Philosophy tackles central questions in human life, such as: What counts as human knowledge? How should I live? What is truth? How is the mind related to the body? What is a just society? These difficult but fundamental questions are rigorously explored in philosophy and worked through by drawing on the historical tradition and utilizing careful reasoning. Because philosophers have shaped many of the central ideas on which Western civilization is based, the study of philosophy plays a vital role in a well-rounded liberal arts education.

Philosophy courses at Washington University provide opportunities to gain deeper knowledge of the history of philosophy, from the work of the ancient philosophers Plato and Aristotle through key thinkers such as Descartes and Kant to the present. Students can study the interface between philosophy and other disciplines (such as psychology, environmental studies, women's studies, law and political science); they also can examine the methods of inquiry and underlying conceptual frameworks of scientific work itself. Courses in logic equip students to think and argue clearly and rigorously, while courses in analytic philosophy allow for the exploration of fundamental questions about knowledge and metaphysics. The department offers a variety of courses in ethics, where students can consider different theoretical approaches to current political, social, medical and environmental problems.

Phone:314-935-6670
Email:mckinneysusan@wustl.edu
Website:http://philosophy.artsci.wustl.edu

Please refer to the following sections for more information about:

The Major in Philosophy

Total units required: 27 units, of which at least 6 units must be at the 400 level, and an additional 15 units must be at the 300 level or above.

Majors are encouraged to take more than this minimum number of courses, especially if they are considering graduate work in philosophy. Majors and minors are encouraged to fulfill the writing-intensive requirement by taking Phil 390 Philosophical Writing. All majors are required to complete a capstone experience in philosophy, either an Honors thesis (Phil 499) or the Philosophy Capstone Course (Phil 3991). Majors who are planning to do graduate work in philosophy should attain at least reading proficiency in German, Greek, Latin or French.

Required courses:

Majors must complete at least one core course in each of the three areas below. Students who do not take Phil 390 will be required to take one additional core course. The core courses, by area, are:

Contemporary/Analytic Philosophy:

Phil 301GSymbolic Logic3
Phil 306GPhilosophy of Language3
Phil 3113Theory of Knowledge3
Phil 315Philosophy of Mind3
Phil 321GPhilosophy of Science3
Phil 3481Introduction to Metaphysics3

History of Philosophy:

Phil 347CAncient Philosophy3
Phil 349CDescartes to Hume3
Phil 357CKant and 19th-Century Philosophy3
Phil 358Conceptual Foundations of Modern Science3

Value Theory: 

Phil 331FClassical Ethical Theories3
Phil 339FPhilosophy of the Arts3
Phil 340FSocial and Political Philosophy3
Phil 345FIssues in Applied Ethics:3
Phil 346Philosophy of Law3

On occasion it may be appropriate to substitute a 400-level course in one of these areas for a 300-level core course; individual petitions for substitutions will be considered by the undergraduate director. Generally, for a course to count either as "core" or as partly satisfying the requirement for 6 units at the 400 level, it must be home-based in Philosophy. At most, 3 units of credit in Phil 499 or Phil 500 can be counted toward the required 6 units of 400-level course work.

Optional tracks: The department offers the following three special tracks through the major: the philosophy research track, the law and policy track, and the philosophy of science track.

Philosophy Research Track

The philosophy research track is especially recommended for students who plan to pursue graduate studies and an advanced degree in philosophy — a must for anyone interested in a career as a university or college philosophy teacher. It will give the student a broad background in philosophy, which is a competitive advantage when applying to graduate programs in the field.

Requirements:

  • At least 36 units total
  • Phil 100G Logic and Critical Analysis
  • One 100-level class in addition to Phil 100G Logic and Critical Analysis, preferably Phil 120F Problems in Philosophy or Phil 125C Great Philosophers
  • In Contemporary/Analytic:
Phil 301GSymbolic Logic3
Phil 3113Theory of Knowledge3
or Phil 3481 Introduction to Metaphysics
Phil 306GPhilosophy of Language3
or Phil 315 Philosophy of Mind
or Phil 321G Philosophy of Science
Total units9
  • In History: Any two core courses (a 400-level History course may be substituted for a second 300-level course):
Phil 347CAncient Philosophy3
Phil 349CDescartes to Hume3
Phil 357CKant and 19th-Century Philosophy3
Phil 358Conceptual Foundations of Modern Science3
  • In Value Theory (Phil 4310 or Phil 4315 can satisfy a 400-level requirement):
Phil 331FClassical Ethical Theories3
Phil 431020th-Century Metaethics3
or Phil 4315 Normative Ethical Theory
Total units6
  • Phil 390 Philosophical Writing or another core course
  • Phil 3991 Philosophy Capstone Course or Phil 499 Study for Honors
  • At least 30 units at the 300 level or above (including core courses)*
  • At least 6 of those 30 units at the 400 level**
  • Courses taken pass/fail cannot count toward the major.

Law and Policy Track

This track is especially recommended for students who intend to pursue a career in law or public policy. The track involves taking certain specific courses for the major, and possibly a few extra courses, that will provide the student with additional preparation and a competitive edge when applying to law school, post-graduate programs in public policy, and related jobs.

Requirements:

  • At least 27 units total
  • Phil 100G Logic and Critical Analysis or Phil 301G Symbolic Logic
  • Strongly recommended: a 100-level class in addition to Phil 100G Logic and Critical Analysis
  • One core course in Contemporary/Analytic and one core course in History

Contemporary/Analytic Courses:

Phil 301GSymbolic Logic3
Phil 306GPhilosophy of Language3
Phil 3113Theory of Knowledge3
Phil 315Philosophy of Mind3
Phil 321GPhilosophy of Science3
Phil 3481Introduction to Metaphysics3

History Courses:

Phil 347CAncient Philosophy3
Phil 349CDescartes to Hume3
Phil 357CKant and 19th-Century Philosophy3
Phil 358Conceptual Foundations of Modern Science3
  • Phil 340F Social and Political Philosophy and Phil 346 Philosophy of Law
  • Strongly recommended: at least one other Value Theory course:
Phil 340FSocial and Political Philosophy3
Phil 346Philosophy of Law3
  • Strongly recommended: at least one 200-level course
  • Phil 390 Philosophical Writing or another core course
  • Phil 3991 Philosophy Capstone Course or Phil 499 Study for Honors
  • At least 21 units at the 300 level or above (including core courses)*
  • At least 6 of those 21 units at the 400 level**
  • Courses taken pass/fail cannot count toward the major.

Philosophy of Science Track

The philosophy of science track is available only as a second major in combination with work in one or more of the sciences. It is intended for those students with a scientific background who have an interest in pursuing philosophical issues relating to the natural and physical sciences.

Requirements:

  • At least 27 units total
  • In Contemporary/Analytic:
Phil 301GSymbolic Logic3
Phil 321GPhilosophy of Science3
Total units6
  • In History: Any one of the core courses listed below:
Phil 347CAncient Philosophy3
Phil 349CDescartes to Hume3
Phil 357CKant and 19th-Century Philosophy3
Phil 358Conceptual Foundations of Modern Science3
  • In Advanced Philosophy of Science:
Phil 4210Topics in Advanced Philosophy of Science3
  • Any three of the Supplementary Courses listed below, which must include Phil 390 Philosophical Writing if the writing-intensive requirement is to be fulfilled in Philosophy
  • Phil 3991 Philosophy Capstone Course or Phil 499 Study for Honors
  • At least 27 units at the 300 level or above (including core courses)*
  • At least 6 of those 27 units at the 400 level**
  • Courses taken pass/fail cannot count toward the major.

Supplementary Courses:

General Philosophy Courses:

Phil 390Philosophical Writing3
Phil 426Theories of Concepts3

Logic and Method Courses:

Phil 403Mathematical Logic 13
Phil 404Mathematical Logic II3
Phil 405Philosophical Logic3
Phil 4051Philosophy of Logic3

Epistemology and Metaphysics Courses:

Phil 3113Theory of Knowledge3
Phil 3481Introduction to Metaphysics3
Phil 4141Advanced Epistemology3
Phil 4142Advanced Metaphysics3
Phil 4332Cognition and Computation3

Life and Science Courses:

Phil 423Philosophy of Biological Science3
Phil 452Aristotle3

Mind and Science Courses:

Phil 315Philosophy of Mind3
Phil 418Current Controversies in Cognitive Science3
Phil 419Philosophy of Psychology3
Phil 4212Philosophy of Neuroscience3
PNP 495PNP Seminar (with approval of topic)3

Additional Information

Senior Honors: Eligible majors are encouraged to work toward Senior Honors. To qualify, students must have the agreement of a faculty member to serve as thesis adviser. In addition, they must have, at the end of the junior year, at least a 3.65 overall GPA. For important additional information regarding Senior Honors, consult our webpage.

The Writing-Intensive Seminar: Majors are encouraged to fulfill their writing-intensive requirement by taking Phil 390, which is specially designated as writing-intensive. It is typically taken in the junior year and is limited to 15 students. Significant attention is devoted to conceiving, researching, writing, revising, critiquing and presenting philosophical essays. A philosophy major who does not take a philosophy writing-intensive seminar must take a fourth core course, in any of the three core areas. Priority is given to philosophy majors and minors who have not yet completed their writing-intensive requirement. 

Capstone Experience: All philosophy majors are required to complete a capstone experience either by writing an honors thesis or by taking the Philosophy Capstone Course (Phil 3991). Please be aware that the Capstone Course is offered only in the spring semester, so students will need to plan their class schedules accordingly if they decide not to do an honors thesis. To qualify for doing an honors thesis, students must have, at the end of the junior year, at least a 3.5 GPA in the major, a 3.5 GPA in advanced philosophy courses, and a 3.65 overall GPA. Alternatively, majors should sign up for Phil 3991 (a 3-credit course), which will draw together a variety of different philosophical areas. Only philosophy majors of senior standing may take this course; preference is given to students not pursuing honors.

*At least 27 units of the required upper-level courses must be completed with a minimum of a C-.

**Three of these credits (one course) must not be from Honors Thesis or Independent Study.

Study Abroad: Students can pursue the philosophy major while studying abroad. The department has special study abroad arrangements with University College, London; King's College, London; Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Sussex University (U.K.); Utrecht University (the Netherlands); and the University of Auckland (New Zealand). Information about study abroad and about specific overseas programs is available from the departmental website and the Study Abroad adviser.

Please refer to the following sections for more information about:

The Minor in Philosophy

Units required: 18

Required courses:

Philosophy minors are required to complete at least 12 units at the 300 level or above, which must include at least one course in each of the following three "core" areas:

Contemporary/Analytic Philosophy:

Phil 301GSymbolic Logic3
Phil 306GPhilosophy of Language3
Phil 3113Theory of Knowledge3
Phil 315Philosophy of Mind3
Phil 321GPhilosophy of Science3
Phil 3481Introduction to Metaphysics3

History of Philosophy:

Phil 347CAncient Philosophy3
Phil 349CDescartes to Hume3
Phil 357CKant and 19th-Century Philosophy3
Phil 358Conceptual Foundations of Modern Science3

Value Theory:

Phil 331FClassical Ethical Theories3
Phil 339FPhilosophy of the Arts3
Phil 340FSocial and Political Philosophy3
Phil 345FIssues in Applied Ethics:3
Phil 346Philosophy of Law3

Additional Information

Minors are encouraged to take the writing-intensive course Philosophical Writing (Phil 390). A philosophy minor must receive a grade of C- or above in each course. Many philosophy courses also can be taken as part of a minor in history, philosophy of science, or legal studies.

The Minor in Philosophy of Science

Units required: 18

Required courses:

Phil 301GSymbolic Logic3
Phil 321GPhilosophy of Science3
Phil 4210Topics in Advanced Philosophy of Science3
Total units9

Elective courses:

At least one course from the following four:

Phil 347CAncient Philosophy3
Phil 349CDescartes to Hume3
Phil 357CKant and 19th-Century Philosophy3
Phil 358Conceptual Foundations of Modern Science3

At least one course from the following:

Phil 3113Theory of Knowledge3
Phil 315Philosophy of Mind3
Phil 3481Introduction to Metaphysics3
Phil 390Philosophical Writing3
Phil 403Mathematical Logic 13
Phil 404Mathematical Logic II3
Phil 405Philosophical Logic3
Phil 4051Philosophy of Logic3
Phil 4141Advanced Epistemology3
Phil 4142Advanced Metaphysics3
Phil 418Current Controversies in Cognitive Science3
Phil 419Philosophy of Psychology3
Phil 4212Philosophy of Neuroscience3
Phil 423Philosophy of Biological Science3
Phil 426Theories of Concepts3
Phil 4332Cognition and Computation3
Phil 452Aristotle3
PNP 495PNP Seminar (with approval of topic)3

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for L30 Phil.


L30 Phil 100G Logic and Critical Analysis

Introduction to the elementary tools of logic required for constructing and critically evaluating arguments and the claims they support. Topics include: the nature of an argument; argument structure; how arguments can fail both in structure and in content; formal and informal fallacies; propositional logic and predicate calculus; and critical analysis of rhetorical strategies for presenting arguments. Students are encouraged to develop critical reasoning skills that can be applied widely.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA, QA A&S IQ: NSM, AN Art: NSM BU: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 102 Introduction to Scientific Reasoning

This course analyzes scientists' reasoning strategies. Case studies from the history of astronomy, epidemiology, molecular biology, and neuroscience provide a basis for understanding of the character of scientific theories and the means by which they are evaluated. Special attention is given to the construction and evaluation of statistical and causal hypotheses, including experimental design, and to the use of scientific knowledge in public policy decision-making. Students acquire basic skills in critical thinking and scientific reasoning and an introductory understanding of issues in the philosophy of science.

Credit 3 units. A&S: NS, QA A&S IQ: NSM, AN Art: NSM BU: HUM


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L30 Phil 120F Problems in Philosophy

Introduction to philosophical methods and concepts through an investigation of major issues in Western philosophy such as: what counts as knowledge; truth and belief; the existence of God; the mind-body problem; materialism and idealism; moral theory and concepts of justice. A range of historical and contemporary views on these issues is considered. The aim of the course is to prepare students to think and write about philosophical problems on their own.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 125C Great Philosophers

In this course we focus on some of the most important texts in the history of Western philosophy in order to discuss a wide range of central philosophical problems. We typically consider, for example, the existence of God, the justification of claims to knowledge, and the requirements of a good human life, including the demands of morality. Among the philosophers most likely studied are Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Marx, Nietzsche and Wittgenstein. Our goal is not just to appreciate the genius of some great philosophers but also to grapple with the current philosophical problems they have bequeathed to us.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L30 Phil 131F Present Moral Problems

An investigation of a range of contemporary moral issues and controversies that draws on philosophical ethics and culturewide moral considerations. Topics may include: racism, world hunger, war and terrorism, the distribution of income and wealth, gender discrimination, pornography, lesbian and gay rights, abortion, euthanasia, and capital punishment. The aim of the course is to present diverse points of view regarding these topics and to provide conceptual and theoretical tools that enable the student to make headway in thinking carefully and critically about the issues.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 233F Biomedical Ethics

A critical examination, in the light of contemporary moral disagreements and traditional ethical theories, of some of the moral issues arising out of medical practice and experimentation in our society. Issues that might be discussed include euthanasia, genetic engineering, organ transplants, medical malpractice, the allocation of medical resources, and the rights of the patient.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L30 Phil 235F Introduction to Environmental Ethics

A general survey of current issues in environmental ethics, focusing on problems such as the obligation to future generations, protection of endangered species, animal rights, problems of energy and pollution, wilderness, global justice, and business obligations. Students also learn some ethical and political theory.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 239 Topics in Philosophy and Environment

Philosophical questions are central to study of the environment. Such questions span many philosophical fields including metaethics, value theory, applied ethics, aesthetics, political philosophy and philosophy of science. Given such a diversity of important questions, this course focuses on a different intersection of philosophy and environment each time it runs. It aims to develop students' understanding of the complex philosophical claims and problems that lie behind environmental values, practices and policies. Examples of topics considered are: wilderness, food and agriculture, and animals.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 297 Undergraduate Independent Study

Prerequisite: permission of the department.

Credit variable, maximum 6 units.


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L30 Phil 299 Internship in Philosophy

Students receive credit for a faculty-directed and approved internship. Registration requires completion of the Learning Agreement, which the student obtains from the Career Center and which must be filled out and signed by the Career Center, the site supervisor and the faculty sponsor prior to beginning internship work. Credit should correspond to actual time spent in work activities, e.g., eight to 10 hours a week for 13 or 14 weeks to receive 3 units of credit; 1 or 2 credits for fewer hours.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L30 Phil 3001 Philosophy of Medicine

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 301G Symbolic Logic

In the first half of the course we study some features of truth — functional and first-order classical logics, including studying the model theory and metatheory for first-order logic in much greater depth than in Phil 100. In the second half of the course we go on to study three different styles of proof system — tableaux, axiomatic and natural deduction. This course continues where Phil 100 An introduction to Logic and Criticial Analysis leaves off. It is recommended for students who already have taken that introductory course, or for students who already have a strong background in mathematics. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: NSM, AN Art: NSM BU: HUM


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L30 Phil 306G Philosophy of Language

A survey of major philosophical problems concerning meaning, reference and truth as they have been addressed within the analytic tradition. Readings that represent diverse positions on these focal issues are selected from the work of leading philosophers in the field, for example: Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Davidson, Quine, Kripke and Putnam. Students are encouraged to engage critically the ideas and arguments presented, and to develop and defend their own views on the core topics. Prerequisites: one 100- or 200-level course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L30 Phil 308 Introduction to Semantics

Semantics is the branch of linguistics which studies how speakers assign meaning to words, sentences, and larger units of discourse. We combine perspectives from both linguistics and philosophy to explore a variety of topics including polysemy, compositionality, quantification, anaphora, definite descriptions, attitude reports, presupposition and implicature. Prerequisite: Ling 170D or Phil 301G or permission of instructor.
Same as L44 Ling 311

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: SSC BU: HUM EN: S


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L30 Phil 309 Topics in the Wilderness

Philosophical questions are central to study of the environment. Such questions span many philosophical fields including metaethics, value theory, applied ethics, aesthetics, political philosophy and philosophy of science. Given such a diversity of important questions, this course focuses on a different intersection of philosophy and environment each time it runs. It aims to develop students' understanding of the complex philosophical claims and problems that lie behind environmental values, practices and policies. Examples of topics considered are: wilderness, food and agriculture, and animals.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 310 Contemporary Jewish Thought


Same as L75 JINE 310

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 3101 Topics in Philosophy of Religion

The question of how God can allow evil to occur to the righteous or innocent people has been a perennial dilemma in religion and philosophy. We study the classic statement of the problem in the biblical book of Job, the ancient Near Eastern literature on which Job is based, and traditional Jewish and Christian interpretation of Job. We study the major approach to the problem of evil in Western philosophical and religious thought.
Same as L23 Re St 3101

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L30 Phil 3113 Theory of Knowledge

This course focuses on issues in epistemology with the aim of providing a survey of contemporary work. The course begins with a close reading of Descartes' first three Meditations. These should help us set some of the problems that figure in more recent work and provide an introduction to certain fundamental epistemological concepts. No particular background is assumed, but participants are expected to come to class prepared to discuss topics at an advanced level. Readings are taken from original sources and can be challenging. Although most assignments are reasonably short, students should allow time for careful reading and re-reading. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level course in philosophy or permission of instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 315 Philosophy of Mind

An introduction to philosophical analyses of the nature of mind, especially those developed by contemporary philosophers. The focus is on questions such as the following: What is a mind? How does it relate to a person's brain? How does it relate to a person's body and the external world? Can a mind exist in a very different kind of body (e.g., a computer or a robot)? Does thinking require a language-like code? If so, can nonlinguistic species think? What is it to have a mental image or to experience pain? Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 316 Mind and Morals

This course explores a number of issues at the intersection of ethics and cognitive science. Possible topics include: Are we rational? Do we know our own thoughts and motivations? Can one believe that one ought to do something without being motivated to do it? Do emotions impair or enhance our ability to reason? How do moral beliefs develop through childhood? Are traits such as intelligence and character unchangeable, and what implications follow if they are (or are not)? Does retaining my identity over time require having the same mind, and, if so, am I the same person now as I was as a child? Are nonhuman animals worthy of moral consideration? If brain activity is determined by causal laws, can we have free will? Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 321G Philosophy of Science

Pivotal concepts common to empirical sciences are examined and clarified. These include: explanation, confirmation, prediction, systematization, empirical significance, and the relationship of all these concepts to the structure of scientific theory. Examples may be drawn from both contemporary and historical science, including the social, biological and physical sciences. Students with a background in science are particularly encouraged to consider this course. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 327 Philosophy of Religion

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L30 Phil 3311 Tragedy

What is the relationship between freedom and luck? How do men and women respond to large forces beyond their control? Is character a struggle against outside events, or is it a submission to destiny? What happens when two ethical principles, taken absolutely, collide together? What is the nature of evil, and how does good respond to it? In ancient Greece, Renaissance England, 17th-century Europe, modern Europe, and postcolonial Africa, the form of tragedy has grappled with these questions, generating both a rich body of imaginative literature and equally compelling philosophical reflections about tragedy. This course explores great works of tragic literature by authors such as Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Dostoevsky, Miller, and Soyinka, and examines philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Weil, and Arendt in order to explore the questions raised by tragedy.
Same as L16 Comp Lit 331C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L30 Phil 331F Classical Ethical Theories

Intensive readings of great works in the history of ethics, especially by Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Mill. Topics may include: the sources of moral knowledge, the nature of practical moral judgment, the moral role of emotion and desire, weakness of will, moral autonomy, and the universality of moral norms. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 100 or 200 level, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L30 Phil 3321 Feminist Philosophy

This course focuses on vital normative issues of government, community, culture and interpersonal relationships that bear on women's lives in distinctive ways. We consider diverse topics from varied feminist perspectives. Probable topics include: race/ethnicity and gender; care and justice; varieties of oppression; lesbianism; sexuality; radical democracy; violence against women; and whether philosophical modes of investigation are biased against women.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: ETH EN: H


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L30 Phil 339F Philosophy of the Arts

An examination both of general issues that apply to all types of art and of issues specific to particular art forms. For example, what is art? What are the central artistic values: beauty, truth, emotional expressiveness, representational power, or something else? Does art have a moral or political function? How can we account for the history of art and for different artistic styles? In regard to selected forms, there are important questions concerning how pictures represent, whether music and dance are forms of "language," and the nature of literary interpretation. Some consideration is given to the relation of psychology and theories of the mind to art. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy at the 100 or 200 level, or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 340F Social and Political Philosophy

Study of certain fundamental issues concerning government, society and culture. For example: What are the nature and limits of legitimate political authority? Are ordinary human beings capable of governing themselves justly? Do citizens have a duty to obey the state? If so, to what extent, if at all, is that duty grounded in consent or contract? Should the state limit or regulate the personal relationships of citizens, such as marriage, family and sexuality? How should social institutions rectify a history of political or social injustice against oppressed groups? Readings from historical and contemporary sources. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy at the 100 or 200 level, or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH, HUM


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L30 Phil 345F Issues in Applied Ethics:

Advanced study of a selected topic in applied ethics. Abstract ethical theories and methods are brought to bear on the moral problems that arise in an area of social and professional practice such as medicine, business, law, journalism, engineering, or scientific and humanistic research. Possible topics include: reproductive health care and policy, the just distribution of medical resources, the social responsibilities of corporations, accountability in the media and public office, and the ethics of research on or affecting human subjects. Prerequisites: one course at the 100 or 200 level in applied ethics; or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 346 Philosophy of Law

This course first focuses on the philosophical foundations of law, examining both the relationship between law and rules, as well as the types of legal reasoning. Second, the course focuses on philosophical issues that arise in the key substantive areas of law: contracts, torts, property, criminal law and constitutional law, as well in specialized areas such as family and employment law. The course ends with a brief discussion of several problems in legal ethics. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 347C Ancient Philosophy

An examination of the high-water marks of philosophy in ancient Greece and Rome, focusing primarily on Plato and Aristotle. A wide range of philosophical problems is discussed, including the nature of the good life, the justification of knowledge, and the ultimate nature of mind and world. Attention is paid to how these problems unfolded in their historical context and to how the ancient treatments of them compare to contemporary efforts. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 100 or 200 level, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 3481 Introduction to Metaphysics

This course is an introduction to central debates of contemporary analytic metaphysics. Metaphysics is concerned with the nature of the most general kinds of things and the relationship between these things. We discuss the nature of and relationship between properties, material objects, persons, time, space and modality. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 349C Descartes to Hume

An examination of major philosophical systems and problems in modern philosophy as presented in the original writings of the 17th and 18th centuries. Topics may include rationalism and empiricism, idealism, materialism and skepticism, with readings selected from the continental rationalists Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz, and from the British empiricists Locke, Berkeley and Hume. Central problems include the mind-body problem, representationalism and transcendentalism. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy at the 100 or 200 level or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L30 Phil 3507 Legal Conflict in Modern American Society

Thousands of lawsuits are filed daily in the state and federal courts of the United States. The disputes underlying those lawsuits are as messy and complex as the human, commercial, cultural and political dynamics that trigger them, and the legal processes for resolving those disputes are expensive, time-consuming and, for most citizens, seemingly impenetrable. At the same time, law and legal conflict permeate public discourse in the United States to a degree that is unique in the world, even among the community of long-established democracies. The overarching objective of the course is to prepare our undergraduate students to participate constructively in that discourse by providing them with a conceptual framework for understanding both the conduct and resolution of legal conflict by American legal institutions, and the evolution of — and values underlying — the substantive law American courts apply to those conflicts. This is, at core, a course in the kind of legal or litigation "literacy" that should be expected of the graduates of first-tier American universities. Some of the legal controversies that are used to help develop that "literacy" include those surrounding the permissible use of lethal force in self-defense, the constitutionality of affirmative action in university admissions, contracts that are unconscionably one-sided, sexual harassment in the workplace, the duty of landlords to prevent criminal assaults on their tenants, groundwater pollution alleged to cause pediatric cancers, and warrantless searches of cellphone locator data by police.
Same as L98 AMCS 3507

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L30 Phil 357C Kant and 19th-Century Philosophy

Examination of Kant and 19th-century philosophy. We discuss Kant's "Copernican Turn" in metaphysics and epistemology, as well as his moral philosophy, and we study works of selected 19th-century philosophers such as Hegel, Marx, Mill and Nietzsche. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L30 Phil 358 Conceptual Foundations of Modern Science

The aim of this course is to present some of the basic concepts underlying modern science. Insofar as many of those concepts first appeared or became predominant in the 17th and early 18th centuries, the course concentrates on primary works from that period. Among the concepts studied are: (1) nature and natures: the ontology of matter and force; causal closure; (2) methods: observing and intervening, systematic and organized; (3) explanations: appeal to laws and mechanisms; teleology. Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 366 Art and the Mind-Brain

In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the bearing of cognitive science on the perception and understanding of art. This interest has roots in tradition: historically, art, aesthetics and vision science have often been linked. But the growth of knowledge in cognitive science has opened up new opportunities for understanding art and addressing philosophical questions. The converse is also true. The production, perception and understanding of art are human capacities that can shed light on the workings of the mind and brain. This course considers questions such as: What is art? How do pictures represent? Does art express emotion? Why does art have a history? Prerequisite: one 100- or 200-level course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. Priority given to majors in philosophy and PNP.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L30 Phil 375 Existentialism

The philosophical systems of selected philosophers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Sartre are examined to determine their historical origins, their ontological and epistemological ramifications, and their relationships to contemporary philosophy. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy at the 100 or 200 level or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 3801 Ancient Greek and Roman Medicine

This course introduces the student to the practice and theory of medicine in the ancient Mediterranean, beginning in Egypt and continuing through Greece and Rome. In the end, we will find ourselves in the Middle Ages. Our focus will be on Greco-Roman medicine: how disease was understood; how disease was treated surgically, pharmacologically, and through diet; the intellectual origins of Greek medicine; the related close relationship between Greco-Roman medicine and philosophy; and the social status of medical practitioners. We will also discuss how medicine was written and in what terms its practitioners conceived it.
Same as L08 Classics 3801

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L30 Phil 390 Philosophical Writing

This seminar has a different topic of central philosophical importance each semester. Significant attention also is devoted to conceiving, researching, writing, revising, critiquing and presenting philosophical essays. Limited to 15 students. Priority is given to philosophy majors and minors who have not yet completed their writing-intensive requirement.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, WI BU: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 397 Undergraduate Independent Study

Credit variable, maximum 6 units.


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L30 Phil 3991 Philosophy Capstone Course

This course focuses either on classic writings from the past century or on contemporary writings that address a major philosophical concern, such as "the meaning of life" or "the concept of self." In either case, the course draws together a variety of philosophical specializations. Must be taken by all philosophy majors who are not writing an honors project. Work for the course typically consists of one written project, one oral presentation, and one commentary on another student's oral presentation. Prerequisites: senior standing and major in philosophy; preference given to those majors not pursuing Honors.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 403 Mathematical Logic 1

A first course in mathematical logic, an introduction to both proof theory and model theory. The structure and properties of first-order logic are studied in detail, with attention to such notions as axiomatic theory, proof, model, completeness, compactness and decidability. Prerequisite: Phil 301G or equivalent or a background in mathematics.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L30 Phil 404 Mathematical Logic II

Godel's Incompleteness Theorem: its proof, its consequences, its reverberations. Prerequisite: Phil 403 or a strong background in mathematics.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 405 Philosophical Logic

What the philosophy student needs to know of logic, its techniques and its use as a tool in philosophical analysis. Some attention to the history of the subject and to its metatheory. Prerequisite: previous exposure to formal logic, or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA


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L30 Phil 4051 Philosophy of Logic

This course surveys some important issues in the philosophy of logic. We begin with basic foundational issues in classical logic, including the relation of logic to psychological reasoning and Tarski's definition of logical consequence, and gradually go on to consider the motivations and status of well-known extensions (sometimes regarded as "neo-classical" logics) such as modal logics and second-order logic. In the last weeks of the course, we examine some outright challengers, including intuitionistic and paraconsistent logics. After evaluating the arguments for and against these challenges, we examine one recent, controversial view-logical pluralism — which suggests that we might not need to choose among the rival systems. Many of the readings for this course are classics of contemporary philosophy, and the subject is likely to be of especial interest to students who have interests in logic, and in the philosophy and foundations of mathematics and language. Some of the important ideas in the course presuppose at least a basic acquaintance with formal logic, and hence either Phil 100 or Phil 301 (or permission of the instructor) are prerequisites.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 4061 Topics in the Philosophy of Language

Focus on the work of a single philosopher of language such as Carnap, Chomsky, Foucault, or Kripke, or on a central topic such as the theory of reference, the theory of meaning, or the problem of cross-cultural translation. Prerequisite: one course in epistemology, philosophy of language, or analytic philosophy, or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L30 Phil 4065 Advanced Philosophy of Language

An advanced-level treatment of basic topics in the philosophy of language as this discipline is understood in the analytic tradition. The main positions and the problems they pose are surveyed; focal themes include meaning, reference and truth. The aim of the course is to help students develop effective expository techniques and to provide them with the necessary conceptual resources to analyze and criticize different theoretical views. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4070 Global Justice

This course examines contemporary debates and controversies regarding global justice. Seminar discussions are arranged around significant issues in the current literature. For example: What (if anything) do we owe to the distantly needy? Do we have special obligations to our compatriots? Do political borders have normative significance? And so on. This course will be of interest not only to political theorists, but also students in other fields interested in social justice or international relations generally.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 4070

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC EN: S


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L30 Phil 410 Theories of Perception

A consideration of recent work in philosophy and cognitive science on the nature of perception and its contribution to thought, knowledge and behavior. Special attention is paid to two questions: To what extent can perceptual experience be changed through learning? In what sense do perceptual states have content? The relation of these issues to more general theories of mental content, to the possibility of objective and theory-neutral observation in science, and to the directness or indirectness of perception are discussed. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L30 Phil 4141 Advanced Epistemology

Competing theories of knowledge and belief justification are considered. Careful attention is given to selected problems such as skepticism, certainty, foundations, coherence, perception, induction. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4142 Advanced Metaphysics

Through readings from both classical and contemporary sources, a single traditional metaphysical concern is made the subject of careful and detailed analytic attention. Possible topics include such concepts as substance, category, cause, identity, reality and possibility, and such positions as metaphysical realism, idealism, materialism, relativism and irrealism. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 418 Current Controversies in Cognitive Science

An advanced survey of current debates in cognitive science with an emphasis on the philosophical issues raised by these debates. Topics may include: evolutionary psychology; innateness and neural plasticity; perception and action; consciousness; connectionism; robotics; embodied cognition; moral reason; emergence and artificial life; concepts and content; animal cognition. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.
Same as L64 PNP 418

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 419 Philosophy of Psychology

An investigation of the philosophical presuppositions and implications of various traditions in psychology, including behaviorism, Gestalt and cognitivism, with a special emphasis on the development of the information processing approach of contemporary cognitivism. The conception of psychological phenomena, data and explanation central to each of these traditions are examined, and typical topics include the debates between propositional and imagistic models of representation, different accounts of concepts and categorization, and the relation of psychology to ethics. Prerequisites: one previous course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4202 Contemporary Feminisms

The purpose of this course is to provide a framework, a map, within which students can locate feminist ideas. The course, which may be presented historically, explores and compares different types of feminism selected from, for example, the following feminisms: liberal; Marxist; socialist; radical; lesbian; black; existentialist; postmodern. The class considers how such feminisms analyze the nature and sources of women's oppressions, the worlds they envision, and the means they use to bring about change. Note: This course is in the core curriculum for the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate certificate. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: completion of at least one women, gender, and sexuality studies course or permission of the instructor.
Same as L77 WGSS 420

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD Art: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 4210 Topics in Advanced Philosophy of Science

This course varies in topics related to philosophy of science from semester to semester. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4212 Philosophy of Neuroscience

This course focuses on the historical roots of neuroscience as well as its contemporary developments. Topics include: (1) the nature of explanatory strategies in neuroscience; (2) the relation between neuroscience research and higher-level disciplines such as psychology; and (3) the epistemology of the investigatory tools of neuroscience. Prerequisite: one previous course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 423 Philosophy of Biological Science

This course examines a number of theoretical, conceptual and methodological issues that arise in the attempts of biologists to explain living systems. One sort of problem concerns the relation between biology (and biological descriptions and explanations) and physics and chemistry. Biological phenomena have often seemed very different from ordinary physical phenomena in being telelogical or goal oriented. Vitalists, accordingly, resisted the attempt to invoke physics and chemistry in the attempt to explain biological phenomena. But recently biology has come more and more to draw upon physics and chemistry; we examine the conceptual frameworks that underlie these efforts. Another sort of problem concerns the adaptiveness of living organisms. Charles Darwin offered one naturalistic explanation of this feature, an explanation that was further developed in this century as the synthetic theory of evolution. A number of controversial issues have arisen within this context of adaptation, and the range of levels at which selection can occur. The ubiquity of evolution, moreover, has been challenged in recent years, as a number of non-selectionist explanations have recently been put forward. We consider the arguments for the synthetic theory and these alternatives.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 426 Theories of Concepts

Concepts are the building blocks of thought. They are implicated in just about every cognitive task. Beyond that, there is little consensus. What information do concepts encode? How are they acquired? How are they combined to form thoughts? How are they related to perception and imagery? Each of these questions has been answered in numerous ways. In this course, we explore competing theories of concepts that have been proposed by philosophers, psychologists and other cognitive scientists. No prior acquaintance with these issues is required. Prerequisite: one previous course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 430 Topics in Ethics

Selected advanced topics in ethics. Prerequisite: 6 units of philosophy, or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM


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L30 Phil 4310 20th-Century Metaethics

An examination of metaphysical and epistemological issues in ethics. Topics include: the nature of the good and the right, the meaning of ethical terms, the logic of moral argument, and the status of moral knowledge. We consider philosophical works written since 1900 by such authors as Moore, Ross, Stevenson, Ayer, Foot, Hare, Brink, Harmon, Blackburn, and McDowell. Prerequisites: one previous course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4315 Normative Ethical Theory

An exploration of the three major normative ethical theories debated by philosophers in the last 100 years: Kantian ethics, utilitarianism and virtue theory. Authors covered in the course may include: Henry Sidgwick, R.M. Hare, R.B. Brandt, John Rawls, Bernard Williams, Philippa Foot, Thomas Nagel, Christine Korsgaard, Michael Slote and Barbara Herman. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4320 British Moralists

An investigation of the work of the great British moral philosophers of the 17th-19th centuries, especially Hobbes, Hume, and Mill. Other figures may include Reid, Butler, Hutcheson, Bentham, and Sidgwick. In considering these philosophers, we explore the relations between normative ethics, moral psychology, and political philosophy, and may include a discussion of legal, social and economic philosophies as well. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4332 Cognition and Computation


Same as L64 PNP 4332

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L30 Phil 438 Aesthetics

A careful consideration of selected issues regarding the experience of visual art, architecture, music or literature, as well as of the power or beauty of nature, people and artifacts. For example, is there a special form of aesthetic experience or aesthetic attitude? In what do aesthetic power and beauty consist? Are they different in art and nature? Do the artists' intentions matter? Some central concerns are: how do visual art and literary texts have "meaning," what role do the viewer's or reader's interpretations play, and how might recent work in cognitive science and social theory shed light on these issues? Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 4400 Advanced Social and Political Philosophy

A selective investigation of one or two advanced topics in the philosophical understanding of society, government and culture. Readings may include both historical and contemporary materials. Possible topics include: liberalism, socialism, communitarianism, citizenship, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, social contract theory, anarchism and the rights of cultural minorities. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 451 Plato

An examination of some of Plato's most important dialogues, typically including Gorgias, Phaedo, and The Republic, with the aim of grasping the development of Plato's most influential thoughts in ethics and in metaphysics and epistemology. In order to provide both historical understanding and philosophical evaluation, attention is paid to the context and structure of the dialogues and to the best of recent secondary literature. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 452 Aristotle

This course offers a maximally full and detailed introduction to the works of Aristotle. His logic, natural philosophy, psychology, metaphysics, ethics and political philosophy are discussed, and stress is laid on the interpretive problems facing contemporary philosophers seeking to understand Aristotle's achievement. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4530 Hellenistic Philosophy

The Hellenistic Age, traditionally dated from the death of Alexander and his (Macedonian) Empire at 323 BCE to the birth of Augustus' (Roman) Empire in 31 BCE, gave the West three of its most innovative and influential schools of philosophy: Epicureanism, Skepticism and Stoicism. This course investigates the central features of their thought. Special attention is paid to the still-relevant debates between the Stoics and Skeptics about the possibility of knowledge, to the disagreements among all three schools about the issues of freedom, responsibility and determinism, and to their ethical theories. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4550 Continental Rationalism

A rationalist is a philosopher for whom at least one certain truth is inborn or comes from reason rather than from empirical or sensory experience. The major systemic writings of Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz are examined with a focus on the question: does the epistemology determine the ontology of these philosophical systems or vice versa? The lines of development connecting these philosophers are traced, and such enduring problems as the relation of mind to body are examined. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4563 Marxism After Marx: Philosophy and Radicalism in the 20th Century

As claims around the supposed "post-modernity" of our contemporary situation have ebbed, so scholars have returned once more to perhaps the defining philosophical and political voice of modernity, Karl Marx. This course prepares students to engage in current debates in the humanities over the nature of the political, the dynamics of class, the relative importance of the economy to "culture," and the historical situatedness of philosophical knowledge, all through close readings of the Western Marxist philosophical tradition. That tradition, developing in Continental Europe and later the United States, sought to revitalize Marx's account of historical development through attention to art, literature and the broader Western philosophical canon, often with the intention of accounting for the failures of Soviet Communism. The course begins with a condensed primer to Marx's original ideas, before turning to the extension of Marxist philosophy in the ideas of Lenin, Lukács, the Frankfurt School, Louis Althusser, the British "New Left," Lucio Colletti and Antonio Negri, before addressing more contemporary authors including Fredric Jameson and Alain Badiou.
Same as L93 IPH 456

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 4570 Kant's Critique of Pure Reason

An in-depth investigation of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, one of the most important books in the history of Western philosophy. Some supplementary readings from other philosophers are used to situate Kant's work in a systematic and historical context, to present some "Kantian" positions in current philosophy, and to bring in some important contrasting views and criticisms. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 4575 Kant and Kantian Practical Philosophy

An in-depth examination of Kant's practical philosophy: his moral and political theory. Readings include the Critique of Practical Reason, parts of the Metaphysics of Morals, Perpetual Peace and other writings. Supplementary readings are used to situate Kant's work in its systematic and historical context, to provide orientation in the world of Kant scholarship, and to introduce important contrasting views and criticisms. We also discuss recent reformulations of Kantian themes in the works of contemporary philosophers. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM


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L30 Phil 464 Advanced Continental Philosophy

A study of selected texts by such major figures of 20th-century continental philosophy as Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Levinas, Habermas, Foucault, Derrida and Irigaray. Such topics as phenomenology, hermeneutics, existentialism, critical theory, structuralism and post-structuralism are investigated. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy at the 300 level, graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 465 Topics in the History of Philosophy

Study of individual philosophers or themes from the ancient, medieval, and/or modern periods. Examples: Spinoza, St. Thomas Aquinas, neo-Platonism, universals in ancient and medieval thought, ancient and modern theories of space and time. Prerequisite: 6 units in philosophy or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L30 Phil 4751 Intellectual History of Feminism

We focus on feminist thought in Western culture but also examine non-Western ideas about feminisms. We trace the relationship among emergent feminist ideas and such developments as the rise of scientific methodology, Enlightenment thought, revolutionary movements and the gendering of the political subject, colonialism, romanticism, socialism and global feminisms. Readings are drawn from both primary sources and recent feminist scholarship on the texts under consideration. Note: This course is in the core curriculum for the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate certificate. Permission of instructor required. Prerequisite: Completion of at least one women, gender, and sexuality studies course or permission of the instructor.
Same as L77 WGSS 475

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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L30 Phil 497 Undergraduate Independent Study

Prerequisite: permission of the department.

Credit variable, maximum 6 units.


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L30 Phil 499 Study for Honors

Prerequisites: Visit http://philosophy.artsci.wustl.edu/undergraduate/honors-thesis-philosophy.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L30 Phil 4ABR Advanced Philosophy Course Work Completed Abroad

Credit 3 units.


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