; Kaplan; and Soloveitchik. Prerequisite: JINE 208F or the equivalent.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L75 JINE 3101 The Problem of Evil

The question of how God can allow evil to occur to the righteous or innocent people has been a perennial dilemma in religion and philosophy. We study the classic statement of the problem in the biblical book of Job, the ancient Near Eastern literature on which Job is based, and traditional Jewish and Christian interpretation of Job. We study the major approach to the problem of evil in Western philosophical and religious thought.
Same as L23 Re St 3101

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L75 JINE 312 Introduction to the History and Cultures of Turkey

Since ancient times, the Anatolian Peninsula, the land surrounded by the Black Sea, the Aegean and the Mediterranean Seas, has been a home and a passageway to a multitude of diverse peoples. This course is intended to offer an overview of Turkey, its history, peoples, cultures, socioeconomic and political structures and institutions within the context of modern and contemporary global trends since the 19th century through the prism of longue durée developments and processes. As an introductory and preparatory course, it aims primarily at familiarizing students with scholarly themes, questions and problems which aids those who wish to further delve into studying the deep and complex fabric of the Turkish society, culture and history.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 3120 South Asian Religious Traditions

The Indian subcontinent is home to Hindu, Islamic, Buddhist, Jain, and Sikh traditions, among others. In this course we explore several traditions that are vital to life in India, Pakistan and beyond. We first encounter each tradition through narrative, with the support of visual media. We then explore how contemporary adherents make these traditions meaningful for themselves — in their everyday lives, in their struggles for social change, and in their political statements and contestations. Students will have the opportunity for creative projects or individual research.
Same as L23 Re St 312

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H UColl: NW


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L75 JINE 3122 From Country to Heavy Metal: Ancient Civilizations of the Old World

This course explores the archaeology of Europe, the Near East and Central Asia from approximately 10,000 years ago to classical times (ending before Ancient Greece). This prehistoric epoch saw major developments among various civilizations of the Old World, such as the introduction of agriculture, animal domestication, the growth of cities, and technological developments such as pottery, metallurgy and horse-riding. A major focus is the trajectory of cultural innovations of regional populations through time, and the complexity of their social, political and ritual practices. We also investigate the variation in human adaptive strategies to various environmental and social contexts, from hunter/gatherers to early Neolithic farmers, to the interactions between nomadic populations and larger scale, urban societies in the Bronze and Iron Ages.
Same as L48 Anthro 3122

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L75 JINE 313C Islamic History 622-1200

The cultural, intellectual, and political history of the Islamic Middle East, beginning with the prophetic mission of Muhammad and concluding with the Mongol conquests. Topics covered include: the life of Muhammad; the early Muslim conquests; the institution of the caliphate; the translation movement from Greek into Arabic and the emergence of Arabic as a language of learning and artistic expression; the development of new educational, legal and pietistic institutions; changes in agriculture, crafts, commerce and the growth of urban culture; multiculturalism and inter-confessional interaction; and large-scale movements of nomadic peoples.
Same as L22 History 313C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS


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L75 JINE 3149 The Late Ottoman Middle East

This course surveys the Middle East in the late Ottoman period (essentially the 18th and 19th centuries, up to the First World War). It examines the central Ottoman state and the Ottoman provinces as they were incorporated into the world economy, and how they responded to their peripheralization in that process. Students focus on how everyday people's lived experiences were affected by the increased monetarization of social and economic relations; changes in patterns of land tenure and agriculture; the rise of colonialism; state efforts at modernization and reform; shifts in gender relations; and debates over the relationship of religion to community and political identity.
Same as L22 History 3149

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 314C Islamic History: 1200-1800

An introduction to Islamic politics and societies from the Mongol conquests to the 13th century to the collapse and weakening of the colossal "gunpowder" empires of the Ottomans, Safavids and Mughals in the early 18th century. Broadly speaking, this course covers the Middle Period (1000-1800) of Islamic history, sandwiched between the Early and High Caliphal periods (600-100) on the one hand and the Modern Period (1800-present) on the other hand. Familiarity with the Early and High Caliphal periods is not assumed. The course is not a "survey" of this period but a series of "windows" that allows students to develop both an in-depth understanding of some key features of Islamic societies and a clear appreciation of the challenges (as well as the rewards!) that await historians of the Middle Period. Particular attention is given to the Mamluk and Ottoman Middle East, Safavid Iran and Mughal India.
Same as L22 History 314C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS


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L75 JINE 3150 The Middle East in the 20th Century

This course surveys the history of the Middle East since World War I. Major analytical themes include: colonialism; Orientalism; the formation of the regional nation-state system; the formation and political mobilization of new social classes; changing gender relations; the development of new forms of appropriation of economic surplus (oil, urban industry) in the new global economy; the role of religion; the Middle East as an arena of the Cold War; conflict in Israel/Palestine; and new conceptions of identity associated with these developments (Arabism, local patriotism, Islamism).
Same as L22 History 3150

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 316 Advanced Persian I

Selected readings from classical Persian prose and poetry. Prose readings from historical, mystical, and ethical literature by such authors as Bayhaghi, 'Attar and Sa'di. Poetry from significant lyrical genres, such as qasida and ghazal, as well as examples from heroic and romantic epics. Continued emphasis on developing skills in writing, speaking, and understanding Persian. Frequent use of traditional music, slides, and videos to enhance cultural awareness. Prerequisite: Pers 217D or equivalent.
Same as L47 Pers 316

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM, IS


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L75 JINE 3192 Modern South Asia

This course covers the history of the Indian subcontinent in the 19th and 20th centuries. We look closely at a number of issues including colonialism in India; anti-colonial movements; the experiences of women; the interplay between religion and national identity; and popular culture in modern India. Political and social history are emphasized equally.
Same as L22 History 3192

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS


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L75 JINE 3194 Environment and Empire

In this course we study British imperialism from the ground up. At bottom, the British empire was about extracting the wealth contained in the labour and the natural resources of the colonized. How did imperial efforts to maximize productivity and profits impact the ecological balance of forests, pastures, and farm lands, rivers and rainfall, animals and humans? We'll ask, with environmental historians of the U.S., how colonialism marked a watershed of radical ecological change. The course will cover examples from Asia to Africa, with a focus on the "jewel in the crown" of the British empire: the Indian subcontinent. We'll learn how the colonized contributed to the science of environmentalism, and how they forged a distinctive politics of environmentalism built upon local resistance and global vision, inspired by religious traditions and formative thinkers, not least Mahatma Gandhi.
Same as L22 History 3194

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 3200 An Introduction to Literature and Visual Culture in the Arab World

The course aims to provide a framework within which the literary and image cultures of the Arabic-speaking peoples have developed. This is done through a combination of contextual analysis and close reading of seminal texts and films. Our starting points are foundational sources such as the Qur'an and classical prose and poetry. From the later period, emphasis is on fiction and cinema.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 320D Advanced Modern Hebrew I

Improves proficiency in the oral and written use of modern Hebrew through reading and discussion of short stories, Israeli newspaper articles, and other selected materials. Students discuss, in Hebrew, current events and public issues related to contemporary Israeli society. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in HBRW 214D or placement by examination.
Same as L74 HBRW 320D

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 3221 Topics: The Jewish Experience in Italy, 1850-1945

This course examines the social and political history of the Jews of Italy from the period of Italian unification through the end of the Second World War. We look through two different prisms: first, the constant of Jews' minority status in a Catholic country at a time when Church doctrine was hostile to them and second, their changing status during significant moments in the brief history of the Italian monarchy. Under the latter rubric we study the rehabilitation of the Jews under liberal political philosophies, their problematic relationship with Fascism, and finally the arrival of the Holocaust in Italy and efforts to defend Jews against Nazi genocide. We approach these topics wherever possible through primary texts, including essays, memoirs and novels. Reading knowledge of Italian is not required. Readings in English; some readings in Italian for Italian majors. Discussion in English. Prerequisite for Italian majors: Italian 307D; no prerequisite for students in other majors. Three five-page papers.
Same as L36 Ital 3221

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 322D Modern Jewish Literature in Hebrew


Same as L74 HBRW 322D

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 3230 Jews & Christians in the Premodern World

In modern times, it is common to think of Judaism and Christianity as two distinct, if historically connected, "religions." Increasingly, however, historians of ancient religions have thought more deeply about the implications of taking Christianity and Judaism in antiquity as more fluid and porous than we tend to think of them. In this upper-division course, we will explore the ways in which the boundaries that early Christians attempted to draw between Christianity and Judaism remained unstable and incomplete. While the various efforts to establish early Christian identity led to the production of a variety of hermeneutical representations of the Judaioi, these literary representations nevertheless often reflected, to various degrees, engagement with actual historical Jews/Judeans, who shared political, economic, and intellectual worlds with Christians. We will consider how early Christian discourse about Jews and Judaism informed and was informed by intra-Christian disputes and their negotiations of their relationships with the wider Greco-Roman culture. We will explore how Christian efforts to establish both continuity and difference between Judaism played a role in the construction of "orthodoxy" and "heresy," as well as the way in which Christians re-appropriated Jewish texts, rituals and ideas in their efforts to construct a Christian identity. We will also explore how this continued dynamic of difference and continuity continued into the Middle Ages.
Same as L23 Re St 323

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L75 JINE 3241 Hebrew of the Media

Reading and discussion of newspaper articles. Viewing and analysis of television news programs and films. Prepares students to become familiar with the language and typical issues of the Israeli media and to discuss in writing and speech the issues in the news. Prerequisite: HBRW 322 or by departmental approval.
Same as L74 HBRW 324

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA


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L75 JINE 3250 Introduction to Arabic Literature

A survey of the major genres and themes in Arabic literature from the pre-Islamic era to the modern period. Texts include pre-Islamic, classical and Sufi poetry, as well as popular tales and critical prose from the Umayyad and Abbasid empires and Andalusia. The modern sections of the course interrogate political commitment in Arabic literature and introduce students to feminist and magical realist novels from North Africa and the Levant. All readings are in English translation.
Same as L49 Arab 325

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 3266 "East" and "West" in Jewish Imagination and Politics

How have Jews, as a paradigmatic diasporic people, understood their place between "East" and "West," and their relationships with other Jews and non-Jews within, across, and beyond the vast territorial expanse of Eurasia? What has it meant to identify, to be identified, and to live as Jews in Eurasia and beyond — both before and after the State of Israel? We begin with the origin of world Jewry, follow the various and interrelated experiences of Jews under Christendom and Islam, and, through carefully chosen vignettes, trace how the modern concepts of "East" and "West" have shaped the course of Jewish history, politics and imagination for millennia.
Same as L97 IAS 3266

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L75 JINE 3273 Introduction to Israel Studies

An exploration of Israel in the Jewish experience from antiquity to modernity and in the history and culture of the Middle East. Special attention is paid to the modern state of Israel and current issues in its politics, economy and society. JINE 5273 is intended for graduate students only.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 3292 Topics in Politics: Modern South Asian Politics

This course focuses on the recent political history and development of South Asia. It begins with a review of the British colonial period and the Independence movement. The remainder of the course examines different political issues in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Topics include political mobilization, land reform, law and politics, social movements, religious and caste politics, the rise of religious nationalism, and political control of the economy.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3292

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L75 JINE 3293 Religion and Society

We take a broad and practice-oriented view of "religion," including uttering spells, sacrificing to a god, healing through spirit possession, as well as praying and reciting scripture. We consider religious practices in small-scale societies as well as those characteristic of forms of Judaism, Islam, Christianity and other broadly based religions. We give special attention to the ways religions shape politics, law, war, as well as everyday life in modern societies.
Same as L48 Anthro 3293

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L75 JINE 331 Topics in Holocaust Studies

This course will approach the history, culture and literature of Nazism, World War II and the Holocaust by focusing on one particular aspect of the period-the experience of children. Children as a whole were drastically affected by the policies of the Nazi regime and the war it conducted in Europe, yet different groups of children experienced the period in radically different ways, depending on who they were and where they lived. By reading key texts written for and about children, we will first take a look at how the Nazis made children-both those they considered "Aryan" and those they designated "enemies" of the German people, such as Jewish children-an important focus of their politics. We will then examine literary texts and films that depict different aspects of the experience of European children during this period: daily life in the Nazi state, the trials of war and bombardment in Germany and the experience of expulsion from the East and defeat, the increasingly restrictive sphere in which Jewish children were allowed to live, the particular difficulties children faced in the Holocaust, and the experience of children in the immediate postwar period. Readings include texts by Ruth Klüger, Harry Mulisch, Imre Kertész, Miriam Katin, David Grossman and others. Course conducted entirely in English. OPEN TO FRESHMEN. STUDENTS MUST ENROLL IN BOTH MAIN SECTION AND ONE DISCUSSION SECTION.
Same as L21 German 331

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 3313 Women and Islam

An anthropological study of the position of women in the contemporary Muslim world, with examples drawn primarily from the Middle East but also from Asia, Africa, Europe and the United States. Students examine ethnographic, historical and literary works, including those written by Muslim women. Topics having a major impact on the construction of gender include Islamic belief and ritual, modest dress (veiling), notions of marriage and the family, modernization, nationalism and the nation-state, politics and protest, legal reform, formal education, work and Westernization. The course includes a visit to a St. Louis mosque, discussions with Muslim women, and films.
Same as L48 Anthro 3313

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L75 JINE 3331 The Holocaust

Origins, causes and significance of the Nazi attempt to destroy European Jewry within the context of European and Jewish history. Related themes: the Holocaust in literature; the psychology of murderers and victims, bystanders and survivors; contemporary implications of the Holocaust for theology and politics.
Same as L22 History 333

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: ETH, HUM, IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 334C Crusade, Conflict, and Coexistence: The Jews in Christian Europe

This course will investigate some of the major themes in the history of the Jews in Europe, from the Middle Ages to the eve of the French Revolution. Jews constituted a classic, nearly continuous minority in the premodern Christian world — a world that was not known for tolerating dissent. Or was it? One of the main purposes of the course is to investigate the phenomenon of majority/minority relations, to examine the ways in which the Jewish community interacted with and experienced European societies, cultures and politics. We will look at the dynamics of boundary formation and cultural distinctiveness; the limits of religious and social tolerance; the periodic eruption of persecution in its social, political, and religious contexts; and the prospects for Jewish integration into various European societies during the course of the Enlightenment era.
Same as L22 History 334C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH, HUM, IS


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L75 JINE 335C Becoming "Modern": Emancipation, Antisemitism, and Nationalism in Modern Jewish History

This course offers a survey of the Jewish experience in the modern world by asking, at the outset, what it means to be — or to become — modern. To answer this question, we look at two broad trends that took shape toward the end of the 18th century — the Enlightenment and the formation of the modern state — and we track changes and developments in Jewish life down to the close of the 20th century with analyses of the (very different) American and Israeli settings. The cultural, social, and political lives of Jews have undergone major transformations and dislocations over this time — from innovation to revolution, exclusion to integration, calamity to triumphs. The themes that we will be exploring in depth include the campaigns for and against Jewish "emancipation;" acculturation and religious reform; traditionalism and modernism in Eastern Europe; the rise of political and racial antisemitism; mass migration and the formation of American Jewry; varieties of Jewish national politics; Jewish-Gentile relations between the World Wars; the destruction of European Jewry; the emergence of a Jewish nation-state; and Jewish culture and identity since 1945.
Same as L22 History 335C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH, HUM


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L75 JINE 336C History of the Jews in Islamic Lands

This course is a survey of Jewish communities in the Islamic world, their social, cultural, and intellectual life from the rise of Islam to the Imperial Age. Topics include: Muhammad, the Qur'an and the Jews; the legal status of Jews under Islam; the spread of Rabbinic Judaism in the Abbasid empire; the development of new Jewish identities under Islam (Karaites); Jewish traders and scholars in Fatimid Egypt; the flourishing of Jewish civilization in Muslim Spain (al-Andalus); and Sephardi (Spanish) Jews in the Ottoman empire. On this background, we will look closely at some of the major Jewish philosophical and poetical works originating in Islamic lands. Another important source to be studied will be documents from the Cairo Genizah, reflecting social history, the status of women, and other aspects of daily life.
Same as L22 History 336C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 3392 Hinduism and the Hindu Right: Topics in South Asian Religions

The topic for this course varies. The topic for fall 2017 is Hinduism and the Hindu Right.
Same as L23 Re St 3392

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 340 Israeli Women Writers

Study of selected novels and shorter fiction by women. Attention to the texts as women's writing and as products of Israeli literature. No knowledge of Hebrew necessary; all readings in English translation.
Same as L74 HBRW 340

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD, WI Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 341 The Jewish People in America

History of the Jews in North America from the colonial era to the present. Close reading of primary sources, with an emphasis on the central issues and tensions in American Jewish life; political, social and economic transformations; and religious trends.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 3411 Children and Childhood in World Religions

This course investigates the roles children play in some of the world's major religious traditions and how those traditions construct their concepts of childhood. From child disciples to child martyrs, from the miraculous childhoods of religious founders to the rites marking childhood's end, and from divine commandments involving fertility to those mandating celibacy, we explore a wide range of different religions' teachings about children and childhood. We combine primary and secondary sources including written texts, movies/video, and web-based content in order to learn more about the complex relationships between children and the religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Confucianism.
Same as L66 ChSt 341

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 3415 Jewish-Gentile Relations in the United States, 1830-1970

Throughout their history Jews faced non-Jewish majorities, and America was no different. Yet unlike Europe, the United States has been, overall, a very hospitable place for Jews, and many of them came to see their new country as "the Promised Land." The course focuses on the relations between Jews and their non-Jewish neighbors from the beginning of a significant Jewish immigration to the United States in the 1830s. The course ends in the 1970s in order to analyze what most historians interpret as a rightward and inward turn of American Jewry (especially after 1967) and link it to the larger wave of ethnic revival in America. As a whole, the course looks at the interethnic and interreligious dimensions of American Jewish life and relates them to the larger American context. How did American Jews view their fellow countrymen and how did these opinions, in turn, affect Jewish integration into the larger society? How did the gamut of relations with other groups, which ran from animosity to coalition building and amity, change the country's political and cultural landscape? How did political and class differences within Jewish communities influence the character of interaction with other communities? Can we learn from the Jewish case about more general patterns of majority-minority relations in America?

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L75 JINE 3421 Childhood, Culture and Religion in Medieval Europe

From child saints to child scholars and from child crusaders to child casualties, the experience of childhood varied widely throughout the European Middle Ages. This course explores how medieval Jews, Christians, and Muslims developed some parallel and some very much divergent concepts of childhood, childrearing, and the proper cultural roles for children in their respective societies. Our readings combine primary and secondary sources from multiple perspectives and multiple regions of Europe and the Mediterranean World, including a few weeks on the history and cultural legacy of the so-called Children's Crusade of 1312. We conclude with a brief survey of medieval childhood and its stereotypes as seen through contemporary children's books and TV shows. This course fulfills the Language & Cultural Diversity requirement for Arts & Sciences.
Same as L66 ChSt 342

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L75 JINE 344 Imagining the Holocaust in Contemporary Jewish Literature

Recent public discourse on the Holocaust has displayed an anxiety that, with the gradual dying out of the survivor generation, the Holocaust too will soon pass into oblivion and one day be forgotten. Accompanying this anxiety about the vanishing eyewitness and the crisis of forgetting is often a parallel skepticism about narratives of the Holocaust that are not rooted in the direct experience of the survivor. Despite an injunction against fictional and imaginative representations of the Holocaust by survivors such as Elie Wiesel, however, the past 20 years have seen a wave of imaginative literature about the Holocaust written by non-survivors. This course examines recent post-Holocaust literature, both fictional and autobiographical, by contemporary Jewish writers from Europe, Israel and the United States, including works by Art Spiegelman, David Grossman, Aharon Appelfeld, Nathan Englander, Anne Michaels, Nava Semal, Patrick Modiano, Jurek Becker and others. Central to our inquiry into this literature is the questions of language, narrative structure, referentiality, artistic representation, intergenerational trauma, vicarious memory and post-Holocaust Jewish identity.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 345 Mesopotamian Mythology: Stories from Ancient Iraq

In this course we read, explore and interpret various ancient myths originating from the fertile crescent, especially ancient Iraq, between the years 2500 and 400 BCE. The Epic of Gilamesh, the Enuma Elish, myths of the goddess Ishtar as well as various flood and creation accounts are among those we read. Cultural background information is examined to situate each myth in its ancient context. Various theories of interpreting myth also are explored in order to appreciate the power and the many uses of these multivalent stories. Several basic questions underlie all that we do throughout the semester: What is myth? How should we understand the conceptualization of the category "myth" (in other words: How does myth work?) Does myth still play a role in our own modern cultures?

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 346 Islamic Law

This course presents a general overview of Islamic law and an introduction to the study of religious legal authority which values consensus. It then explores the formation of the major schools of law. Next it debates the notions of "ijtihad" and "taqlid" and discuss how open and independent legal decisions have been in the Islamic world. It also traces the transmission of legal knowledge in religious institutions across time and place by focusing on medieval Muslim societies and by closely examining the education of a modern-day Ayatollah.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 349 Yidishkayt: Yiddish Literature in English Translation

This course traces the emergence, development, flourish and near-decline of Yiddish literature, beginning with some of the earliest writings to appear in Yiddish in the late Middle Ages and early modern period, continuing with 19th-century attempts to establish a modern Yiddish literature and the 20th-century emergence of both a classical canon and a literary avant-garde, and ending with post-Holocaust attempts to retain a Yiddish literary culture in the near absence of Yiddish-speaking communities. Focusing on the role of Yiddish as the "national" language of Ashkenaz, the course examines the ways in which Yiddish literature has responded to the social conditions of European Jewish life, exploring among others the relationship between Yiddish and the non-Jewish cultures in which it existed, the tensions between secular trends versus religious tradition, life in the shtetl and in the metropolis, immigration from the old world to the new, and Yiddish literary responses to the Holocaust.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 350 Israeli Culture and Society

An examination of critical issues in contemporary Israeli culture and society, such as ethnicity, speech, humor, religious identity and the Arab population, using readings in English translation from a variety of disciplines: folklore, literary criticism, political science, sociology, psychology, anthropology. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS


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L75 JINE 351 Muhammad in History and Literature

This course intends to examine the life and representations of the Prophet Muhammad from the perspective of multiple spiritual sensibilities as articulated in various literary genres from medieval to modern periods. The course is divided roughly into two parts. One part deals with the history of Muhammad and the related historiographical questions. The second part deals with the representations of Muhammad in juristic, theological, Sufi, etc., literature. Because of the availability of primary sources in English translation, there is a healthy dose of primary source reading and analysis throughout the semester. Those students with advanced Arabic (and Persian and Turkish) skills are encouraged to engage sources in their original language.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L75 JINE 352 Iraqi Literature

This course introduces students to major works in Iraqi literature in the 20th and 21st centuries, with a focus on the post-World War II period up to the present day.
Same as L49 Arab 352

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 353 Understanding Indian (Hindi/Urdu) Literature: Through Text and Images (Visual)

This course focuses on literary and cultural traditions of South Asia in general and India in particular. Students will be introduced to a variety of contemporary literary genres through text and visuals. Weekly readings and class discussions will be followed by a film screening from the popular Hindi cinema, known as Bollywood industry of India, to demonstrate how literary writings influence modern day cultural traditions. Students will also work on films based on literary texts by well-known writers of the subcontinent. These readings and films focus on various social, cultural, political and historical aspects of Indian society. Students will be encouraged to explore these issues in their written assignments as well as in the class discussions.

Credit 3 units.


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L75 JINE 354 Anthropological and Sociological Study of Muslim Societies

This course introduces students to anthropological and sociological scholarship on Muslim societies. Attention will be given to the broad theoretical and methodological issues which orient such scholarship. These issues include the nature of Muslim religious and cultural traditions, the nature of modernization and rationalization in Muslim societies, and the nature of sociopolitical relations between "Islam" and the "West." The course explores the preceding issues through a series of ethnographic and historical case studies, with a special focus on Muslim communities in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and Europe. Case studies address a range of specific topics, including religious knowledge and authority, capitalism and economic modernization, religion and politics, gender and sexuality, as well as migration and globalization.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD, SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L75 JINE 355C The Flowering of Islamic Literature, 500-1200

Exploration of the multilingual (Arabic, Persian, Turkish) literary cultures of a civilization that stretched from Spain to India. Themes and genres include early court patronage, bedouin odes, wine poetry, social satire, mystical poetry, national epic, and the literature of love and romance. Comparisons to contemporaneous Hebrew and ancient and medieval Western literatures. Readings in English.
Same as L16 Comp Lit 355C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L75 JINE 3581 Musica Ebraica: Jewish Identities in Western Music from 1600 to the 21st Century

The course explores Western music from the 17th century to the 21st century through the prism of musical works that were written by Jews and for Jews and of musical compositions reflecting their composers identifying themselves as Jews. Jewish art music from these periods are examined against the background of musical development in general, the social, political and religious context of the composers, and written reflections about Jewish music. Examples of Jewish art music are analyzed through different approaches in order to determine the cultural interrelationships between Jews and non-Jews, Jewish cultural autonomy, and the perception of Jewishness in music.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA, CD A&S IQ: LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 3582 Music in Jewish Culture and Society

The common term "Jewish Music" raises numerous questions that emanate from the difficulty to define "Jewish" identity of any given music. This course deals with various approaches to the definition of Jewish music, perceived as a cultural and sociological component in the Jewish communities throughout the diaspora. We survey the functions in which music is performed in traditional Jewish communities, especially Jewish liturgy, and the substantial vicissitudes in these musics after the European Enlightenment, European colonialism in north-Africa, and in the Mediterranean. We study the background and the different characteristics of selected Jewish communities — Ashkenazic, Sephardic, Italian, Yemenite and others — as well as instrumental music, questions of gender and the relationship between music and text. A secondary goal of this course is the study of the bibliography and discography of Jewish musics.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 3583 The Soundtrack of Israeli History

This course explores connections between Israeli history, nationality and culture, and between Israeli art music. Such an encounter between reveals the reflection of, and responses to, local social developments in various historic and constitutive moments in Israeli history such as: the fifth Aliya (wave of immigration) in the 1930s, the statehood years, the waning of nationalistic sentiments in the late 1950s, the aftermath of Israeli wars, the negotiation between Israeli and Jewish identities, and even artistic expressions of postmodernity within the Israeli context. These histories are surveyed through historical studies as well as through their musics and against the background of developments in 20th-century music.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 3584 Music in the Holocaust: Portrayals in Sound from Past and Present

The course explores Germany's road to totalitarianism through three different stages seen through its musical contexts: the embediment of "music libels" against Jews in 19th-century European culture in general and German culture in particular; the association of Jewish culture with the threat of modernism until World War II; and Nazi policies in the 1930s regarding music and their repercussion on musical activities in the different ghettos (especially Terezin and Lodz). The last segment of this class deals with the challenge of commemorating the holocaust through music.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 3585 Islam, Music, Muslim Media

How do Muslim individuals and communities understand and negotiate the relationship between sound and spirituality? How does Islamic philosophy challenge Western definitions of music? How do music and cultural practices reflect and shape diverse Muslim identities and political struggles? To what extent can we speak of an "Islamic world," musical or otherwise? In this course, we investigate Islamic musics and musical practices in the lives and experiences of Muslims throughout the world. We approach our study of Muslim musical practices with the understanding that the social, cultural and political contexts where music is created, disseminated, and consumed inform the sounds of the music and its various — and often conflicting — interpretations and meanings. We engage with a variety of academic, musical and media texts to develop interdisciplinary analyses about Islam, music, sound experience, and Muslim subjectivities. Issues of nationalism and transnationalism, class, race and ethnicity, gender and sexualities, colonialism and postcolonialism, history and memory remain central to our exploration of spirituality and religion in Muslim musical and cultural practices.
Same as L27 Music 3585

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 359 Travelers, Tricksters, and Storytellers: Jewish Travel Narratives and Autobiographies

Jewish literature includes a number of highly fascinating travel accounts and autobiographies that are still awaiting their discovery by a broader readership. In this course, we will explore a broad range of texts originating from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. They were written by both Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews hailing from countries as diverse as Spain, Italy, Germany, and the Ottoman Empire. Among the authors were pilgrims, rabbis, merchants, and one savvy business woman. We will read their works as responses to historical circumstances and as expressions of Jewish identity, in its changing relationship to the Christian or Muslim environment in which the writers lived or traveled. Specifically, we will ask questions such as: How do travel accounts and autobiographies enable their authors and readers to reflect on issues of identity and difference? How do the writers produce representations of an "other," against which and through which they define a particular sense of self? To what extent are these texts reliable accounts of their authors' personal experiences, and where do they serve their own self-fashioning? How do the writers portray Christians, Muslims and Jews from other cultural backgrounds than their own? How do they construe the role of women in a world dominated by men? How do they reflect on history, geography, and other fields of knowledge that were not covered by the traditional Jewish curriculum; and how do they respond to the challenges and opportunities of early modernity? This course is open to students of varying interests, including Jewish, Islamic, or Religious Studies, medieval and early modern history, European or Near Eastern literatures. All texts will be read in English translation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 3602 Borders, Checkpoints and the Frontiers of Literature

Borders are some of the most strange, dangerous, and changeable places in the world. They help define not only where we are but also who we are. This course reads literature from and about border regions around the world: the Mexican-American frontera, the Indian and Pakistani Partition line, the German Iron Curtain, the African colonial borders, and the Israeli-Palestinian divisions. Even if we live far from any international boundary, the notion of the border shapes our thinking about the world. Literature is a place where borders are vividly imagined, marked and debated in ways that both affect preexisting frontiers and help draw new ones on the ground. We read all texts in English.
Same as L97 IAS 3602

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 361 City of Peace: Baghdad in Medieval Times (ca. 762-1250)

The subject of this course is an exploration of the city of Baghdad in medieval times from its foundation in the eighth century to its sack by the Mongols in the 13th. Starting from the background history of its location in Mesopotamia, we study the reasons of its foundation in that location and examine its topography, city planning and layout, institutions, citizens, neighborhoods, markets, libraries and workshops to discuss life in the city. Because Baghdad was the seat of the Abbasid caliphate at the time, we examine its role as the hub of the empire (in politics, administration, economy and literature), and its links to and rivalries with other provincial cities.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 362 Approaches to the Qur'an

The place of the Qur'an in Islamic religion and society. Equal emphasis on text: the Qur'an's history, contents, and literary features; and context: the place of the Qur'an in everyday life, its oral recitation, artistic uses, and scholarly interpretation. Knowledge of Arabic not required.
Same as L23 Re St 366

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH


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L75 JINE 3622 Topics in Islam

Selected themes in the study of Islam and Islamic culture in social, historical and political context. The specific area of emphasis is determined by the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 364 Literature and Ethics


Same as L16 Comp Lit 364

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L75 JINE 365F The Bible as Literature

Extensive reading in English translations of the Old Testament and the New Testament, with emphasis on literary forms and ideas.
Same as L14 E Lit 365F

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L75 JINE 366 The Sephardic Experience: 1492 to the Present

This course explores the history and culture of the Sephardic diaspora from the expulsion of Spanish and Portuguese Jewry at the end of the 15th century to the present. We will start with a brief introduction into the history of Iberian Jews prior to 1492, asking how this experience created a distinct subethnic Jewish group: the Sephardim. We will then follow their migratory path to North Africa, Italy, the Ottoman Empire, the Netherlands and the Americas. The questions we will explore include: In what sense did Jews of Iberian heritage form a transnational community? How did they use their religious, cultural, and linguistic ties to advance their commercial interests? How did they transmit and transform aspects of Spanish culture and create a vibrant Ladino literature? How did the Sephardim interact with Ashkenazi, Greek, North African, and other Jewish, Muslim, and Christian communities? How did Jewish emigres from Spain and Portugal become intermediaries between Christian Europe and the Ottoman Empire? What was the role of Sephardim in Europe's transatlantic expansion? How did conversos (converts to Christianity) return to Judaism and continue to grapple with their ambiguous religious identity? How did Ottoman and North African Jews respond to European cultural trends and colonialism and create their own unique forms of modern culture? How did the Holocaust impact Sephardic Jewry? The course will end with a discussion of the Sephardic experience in America and Israel today.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 367 Jewish American Literature "Roth and Company"

The use by selected 20th-century writers of religious themes and symbols. Close analysis of the literary techniques by which religious concepts and images are developed and differing insights of writers representing a broad spectrum of contemporary attitudes toward religious issues.
Same as L14 E Lit 367

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L75 JINE 3670 Gurus, Saints, and Scientists: Religion in Modern South Asia

Many long-standing South Asian traditions have been subject to radical reinterpretation, and many new religious movements have arisen, as South Asians have grappled with how to accommodate their traditions of learning and practice to what they have perceived to be the conditions of modern life. In this course we consider some of the factors that have contributed to religious change in South Asia, including British colonialism, sedentarization and globalization, and new discourses of democracy and equality. We consider how new religious organizations were part and parcel with movements for social equality and political recognition; examine the intellectual contributions of major thinkers like Swami Vivekananda, Sayyid Ahmad Khan, and Mohandas Gandhi; and explore how Hindu, Islamic, and other South Asian traditions were recast in the molds of natural science, social science, and world religion.
Same as L23 Re St 3670

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L75 JINE 3681 The U.S. War in Iraq, 2003-2011

This course presents a historical assessment of the United States' eight year war in Iraq from its inception on March 20, 2003, to the withdrawal of all combat troops on December 15, 2011. Topics to be covered include: the Bush Administration's decision to make Iraq part of the "War on Terror" and the subsequent plan of attack; the combat operations; losing the victory; sectarian violence; torture; the insurgency; battling Al-Qaeda in Iraq; reassessment; the surge; the drawdown; and the end of the war. The course will conclude with an assessment of the war's effectiveness regarding the Global War on Terrorism and U.S. policy in the Middle East.
Same as L22 History 3681

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 370C Islamic Movements: Reform, Revival, Revolt

As a religion and a social/intellectual and political movement, Islam has undergone constant reassessment since its inception 14 centuries ago; thus modern fundamentalist movements are the latest manifestation of long-term trends. An overview of this historical process, concentrating on contemporary Islamic movements and works by seminal thinkers.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS


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L75 JINE 373 Topics in Near Eastern Cultures

The topic for this course will change each semester; the specific topic for each semester will be given in Course Listings.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 3781 Israeli Politics

This course is intended primarily for sophomores and juniors. The topic of this course varies by semester, dependent on faculty and student interests.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3781

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L75 JINE 3782 Before "the Clinic Was Born": Medicine among European Jews from the Middle Ages to Modern Period

This course offers a survey of European medical history in general and of the Jewish medical world in particular, from the Middle Ages to the threshold of modernity.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 3841 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew

This course enables students to read the Bible in the original Hebrew. Review of Hebrew grammar. History of the Hebrew language. Intended for students with a foundation in modern Hebrew. Prerequisite: HBRW 214D or instructor's permission.
Same as L74 HBRW 384

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 385 Topics in Jewish and Near Eastern Studies

Consult Course Listings for current topics. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 385D Topics in Biblical Hebrew Texts

Prerequisite: L74 HBRW 384 or permission of the instructor.
Same as L74 HBRW 385D

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 386 Topics in Jewish History

Consult Course Listings for current topics. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L75 JINE 387C Topics in Hebrew Literature

Hebrew works read in English translation. Prerequisite: sophomore standing; previous courses in literature recommended.
Same as L74 HBRW 387C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L75 JINE 38A8 Women, Men and Gender in Africa: Writing Intensive Seminar

This seminar explores the ways in which gender relations have been produced, reproduced and transformed through the everyday actions of women and men in Africa. The focus is both on agency and on structures of power, as we move from a consideration of gender relations during the 19th-century jihads in West Africa to problems of love, sexuality and marriage in contemporary South Africa.
Same as L22 History 38A8

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: BA EN: H


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L75 JINE 38C8 Religion and Politics in South Asia: Writing-Intensive Seminar

The relationship between religion, community and nation is a topic of central concern and contestation in the study of South Asian history. This course will explore alternative positions and debates on such topics as: changing religious identities; understandings of the proper relationship between religion, community and nation in India and Pakistan; and the violence of Partition (the division of India and Pakistan in 1947). The course will treat India, Pakistan and other South Asian regions in the colonial and postcolonial periods.
Same as L22 History 38C8

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 3900 Topics in Migration and Identity

The course examines migration movements that are related to the Nazi genocide in Europe. Grounded in a study of the Nazi project to reshape the European geopolitical map, students explore how the mass movement of people is impacted by geopolitics, political violence, and economical considerations. Class materials address the relationship between identity formation and social exclusion, thus opening up a critical investigation of concepts of citizenship, human rights, and their institutional frameworks (states, international organizations, etc.) more generally. Students work with a variety of sources, including primary sources, scholarly analyses, podcasts, literary works and film to study migrations related to the prehistory, policies and aftermath of the Nazi regime. The class provides insights into issues of expulsion, refuge, forced migration, settlement projects, ethnic cleansing and others, but also demonstrates the global impact and long-term repercussions of political and genocidal violence. Looking at the Nazi regime through the lens of migration shows that the Nazi genocide is embedded in a history of racism, colonialization and mass violence.
Same as L97 IAS 390

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 3921 Secular & Religious: A Global History

Recent years have seen a dramatic rethinking of the past in nearly every corner of the world as scholars revisit fundamental questions about the importance of religion for individuals, societies and politics. Is religion as a personal orientation in decline? Is Europe becoming more secular? Is secularism a European invention? Many scholars now argue that "religion" is a European term that doesn't apply in Asian societies. This course brings together cutting-edge historical scholarship on Europe and Asia in pursuit of a truly global understanding. Countries covered vary, but may include Britain, France, Turkey, China, Japan, India and Pakistan.
Same as L22 History 3921

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 396 Islamic Philosophy, Mysticism, and Theology

How does an individual achieve access to knowledge and access to God? To what extent is such access dependent upon scripture? To what extent is such access dependent upon reason? Are there forms of truth and experience that only reveal themselves through mysticism? Questions of this sort are central to the interrelated disciplines of Islamic philosophy, Islamic theology, and Islamic mysticism (i.e., Sufism). This course examines the preceding three disciplines, with a focus on the premodern period. Students will be introduced to major figures within these disciplines, including al-Ghazali, Ibn Sina, Ibn al-'Arabi, Ibn Taymiyya, and Rumi. Moreover, students will also examine how these disciplines have shaped various aspects of social life within premodern Muslim communities. Although the course addresses a range of issues, special attention will be given to the following topics: (1) the relationship between Islamic scripture/law and Islamic philosophy, mysticism and theology; (2) the relationship between Islamic religious teachings and the forms of both "high" and "popular" culture found in premodern Muslim societies; (3) free thought, scientific inquiry, heterodoxy, skepticism and blasphemy in premodern Muslim societies; (4) Muslim institutions and social movements dedicated to promoting philosophy, mysticism and theology; (5) the aesthetic significance of philosophical, mystical, and theological teachings, and the expression of such teachings in Islamic ritual, poetry, literature, music, dance, painting and architecture.
Same as L23 Re St 396

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L75 JINE 39SC Imperialism and Sexuality: India, South Asia, and the World: Writing-Intensive Seminar

What is the connection between the appropriation of other people's resources and the obsession with sex? Why is "race" essential to the sexual imperatives of imperialism? How has the nexus between "race," sexuality, and imperial entitlement reproduced itself despite the end of formal colonialism? By studying a variety of colonial documents, memoirs produced by colonized subjects, novels, films and scholarship on imperialism, we will seek to understand the history of imperialism's sexual desires and its continuation in our world today.
Same as L22 History 39SC

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 4001 Capstone Seminar

The capstone course for Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies majors, Arabic majors, and Hebrew majors. The course content is subject to change.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 4010 Fourth-Level Modern Hebrew I

Introduction to modern Israeli literature and literary analysis for the advanced student of Hebrew. Topics include selected genres, influential writers, and the relationship between literature and society. Conducted in Hebrew. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in HBRW 321D, or permission of instructor.
Same as L74 HBRW 4010

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA, WI A&S IQ: LCD, WI BU: HUM, IS


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L75 JINE 401W Seminar in Hebrew Literature (Writing Intensive)

This course is designated as Writing Intensive.
Same as L74 HBRW 401W

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, WI EN: H


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L75 JINE 4020 Jerusalem, the Holy City

An examination of the role that Jerusalem has played in three religious traditions — Judaism, Christianity and Islam — through a study of archaeology, history, literature, politics and theology from antiquity to contemporary times. A senior seminar in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies. During winter break, the class goes to Jerusalem as part of the course. Student portion of travel costs TBA. Students unable to make the trip receive a reduction to 4 units of course credit. Preference given to seniors majoring in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies. Others may enroll with instructor's permission.

Credit 5 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD EN: H


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L75 JINE 403 Gender and Sexuality in Judaism

A critical inquiry into the Jewish sociocultural construction of gender, past and present. Topics include the nature of the Jewish convenantal community and male circumcision as a sign of membership; the matrilineal principle of ancestry; genital emissions and purity; marriage and divorce; and male and female roles, including leadership roles. Documents by and about Jewish women, their daily lives and their sacral lives, are among the materials explored. JINE 208F is recommended.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD


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L75 JINE 404 Islam Across Cultures

In this seminar we examine the variety of historical and contemporary ways of interpreting and practicing Islam, with special attention to issues of ritual, law and the state, and gender. Cases are drawn from Asia, Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and students engage in fieldwork or library research projects.
Same as L48 Anthro 4042

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC


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L75 JINE 4041 Islam and Politics

Blending history and ethnography, this course covers politics in the Islamic world in historical and contemporary times. Topics include history of Islam, uniformity and diversity in belief and practice (global patterns, local realities), revolution and social change, women and veiling, and the international dimensions of resurgent Islam. Geographical focus extends from Morocco to Indonesia; discussion of other Muslim communities is included (Bosnia, Chechnya, sub-Saharan Africa, U.S.).
Same as L48 Anthro 4041

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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L75 JINE 4042 Competing Ideologies and Nationalisms in the Arab-Israeli Arena

We trace the roots of modern ideologies and nationalisms in the Middle East and analyze how they have developed in modern times under the influence of both secular and religious ideas. We examine how international politics have exerted their influence and how Arab and Israeli nationalism have affected one another. Among the topics discussed are Shi'ism, Nasserism, Zionism and fundamentalism.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: IS EN: S


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L75 JINE 405 Diaspora in Jewish and Islamic Experience

The polarities of diaspora and home — periphery and center, wandering and rest, exile and return — have played important roles in the historical experience and religious culture of both Jews and Muslims. For long stretches of time, Jewish culture has been marked by the historical condition of statelessness combined with a theology of redemptive return. Paradoxically, it was the significant political and military success of Islam in its first millennium that helped to create a far-flung diaspora well removed from its center in Arabia. The institution of pilgrimage to Mecca counterbalanced a sense of distance and remove. More recently, modern nationalisms, war, and postcolonial politics — including the Israeli-Palestinian conflict — have done much to underscore the continuing dilemmas of diaspora and home in both Jewish and Islamic identity. The goal of the seminar is to offer a comparative, historical perspective on this theme and to encourage students to examine an aspect of the diaspora experience in depth. (Note: This course fulfills the capstone requirement for Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies. It also qualifies as a history department advanced seminar.)

Credit 4 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 4051 Colloquial Arabic

The aim of this course is to introduce the students to colloquial Arabic through their knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). We will focus on the main differences between colloquial and MSA so that the students can use the colloquial form for practical purposes in everyday life. Prerequisite: Arab 208D or instructor's permission.
Same as L49 Arab 405

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 4060 Convivencia or Reconquista? Muslims, Jews and Christians in Medieval Iberia

Senior Seminar. This seminar provides an opportunity to explore in some depth various facets of the convivencia ("dwelling together"; coexistence) of Muslims, Jews and Christians in medieval Iberia. While we pick up the timeline with the emergence of an Ibero-Islamic society in the eighth century CE, the seminar's historical horizon stretches up to the turn of the 15th to the 16th century, when Spanish Jews and Muslims were equally faced with the choice between exile and conversion to Christianity. Until about the mid-11th century Muslims dominated most of the Iberian Peninsula. From roughly the mid-11th through 15th centuries, Christians ruled much and eventually all of Spain and Portugal. Through a process termed, from a Christian perspective, as reconquista ("reconquest"), Catholic kingdoms acquired large Muslim enclaves. As borders moved, Jewish communities found themselves under varying Muslim or Christian dominion, or migrated from one realm to the other. Interactions between the three ethno-religious communities occurred throughout, some characterized by mutual respect and shared creativity and others by rivalry and strife. The course focuses on these religious and cultural contacts, placing them in various historical and geographic contexts. It raises questions concerning the ambiguities of religious change and concerning the interplay of persecution and toleration. Methodologically, the seminar emphasizes the study of primary sources, including documentary, historiographical, literary and poetical texts. In the course of their study, attention is paid to peculiarities of genre and difficulties involved in formulating historical assessments. In this sense, we also aim at developing critical reading skills in relation to secondary literature. Seniors in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies are given preference in admission. Advanced students in other fields are asked to contact the instructor prior to enrollment.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 407 Fourth-Level Arabic I

Focused reading and discussion of classical and modern texts centered on selected topics in Arabic literature, poetry and media. Continued development of oral, aural and writing skills. Students' interests are taken into consideration before finalizing the selection of texts. Practice in writing and grammar. Prerequisite: grade of B- or better in Arab 308D or placement by examination.
Same as L49 Arab 407

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 4070 Judaism and Islam in Comparative Perspective

The historical trajectories of Rabbinic Judaism and Islam are intimately intertwined. Moreover, a strong argument can be made that Rabbinic Judaism and Islam bear some obvious affinities with one another. Nevertheless, the two traditions generally continue to be studied in isolation from one another. The goals of this seminar are (1) to foster better understanding of areas of historical contact and intersections between Jewish and Islamic civilizations and (2) to start the work of developing a common framework for the comparative study of the two traditions. We examine examples of sustained and meaningful contact such as Muslim-Jewish symbiosis in early Islam as well as interaction on the level of philosophical and theological discourses between medieval Jews and Muslims. We also attempt to identify instances of affinity between the two traditions through comparative study of their exegetical, messianic, legal and mystical dimensions. Seniors in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies are given preference in admission. This is the capstone course in JINES. Advanced students from other departments and programs should contact the instructor prior to enrollment.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 4081 Fourth-Level Arabic II

Readings and discussion in Arabic of selected classical texts. Students' interests will be taken into consideration before finalizing the selection of texts. Practice in writing and grammar. Continued development of colloquial Arabic.
Same as L49 Arab 408

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 409 Beyond Geography: The Meaning of Place in the Near East

This course considers the importance of place in the Middle East with particular reference to Jewish and Islamic traditions. Topics include the creation of holy sites, the concept of sacred space, the practice of pilgrimages, and the tropes of exile and return. Texts range from analytical essays to novels, memoirs and films by authors such as Edward Said, Naguib Mahfouz, Taher Ben Jelloun, Elif Shafak, A.B. Yehoshua, Shulamit Hareven and Hanan Al-Shaykh. Requirements include participation, short assignments and a seminar paper. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for students majoring in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, but is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Prerequisites: course work in JINES and senior standing or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 4100 The Ottoman Empire: 1300-1800

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L75 JINE 412 Islamic Theology

This course explores major themes of early Islamic theology as developed by the Mutazilite, Ash'arite, and Maturidi schools. Some attention is paid to defunct theological systems, the traces of which have remained in the heresiographical literature. Most readings are in primary sources in English translation, though the students are also introduced to some secondary literature on various themes. Some comparative theology with reference to the Judeo-Christian tradition are a regular feature of class discussion. Topics include (but are not limited to): debates over the createdness of the Qur'an; predestination and foreknowledge; God's attributes; the nature of language; the nature of the human soul; and creation and afterlife.
Same as L23 Re St 412

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 415 Topics in Judaism

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L75 JINE 4154 Postcolonial South Asia: Nations, Cultures, and Identities in Transnational Perspective

Independence from European colonialism was a victory for some people, although for the majority, the experience of nation-building and the Cold War only sanctioned further inequities. A further set-back arrived in the guise of Globalization. The countries of Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri-Lanka have grappled differently with the many varieties of 20th-century transnational power. This course studies the histories of decolonization, nation-building and the Cold War for those South Asian countries created since the 1940s and traces the manner by which ordinary people have interrogated the multiple levels of state power unleashed upon them since the formal end of European colonialism.
Same as L22 History 4154

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L75 JINE 420 Topics in the Israeli Short Story

Various themes in Hebrew belles lettres, e.g., the intertwining of politics and literature, the survival of rabbinic metaphors.
Same as L74 HBRW 420

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD Art: HUM


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L75 JINE 4201 Islam, Immigrants and the Future of European Culture

Coming from Turkey, North and West Africa, Pakistan, and elsewhere, Muslim immigrants in Europe are changing what it means to be a European. In the process, they have brought questions of cultural identity into the international media. Examining literature, the press, and secondary studies, this writing-intensive course studies the ways in which national governments and institutions have chosen to deal with the arrival of large numbers of Muslims as permanent residents. We consider what the various controversies and prejudices surrounding their presence mean for the future of European culture. Such issues as citizenship, assimilation, the right to cultural difference, and the use of cultural and religious symbols are among our major interests. No foreign language background is assumed. Priority is given to IAS majors for this WI course.
Same as L97 IAS 420

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI EN: H


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L75 JINE 4213 Sufism and Islamic Brotherhoods in Africa

Muslim societies are prevalent in Africa — from the Horn, the North, the East to the West, with smaller conclaves in Central and South Africa. Islam has played an influential role in these diverse societies, particularly through its Sufi form. Even though Sufism originated in the Arabian Peninsula, it has fit well with African beliefs and cultures. This course aims to explore Sufi beliefs, values and practices in Africa. It reconsiders the academic constructions of "African Islam" by exploring education, intellectual life, economics, gender roles, social inequalities and politics. The goal is to show that Africa is a dynamic part of the Muslim world and not a peripheral one, as it is most often portrayed by the international media or historically, through travelers and colonial accounts. African Muslim brotherhoods have served as political mediators between countries and people (i.e., the role of the Tijaniyya in the diplomatic rivalry between Morocco and Algeria, or its role in reconciliation of clanic rivalries in Sudan). In addition, the course pays attention to hierarchy in particular tariqa. Finally, the course examines how African Sufi orders have shaped their teachings to fit transnational demands over the 20th and 21st century. We explore these issues through readings, current media, lectures and special guest speakers.
Same as L90 AFAS 4213

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 4274 Palestine, Israel and the Arab-Israeli Conflict

This course examines the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict from the mid-19th century to the present. Topics include: Palestine in the late Ottoman period; the development of modern Zionism; British colonialism and the establishment of the Palestine Mandate; Arab-Jewish relations during the Mandate; the growth of Palestinian nationalism and resistance; the establishment of the state of Israel and the dispersion of the Palestinians in 1948; the Arab-Israeli wars; both Palestinian uprisings; and the peace process.
Same as L22 History 4274

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 4357 The Holocaust in the Sephardic World

The course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the Holocaust, of its impact on the Sephardic world, of present-day debates on the "globalization" of the Holocaust, and of the ways in which these debates influence contemporary conflicts between Jews, Muslims and Christians in Southern Europe and North Africa. We will turn to the history of these conflicts, and study the Sephardic diaspora by focusing on the consequences that the 1492 expulsion had within the Iberian Peninsula, in Europe, and in the Mediterranean world. We will study Sephardic communities in Europe and North Africa and their interactions with Christians and Muslims before World War II. Once we have examined the history of the Holocaust and its impact on the Sephardic world in a more general sense, our readings will focus on the different effects of the Holocaust's "long reach" into Southeastern Europe, the Balkans, and North Africa, paying close attention to interactions among Jews, local communities, and the Nazi invaders. Finally, we will address the memory of the Sephardic experience of the Holocaust, and the role of Holocaust commemoration in different parts of the world. We will approach these topics through historiographies, memoirs, novels, maps, poetry and film.
Same as L97 IAS 4357

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 440 Topics in Rabbinic Texts

The course aims to introduce students to independent reading of selected rabbinic texts in the original language. We will focus on a number of topics representing the range of rabbinic discussion, including legal, narrative, and ethical issues. At the same time, we will study the necessary linguistic tools for understanding rabbinic texts. Prerequisites: HBRW 385 or HBRW 401 or instructor's permission.
Same as L74 HBRW 440

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 442 Empire and Memory: Approaches to Islamic Historiography (ca. 800-1250)

This course is an in-depth study of medieval Arabic historiography from the eighth through the 13th centuries, when the Mongols ran over the remnants of the Abbasid caliphate, established their own rule over Eurasia, and thereby sparked new questions about the past. After the initial survey of medieval Islamic history as background, we focus on the development of historiographical writing in its sociopolitical context and examine one by one the most major historiographical traditions and philosophies from the eighth through the 13th centuries: prophetic traditions, belles lettres, annals, biographical dictionaries and genealogical literature.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 4442 The Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe

A study of Jewish culture, society, and politics in Poland-Lithuania, Hungary, the Czech lands, Russia, Romania, and the Ukraine, from the 16th century through the 20th century. Among the topics to be covered are: economic, social, and political relations in Poland-Lithuania; varieties of Jewish religious culture; Russian and Habsburg imperial policies toward the Jews; nationality struggles and antisemitism; Jewish national and revolutionary responses; Jewish experience in war and revolution; the mass destruction of East European Jewish life; and the transition from Cold War to democratic revolution.
Same as L22 History 4442

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD


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L75 JINE 445 Topics in Islam

Fall 2017 Topic: History of Political Thought. This course aims to study political thought and practice in Islamic history (circa eighth through 13th centuries) through a close reading of a selection of primary sources in translation (and in their original language if language proficiency is satisfactory). Particular attention will be given to historical contexts in which thoughts are espoused and texts written. We plan to examine the development of political concepts and themes as articulated in diverse literary genres (legal, theological, political) from the eighth through the 13th century. We hope to engage various theoretical models to analyze the relationship between politics and religion and tease out the role of power in determining sociopolitical relations, distinctions and structures. We hope to have a better grasp on the historicity of ideas presented in timeless categories in political discourse. Prerequisite: advanced knowledge of Arabic preferred but not required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L75 JINE 464 Arabic Textual Analysis

This course introduces the advanced student of Arabic to a variety of prose narratives in the modern language. Readings, which include literary texts and topical essays on aspects of Arabic society and culture, reflect the needs and interests of the enrolled students.
Same as L49 Arab 464

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, LA A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 4675 Beyond the Harem: Women, Gender, and Revolution in the Modern Middle East

This course examines the history and current situations of women in Middle Eastern societies. The first half of the course is devoted to studying historical changes in factors structuring women's status and their sociopolitical roles. The second half of the course will focus on several case studies of women's participation in broad anti-colonial social revolutions and how these revolutions affected the position of women in those societies.
Same as L22 History 4675

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: BA EN: H


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L75 JINE 471 Topics in Modern Arabic Literature in Translation

Modern Arabic narratives read in English translation foregrounding themes such as the conflict between tradition and modernity, civil war, poverty, alienation, religion and politics, and changing gender roles.
Same as L49 Arab 471

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L75 JINE 475 Screening the Holocaust

This course surveys the history of Holocaust representation on film, examining a wide range of documentary and fictional works from 1945 to the present day. Discussions will consider a number of key questions, including: What challenges does the Holocaust pose to cinematic representation, and how have filmmakers grappled with them? How have directors worked within and against notions of the Holocaust as unrepresentable, and how have they confronted the challenge of its association with a limited set of highly iconic images? What are the more general ethical and political dimensions of representing the Holocaust onscreen — its victims as well as its perpetrators, the systematic genocidal violence that characterized it, and the sheer absence of so many dead? We will also probe the changing significance of cinematic representation of the Holocaust, exploring the medium's increasingly memorial function for audiences ever further removed from the historical moment of its occurrence. Screenings may include The Last Stage; Distant Journey; Night and Fog; Judgment at Nuremberg; Shoah; Europa, Europa; Schindler's List; Train of Life; The Specialist; Photographer; A Film Unfinished. Critical readings by figures such as Giorgio Agamben, Jean Amery, Shoshana Felman, Geoffrey Hartman, Marianne Hirsch, Sidra Israhi, Dominick LaCapra, Alison Landsberg, Berel Lang, Michael Rothberg, and James Young. Required screenings Thursdays at 4 p.m.
Same as L53 Film 475

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 479 Senior Seminar in Religious Studies

The topic for this seminar differs every year. Previous topics include Saints and Society; Religion and the Secular: Struggles over Modernity; and Pilgrimage and Sacred Space in Antiquity. The seminar is offered every spring semester and is required of all religious studies majors, with the exception of those writing an honors thesis. The class is also open, with the permission of the instructor, to other advanced undergraduates with previous course work in Religious Studies.
Same as L23 Re St 479

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L75 JINE 4790 Advanced Seminar: Empire and Messianism in the Middle East

Credit 3 units.


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L75 JINE 485 Topics in Jewish Studies:

Consult Course Listings for current topic. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH EN: H


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L75 JINE 4851 Topics in American Jewish Studies

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 487 Topics in Jewish and Near Eastern Studies: Readings in Midrash

The aim of this course is to learn to read Midrash, the literature of classical Rabbinic Bibilical interpretation. Addressing the literary, historical and cultural context in which rabbinic Midrash developed, we get to know a variety of Midrashic collections covering a time span from late antiquity to the Islamic Middle Ages. These works were composed according to a complex set of exegetical and literary rules illustrated by the selected readings. Certain Midrashic genres reflect their origins in academic discourses, while others were delivered as public sermons, drawing on parables, legends and folk lore. Among the topics studied are: How did the Rabbis read the Bible? What is the relationship between the plain meaning of the Biblical text and the polyphone interpretations of Midrash? Is Midrash a commentary or a literary discourse in its own right? Initially the Midrashic logic may seem elusive from the viewpoint of a modern Western reader, in turn its creative thinking proves to be smart, playful, at times even slippery, and yet substantial. All texts are read in translation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM


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L75 JINE 4872 Colonial Cities and the Making of Modernity

Massive urban growth has been a central result of the incorporation of many areas — both central and peripheral — into the global economy in the 19th and 20th centuries. Scholars have long theorized urbanization as a key component of modernity, but they have usually done so by looking at urbanization and modernization from the perspective of the West. This course investigates the character of cities in the colony and then uses these empirical and analytical entry points to examine critically some theories of modernity. The geographical focus of the course is primarily on cities in the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia.
Same as L22 History 4872

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 4901 Topics in Islamic Thought: Proseminar in Methods and Approaches in Islamic Studies

This seminar is an introduction to the methods, research tools, and theoretical assumptions that Islamicists have used to study diverse aspects of Islamic societies and civilizations, past and present. Critical reading and discussion of scholarly works are paired with bibliographical research assignments. Permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 492 Adv. Sem: Europe's "Jewish Question": Emancipation, Antisemitism, & Jewish-Christian Confrontation

The so-called "Jewish Question" was a product of European modernity. It emerged in conjunction with the formation of modern states, Enlightenment projects for political reform, the decline of religious influence in society, and struggles over Jewish emancipation. In this seminar, students will examine the unusual career of this obsession from the 16th through the 20th century by focusing selectively on a number of illustrative episodes: Christian Hebraism and the Reformation; the Enlightenment assault on religious power; European debates on Jewish emancipation; the emergence of the "Jewish Question" in the 19th century; antisemitism as a modern political phenomenon; the renewed discourse of Jewish "ritual murder" at the turn of the 20th century; Zionism and other forms of Jewish nationalism; and the question of anti-Zionism in the reformulation of the "Jewish Question" during the past half-century.
Same as L22 History 4942

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L75 JINE 4944 Advanced Seminar: The Inquisition in Europe, Asia, and Latin America, 1200-1700

This seminar will study the history of the Inquisition from its beginnings in southern France in the first half of the 13th century up to the investigations undertaken by Dominicans and Franciscans in 17th-century Mexico and Peru. Along the way the seminar will focus upon other inquisitions in Europe (especially those made in Italy, Spain and Germany), and the hunt for heresy in Goa and the Philippines. This course will read inquisitional manuals (books on how to conduct an inquisition) and original inquisitional documents (the records of the trials and interrogations). Consequently, the history of heresy and witchcraft, as understood by people in the past and historians in the present, will be discussed.
Same as L22 History 4941

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L75 JINE 497 Guided Readings in Arabic

Prerequisites: senior standing, and permission of instructor and department chair.
Same as L49 Arab 497

Credit variable, maximum 5 units. A&S: LA


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L75 JINE 4970 Empire and Messianism in the Middle East

Senior Seminar: This course looks at imperial politics in its relations to monotheistic messianic movements and ideologies in the Islamic Mediterranean from the late antiquity to the 16th century. Messianic beliefs offered political hope, rallied opposition against the existing rule, defined and ordered lived reality for imperial subjects, presented a political leitmotiv for rulers, and advocated a just sociopolitical order to be realized in the immediate or indefinite future. Thus, this course attempts to see how politics became messianic by its very ability to promise a better future. Despite the chronological scope of the course, we examine only specific ideas, practices and movements as case studies to study in depth various facets of messianic movements and thought in their geographic and historical context. We use primary sources, which are the main methodological focus of the course, and secondary literature. We aim to develop skills in identifying, reading, analyzing and dealing with primary sources in their variety and critically engaging modern scholarship on the political role of Messianism. Students write a term paper and several reports on preassigned readings, and make regular class presentations. Admission preference is given to graduating seniors in JINELC, but the course is open to all advanced students provided that they consult the instructor prior to enrolling. Knowledge of a relevant primary source language is highly desired but not required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 4972 Guided Readings in Persian

Prerequisites: senior standing, and permission of the instructor and the department chair.
Same as L47 Pers 4972

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: LA


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L75 JINE 4973 Guided Readings in Hebrew

Prerequisites: senior standing, and permission of the instructor and the department chair.
Same as L74 HBRW 4973

Credit variable, maximum 5 units. A&S: LA


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L75 JINE 498 Guided Readings in Arabic

Prerequisites: senior standing, and permission of the instructor and the department chair.
Same as L49 Arab 498

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA


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L75 JINE 4982 Guided Readings in Persian II

Prerequisites: senior standing, and permission of the instructor and the department chair.
Same as L47 Pers 4982

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: LA


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L75 JINE 4983 Guided Readings in Hebrew

Prerequisites: senior standing and permission of the instructor and the department chair.
Same as L74 HBRW 4983

Credit variable, maximum 5 units. A&S: LA


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L75 JINE 4984 Guided Readings in Aramaic

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and the department chair.
Same as L74 HBRW 4984

Credit variable, maximum 6 units. EN: H


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L75 JINE 4985 Guided Readings in Biblical Hebrew

Prerequisites: permission of the instructor and the department chair.
Same as L74 HBRW 4985

Credit variable, maximum 6 units. EN: H


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L75 JINE 4986 Guided Readings in Talmudic Aramaic and Rabbinic Texts

Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Credit variable, maximum 6 units. A&S: LA


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L75 JINE 4987 Guided Readings in Akkadian

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and the department chair.
Same as L74 HBRW 4982

Credit variable, maximum 6 units. EN: H


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L75 JINE 499 Study for Honors in Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Studies

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the chair of the program.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 4991 Study for Honors in Jewish, Islamic, and Near Eastern Studies

Offered in the spring semester in conjunction with L75 JINE 499. Prerequisites: senior standing and permission of the chair of Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern department.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L75 JINE 49CA Advanced Seminar: Religion and the Secular: Critical Perspectives from South Asia

A generation ago, scholars and observers around the world felt assured that modernization would bring the quiet retreat of religion from public life. But the theory of secularization now stands debunked by world events, and a host of questions has been reopened. This course provides students with a forum to think through these issues as they prepare research papers on topics of their own choosing.
Same as L22 History 49CA

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 49JK Advanced Seminar: Blood and Sacred Bodies: Ritual Murder and Host Desecration Accusations

This seminar follows the history of the Ritual Murder and Host Desecration accusations from the origins in 12th- and 13th-century Europe to the 20th century. It pays close attention to the social and political functions of the narratives; their symbolic importance in Christianity's salviric drama; attacks on such beliefs from both within and outside the community of the faithful; the suppression and decline of the ritual murder accusation; the integration of Jews into European societies in the 19th century; and the reappearance of the blood libel in the aftermath of emancipation.
Same as L22 History 49JK

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 49NR Advanced Seminar: Egypt and the Arab Spring: Middle Eastern Revolution in Historical Perspective

The uprisings of the "Arab Spring" of 2011 captivated global media and observers. The movements brought down established regimes in Tunisia, Libya, Yemen and Egypt. The focus of this course will be to understand the historical background and primary contemporary issues that have shaped Egypt's Arab Spring, and to examine the huge popular effort to document Egypt's revolution. Each student will design, research and write a 25-page paper on a topic of their choice related to the Arab Spring.
Same as L22 History 49NR

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L75 JINE 49SC Advanced Seminar: Incredible India?

Yoga, the Kamasutra, nonviolence, poverty, royalty, population, asceticism, vegetarianism, anticolonialism, democracy, Hinduism: All these and more signify the idea of India. This course uncovers the history by which "India" has come to occupy a privileged position in the global imaginary. We view the circulation of India as a cultural resource over the centuries and ask what popular assumptions are made about it at a time of heightened globalization; how does the idea of India circulate and through what kinds of pathways; what political role does this seemingly cultural notion of India fulfill? Finally, what is the connection between such an idea of India and the rise of a new, U.S. centered, imperial formation?
Same as L22 History 49SC

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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