The Department of Classics offers course work in the language, history, literature, archaeology and culture of ancient Rome. At the heart of these courses are classes in the Latin language. Students of beginning Latin master the grammar in two semesters and go on immediately, in the third semester, to read authors such as Cicero and Vergil. Students who have studied Latin in high school begin with a placement exam, and many can begin their studies in more advanced courses. Students have the opportunity to study numerous Latin authors, including the great poets Vergil and Ovid, the historians Livy and Tacitus, and the novelists Apuleius and Petronius. More advanced undergraduates often work alongside graduate students in our vigorous graduate program, and they also have the opportunity to do their own research or to assist in faculty members' research projects. It is a remarkable and dynamic environment, one that students find both rewarding and stimulating. Resources on campus supporting the study of Latin include the Wulfing Coin Collection, one of the largest collections of ancient coins owned by an American university.

Additional Information

Study Abroad: Washington University is associated with both the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies (ICCS) in Rome and the College Year in Athens (CYA). Students interested in studying in one of these programs should consult Professor Timothy Moore, the study abroad adviser for Classics.

Contact:Cathy Marler
Phone:314-935-5123
Email:classics@wustl.edu
Website:http://classics.artsci.wustl.edu

Students interested in Latin should explore either the major in Classics or the major in Ancient Studies offered through the Department of Classics.

Students interested in Latin should explore either the minor in Classics or the minor in Ancient Studies offered through the Department of Classics.

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for L10 Latin.


L10 Latin 101D Beginning Latin I

An introduction to Latin, the language of Ancient Rome and the European Middle Ages and Renaissance, and the most important source of English medical and scientific terms. Beginning with the foundations of Latin grammar, students work toward developing reading knowledge with the goal of reading literary texts. Students who have already begun their study of Latin should consult the chair of the department.

Credit 4 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 102D Beginning Latin II

Continuation and completion of the program begun in Latin 101D. Prerequisite: Latin 101D or equivalent or permission of instructor.

Credit 4 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 210 Intensive Elementary Latin II

Completion of work begun in Latin 190D followed by readings in original Latin poetry and prose. Successful completion of Latin 210 with a grade of B+ or better allows the student to proceed directly to Latin 318C.

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: IS


View Sections

L10 Latin 301 Introduction to Latin Literature I

Review of Latin grammar and syntax and development of reading skills and translation techniques through short readings from original texts in prose and poetry such as Caesar and Ovid. Prerequisites: Latin 102D or Latin 190D, placement by examination, or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 3161 Introduction to Latin Literature II: Elementary Prose and Poetry

Appreciation of literary forms through study of selected elementary literary texts in Latin prose and poetry. Prerequisite: Latin 301, placement by examination or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 3171 Survey of Latin Literature: The Republic

A sampling of the major literary achievements of the last two centuries of the Roman Republic, including prose and verse authors. Readings are typically drawn from Catullus, Lucretius, Caesar, and Cicero. There will be regular, selective grammar review and discussion of translation strategies. Prerequisite: Latin 102D or Latin 190D with a grade of B+ or better, or Latin 301 and Latin 3161, or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 3181 Survey of Latin Literature: The Empire

Readings in the verse and prose literature of the Roman Empire, particularly its first two centuries, with targeted grammar review and stylistic analysis. Readings may be drawn from Vergil, Livy, Suetonius, or other appropriate authors. Prerequisite: Latin 102D with a grade of B+ or better, or Latin 301, or Latin 3161, or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 350W Writing about Latin Literature

Latin courses at the 300 level with enhanced writing requirements may be taken under this designation as writing-intensive courses. Required: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, HUM, LCD, WI BU: HUM EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 370 Topics in Latin Literature

Study in selected problems, eras or generic sequences; specific topic for each semester in Course Listings. May be repeated for credit for study of different topics. Prerequisites: Latin 318C or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 400 Independent Study

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 401 Medieval Latin

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 413 Latin Philosophical Writers

Readings among various writers of philosophy in Latin, ranging from Cicero to Seneca to Augustine. Texts vary; therefore, course may be taken more than once.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 415 Cicero

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, LA A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 416 Seneca

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 4161 Seneca: Philosopher and Friend

Seneca the Younger was a philosopher, politician, playwright and propagandist; he rose from the province of Spain to become tutor and adviser to Nero, only to fall from favor and commit suicide at the emperor's command. We will study Seneca's life and works, focusing on the Epistulae Morales and select philosophical treatises. We will pay special attention to issues of language and style, cultural and historical context, and ideological and philosophical content. Prerequisites: Latin 3171 and Latin 3181 (or equivalent) and sophomore standing or above.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, LA, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 419 Julius Caesar and His Image

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 421 Roman Comedy

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

L10 Latin 4215 Plautus

Readings from the comedies of Plautus. Discussion of play production in Republican Rome, reception and interpretation. The advanced-level Latin reading load is supplemented by secondary readings, quizzes and short reports. Prerequisites: Latin 3171 and Latin 3181 (or equivalent) and sophomore standing or above.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 422 Lucretius

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 431 Vergil: The Aeneid

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 432 Horace on Poetry

This course examines Roman poetry that illuminates ancient and still-influential ideas about the functions of literature. Horace's monumental "Ars Poetica" and his other literary-critical works will be the major texts. These works convey the complexity of contemporary debates about literature's role in society and history and about the merits of various genres (epic, tragedy, comedy, satire, epigram). Readings in secondary sources will help to fill out the picture of Horace's career and of the climate of literary production in early Imperial Rome.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 433 Ovid

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 441 Roman Satire

This course focuses on the genre of hexameter satire represented by the Roman poets Lucilius, Horace, Persius, and Juvenal (second century BCE through second century CE). The Roman professor Quintilian called satire "entirely Roman" (tota nostra), and our readings will allow us to explore the meaning of this claim for satire's authors and readers. We will read a large sampling of satiric verse in the original Latin, practice reading the dactylic hexameter, and observe and discuss differences between the poets' styles and themes. We'll also read and discuss scholarship on the genre's formal characteristics and influences, its origins in Republican literary culture, and its development in the Imperial period.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 444 Latin Prose Composition

Readings in select authors coupled with Latin composition, primarily in prose but occasionally in verse, with attention to grammatical and idiomatic accuracy as well as elegance of style.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 451 The Roman Historians

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 465 Silver Latin Epic: Lucan

Lucan's epic poem about the civil war between Caesar and Pompey, written under Nero, investigates themes of individuality, citizenship, morality, and historical inevitability in Roman history. We will read selections from the poem, focusing on Lucan's literary models and poetic style; his treatment of the past and of historical figures like Caesar, Pompey and Cato; and Lucan's place in the political, philosophical and literary world of Neronian Rome. Prerequisites: Latin 3171 and Latin 3181 (or equivalent) and sophomore standing or above.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, LA, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 471 Elegiac Poetry

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 493 Readings in Latin Prose: Apuleius

A survey of the major genres of Latin prose, history, oratory and philosophy. Authors may include Caesar, Cicero, Seneca, Tacitus. Aim is to develop reading facility and understanding.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 494W Topics in Latin Literature

Advanced Latin seminars with enhanced writing requirements may be taken under this designation as writing-intensive courses. Required: permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, WI EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 495 Topics in Republican Latin

May be repeated for credit for study of different topics.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 496 Tacitus

Tacitus, the great historian and orator of the late first and early second centuries CE, is one of our best sources for the early history of the Roman Empire. With his concise style and scathing political insight, Tacitus' writings influenced later authors from Ammianus Marcellinus to Macchiavelli. We will read selections from Tacitus' historical works, paying particular attention to: prose style; genre, rhetoric and historiography; and Tacitus' critique of the Principate. Prerequisites: Latin 3171 and Latin 3181 (or equivalent) and sophomore standing or above.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 4961 Topics in Empire Latin

May be repeated for credit for study of different topics.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 4962 Juvenal and Martial

This course examines satiric representations of life in the city of Rome in the Epigrams of Martial and Satires of Juvenal. The two poets, who were near-contemporaries and acquaintances, have had a massive impact on modern perceptions of imperial Rome in the ages of Domitian, Nerva, Trajan, and Hadrian (80s-120s CE). The Rome they represent is both a real place and a poetic world full of dramas and fictions. From our readings from Martial, Juvenal, and sources on their work and times, we will gain an understanding of their literary agendas and of the realities of Roman life that their poems represent and distort. Topics will include the poetic career, the public spaces of Rome, amicitia and its rituals, private life, sexual behavior, and family affairs.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 4963 Martial

Martial, the prolific first-century Latin poet, left behind 15 books of poetry. Martial's epigrams can be witty, sincere, caustic, and often quite sexually explicit. In this course, we will read a selection of Martial's epigrams in Latin, and we will discuss various themes related to Martial's work, such as gender and sexuality, ancient conceptions of authorship and publishing, flattery, invective, and the many personae Martial adopts. We will also pay close attention to Martial's language and style, and we will discuss where Martial fits into the wider social and historical context.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


View Sections

L10 Latin 497 Honors Course I

Students interested in pursuing honors should consult the director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Classics. Prerequisite: overall GPA of 3.65.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM


View Sections

L10 Latin 498 Honors Course II

Students interested in pursuing honors should consult the director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Classics. Prerequisite: overall GPA of 3.65.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM


View Sections