The legal studies minor is an interdisciplinary program that allows students to study the role of law and legal institutions in society.

Students who minor in legal studies learn about law in courses from anthropology, economics, history, philosophy, political science and other disciplines. The curriculum emphasizes the forces that shape law and the ways that peoples of different cultures and from different historical periods have used and interpreted the law.

Because Legal Studies is interdisciplinary in nature and offers a variety of courses, each student can design a course of study that addresses their individual needs and interests.

Students may choose to take advantage of internships available in law and government. Legal Studies is an excellent pre-law program. It also prepares students well for other graduate study, as well as for careers in academia, business, politics or social services.

Phone:314-935-4200
Email:legalstudies@wustl.edu
Website:http://legalstudies.artsci.wustl.edu

There is no major available in this area. Students interested in undergraduate, pre-professional preparation for the study of law should contact the pre-law adviser in the College of Arts & Sciences, who is available to help plan a course of study and prepare a strategy for applying for admission to law school.

The Minor in Legal Studies

Units required: 18

The minor in legal studies requires six courses (18 graded units), at least three of which must be upper-division (300- or 400-level). Two of the six courses may be drawn from the student's major, but as in all College programs, they can not be double-counted (i.e., applied to both the major and minor). The six courses also must be distributed across three of four thematic subject areas. For details, please visit the Legal Studies website or consult the director of Legal Studies.

The following is a list of courses that have been offered in Legal Studies in recent years. Note that some of these courses are not currently offered, and some new courses may also count toward the minor. For a current list of courses in Legal Studies, please visit the Legal Studies website or contact the director of Legal Studies.


Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for L84 Lw St.


L84 Lw St 105G An Introduction to Logic and Critical Analysis

Introduction to the elementary tools of logic required for constructing and critically evaluating arguments and the claims they support. Topics include: the nature of an argument; argument structure; how arguments can fail both in structure and in content; formal and informal fallacies; propositional logic and predicate calculus; and critical analysis of rhetorical strategies for presenting arguments. Students will be encouraged to develop critical reasoning skills that can be widely applied.
Same as L30 Phil 100G

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA, QA A&S IQ: NSM, AN Art: NSM BU: HUM


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L84 Lw St 126 Freshman Seminar: Law and Society

This course considers the basic aspects of the American legal system: its foundations, processes, institutions and rights. We will also study some specific substantive areas of the law. The course consists of two 1.5-hour Socratic lectures per week. Upon completion of this course, students should have a basic knowledge of the American legal system, an important part of a general education. Our hope is that such knowledge will enable students to better understand and assess current legal events. We also hope that students, if they have not already done so, develop an interest in those events. Further, this course should enable students to consider law as a future area of study and career. Interested students may continue their study in the spring semester with an optional 1-credit seminar focusing on contemporary Supreme Court cases. Open only to freshmen.
Same as L43 GeSt 126

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 131F Present Moral Problems

An investigation of a range of contemporary moral issues and controversies that draws on philosophical ethics and culturewide moral considerations. Topics may include: racism, world hunger, war and terrorism, the distribution of income and wealth, gender discrimination, pornography, lesbian and gay rights, abortion, euthanasia, and capital punishment. The aim of the course is to present diverse points of view regarding these topics and to provide conceptual and theoretical tools that enable the student to make headway in thinking carefully and critically about the issues.
Same as L30 Phil 131F

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L84 Lw St 203C Early Political Thought: Text and Tradition

A selected survey of the political and moral thought of Europe from the rise of Athenian democracy to the Renaissance, with emphasis on analysis and discussion of writers such as Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, Castiglione and Machiavelli. The course aims to introduce students to basic texts in the intellectual history of Western Europe, understood both as products of a particular time and place and as self-contained arguments that strive to instruct and persuade. The texts are simultaneously used to chart the careers of such fundamental notions as liberty, virtue and justice. Preference given to Text and Tradition and IPH students.
Same as L93 IPH 203C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L84 Lw St 207C Modern Political Thought: Text and Tradition

This course is an exercise in understanding how professional historians and the general public discover and use the past. The main goals of this course are to understand the many different methods and standards applied to the past; to understand how and why each generation changes the past as it seeks to make it "usable"; and to develop the skills of exposition and argumentation necessary to describe and analyze complex historical issues and to express critical ideas effectively. The subject of this inquiry will be the Nuremberg trials — the innovations and critiques around the law and politics of the trials themselves, as well as the trials' legacies for ideas about international justice in postwar America and the world.
Same as L22 History 2443

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L84 Lw St 2110 Social Inequality in America

Americans face different challenges and opportunities that depend on a variety of characteristics, including race, class, gender and sexual orientation. This class examines these intersecting categories from a sociological perspective — not simply as ways to classify people, but as social constructions that help to explain social inequality. We examine these systems in a variety of institutional contexts, such as popular culture, family life, education, the criminal justice system and the labor force. Introductory level, no prerequisites.
Same as L40 SOC 2110

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC, SD EN: S


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L84 Lw St 2152 The Theory and Practice of Justice: The American Historical Experience

This introductory course uses historical case studies combined with readings in law, literature and philosophy to illuminate key episodes where definitions of justice were contested in 19th- and 20th-century America. Some of the conflicts to be explored include: Cherokee Removal, Civil War era debates over southern secession; whether reparation should be offered to freed people to redress the injustices of racial slavery; the denial of voting rights to women as a case of "taxation without representation"; 20th-century controversies over legal bans on racial intermarriage; free speech versus hate speech in the 1960s and '70s; and recent debates over affirmative action and gay marriage. Attendance required.
Same as L98 AMCS 2152

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM BU: BA, ETH, HUM


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L84 Lw St 220A Topics in American Culture Studies: American Democracy, from Tocqueville to Trump

This course introduces students to the different approaches and methodologies within the American Culture Studies field, including those represented by literature, history, sociology and political science; at the same time, they learn key concepts within the field that inform their future work. These are presented in a semester-specific topic of focus; please refer to Course Listings for a description of the current offering. The course is ideal for AMCS majors and minors, but others are welcome. This course fulfills the introductory course requirement for AMCS majors and minors.
Same as L98 AMCS 220

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L84 Lw St 233F Biomedical Ethics

A critical examination, in the light of contemporary moral disagreements and traditional ethical theories, of some of the moral issues arising out of medical practice and experimentation in our society. Issues that might be discussed include euthanasia, genetic engineering, organ transplants, medical malpractice, the allocation of medical resources, and the rights of the patient.
Same as L30 Phil 233F

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L84 Lw St 235F Introduction to Environmental Ethics

A general survey of current issues in environmental ethics, focusing on problems such as the obligation to future generations, protection of endangered species, animal rights, problems of energy and pollution, wilderness, global justice and business obligations. Students also learn some ethical and political theory.
Same as L30 Phil 235F

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L84 Lw St 2443 Freshman Seminar: The Nuremberg Trials and International Justice

This course is an exercise in understanding how professional historians and the general public discover and use the past. The main goals of this course are to understand the many different methods and standards applied to the past; to understand how and why each generation changes the past as it seeks to make it "usable"; and to develop the skills of exposition and argumentation necessary to describe and analyze complex historical issues and to express critical ideas effectively. The subject of this inquiry will be the Nuremberg trials — the innovations and critiques around the law and politics of the trials themselves, as well as the trials' legacies for ideas about international justice in postwar America and the world.
Same as L22 History 2443

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L84 Lw St 260 Game Theory in Science and Culture

Introduces the major intellectual insights of game theory in a nontechnical fashion, and examines the influence game theory has had on geopolitics, social philosophy, psychology, art and the humanities. In addition to covering the basic machinery of the theory, the class: participates in numerous illustrative classroom games; examines game theory in film, literature and literary criticism; sees how game theory has contributed to social theory; and learns about the background of game theory and its history and perception as a hoped-for tool in the Cold War. Grades based on problems, short essays, two short-essay exams, and participation.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 260

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L84 Lw St 280 Exploring Inequality: The Social and Structural Analysis of Modern American Life

What would it mean to engage in effective social and structural analysis of the complex problems of modern American life that are so often reduced by policy makers to matters of personal responsibility and individual choice? This is an urgent question at a historical moment when America "society" is becoming more diverse and more divided. This course explores four areas of inequality: poverty, racism and sexism, the crisis in health care, and the perils of globalization. We will pay particular attention to how intersections of minority statuses as defined by race, social class, gender and sexuality conspire to script social and political outcomes. Our investigations will allow us to consider multiple academic and applied models. In an original research project that closely engages real world cases and draws upon multiple disciplinary perspectives, students will gain an understanding of the complexity of social problems, and what productive intellectual and policy responses entail. Guests from local social, educational, and political agencies will share their perspectives with the class. Above all, students will emerge from the course with a set of critical skills that will empower them to decipher contemporary policy debates and develop their own social analyses.
Same as L98 AMCS 280

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC, SD BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 299 Undergraduate Internship in Legal Studies

Students receive credit for a faculty-directed and approved internship. Registration requires completion of the Learning Agreement which the student obtains from the Career Center and which must be filled out and signed by the Career Center and the faculty sponsor prior to beginning internship work. Credit should correspond to actual time spent in work activities, e.g., 8-10 hours a week for 13 or 14 weeks to receive 3 units of credit; 1 or 2 credits for fewer hours. Students may not receive credit for work done for pay but are encouraged to obtain written evaluations about such work for the student's academic adviser and career placement file.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L84 Lw St 3012 Biblical Law and the Origins of Western Justice

This course will explore how law developed from the earliest periods of human history and how religious ideas and social institutions shaped law. The course will also illuminate how biblical law was influenced by earlier cultures and how the ancient Israelites reshaped the law they inherited. It will further analyze the impact of biblical law on Western culture and will investigate how the law dealt with those of different social classes and ethnic groups, and we will probe how women were treated by the law.
Same as L75 JINE 3012

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L84 Lw St 312 Argumentation

This advanced writing course examines the strategies of argumentation, exploring such elements of argument as the enthymeme, the three appeals, claim types and fallacies. Prerequisites: Writing 1 (Writing 100) and junior standing. A note for students and advisers: when registering refer to WebSTAC for updated information on section times and available seats.
Same as L13 Writing 312

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L84 Lw St 314W Topics in Composition: Writing and the Law

An advanced writing course focusing on selected topics related to writing. Topics chosen by department/instructor. Consult section description for details about specific class emphases. (Note: In some cases, this course may be cross-listed with other programs/departments and may satisfy the writing-intensive requirement.) Prerequisites: CWP 100 College Writing 1 and junior standing.
Same as L13 Writing 314

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L84 Lw St 315 Introduction to Social Psychology

Introduction to the scientific study of individual behavior in a social context. Topics: person perception, stereotyping and prejudice, attitudes, memory and political psychology, among other issues. Prerequisite: Psych 100B.
Same as L33 Psych 315

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 3201 Religious Freedom in America

This interdisciplinary course, co-taught by a law school professor and an American historian, concerns the intersection of religion, liberty and law in American culture. It introduces students to the major texts and historical issues concerning religious liberty, using legal history and case law, intellectual and social history, and political philosophy. It will address issues of significant contemporary debate — from the role of religious groups on college campuses to bakers and gay weddings — along with the deep historical background, from English settlement of North America and the making of the Constitution, through the Civil War, to the Cold War and the recent political developments.
Same as I50 InterD 320

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, SD EN: H


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L84 Lw St 331 Theories of Social Justice

This course is intended primarily for sophomores and juniors. The topic of this course varies by semester, dependent on faculty and student interests.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 331

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: HUM


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L84 Lw St 3325 Constitutional Politics in the United States

The principal purpose of this course is to introduce students to the politics of constitutional interpretation. We first discuss the origins of the constitution, the structure operation and work of courts, and judicial decision making. Afterward, we examine various areas of the law relating to institutional powers and constraints (e.g., federalism, presidential powers, Congressional authority). In so doing, we develop an understanding for the legal doctrine in each area of the law and also examine explanations for the legal change we observe.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3325

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 3373 Law and Culture

We live in an age when social policy is increasingly displaced into the realm of law, when justice and equality are matters of courtroom debate rather than public discussion. Legal language has become a key resource in all kinds of struggles over livelihood and ways of life. In this course, we study the cultural dimensions of law and law's changing relationship to state power, the global economy, social movements, and everyday life. We approach law as a system of rules, obligations, and procedures, but also a cultural practice, moral regime, and disciplinary technique. How are relationships between legal, political, and economic realms structured and with what consequences? How does law provide tools for both social struggle and social control? What does anthropology contribute to research on these issues? In exploring these questions, we combine readings from classical legal anthropology with recent ethnographic work from around the globe.
Same as L48 Anthro 3373

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L84 Lw St 344 Courts and Civil Liberties

This course focuses on constitutional law principles in the Bill of Rights, and examines how Supreme Court decisions influence these principles in everyday life. We explore how the courts, and particularly the Supreme Court, have interpreted these rights in light of changing times and emerging issues. Topics include the First Amendment; free exercise of religion and the establishment clause; freedom of speech, assembly and association; freedom of the press; the Fourth Amendment and the rights of those accused and convicted of crimes; the right to privacy, including reproductive freedom and the right to die; equal protection and civil rights, including race, gender, sexual orientation; immigrants' rights and voting rights; and civil liberties after September 11. Recommended for the Liberal Arts and Business (LAB) Certificate.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 344

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA, ETH, HUM


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L84 Lw St 3441 Defendant's Rights

This course explores the operations of the American criminal justice system. Substantial emphasis on the constitutional rights accorded to the criminally accused. Readings consist primarily, but not exclusively, of Supreme Court cases.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3441

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA, ETH


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L84 Lw St 346 Philosophy of Law

This course will first focus on the philosophical foundations of law, examining both the relationship between law and rules, as well as the types of legal reasoning. Second, the course will focus on philosophical issues that arise in the key substantive areas of law: contracts, torts, property, criminal law, and constitutional law, as well in specialized areas such as family and employment law. The course will end with a brief discussion of several problems in legal ethics. Prerequisites: one course in Philosophy at the 100 or 200 level, or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.
Same as L30 Phil 346

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L84 Lw St 3462 The Politics of Privacy in the Digital Age

This course explores the changing nature of privacy in contemporary society.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3462

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: ETH EN: S UColl: PSA, PSC


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L84 Lw St 346J Islamic Law

This course presents a general overview of Islamic law and an introduction to the study of religious legal authority which values consensus. It then explores the formation of the major schools of law. Next it debates the notions of "ijtihad" and "taqlid" and discuss how open and independent legal decisions have been in the Islamic world. It also traces the transmission of legal knowledge in religious institutions across time and place by focusing on medieval Muslim societies and by closely examining the education of a modern-day Ayatollah.
Same as L75 JINE 346

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L84 Lw St 3507 Legal Conflict in Modern American Society

Thousands of lawsuits are filed daily in the state and federal courts of the United States. The disputes underlying those lawsuits are as messy and complex as the human, commercial, cultural and political dynamics that trigger them, and the legal processes for resolving those disputes are expensive, time-consuming and, for most citizens, seemingly impenetrable. At the same time, law and legal conflict permeate public discourse in the United States to a degree that is unique in the world, even among the community of long-established democracies. The overarching objective of the course is to prepare our undergraduate students to participate constructively in that discourse by providing them with a conceptual framework for understanding both the conduct and resolution of legal conflict by American legal institutions, and the evolution of — and values underlying — the substantive law American courts apply to those conflicts. This is, at core, a course in the kind of legal or litigation "literacy" that should be expected of the graduates of first-tier American universities. Some of the legal controversies that are used to help develop that "literacy" include those surrounding the permissible use of lethal force in self-defense, the constitutionality of affirmative action in university admissions, contracts that are unconscionably one-sided, sexual harassment in the workplace, the duty of landlords to prevent criminal assaults on their tenants, groundwater pollution alleged to cause pediatric cancers, and warrantless searches of cellphone locator data by police.
Same as L98 AMCS 3507

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L84 Lw St 3510 The Supreme Court

This course is intended primarily for sophomores and juniors. The topic of this course varies by semester, dependent on faculty and student interests.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3510

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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L84 Lw St 3561 Women and the Law

This course (formerly called "Women and the Law") explores how social constructions of gender, race, class and sexuality have shaped traditional legal reasoning and American legal concepts, including women's legal rights. We will begin by placing our current legal framework, and its gender, race, sexuality, and other societal assumptions, in an historical and Constitutional context. We will then examine many of the questions raised by feminist theory, feminist jurisprudence, and other critical perspectives. For example, is the legal subject gendered male, and, if so, how can advocates (or women and men) use the law to gain greater equality? What paradoxes have emerged in areas such as employment discrimination, family law, or reproductive rights, as women and others have sought liberal equality? What is the equality/difference debate about and why is it important for feminists? How do intersectionality and various schools of feminist thought affect our concepts of discrimination, equality and justice? The course is thematic, but we will spend time on key cases that have influenced law and policy, examining how they affect the everyday lives of women. Over the years, this course has attracted WGSS students and pre-law students. This course is taught by law students under the supervision of a member of the School of Law faculty. In spring 2017, Jesse Doggendorf, Sapna Khatri, Rebecca Swarm, and Sarah Watson will be teaching this course under the supervision of Professor Susan Appleton. Students who have taken L77 3561 Women and the Law can not take this class.
Same as L77 WGSS 3561

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 3562 Introduction to Forensic Psychology

This course is an introduction to the interaction between psychology and the legal system. The contribution of psychology to such legal areas as family law, juvenile delinquency, criminal cases, law enforcement, and correctional psychology are surveyed. Topics covered include domestic violence, child abuse, personal injury, eyewitness testimony, insanity, sex offenders and psychopaths. Legal standards regarding insanity, civil commitment and expert testimony are reviewed. We also focus on the emerging contributions of neuroscience to the field of forensic psychology. Prerequisite: Psych 100B.
Same as L33 Psych 356

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 358 Law, Politics and Society

This course offers an introduction to the functions of law and the legal system in American society. The course material stresses the realities of the operation of the legal system (in contrast to legal mythology), as well as the continuous interaction and feedback between the legal and political systems. There are four specific objectives to the course: (1) to introduce students to legal concepts and legal theories; (2) to analyze the operation of the appellate courts, with particular emphasis on the U.S. Supreme Court; (3) to analyze the operation of American trial courts, especially juries and the criminal courts; and (4) to examine the linkages between culture and law.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 358

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 3670 The Long Civil Rights Movement

The Civil Rights Movement is known as a southern movement, led by church leaders and college students, fought through sit-ins and marches, dealing primarily with non-economic objectives, framed by a black and white paradigm, and limited to a single tumultuous decade. This course seeks to broaden our understanding of the movement geographically, chronologically and thematically. It pays special attention to struggles fought in the North, West and Southwest; it seeks to question binaries constructed around "confrontational" and "accommodationist" leaders; it reveals how Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans impacted and were impacted by the movement; and it seeks to link the public memory of this movement with contemporary racial politics.
Same as L22 History 3670

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: BA EN: H


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L84 Lw St 3713 Law in American Life I: English and Colonial Foundations to 1776

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: ETH


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L84 Lw St 389 Power, Justice and the City

This course examines normative theoretical questions of power and justice through the lens of the contemporary city, with a particular focus on American urban life. It explores urban political economic problems, questions of racial hierarchy and racial injustice in the modern metropolis, and the normative and practical dilemmas posed by "privatism" in cities and their suburbs. In addition, the course devotes considerable attention to honing students' writing skills, through class assignments that stress rewriting and revising, and also through four in-class writing workshops devoted to formulating a thesis and making an argument, revising and rewriting, writing with style, and peer consultation.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 389

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD, WI A&S IQ: SSC, SD, WI Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 389A Power, Justice and the City

This course examines normative theoretical questions of power and justice through the lens of the contemporary city, with a particular focus on American urban life. It explores urban political economic problems, questions of racial hierarchy and racial injustice in the modern metropolis, and the normative and practical dilemmas posed by "privatism" in cities and their suburbs.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 389A

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 390 Gender Violence

This course explores the issue of violence against women within families, by strangers in the workplace, and within the context of international and domestic political activity. In each area, issues of race, class, culture and sexuality are examined as well as legal, medical and sociological responses. Readings cover current statistical data, research and theory as well as information on the history of the battered women's movement, the rape crisis center movement, violent repression of women's political expressions internationally, and the effect of violence on immigrant and indigenous women in the United States and abroad. Not open to students who have taken U92 (UCollege) WGSS 363.
Same as L77 WGSS 393

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: SSC, SD Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 393 History of Political Thought III: Liberty, Democracy and Revolution

How, if at all, should the political institutions of the modern state express and secure the liberty and equality of citizens? What is the political significance of private property? Is world history to be understood as progress toward one best form of government — capitalist democracy, perhaps, or communism? What forces drive history? We address these and other timeless political questions through close reading and rigorous analysis of classic texts in the history of Western political thought. Authors studied include Kant, Hegel, Marx, Tocqueville, John Stuart Mill, and Nietzsche. Prerequisite: one previous course in political theory or political philosophy. The course is the third in a three-semester sequence on the history of political thought, and students are encouraged but not required to take the courses in chronological sequence.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 393

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L84 Lw St 4002 Directed Fieldwork in Legal Research

A fieldwork project in empirical and/or archival legal research under the direction of a member of the Washington University faculty. The fieldwork may be planned and undertaken individually or as part of a formal project. Permission of supervising faculty member and director of the program is required.

Credit variable, maximum 6 units. A&S: TH EN: H


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L84 Lw St 4013 Negotiating Major Legislation in Congress

This course examines the outcomes of the legislative process in the United States. The first third of the course will examine key concepts and major determinants of the negotiation process: majority rule instability, agenda control, political parties, the amendment process, and the uncovered set. The rest of the course will examine the negotiations that led to some of the most significant legislation in the past 100 years, from the Federal Reserve Act of 1913 through the Voting Rights Act of 1965 to the immigration bill of 2006. Along with other assignments, each student will write several drafts of a major research project on a major piece of legislation. Each research project will examine the amedments offered, the strategic intentions of the amendments' sponsors, the agenda process, and the role of party. Prerequisite: Poli Sci 101B.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 4013

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, WI A&S IQ: SSC, WI EN: S


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L84 Lw St 4030 Political Theory of Education

This course explores issues of authority, legitimacy, citizenship, freedom and equality through contemporary readings in the political theory of education. What is to be done when parents, citizens, and educational experts make conflicting judgments about the proper education of children? When should the state defer to parental judgments and what are the grounds for legitimately refusing to do so? How should public schools aim to equip their students for the responsibilities of citizenship in a diverse liberal democratic state? What do the concepts of equality and equality of opportunity mean in the context of education, and (how) should governments pursue these values through education policy? We explore these issues through contemporary works of political theory as well as through considering a number of important U.S. court cases, including those dealing with the schooling of children from minority religious and cultural groups, affirmative action in university admissions, and school desegregation plans. Prerequisite: one previous course in political theory or political philosophy.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 4030

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC BU: ETH EN: S


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L84 Lw St 425A Law, Religion, and Politics

What is the role of religious argument in politics and law? What kinds of arguments are advanced, and how do they differ from one another? Are some of these arguments more acceptable than others in a liberal democracy? This course will explore these questions through the work of legal scholars, theologians and political theorists. Our topics include the nature of violence and coercion in the law, constraints on public reason, the relationship between religion and government, and the nature of religious practice and tradition.
Same as L57 RelPol 425

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L84 Lw St 4400 Advanced Social and Political Philosophy

A selective investigation of one or two advanced topics in the philosophical understanding of society, government and culture. Readings may include both historical and contemporary materials. Possible topics include: liberalism, socialism, communitarianism, citizenship, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, social contract theory, anarchism, and the rights of cultural minorities. Prerequisites: one course in Philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.
Same as L30 Phil 4400

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L84 Lw St 472 Social Theory and Anthropology

A seminar on social theory and its ethnographic implications. Course combines major works of modern social theory, including Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, with current work by contemporary anthropologists, such as Clifford Geertz, Eric Wolf, Marshall Sahlins, and Fredrik Barth, and ethnographers from related disciplines, such as Pierre Bourdieu and Paul Willis. Prerequisite: previous anthropology course work or permission of instructor.
Same as L48 Anthro 472

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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L84 Lw St 4851 Advanced Seminar: Prisons, Politics and Activism

Prison reformers argue that de-criminalizing nonviolent offenses will be enough to reduce mass incarceration, while prison abolitionists argue that we need to dismantle the entire carceral state in the U.S., which is maintained by a racially stratified system of public schooling, housing, employment and health care. What is at stake in these debates? Are we seeking to promote basic humanity, racial and gender equality or utopian visions of rehabilitation? This course seeks to historically contextualize prison reform and abolitionism from the 13th Amendment's re-articulation of slavery to current resistance to mass incarceration. Special attention will be paid to the intersections between the prisoner's rights movement and the Black & Brown Power, feminist, queer and disability movements.
Same as L22 History 4851

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L84 Lw St 4981 Advanced Seminar: Historical Perspectives on Human Rights

This course offers a historical perspective on the modern international human rights regime, using materials drawn from diplomatic, legal, political, and cultural studies. Successful completion of this seminar involves designing, researching and writing a 25-30 page paper on a historically-oriented, human-rights-related topic of student's choice.
Same as L22 History 4981

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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Chair

Frank Lovett
Associate Professor
PhD, Columbia University
(Political Science)

Endowed Professor

John R. Bowen
Dunbar–Van Cleve Professor in Arts & Sciences
PhD, University of Chicago
(Anthropology)

Professors

Margaret C. Garb
PhD, Columbia University
(History)

William R. Lowry
PhD, Stanford University
(Political Science)

Associate Professors

Elizabeth K. Borgwardt
JD, Harvard University
PhD, Stanford University
(History)

Ian MacMullen
PhD, Harvard University
(Political Science)

Andrew R. Rehfield
PhD, University of Chicago
(Political Science)

Professor of Practice

Michael Cannon
JD, Yale Law School

Professor Emeritus

David Konig
PhD, Harvard University
(History and Law)