Speaking Spanish is the key to unlocking the cultures, traditions and experiences of 20 different countries throughout the world. From the medieval knights and Don Quixote through the modern novels by prize-winning authors and the world of film, the Spanish faculty at the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures guides Spanish students into the unexpected territories of Europe and Latin America, territories that are as rich geographically as they are culturally. Students who major and minor in Spanish graduate with top-notch communication skills. Our students speak Spanish and they speak culture, which are valuable professional skills today. The exponential growth of the Spanish-speaking population in the United States, the constant presence of Latin America at the top of America's political and business agenda, and the continued lure of Spain as a gateway to Europe and parts of Africa makes speaking Spanish and the ability to interpret the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries two of the most profitable and enjoyable skills that one can acquire.

Study Abroad opportunities complement our courses in St. Louis, including Freshman Focus programs in Argentina and Cuba; summer programs in Argentina and Spain; and semester programs in Chile and Spain. In addition, our Spanish program is linked to volunteer opportunities with the Latino community in St. Louis. For more information on the Spanish major and minor visit our website.

Contact:Professor Eloísa Palafox
Phone:314-935-5002
Email:epalafox@wustl.edu
Website:http://rll.wustl.edu

The Major in Spanish

Required units: 27-30

A minimum of 30 units (double majors: 27 units) at the 300 level or above, of which 21 units must be taken in residence. Study at Washington University's own programs in Spain or Chile is considered "in residence."

Required courses

The following courses must be included in the 30 units:

Advanced Grammar and Composition (6 units)

Span 307D Spanish Level 4: Grammar and Composition (or elective if placed in L38 Span 308E)

Span 308E Advanced Reading and Writing (L38 Span 308E is now offered instead of L38 Span 308D)

  • Students who place out of L38 Span 307D through Washington University's placement exam and consultation with the director of undergraduate studies receive back credits toward graduation but not toward the major. These students need to take another advanced (300- or 400-level) Spanish course to obtain the credits typically obtained through L38 Span 307D.
  • L38 Span 307D is a prerequisite for the 300-level literature surveys.
  • Students are strongly encouraged also to take L38 Span 308E before registering for the survey classes but may take 308E and their first 300-level survey concurrently (listed below).

Three Literature Survey courses (9 units)

Three of the following courses, including one Peninsular and one Spanish-American course:

Span 341Literary and Cultural Studies in Spanish3
Span 342Iberian Literatures and Cultures3
Span 343Latin American Literatures and Cultures3

Study Abroad:

Span 354A View from the Southern Cone: Perspectives on Art, Literature and Culture (Chile)3
Span 3341Spanish Literature II in Chile/Spain (Spain)3
Span 3361Spanish-American Literature II in Chile/Spain (Spain/Chile)3

Notes for students considering 400-level courses and study abroad:

  • A minimum of two survey courses are prerequisites for all 400-level courses.
  • One literature course taken in the Chile or Spain Romance Languages and Literatures semester programs, designated as an acceptable substitute, may be used as one of the three required 300-level survey courses. Students who still must fulfill a survey on campus after returning from study abroad may, with permission of the director of undergraduate studies in Spanish, petition to take an appropriate 400-level seminar in place of the remaining 300-level survey course. Otherwise, students may not take a 400-level course to replace a required 300-level survey course.

One Culture or Linguistics Survey Course (3 units)

Choose one from:

Span 370Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics3
Span 380Topics in Hispanic Cultures3

 Study Abroad:

Span 3181Spanish Culture and Civilization3
Span 311Hispanic Culture and Civilization I (summer in Madrid)3
Span 313Chilean Contemporary Culture (Chile)3

Two 400-Level Seminars (6 units)

Span 405W Major Seminar (selected topics)

Span 410 Major Seminar (selected topics)

Other 400-level class taught in Spanish

  • Beginning 2016-17, students may take 405W or 410 in any combination; 405W will fulfill the College's Writing Intensive requirement for those who need it.
  • When offered, one of the following language seminars may be substituted for one of the two 400-level literature seminars: Span 417 Spanish Phonetics, Phonology and Dialectology or Span 411 Advanced Grammar and Syntax.
  • Span 370 (or consent of the instructor) is a prerequisite for the 400-level linguistics courses taught in Spanish.

Study Abroad:

  • One 400-level seminar must be taken on campus
  • Approved 400-level course from the Madrid or Chile program (refer to Study Abroad guidelines on our website)

Elective courses (two for single majors; one for double majors)

Span 324Conversation in Cinema (Span 324 is the only University College course that can count as elective credit for the major and minor)3
Span 331Hispanic Art/Arte Hispano3
Span 351Business Spanish3
Span 353Medical Spanish3
Any other advanced 300- or 400-level Spanish (L38) class taught by a Romance languages and literatures faculty member
  • Only one elective course taught in English may be taken, when available, for the major

Study Abroad:

  • Span 322 Advanced Conversation in Spain
  • Elective credit from semester programs in Santiago or Madrid
  • Elective from the Latin American Studies summer program in Buenos Aires (either Latin American and Argentine Literature or Argentine History)
  • Elective credit from Petitioned, Organization for Tropical Studies, School for International Training, or Comparative Literature programs (refer to Study Abroad guidelines on our website)
  • Spanish courses completed (and approved) from Study Abroad programs other than those at Washington University may be used for Spanish elective credit only.
  • All Study Abroad credit requires authorization from the director of undergraduate studies.

Other Requirements

Prior to declaring a major, students are required to fill out a questionnaire about their previous preparation and objectives in studying Spanish. As seniors they may fill out an optional survey about the major. Double-major seniors may elect to do their capstone experience in a 400-level course; single majors must do so. The capstone may be fulfilled through the completion of a 400-level class with a B+ or better, or via Honors (refer to Honors guidelines on our website). All qualified majors in the school of Arts & Sciences may elect to meet the requirements for honors. To be eligible to earn honors in Spanish, Spanish must be the student's prime major.

Recommended for prospective teachers:

  1. A second language

  2. Span 466, Span 467, Span 469, Span 413, Span 417, Span 411

  3. Semester or year in Spain or Chile

Recommended for prospective graduate students:

  1. A second language related to student's area of interests

  2. Advanced work in other literatures, literary criticism and theory, and related course work in other literature or film programs

  3. Year in Spain or Chile

  4. Senior Honors by thesis or course work (refer to Honors guidelines on our website). Students who have maintained at least a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.65 through the end of the junior year are encouraged to work toward Latin Honors (cum laude, magna cum laude, summa cum laude).

The Minor in Spanish

Units required: 18

The Spanish minor includes 18 units, of which 12 must be taken in residence. Students must complete courses with a grade of B- or above and maintain a B average or better overall in Spanish. Courses taken Credit/No Credit (Pass/Fail) do not count toward the Spanish minor.

Required courses

Advanced Grammar and Composition (6 credits)

Span 307D Spanish Level 4: Grammar and Composition (or elective if placed in 308E). Spanish 307D is a prerequisite for the 300-level literature surveys.

Span 308E Advanced Reading and Writing (Spanish 308E is now offered instead of 308D). Students are strongly encouraged also to take Spanish 308E before registering for the 300-level survey classes but may take 308E and their first 300-level survey concurrently.

Two Literature and Culture Surveys (6 credits)

Two of the following courses, including one Peninsular and one Spanish American course:

Span 341Literary and Cultural Studies in Spanish3
Span 342Iberian Literatures and Cultures3
Span 343Latin American Literatures and Cultures3

Study Abroad:

Span 354A View from the Southern Cone: Perspectives on Art, Literature and Culture3
Span 3341Spanish Literature II in Chile/Spain3
Span 3361Spanish-American Literature II in Chile/Spain3
Notes for students studying abroad and/or students considering the major in Spanish:
  • A minimum of two survey courses are prerequisites for all 400-level courses.
  • One literature course taken in the Chile or Spain RLL semester programs, designated by the department as an acceptable substitute, may count as one of the three required 300-level surveys. Students who return from Study Abroad needing to complete one outstanding survey may, with permission of the director of undergraduate studies in Spanish, petition to take an appropriate 400-level seminar in place of the remaining 300-level survey. Students who do not receive approval from the director of undergraduate studies may not take a 400-level course in place of a required 300-level survey course.

One Culture or Linguistics Survey Course (3 credits)

One of the following courses:

Span 370Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics3
Span 380Topics in Hispanic Cultures3

Study Abroad:

Span 311Hispanic Culture and Civilization I3
Span 3181Spanish Culture and Civilization3
Span 313Chilean Contemporary Culture3

One Elective Course (3 credits)

One of the following courses:

Span 331Hispanic Art/Arte Hispano3
Span 351Business Spanish3
Span 353Medical Spanish3
Any other advanced-level Spanish course offerings either at the 300 or 400 level or approved study abroad course.

Study Abroad:

  • Span 322 Advanced Conversation in Spain
  • Elective credit from semester programs in Santiago or Madrid
  • Elective credit from the Latin American Studies summer program in Buenos Aires (either Latin American and Argentine Literature or Argentine History)
  • Elective credit from petitioned OTS, SIT, or Comparative Literature program (refer to Study Abroad guidelines on our website)
  • Spanish courses completed (and approved) from Study Abroad programs other than those at Washington University may be used for Spanish elective credit only. All Study Abroad credit requires authorization by the director of undergraduate studies.

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for L38 Span.


L38 Span 101 Elementary Spanish 1

Beginning language program stressing acquisition of spoken ability together with attention to the development of reading, writing and listening skills. In addition to three hours of class, students complete weekly, assessed independent learning activities with multimedia resources.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L38 Span 102 Elementary Spanish 2

Second semester of the beginning language program stressing acquisition of spoken ability together with attention to the development of reading, writing and listening skills. In addition to three hours of class, students complete weekly, assessed independent learning activities with multimedia resources. Prerequisite: Span 101D or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L38 Span 201D Spanish Level 3: Intermediate Spanish

An accelerated intermediate-level grammar review taught by a team of instructors in a MWF grammar class and a T/TH literature/composition class. Reviews basic and some advanced skills intensively with increased emphasis upon reading, writing, culture, and vocabulary learning. Prerequisite: Span 102D or placement by examination. Students must register for both a T/TH and a MWF class.

Credit 5 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L38 Span 201E Intermediate Spanish I

The first half of a two-semester intermediate-level sequence. Reviews basic knowledge and introduces advanced skills in grammar, reading, writing, culture and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Span102D, or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L38 Span 202 Intermediate Spanish II

The second half of a two-semester intermediate-level sequence. This class continues to review basic knowledge and to introduce advanced skills in grammar, reading, writing, culture and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Span201E or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L38 Span 223 Intermediate Spanish Conversation and Culture

Practice of spoken Spanish and expansion of vocabulary in a wide range of topics. Discussion and role play based on short readings, music and film. Use of the World Wide Web for up-to-date news and culture. Oral presentations and limited writing. Prerequisite: 201D or equivalent. Concurrent enrollment in Span 307D recommended.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L38 Span 245 Women's Fiction in Contemporary Spain

This course focuses on selected novels and short stories by 20th-century women writers in Spain, beginning with those writing during the post-Civil War years (1939-1975) and ending with the new generation of women writers who emerged after the end of the Franco dictatorship (post-1975). Discussions center on both political and aesthetic issues in the contexts of post-war and post-Franco Spain, including the effects of political repression and censorship; representations of gender and sexuality; and literature's relationship to feminist and nationalist movements in Spain. When relevant, other cultural media, such as film and music, are used in conjunction with our reading and analysis of literary texts. The course is taught in English.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L38 Span 246 Freshman Seminar: Latin American Women in History and Culture: Icons and Idols

In English. This class takes an in-depth look at various iconic female figures in the history of Latin America, examining their (self-) representation in history, literature, art and other cultural manifestations. We examine their lives, writings and art to learn more about the historical and cultural moment they lived in; how this moment shaped their lives and how they, in turn, shaped their historical moment. We aim to draw the larger conclusions of how women in history, despite hostile circumstances, have managed to forge political, cultural and artistic identities and make an impact on the world around them. We study these women in a chronological fashion, showing how society's attitudes changed toward women and how, in some ways, paradoxically, stayed the same. The women we study are all very different in terms of identity, historical period and sociocultural background but all are similar in terms of their desire to overcome convention and resist repression — sometimes with very tragic results. Figures we study include La Malinche, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Manuela Saenz, Delmira Agustini, Frida Kahlo, Eva Perón, the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo, Rigoberta Menchú and Ingrid Betancourt. Prerequisite: concurrent registration in individually appropriate level of Spanish language course is required.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L38 Span 247 Freshman Seminar

Same as WGSS 247. Taught in English. Small group seminar devoted to readings and study of other texts such as films, paintings, etc., active discussion, writing. Topics vary; interdisciplinary focus.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: ETH EN: H


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L38 Span 251 Latin American Nomads and Travelers

Rites of passage and trespassing representing Latin American immigrants, nomads and travelers in narrative and film. This course is designed to map the multicultural context of travel, nomadism, displacement and immigration while studying narrative texts (Before Night Falls; Heading South, Looking North; Life on the Hyphen; Translated Woman: Crossing the Border With Esperanza's Story) and films (El Norte, Gringuito, Old Gringo, Stand and Deliver) by Latin American and Latino authors. We look at the images, metaphors and myths that pervade current conceptualizations of the borderlands and explore the variety of ways in which postcolonial rites of passage and trespassing inform the aesthetics of contemporary Latin American cultural expression. In English.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH BU: IS


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L38 Span 252 Introduction to Latino/a Studies: Exploring Memory

The course is an interdisciplinary introduction to Latino Studies, a discipline that studies the experiences and conditions of U.S. Latinos drawing from both the Social Sciences and Humanities. The course presents and analyzes works that include methodological strategies and analytical approaches to learning about U.S. Latinos. We analyze the social, political, and cultural forces that have affected the experiences of Latinos/as with particular attention to the ways in which historical, collective, family, and personal memories have shaped and continue to shape these experiences. We explore the intersections of history, place and identity through a selection of works, including literary and media studies, in order to understand the principle questions and concerns in the major fields of interest to U.S. Latino Studies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 299 Undergraduate Independent Study

Prerequisites: Span 201D and permission of the department.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L38 Span 307D Spanish Level 4: Grammar and Composition

This course combines a review of Spanish grammar and syntax with the analysis of several concrete examples of cultural production in Spanish. This dual emphasis on refining linguistic skills already studied, and exploring the cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world, will provide students with the tools for effective and culturally appropriate written and oral communication in Spanish necessary for establishing strong cross-cultural relations in today's interconnected world. Prerequisites: Span 201D or Span 202 or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L38 Span 308D Spanish Level 4: Grammar and Composition 2

In-depth study of the process of writing, designed to prepare the Spanish major to write literary analysis. Literary texts studied as examples of writing styles. Regular compositions. Prerequisite: Span 307D or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM


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L38 Span 308E Advanced Reading and Writing

In depth study of the process of advanced reading and writing designed to prepare the Spanish major for upper-level courses. Literary texts studied as examples of writing styles. Regular compositions. Prerequisite: Span 307D or placement by examination. Conducted in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD, LS BU: HUM EN: H


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L38 Span 310 Advanced Intermediate Spanish in Spain

Continued study of Spanish grammar and syntax at Washington University's Madrid Carlos III University Program. A course designed for non-native speakers of Spanish, to refine communicative abilities in all four skills. Prerequisite: placement by exam at Carlos III.

Credit variable, maximum 4 units.


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L38 Span 311 Hispanic Culture and Civilization I

Study of aspects of the political, social and cultural life of contemporary Spain and Portugal and their historical development. Class discussion; readings with compositions. Conducted in Spanish. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Span 201D.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: BA EN: H


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L38 Span 312 Topics in Hispanic Culture and Civilization II

Study of aspects of the political, social and cultural life of contemporary Latin America and their historical development. Class discussion; readings with compositions. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Span 201D or placement by examination.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD BU: BA EN: H


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L38 Span 313 Chilean Contemporary Culture

This two-week course provides a panoramic view of Chilean contemporary culture, focusing on the years from 1988 to the present. We examine the representation of current issues in literature, the arts and the media, and study topics such as governmental institutions, the constitution of 1980, the economy, the role of the Catholic Church, public policy concerning culture, etc. The course meets three hours a day, and there are several guest lecturers. Conducted in Spanish. Requirements: two short papers, short reports in class of the news or a cultural activity students have attended, and participation in class discussions. Course includes an all-day cultural excursion on Saturday, which features a visit to one of Neruda's houses, a history museum, etc.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: ETH


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L38 Span 317 Advanced Spanish Language in Chile/Spain

Continued study of Spanish grammar and syntax at Washington University's program in Chile or Spain. A course designed for non-native speakers of Spanish to refine mastery of difficult uses and structures in all four skills. Prerequisite: placement by exam or program director.

Credit variable, maximum 4 units.


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L38 Span 3181 Spanish Culture and Civilization

This course is intended to acquaint students with important aspects of Spanish culture, including history, civilization, society, politics and the arts, dating from the first invasions of the Peninsula to the present. Students gain an awareness of the ethnic, cultural and aesthetic diversity of Spain as a country of multiple autonomous regions, by working with written texts and other media and by visits to various locations. The broader aim of the course is to enable students to engage with and to analyze Spanish culture from an intellectually critical perspective and knowledge of its sociohistorical distinctiveness. Requirements include active participation within all classes and excursions, presentations and various written assignments. This course is taught in Madrid, as part of the Washington University Carlos III Program. Conducted in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L38 Span 322 Advanced Conversation in Spain

Designed to offer students with advanced skills in Spanish an opportunity to refine their ability to discuss a variety of topics. Various media such as films, television, newspapers and other modes of communication are used for oral presentations and some writing. Prerequisite: Span 301, 307D or 308E, or multiple 300-level courses.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 325 Exploration, Traveling and the Double Gaze: Mapping Geography and Identity in Colonial Spanish America

In this course we examine the geographical, cultural and ideological mapping as described in the travel/exploration chronicles of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. We focus on the Southern hemisphere (Peru) as well as the Northern Frontier (Mexico, New Mexico, La Florida, Colorado) while reading narrative texts such as Columbus' Diario, Cabeza de Vaca's Naufragios, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega's The Florida of the Inca, Francisco Vásquez de Coronado's Narratives of the Coronado Expedition, and Alonso Carrió de la Vandera's El Lazarillo de ciegos caminantes (guide for travelers in 18th-century Spanish America). We use art work and historical maps for our study of the cultural and ideological representations of alterity and of the geography of the colonial empire. In English.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L38 Span 331 Hispanic Art/Arte Hispano

This course focuses on the most important movements, artistic expressions and its representatives of the art history of Latin America and Spain. From the Pre-Columbian art of the Mayas, Aztecs and Incas, to the syncretism of Postcolonial Latin American art, the Mexican Muralism and the self-reconstruction portraits of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo to the Chicano Art in the USA. From the Medieval paintings of religious Spain, to the criticism of the Spanish nobility by Diego Velazquez, the Spanish Civil War of Guernica by Pablo Picasso, to the Surrealism of Salvador Dalí and Antonio Gaudi. The students visit the St. Louis and the Kemper Art Museums. Prerequisite: Span 308E. May be used for elective credit in the Spanish major or minor. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L38 Span 3321 Spanish Film Studies in Spain

An introduction to contemporary Spanish film taught at Washington University's program in Spain. Prerequisite: approval of Washington University's program director.

Credit 3 units. BU: IS


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L38 Span 3331 Spanish Literature I in Chile/Spain

Introductory survey of Spanish literature from its beginnings in the Middle Ages to the baroque period at Washington University’s program in Chile or Spain. Prerequisite: Span 308E or the equivalent.

Credit 3 units. Art: HUM


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L38 Span 3332 Early Modern Spanish Texts: Whose Golden Age Do They Represent?

This course studies a series of work from 16th- and 17th-century Spain canonized by later readers as classics of national Spanish literature, that daringly experiment with the literary genres of their period to incorporate discourses from daily life, thereby revealing the decadence of imperial Spain and questioning the representation of this period as a "Golden Age." Includes the Lazarillo de Tormes, El Abencerraje, Fuenteovejuna, La vida es sueño, La dama boba and short narratives by Cervantes and María de Zayas. Prerequisites: Span 307D; concurrent enrollment in Span 308E is allowed; completion of Span 308E is recommended. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, SD BU: IS EN: H


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L38 Span 3334 Medieval Iberia: A World with Many Faces, Through its Texts and Other Cultural Artifacts

This course offers a panoramic vision of the medieval literature of the Iberian Peninsula, from its beginnings until the end of the Middle Ages (11th to 15th centuries). We read student modernized and annotated versions of some of the most famous works of this period, originally written in Castilian: lyric and epic poetry, ballads, miracles and exemplary stories, and the first act of Celestina. This selection includes works written by Christian, Hispano-Arabic and Hispano-Hebrew authors, and also some works originally written in other languages of the Peninsula (Arabic, Hebrew, Portuguese and Latin), that were translated into Castilian during the Middle Ages and are now considered part of the corpus of Castilian literature, because they significantly influenced Castilian authors of this and later periods. We also use music, art, images of old manuscripts and books, and secondary readings that help us better understand the cultural context of this period. Our discussion of the texts include topics such as the relations among the three main Cultures of the Peninsula: Arabic, Jewish and Christian, the role of the Christian Church in medieval society, the situation of minority and women, the presence of oral tradition in written texts, and the creation and spread of manuscripts and early printed books. Prerequisite: Span 307D; concurrent enrollment in Span 308E is allowed; completion of Span 308E is recommended.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, SD BU: HUM EN: H


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L38 Span 3341 Spanish Literature II in Chile/Spain

An introduction to key texts from Spanish literature in the 19th and 20th centuries at Washington University's program in Chile or Spain. Prerequisite: Span 308E or the equivalent.

Credit 3 units. Art: HUM


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L38 Span 334C Spanish Literature II

An introduction to key texts from Spanish literature and culture in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries in their specific historical contexts. Topics may include encounters between Arabs, Christians and Jews in the Iberian peninsula; issues of gender and sexuality; the modern city; discourses of nationalism; the Spanish Civil War; the Francoist dictatorship; transition to democracy; and contemporary challenges in an increasingly multicultural and multiracial society. Prerequisites: Span 307D; concurrent registration in Span 308E is allowed; completion of Span 308E is recommended. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM BU: IS


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L38 Span 3351 Spanish-American Literature I in Chile/Spain

A survey of major figures and literary trends in Spanish America from 1492 to Modernismo (1880); at Washington University's program in Chile or Spain. Prerequisite: Span 308E or the equivalent.

Credit 3 units. Art: HUM


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L38 Span 3352 Spanish-American Literature of the Long 19th Century: From Empire to Nation

This survey examines the changing roles of literature and its creators during the period that saw the end of the powerful Spanish empire and the emergence of the political framework of independent nations we are familiar with today. Students are introduced to prominent themes such as independence writing, the experience of race in literature, romanticism, civilization vs. barbarism, the appeal of literature to popular classes, modernismo, the place of literature in nation building and in shaping national identity, and the idea of the past as present. Prerequisites: Span 307D or permission of instructor; concurrent enrollment in Span 308E is allowed; completion of Span 308E is recommended. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS EN: H


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L38 Span 335C Spanish-American Literature I

A survey of major figures and literary trends in Spanish America from 1492 to Modernismo (1880). Emphasis on the writings of either Colón or Columbus, Cortés, Bernal Diaz, Las Casas, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega; and Aztec reactions to the Conquest in the early period and on Sor Juana in colonial times. After the period of independence from Spain (1810–1824), the focus is on the literary representation of the making of the new nations and cultural autonomy. Readings include chapters of a picaresque novel, the representation of dictatorship, civilization vs. barbarism, the gaucho epic, and 19th-century fiction. Lectures and class discussions of the readings; exams, papers and short reports. Prerequisites: Span 307D; concurrent registration in Span 308E is allowed; completion of Span 308E is recommended. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM BU: IS


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L38 Span 3361 Spanish-American Literature II in Chile/Spain

A survey of major Spanish-American literary works from the end of the 19th century to the contemporary period at Washington University's program in Chile or Spain. Prerequisite: Span 308E or the equivalent.

Credit 3 units. Art: HUM


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L38 Span 336C Spanish-American Literature II

A survey of major Latin American literary works focusing on canonical works of the 20th and 21st centuries in their cultural and historical contexts. The course includes discussions of major literary movements such as the avant-garde, the Boom and the post-Boom. Other topics may include the literary and cultural responses to revolution, dictatorship and the evolving definitions of Latin America. Authors may include Quiroga, Neruda, Guillén, Vallejo, Borges, Cortázar, Rulfo, Carpentier, García Márquez, Poniatowska, Fuentes, Ferré and others. Prerequisites: Span 307D; concurrent enrollment in Span 308E is allowed; completion of Span 308E is recommended.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS Art: HUM BU: IS


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L38 Span 337C The Chilean Short Story

In this course we trace the trajectory of the short story in Chile in the 20th century with special attention to such literary movements as realism, naturalism, vanguardism, surrealism and the new narrative, including the literature written during the dictatorship. The course tries to determine what specifically can be expressed about national identity through narrative, and is informed by historical, political and sociological analyses. The course includes several field trips to related sites and guest lectures by major Chilean writers and critics. Class requirements include a short essay, a long final essay and a final exam. This course is taught in Santiago, Chile, as part of the Washington University Chile Program. Conducted in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 340 Nationalism in Action: The Spanish-American War

We study nationalism as it was in evidence in the Spanish-American War in the United States and in Spain as an outgrowth of each country's history. We read periodicals of the period and study caricatures and other artistic expressions, as well as writings by authors such as Stephen Crane, Galdós, Mark Twain, Fernando Ortíz, Ivan Musicant and others. Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Philippines are included in the scope of the course. Students are expected to present a book report orally and to write it formally; in addition, a term paper of about 15 pages on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor serves as a final project. The course is conducted in English although students able to read other languages may do some of the readings in the original. May count as elective credit for the major if work is done in Spanish. Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L38 Span 341 Literary and Cultural Studies in Spanish

This course is an introduction to cultural and literary analysis within Iberian and Latin American cultures. The course covers a wide variety of materials that span different countries, historical periods, and various cultural and literary forms. The main objective of the course is to introduce students to key historical, geographical and political aspects of these cultures, while at the same time applying different approaches of cultural analysis. The course is structured upon key central concepts as they are particularly related to the cultures of the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America, such as nation, colonialism/postcolonialism; modernity and postmodernity; popular and visual media; gender, race, migration and social class. The course combines the reading of literary texts, films and other cultural forms, with the examination of introductory critical works related to the key concepts that are explored throughout the semester. Prerequisites: Span 308E or concurrent enrollment in 308E. Taught in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L38 Span 342 Iberian Literatures and Cultures

Which are the cultures that shape what Spain is today? This course explores the diversity of the Iberian Peninsula through its literatures and cultures. As part of both the Mediterranean and Western Europe, the Iberian Peninsula has been shaped through a dynamic of conflict and negotiation between various cultures, languages and religions. Students engage themes such as internal colonization, imperialism, multiculturalism, regional identities, nation formation, migration, media and popular culture, modernization, and gender and race relations, as they relate to our understanding of the country today. Focuses may include but are not limited to the following: multiculturalism of the Middle Ages, the Muslim and Jewish presence in Spain, identity narratives and power relations, stage and performance traditions, as well as authors and artists like Cervantes, Galdós, García Lorca, Picasso, Almodóvar. Prerequisites: Span 308E or concurrent enrollment in 308E. Taught in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L38 Span 343 Latin American Literatures and Cultures

How did Latin America become Latin America? This course explores the different inventions and reinventions of the region through its literatures and cultures. Beginning with the encounter of Europeans with America, students engage themes like colonization and colonialism, urban and rural cultures, nation formation, modernization, media and popular culture, as well as gender and race relations. Authors studied may include Colón, Sor Juana, Sarmiento, Neruda, Borges, García Márquez, or Morejón. Prerequisites: Spanish 308E or concurrent enrollment in 308E. Taught in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, LS, SD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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L38 Span 349 Don Quixote in Translation

Because Cervantes' masterpiece is considered to be the first modern novel, it is absolutely essential to any understanding of literature as a whole. By way of a close textual reading, this course focuses on all the ways Don Quixote recapitulates almost the entire Western tradition and how it anticipates so many of the later developments of the novel. Course conducted in English.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 350 Undergraduate Seminar in Spanish Literature and Culture

Taught in Spanish. Topics vary. Can be repeated for credit. This course can be counted as one of the three surveys required to obtain a Spanish major. Prerequisites: Span 307D; concurrent registration in Span 308E is recommended. Satisfies the 300-level literature survey requirement for the Spanish major and minor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 3501 Latin American Women Writers in Translation

Study of major 20th-century women writers in English translation. We read poems, plays, essays and short fiction by authors such as Agustini, Ocampo, Mistral, Bombal, Gambaro, Ferré, Valenzuela and others. Class conducted in English. Spanish majors do the readings and papers in Spanish. Enrollment limit 25.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM BU: IS


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L38 Span 3502 Spanish-American Short Novel

Study of the 20th-century short novel in Spanish America. Authors include Bombal, Bioy Casares, Hernández, Castellanos, Fuentes, García Márquez, Ferré, Valenzuela, del Río.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L38 Span 3503 Fiction, Crime and Enigma: Clues to Detective Narrative from the Americas

Ever since the detective story took readers by storm during the last decades of the 19th century, the genre of detective fiction has continued to flourish while undergoing numerous transformations. Latin American literature is well known for the alternative re-readings of the crime fiction canon by well-established writers who broke canonical rules of classical and hard-boiled detective narrative and both parodied and politicized the genre through endless experimentation. In this course, we focus on the intersection of action and enigma, clues and patterns of a crime, the unraveling of a puzzle and the solution of a mystery in narratives by Poe, Borges, Chandler, Hammett, Valenzuela, Piglia, García Márquez and others, as well as in selected films based on their works. In English.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 3504 The Spanish Short Story During the Past 50 Years

An explosion of storytellers: the rise and fall and rebirth of a genre. This course reviews a half century of short fiction in Spain, emphasizing the works written since 1970. We focus on the most significant, representative movements in relation to their historical and social contexts. Writers studied include Camilo José Cela, Miguel Delibes, Ignacio Aldecoa, Ana María Matute, Carmen Martín Gaite, Juan Benet, José María Merino, Luis Mateo Díez, Esther Tusquets, Cristina Fernández Cubas, Soledad Puértolas, Javier Marías, Antonio Muñoz Molina and Marina Mayoral. Prerequisites: Span 307E; concurrent registration in Span 308D is recommended. Paper, midterm and final exams. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 3505 Borges in Translation

Comprehensive study of Borges' major works. Analysis of basic themes, philosophical implications and structural elements present in Borges' poetry, essays and short stories. We also study a number of film adaptations of Borges' work, as well as a number of texts by writers he has influenced.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 3506 Women Writers of Early Modern Spain

This course analyzes early modern women's writings (both secular and religious) by considering sociohistoric context, genre studies (autobiography, convent narratives, short prose fiction, poetry and theater) and feminist criticism. Critical approaches included consider issues of self-representation and subjectivity; performance; mysticism; life writing; feminist and lesbian utopias; cross-dressing; the body and spirituality; and the role of the Inquisition and confessors in the collaborative process of confessional writing. Class conducted in English. Spanish majors do the readings and papers in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 351 Business Spanish

Study of language and structures used in conducting business in the Hispanic world. We use actual materials from various businesses — advertising, marketing, real estate, accounting. Particular stress on speaking and writing. Prerequisite: Span 308E or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD BU: HUM


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L38 Span 353 Medical Spanish

Designed for future medical professionals, this course provides students with a complete vocabulary and cultural sensitivity necessary for treating Spanish-speaking patients. While the main focus is oral/aural, written exams, varied reading and some research are required. Volunteer work recommended for enrolled students. Advanced students are given priority. Prerequisite: Span 307D.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD BU: HUM


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L38 Span 354 A View from the Southern Cone: Perspectives on Art, Literature and Culture

This course deals with current issues of cultural, social, political and literary importance related to the Southern Cone. We study selected texts from Argentina, Chile and Uruguay as well as contemporary films and drama productions. This course seeks to determine what specifically can be expressed about national identity, globalization and the environment as these countries face the 21st century. Course requirements include four short essays and a final exam. This course is taught in Santiago, Chile, as part of the Washington University Chile Program. May be repeated for credit. Conducted in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L38 Span 355 Spanish for the Social Sciences

This is an advanced Spanish language course designed to develop conversational, writing and listening skills for students in the social sciences. Students will learn and use the language in a content-based format, guided by culturally sensitive readings, discussions and activities. Prerequisite: Spanish 307D. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: HUM EN: S


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L38 Span 360 Literature Topics Course in Spain

Taught through the Humanidades program of Carlos III University. Topics vary each semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: approval of Washington University's Madrid Program director and Carlos III.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. Art: HUM


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L38 Span 3601 Cultural Studies Topics Course in Spain

Taught through the Humanidades program of Carlos III University. Topics vary each semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: approval of Washington University’s Madrid Program director and Carlos III.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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L38 Span 370 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

An introduction to the scientific study of the Spanish language, this course focuses on each of the major linguistic subsystems, including the sound system (phonetics and phonology), word formation (morphology), formation of phrases and sentences (syntax) and the use of the language to convey meaning (semantics and pragmatics). At each level of analysis, selected comparisons are made between Spanish and English and between Spanish and other languages. The course also examines different historical, regional and social varieties of Spanish and situations of Spanish in contact with other languages.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD BU: HUM EN: H


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L38 Span 380 Topics in Hispanic Cultures

This course surveys cultures in specific contexts (Latin America and Spain) and in different historical periods, from the Middle Ages to the present. The course provides students with critical and methodological tools in order to carry out an articulate and informed cultural analysis. Prerequisites: Span 307D; concurrent registration in Span 308E is recommended. In Spanish. Topics vary from semester to semester. Consult section description for current offering.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH EN: H


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L38 Span 400 Intensive Translation for Graduate Students I

The first part of a two-semester course sequence in reading and translating Spanish. For graduate students in the humanities and social and natural sciences. Nongraduate students may enroll with permission of the department. Must be followed by Span 401.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD


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L38 Span 401 Intensive Translation for Graduate Students II

Continuation of Span 400. For graduate students in the humanities and social and natural sciences. Prerequisite: Span 400. Credit for Span 400 is contingent on completion of Span 401.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD


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L38 Span 4013 Second-Language Acquisition and Technology

This seminar, for undergraduate and graduate students, transforms research and theory about second-language acquisition into practice while focusing on technology-driven applications. The course fosters professional development as participants formulate critical skills for evaluating, creating and integrating technology into the language classroom. Course formats include readings, discussions and demonstrations with technologies. The course is now open to undergraduates. Graduate students can enroll whenever it suits their course planning. The course counts for the Graduate Certificate in Language Instruction and for the undergraduate minor in applied linguistics. This course carries the Social and Behavioral Sciences attribute and can be taken as an elective in several different programs.
Same as L12 Educ 4023

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L38 Span 405W Major Seminar

An undergraduate seminar. Topics vary. This is a writing-intensive course, which requires a minimum of three papers of approximately four to five pages in length, with rewrites; 50 percent of the grade must come from written work. Prerequisites: Span 307D and Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, WI A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, WI EN: H


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L38 Span 406 The Spanish Symbiosis: Christians, Moors and Jews

This course explores the contributions of Christians, Muslims and Jews in the Spanish peninsula, which led to what historians have called a convivencia (the peaceful and productive coexistence of these groups in medieval Spain), albeit an arrangement that was often troubled and tested. Among the topics studied are the Visigothic kingdom, the "Golden Age" of Muslim and Jewish Spain, the reconquista (reconquest; a series of campaigns by Christian states to recapture territory from the Moors), the age of Alfonso X, the Inquisition, the conquest of the New World, the expulsion of the Jews and the Moríscos (Moors), and the formation of modern Spain. We read historical accounts by Vives, Américo Castro, Benassar. Literary texts in translation include some of the greatest works of the Spanish tradition: The Cid, The Celestina, Galdós' Compassion, Goytisolo's Count Julian, Aridjis's 1492 and excerpts from Fuentes' Terra Nostra, among others. Pertinent films are discussed in class. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Spanish, Hebrew or Arabic, or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 407 Seminar in Spain: Cultural Encounters

The Spanish, Latinos and non-Hispanic North American vis-a-vis "the Other." Designed to study the historical and ideological bases of attitudes and mutual perceptions that inform these three cultures' understanding of each other. Analysis of literary and extra-literary representations of the three identities in question teach students to think critically about the cultural, religious and political foundations of intercultural perceptions. Washington University students' experiences living in Spain provide a context for them to examine their own attitudes about "Hispanidad," as well as to learn about their own cultures (American, "Latino") as they are understood from abroad. Study of theoretical concepts of identity, ethnicity, minority, gender, culture and intercultural communication enables students to participate in practical discussions based on observation and experience with an objective, critical understanding of how they perceive and are perceived by others. Fulfills 400-level literature course requirement for the Spanish major. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and two 300-level literature surveys or the equivalent in Spanish. Course taught in Madrid, Spain, through the Washington University Madrid Program.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L38 Span 408 Topics in Medieval Literature and Culture

This is a writing-intensive course that requires a minimum of three papers of approximately four to five pages in length, with rewrites; 50 percent of the grade must come from written work. Prerequisites: Span 307D and Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L38 Span 410 Major Seminar

An undergraduate seminar. Topics vary. Prerequisites: Span 307D and Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature/culture surveys taught in Spanish. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 411 Advanced Grammar and Syntax

This course presents a detailed study of Spanish syntax. Different theories (including generative theory) as well as the relationship between (morpho) syntax and other linguistic subsystems are considered. Special attention is also given to Spanish/English contrasts of particular interest to language learners and teachers. Prerequisites: 6 units of 300-level Spanish, or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD


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L38 Span 4111 Advanced Grammar and Syntax in Spain

Detailed study of contemporary Spanish syntax. Special attention to fine points of grammar and syntax necessary for communication at the advanced level, taught at Washington University's Carlos III Program in Madrid. Prerequisite: placement by exam.

Credit variable, maximum 4 units.


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L38 Span 4112 Bilingual Advanced Grammar and Syntax in Spain

Detailed study of contemporary Spanish syntax for bilingual students, taught at Washington University's Carlos III Program in Madrid. Prerequisite: placement by exam or program director.

Credit 3 units.


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L38 Span 413 Linguistics and Language Learning

The course, taught in English, provides a critical survey of various components involved in the relationship between linguistics and language learning. The course emphasizes the language learner and explores dimensions of second-language acquisition. The course begins with an examination of linguistic theories and then highlights the influence of linguistic theories on L2 acquisition research. The course then moves to an exploration of research on language and the brain. With this foundation, the course covers both internal and external factors related to language acquisition, such as language aptitude, age, gender, memory, prior knowledge, etc. In summary, theoretical and research dimensions of both linguistics and language learning are treated. This course counts as a requirement for the Graduate Certificate in Language Instruction and for the undergraduate minor in applied linguistics. Prerequisite: Ling 170 is recommended but not required.
Same as L12 Educ 4111

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: SSC BU: BA EN: S


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L38 Span 416 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

An introduction to the scientific study of the Spanish language, this course focuses on each of the major linguistic subsystems, including the sound system (phonetics and phonology), word formation (morphology), formation of phrases and sentences (syntax), and the use of the language to convey meaning (semantics and pragmatics). At each level of analysis, selected comparisons are made between Spanish and English and between Spanish and other languages. The course also examines different historical, regional and social varieties of Spanish and situations of Spanish in contact with other languages. Preceptorial for undergraduates only.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 417 Spanish Phonetics, Phonology and Dialectology

This course, conducted in Spanish, explores the linguistic varieties of the 21 Spanish-speaking countries from both a historical and a synchronic perspective. The course begins with a traditional look at Spanish phonetics and phonology, with all students memorizing and utilizing the International Phonetic Alphabet. Course readings and discussions extend beyond the descriptive and include a search for the sources of language variation within the Spanish-speaking world. Particular attention is devoted to language contact and bilingualism. Students read in areas such as history, sociolinguistics, dialectology and sociology, as well as traditional linguistic studies, in designing their projects concerning phonetics, phonology and dialect diversification.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD BU: IS EN: H


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L38 Span 419 Feminist Literary and Cultural Theory

This course intends to acquaint students with basic ideas and issues raised by a diversity of voices in contemporary feminist and cultural theory. Readings cover a wide range of approaches and tendencies within feminism, among them: French feminism, Foucauldian analyses of gender and sexuality, lesbian and queer theories, Third World/postcolonial feminism, and feminism by women of color. Given that feminist theories developed in response to and in dialogue with wider sociopolitical, cultural and philosophical currents, the course explores feminist literary and cultural theory in an interdisciplinary context. Note: This course is in the core curriculum for the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate certificate. Prerequisites: advanced course work in WGSS or in literary theory (300-level and above) or permission of the instructor required.
Same as L77 WGSS 419

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L38 Span 420 Captivity and Its Consequences: Horror, Desire and Nostalgia in Colonial Narratives

The objective of this course is to examine the formation and evolution of narratives of captivity in Latin American texts and their visual representations from the first indigenous and European contacts to the end of the colonial period. Prerequisite: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level courses taught in Spanish; in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L38 Span 421 Argentinean Literature

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 4211 Spanish-American Literature of the Colonial Period

A selective survey of the literature of the three centuries between the first encounters of the European and American Indian cultures and independence from Spain. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only; in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 423 Trotaconventos, Celestina & Co.: Go-Betweens, Love, Witchcraft and Other Related Subjects

In this course we study how the literary figure known as the "go-between" evolved in Spanish literature, from its origins in Roman literature, the Cantigas and the Exempla, to its culmination in the Libro de buen amor and the Tragicomedia de Calisto y Melibea, also called Celestina. We also read a selection of texts that were influenced by Celestina and examine how their authors recreated Celestina's characters and theme. Our analysis of the go-between leads us to a series of reflections about various related subjects, including the literary representation of love, the uses of language and magic as instruments of manipulation and power, and the ethical problems associated with such uses. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. Preceptorial for undergraduates only; in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L38 Span 424 Latin American Literature and Theory: Reading the State, Culture and Desire

In this course, we pair literary and theoretical texts in order to hone a way of reading in which theory and literature are mutually informative, provocative and inspiring. The idea of these loose groupings is not to prescribe a particular relationship between given literary and theoretical texts but rather is a way to begin negotiating the necessarily multiple relationships of theory and literature. These pairings come to seem more artificial over the course of the semester as we trace a network of relations that begins to look more and more like the Borgesian map that covered up the entire territory it described. The object of the course is, thus, not to define or prioritize a particular set of relations but rather to practice a way of reading literature theoretically and theory literarily, by which the strengths of both are allowed to come to the forefront in their complexity. Thematically, the course has several nuclei: the triangulation of State, culture and art (Piglia/Foucault, Burman/Agamben); a psychoanalytic approach to art as desire (Lispector/Lacan/Cixous); and finally, a third nucleus about which the first two commingle completely: "post-State," proliferating desire, libidinal economies wherein the State is anachronism and failure (Arlt/Deleuze; Sorín/Virilio/Sitrin, Sassen; Bolaño/Zizek). Readings may include: Piglia, Foucault, Agamben, Arlt, Deleuze, Virilio, Sassen, Borges, Benjamin, Bolaño, Zizek, Lispector, Lacan, Cixous, as well as the films Garage Olimpo and Historias mínimas. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only; in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 425 Humanism, Magic and Rhetoric in 15th-Century Castilian Literature

This course offers a panoramic view of 15th-century Castilian literature. We study a selection of texts produced both in the Castilian court and in some centers of higher learning, especially the University of Salamanca. The secondary readings help us to better understand the cultural context of the time and deepen our knowledge of four subjects that were highly present in the minds of 15th-century authors: humanism, rhetoric, love and magic. Because some of the texts selected for this course were written by (or have been attributed to) "converso" authors, we also examine the phenomenon of "converso" literature. Prerequisites: Span 307D and Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 426 Latin American Theater

Survey of dramatic and theatrical currents from the late 19th century to the present. The course focuses on tracing the themes of nationalism, cultural identity, immigration, class displacement and the effects of consumerism in representative plays from the Rio de la Plata, Chile, Colombia and Mexico. The course studies manifestations of the sainete, the grotesco criollo, theater of the absurd, as well as the popular independent theater movements of the 1960s and '70s. Theoretical works studied include those of Brecht, Piscator, Esslin. Authors studied: Dragún, Payró, Cossa, Wolff, Sánchez, Díaz, Carballido, Gambaro, Buenaventura. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only; in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD


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L38 Span 4261 The Erotics of Violence in Latin America

The course is based on a combined analysis of theories on violence, nation and urban spaces, and the study of literary texts pertaining to the Latin American post-Boom. Some of the authors be studied are Ricardo Piglia, Fernando Vallejo, Joge Franco, Roberto Bolaño, Mario Mendoza, Laura Restrepo, Evelio Rosero, Santiago Roncagliolo, Alonso Cueto, Martin Kohan, Guillermo Arriaga, Daniel Alarcón, Paulo Lins, etc. The course is conducted in Spanish and focuses on the interconnections between sexuality, violence and political issues, and on the discursive strategies used for the representation of collective subjectivities and social conflict in Latin American societies.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 4281 Creative Difference: Reclaiming Spanish-American "Traditional" Novel

This class focuses on a selection of aesthetically and socially representative 19th- and early 20th-century Spanish-American novels. Integrating a wide range of sources (critical essays, paintings, film), we explore abolitionist issues in Sab (Cuba), the reinvention of Amerindian legacies in Aves sin nido (Peru), and the different facets of modernization and nation-building in Los de abajo (Mexico) and La vorágine (Colombia). Students should finish the course with a broader knowledge of Spanish-American literary history, a deeper understanding of textual representations of gender, class and multiethnic identities, and a sharper awareness of their potential as reader and critic. Significant selections of pertinent criticism and theory are required of graduate students. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates; in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 4282 Voice into Print: The Art of Storytelling in Spanish-American Short Story

The short story has been a central part of the extraordinary originality and vitality of Spanish-American writing, and it enjoys great popularity among scholars and the general public alike. Integrating a wide range of complementary sources (critical essays, paintings, film), this course brings together the best examples of the genre that span over a hundred years of the history of Spanish-American literature and exemplifies a variety of themes and forms: from the fantastic to the "magical-realist," from crime fiction to romance, from rural to urban. Special emphasis is placed on the topics of gender, ethnicity, religious syncretism, political resistance, and popular culture. Students familiar with the "canonical" works of Quiroga, Borges, Rulfo, Fuentes, Cortázar, García Márquez or Valenzuela discover many more vibrant voices representing a variety of national literatures: Sommers and Roa Bastos (Paraguay), Ponte, Bobes and Padura (Cuba), Vega and Ferré (Puerto Rico), Onetti and Peri Rossi (Uruguay). Significant selections of pertinent criticism and theory are required of graduate students. Prerequisites for undergraduate students: Span 307D and Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only; in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 4291 The Politics and Poetics of Spanish-American New Novel

When Spanish-American writers gained acclaim in the world literary scene in the so-called "Boom" of the 1960s, their spectacular success was often linked with the so-called magical realism that draws upon the oral and written tradition of both European and regional heritage (African, Amerindian) and shapes them to forge a uniquely Latin American poetics. Through theoretically informed approach, this course offers an overview of the most acclaimed Spanish-American novels published between 1950 and 1970, with special attention given to the divergent cultural legacies and political uses of "magical realism." Specific notions of New World/Old World, modernization/tradition, nation building/otherness are explored in novels such as: Los pasos perdidos by Carpentier (Cuba), Pedro Páramo by Rulfo (Mexico), La ciudad y los perros by Vargas Llosa (Peru), Los recuerdos del porvenir by Garro (Mexico), La traición de Rita Hayworth by Puig (Argentina), and Cien años de soledad by García Márquez (Colombia). Significant selections of pertinent criticism and theory are required of graduate students. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only; in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 430 Latin American Essay

Study of the principal movements and outstanding figures in the Spanish-American essay from the colonial period to the present. Sor Juana, Sarmiento, Alberdi, Marti, Rodo, Paz, Freire, Ortiz, Sabato, H.A. Murena. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 4301 Print and Power in 19th-Century Latin America

Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students, this seminar covers one of the most fascinating periods in Latin American history and cultural production, spanning from the eve of the wars for independence to eve of the Mexican Revolution (1800-1910). Several reasons make this period and the connections between print media or print culture and power worthwhile. This long century was the most war-torn in the region's history. Not only did writers engage issues of war on what was almost a daily basis, but war generated a wealth of new modes of literature. Debates on the slave trade and abolition also occurred during the 1800s, and largely in writing. And while places such as Lima, Peru and Mexico City were established printing centers during the Iberian occupation of the Americas, true printing revolutions were not widespread until during and after the wars for independence. One of the results to emerge during the first third of the century was that writing and print media gave legitimacy to incipient republican states, wedding print to power in new ways. And by the end of the century, educators and state bureaucrats teamed up to push for public primary education and literacy as components of progressive, "civilized" nations. Add to this the visual technologies and an overall surge in new forms of symbolic communication through print, and it is easy to see why this period offers such a rich backdrop for observing how print and power fit into the landscape we now know as Latin America. We pay special attention to themes including writing as a legitimizing force, writing and nation building, and the intersection of print with war, race, identity formation, modernity and ideologies. Readings include archival materials, wartime and popular poetry, novels by authors such as Jorge Isaacs and Ignacio Altamirano, writings by Simon Bolivar and Domingo Sarmiento, and modernista poetry and prose. Historical and theoretical selections guide our analysis of primary sources. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 431 Latin American Poetry I

Survey of the major figures of Latin American poetry from the colonial period to modernism. Poets studied include Sor Juana, Caviedes, Avellaneda, Marti, Dario, Silva, Najera. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 432 Latin American Poetry II

Survey of contemporary Latin American poetry, "postmodernismo" to the present. Poets studied include González Martinez, Vallejo, Neruda, Huidobro, Paz, Parra, Orozco, Pizarnik, Cardenal, Belli. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 433 Spanish-American New Novel

This course offers a critical overview of the most acclaimed Spanish-American novels published between 1950 and 1970. The following texts are read critically with special attention given to the problematics of canonicity and formal experimentation: Los pasos perdidos by Carpentier, Pedro Páramo by Rulfo, La ciudad y los perros by Vargas Llosa, Los recuerdos del porvenir by Garro, La traición de Rita Hayworth by Puig and Cien años de soledad by García Márquez. Significant selections of pertinent criticism and theory are required of graduate students. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 434 The 19th-Century Spanish Novel

Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 435 Mediterranean Cultural Studies

This course is a cultural studies seminar for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Taking a Mediterranean perspective as a background (and we certainly spend some time discussing what such a perspective entails), we investigate the different historical, political and cultural crossings that have been taking place and are taking place at the Iberian Peninsula. Rather than a historical or chronological survey, the different sections of the course focus on the questions and conflicts that arise in these different Mediterranean encounters. These appear articulated in a series of texts that include literature, film, historical documents, song and art. Even though we mainly concentrate on texts from the second part of the 20th century, the historical background, particularly regarding the Arab and Sephardic presence in Spain, is highlighted throughout the semester. The interdisciplinary approach of this course allows students to explore human and Mediterranean geography, analyze different genres, and, finally, discuss present problems and debates from a historical perspective. Some of the issues addressed include: the question of a Mediterranean perspective, Arab and Sephardic Spain, the Mediterranean during the Spanish Civil War and World War II, old and new migrations, sexuality, globalization, and tourism. Course requirements include short papers at the end of every section and a final paper for undergraduate students, a presentation on a related topic, and a research paper for graduate students. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units.


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L38 Span 436 Spanish-American Fiction: 1970 to the Present

Study of Spanish-American narrative from the early 1970s to the present. Includes novels by writers both established before the 1970s (Vargas Llosa, García Márquez, Fuentes) and writers associated with the newest novelistic trends (Eltit, Fuguet, Martínez, Paz, Valenzuela). Prerequisite: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 4361 Latin American Prose Fiction: 1975 to Present

Study of Latin American narrative from the late 1970s to the present includes both recent novels of writers established before the 1970s (Vargas Llosa, García Márquez, Fuentes) and younger writers associated with the post-"Boom" phenomenon. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 442 Literature and Revolution

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 443 The Inconvenient Indio: Imagining Indigenous Cultures in Peru and Bolivia

In the cultural history of the Andean nations, the Indio has always been a powerful yet perpetually unstable signifier, whose meaning is constantly redefined by non-Indians. An archaic residue for some, the bedrock of a new society for others, the Indio conjures contradictory imaginaries of articulation, combination, disjunction and metamorphosis that have shaped a wide range of debates: from assimilation and mestizaje in the context of nation-building and modernity, to the politicizing of ethnic identities in the context of immigration and globalization. Focusing on Peru and Bolivia, this course examines these cultural imaginaries and the debates in which they appear, as well as the models of community and identity they suggest. In doing so, we discuss topics such as the discourse of illness, indigenismo, transculturation, heterogeneity, violence and memory. Materials analyzed include poetry by César Vallejo and Carlos Oquendo de Amat; essays by José Carlos Mariátegui and Ángel Rama; José María Arguedas's novel Los ríos profundos; Jorge Sanjinés's film El Coraje del pueblo; and theatrical performances by Grupo Yuyachkani. Prerequisites: Span 307D and Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates; in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 4471 Spanish-American Women Writers I

A study of women's writing from the turn of the century to 1970. Readings include novels, short stories, poetry, essays and autobiographical texts. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature course taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 4472 Spanish-American Women Writers II

A study of contemporary women's writing from 1970 to the present within a feminist theoretical framework. Topics include the construction of gender, female subjectivity, love and power, women and politics, literary strategies, etc. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 450 Special Topics in Hispanic Literature and Culture

Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish. May be repeated for credit.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM


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L38 Span 4502 Latin American Narrative in Film

Analysis and discussion of a select group of films, focusing on their literary origins or their peculiar elaboration of critical conflicts in contemporary Latin American society. Films by Littin, Puenzo, Lombardi, Skarmeta, Solanas, Gutiérrez Alea, Lilienthal and others. Novels by Vargas Llosa, Carpentier, Amado, Puig, Skarmeta and Soriano. Course conducted in English. Does not fulfill 400-level literature requirement.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L38 Span 4503 Latin American Film: Argentine Cinema

This course examines the development of cinema in Argentina, from the earliest attempts to codify a particularly Argentine perspective in Tango musicals to the present day. We explore the relationships between both film and nation building and film and revolution. We also study the role of cinema in national memory, using the cinema of the post-dictatorship as a case study. We read widely in film, cultural and political theory to enrich our study of the various films under consideration. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. Conducted in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD BU: IS


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L38 Span 450C Advanced Seminar Abroad in Spanish and Latin American Literature

Credit 3 units.


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L38 Span 451 Medieval Spanish Literature

Study of the development of the principal literary traditions of medieval Spain, emphasizing major genres, themes and styles. Consideration of various critical approaches and responses to medieval texts. Lectures, papers and class reports. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 453 Survey of 18th-Century Latin American Narrative

Exploring new ways of thinking; scientific observation and traveling; historiography; and the organization of knowledge. Analysis and discussion of a variety of 18th-century Latin American narratives such as conventual writing by women, memoirs, travel, scientific writing and newspaper articles, to understand how that century's attempts to compile, question, seek, build and reform came about. The narratives are regarded in their historical context and in a dialogue with some of the most recent literary studies about 18th-century Latin America. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 4533 Narratives of Fear: Violence in Latin American Literature

This course analyzes different representations of violence in Latin American literature. Based on a critical analysis of 19th- and early 20th-century texts, we study how the recognition and legitimization of violence occurs in the context of hierarchical relationships in the society. Also we study how the literary images of bandits, pirates, thieves and assassins become the counter-discourse of the views of progress sustained by the hegemonic powers. The role of power and ideology is discussed in texts that define different levels of violence as a cultural manifestation.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 455 History of the Language

A study of the evolution of Spanish and its dialects from Latin to contemporary usage. Knowledge of Latin helpful but not required. Prerequisites: Span 307D and Span 308E.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA


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L38 Span 456 Romance Philology

Study of the evolution of the major Romance languages from their common Latin origins. Knowledge of classical Latin not required, but acquaintance with phonetics of at least one Romance language extremely helpful. Conducted in English. Prerequisites: French 325 and French 326 or one of these courses and the equivalent Washington University transfer literature course from Toulouse or Paris. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates.
Same as L34 French 456

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA


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L38 Span 4571 Exemplarity, the Writing of History and the Beginnings of Chivalry in Medieval Spain

This course is devoted to the study of exemplarity, historical discourse and chivalric fiction in medieval Iberia. It begins with an introductory selection of 13th-century texts that prepares students to better understand the development of Castillian identity, as shown in a selection of historical chronicles, and in some of the most canonical texts of the 15th century, such as El Libro del Conde Lucanor, El Libro de buen amor and El Libro del caballero Zifar.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 458 Gender, Politics and Writing in Women's Fiction of the Post-Franco Era

This course focuses on the narrative fiction of Spanish women of the post-Franco era: those who began to publish shortly after Franco's death and continue to write into the new century (Esther Tusquets, Cristina Fernández Cubas, Rosa Montero, Carmen Riera and Adelaida García Morales), as well as the more recent crop of writers who emerged on the literary scene in the past decade (Nuria Amat, Lucía Etxebarria and Espido Freire). We consider the works of these women within their cultural, historical and political contexts, addressing issues such as the representation of gender and sexuality; the cultural impact of feminism, nationalism and globalization; and the influence of the publishing industry and the market on literary production. Whenever available, film adaptations of these literary works are used in conjunction with the readings. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level courses taught in Spanish. One hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 459 16th- and 17th-Century Drama

Study of early modern Spain's highly influential and innovative Comedias, from Lope de Vega's creation of new popular forms for public Corrales to the spectacles of court theater for elite audiences in the generation that followed. Includes study of selected plays, as both texts and performances. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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L38 Span 461 Cervantes: Don Quixote

Study of the famous work that launched the novel, giving voice to surprisingly different forms of experience and identity as it narrates the life of a crazed reader who attempts to rewrite his own history by becoming a knight errant. Includes Parts 1 and 2 of Cervantes' Don Quixote, a range of critical readings, and the use of visual media that reflect how this work has in subsequent centuries entered popular culture. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 4611 The Golden Age Novelas

A detailed study of the novela, or novella, genre in 17th-century Spain, including selected novelas ejemplares by Cervantes and selected novelas amorosas and Desengaños amorosos by María de Zayas. The course considers the problem of exemplarity, the representation of transgression or deviancy, literary tradition and sociohistorical context in these works. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 462 16th- and 17th-Century Prose

Reading of works that are groundbreaking in the formal development of Golden Age Spanish literature and in the representation of ideas concerning national and individual identity during the imperial period. To include Dialogo de la lenqua, Lazarillo de Tormes, Diana and selected works by Guevara, Cervantes, Quevedo and Zayas. Seminar discussions and research paper. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 463 16th- and 17th-Century Poetry

Classical Spanish poetry during the Renaissance and the baroque periods. Poets range from the Marques de Santillana and Garcilaso de la Vega to Luis de Gongora, San Juan de la Cruz and Francisco de Quevedo. Movements and trends explored include the tradition of courtly love, culteranismo, Spanish mysticism and conceptismo. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 464 Self-Representation and Picaresque Fiction in Early Modern Spain

This course investigates self-representation through the figure of the picaro and fictional autobiography in the representative works of the Spanish picaresque genre (Lazarillo, Guzmán de Alfarache and El buscón). We also examine the figure of the picara in novels with female protagonists such as La lozana andaluza and La pícara Justina (as well as a short story by María de Zayas) and consider the relation of the picara to women's roles in Spanish fiction and culture. This course considers aspects of gender, ethnicity, class and desire in the sociohistorical context of picaresque fiction as well as narratological approaches to these texts. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 465 The Spanish Trickster

A study of Spain's major picaresque novels in the Golden Age in the context of early modern Europe. Translations of works such as the Lazarillo and El buscón, as well as selected foreign imitations and parodies of the Spanish picaresque from the 17th and 18th centuries. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. Does not fulfill the 400-level literature requirement for the Spanish major but is applicable to other credit required for the major. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 466 Second-Language Acquisition

There are many ways in which a second language can be learned: from infancy as the child of bilingual parents, or later through formal instruction, immersion in a new culture, or in a particular work or social situation. This class is an inquiry into the processes by which acquisition occurs. Topics include the nature of language learning within the scope of other types of human learning; the relationship between first- and second-language acquisition; the role of linguistic, cognitive and sociocultural factors; insights gained from analyzing learners' errors; key concepts such as interlanguage and communicative competence; bilingualism; the optimal age for second-language acquisition; and a critical appraisal of different theories of second-language acquisition. Both theoretical and instructional implications of second-language acquisition research are considered. This course can be used toward certification in TESOL and is a required course for the Graduate Certificate in Language Instruction. Prerequisite: Ling 170D or equivalent is recommended, especially for undergraduates, but is not required.
Same as L44 Ling 466

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: HUM EN: H


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L38 Span 467 Grammar and Vocabulary Acquisition

This course examines theoretical and instructional implications of research on grammar and vocabulary acquisition. Topics include making form-meaning connections during language learning; developmental stages; the role of input and input processing; explicit and implicit methods of grammar instruction; pertinent factors in vocabulary acquisition, such a learning context and processing resource allocation; and comparisons of incidental and direct vocabulary instruction techniques. Major theories of language acquisition (e.g., nativism, emergentism) are critically examined in light of the research presented, and research findings are applied to instructional practices.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD BU: BA EN: H


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L38 Span 468 Don Quixote

A close reading of the English translation of Cervantes' masterpiece, with special attention given to the European literary context. Conducted in English.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 469 Reading and Writing in a Second Language

This course, taught in English, extends issues in second language literacy beyond pedagogy by examining the wide range of theoretical and research issues, both historical and current. Literacy acquisition among second-language learners involves a number of variables including both cognitive and social factors. Topics discussed in class include literacy and social power, universal cognitive operations, individual learner differences, text types and literary forms, and the extent to which reading and writing are interrelated. Students discuss how to bridge research and practice, and they create reading and writing activities driven by theory and empirical investigations. This course is a required course for the undergraduate minor in Applied Linguistics and an elective for the Graduate Certificate in Language Instruction.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD


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L38 Span 4691 Second Language Reading and Writing: Theory, Research and Practice

This course, taught in English, extends issues in second language literacy beyond pedagogy by examining the wide range of theoretical and research issues, both historical and current. Literacy acquisition among second-language learners involves a number of variables including both cognitive and social factors. Topics discussed in class include literacy and social power, universal cognitive operations, individual learner differences, text types and literary forms, and the extent to which reading and writing are interrelated. Students discuss how to bridge research and practice, and they create reading and writing activities driven by theory and empirical investigations. This course is a required course for the undergraduate minor in applied linguistics and an elective for the Graduate Certificate in Language Instruction. This course carries the Social and Behavioral Sciences attribute.

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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L38 Span 471 Borges

Comprehensive study of Borges' major works. Analysis of basic themes, philosophical implications and structural elements present in Borges' poetry, essays and short stories. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 472 19th-Century Novel

Departing from writings on realism by both 19th-century European writers and more contemporary literary theorists, the course carries out a critical reappraisal of the notion of "realism" in the 19th-century Spanish novel. Texts covered include selected works of Benito Pérez Galdós, Leopoldo Alas (Clarín), and Emilia Pardo Bazán that represent different periods of their literary trajectory. Daily readings and discussions focus on issues such as: the "reality effect"; the poetics of detail; naturalism in the Spanish context; the aesthetics of beginnings and endings; gender and consumption; fin-de-siècle crisis of gender ("New Women" and emasculated men); the problem of modernity; and the intersections of gender, class and national identity. These critical issues are situated in the context of theoretical discussions on the complex, and often ambivalent, function of realist discourse in Spanish fin-de-siècle culture and society. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 473 Romanticism

The origins of romanticism as a movement explored before reading and analyzing key works by the main Spanish romantic writers: Cadalso, El Duque de Rivas, Espronceda, Larra, Mesonero Romanos, Becquer, Campoamor and Zorilla. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 474 Mexican Film in the Age of NAFTA (1990-2010)

Starting in the 1990s, as NAFTA came into effect, Mexico revitalized its film industry and managed to produce not only a somewhat sustainable market within the country, but also a set of recognized figures in acting (Salma Hayek, Gael García, Diego Luna), directing (Guillermo del Toro, Alfonso Cuarón, Alejandro González Iñarritu), and moviemaking in general (Emmanuel Lubezki, Rodrigo Prieto, and others). This course explores the underlying processes that allowed for such a rebirth. The main focus of the course is to understand the contradictory impact of neoliberalism in film, understanding neoliberalism as the economic doctrine of unbridled free markets, and its social and cultural consequences. Paradoxically, neoliberalism allowed the industry to become financially and aesthetically viable, while becoming inaccessible to the lower classes in Mexico. The course mostly develops four of these processes: the undermining of nationalism as the main topic; the displacement of the target audience from the working classes, both rural and urban, to the urban middle class; the transformation of political cinema from the leftist films of the '70s to the conservative ideologies of neoliberal politics; and the intersection of Mexican film to the global market of so-called "art house cinema." Students compare films that have reached an international market with those viewed only within Mexico. In addition, students are introduced to critical approaches that allow them to appreciate these movies in the context of film aesthetics, social identities, and the relationship between film and economic development. Movies are shown outside of class in Spanish with English subtitles. The class is conducted in English. Written course work may be pursued in English or Spanish. No prerequisites.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 475 The Other in Contemporary Spanish Fiction

An examination of the various manifestations of "the other" in works of Delibes, Perez Reverte, Matute, Goytisolo, Riera, Atxaga. Aspects studied include history, culture, religion, language and gender. Ancillary readings treat theoretical as well as critical issues. Two or three short papers (two to three pages) and a longer paper with specific installments and revisions due during the semester (undergraduates, 15 pages; graduates, 20 pages). Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 479 Generation of 1898: Theater and Poetry

Analysis of works by Azorin, Unamuno, Baroja, Maeztu and Valle-Inclan. Various approaches to each work encouraged, and the theory of "generations" questioned. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 480 The Generation of '98

An analysis of the Spanish-American War, the warring parties, and particularly of the literature it created in Spain by authors such as Unamuno, Machado, Valle-Inclán, Azorín and Baroja, The "desastre" led to introspective analyses of philosophy, education, and history. It attempted to rediscover the Hispanic ethos, to re-create its landscape poetically, and to become European without losing its Spanish roots. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 481 Modern Drama

Readings from 19th- and 20th-century playwrights such as Zorrilla, Benavente, Valle-Inclan, Lorca, Buero-Vallejo. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 482 Topics in 19th-Century Spanish Cultural Studies

Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 486 20th-Century Novel

A study of the novel in 20th-century Spain, focusing on the contemporary period. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 487 Discourses on Gender in 19th- and 20th-Century Spain

This course focuses on discourses on gender, from the late 19th century to the present in the context of feminism in Spain. We explore the social, political and cultural role of Spanish women (writers) within their specific historical contexts, with a special attention to their struggle to construct a new female subjectivity through their writings. To this end, their narrative fiction (novels, short stories) are read in conjunction with nonfiction writings (essays, journalism, etc.). Authors studied include 19th-century proto-feminists such as Emilia Pardo Bazán and Concepción Arenal; early 20th-century writers such as Carmen de Burgos, Margarita Nelken, and other female activists of the Republican period; and women writers of the post-War and post-Franco eras. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduate students. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD, SD EN: H


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L38 Span 488 Narrating Mexico City

The city has been one of the central topics of modern Mexican literature. Ever since the emergence of the modern capital at the end of the 19th century, urban culture became one of the central concerns of Mexican and Latin American intellectuals across the continent. With the emergence of the megalopolis and the new centrality of questions of violence, postmodernity and urban experience, Mexican literature and film have contributed, in the past 20 years, new ways to approach, discuss and narrate the city. This class seeks to tackle different meanings of Mexico City in the cultural discourse of Mexico, by exploring novels (Carlos Fuentes, José Emilio Pacheco, Juan Villoro), poems (Manuel Mapes Arce, Vicente Quirarte, Fabio Morábito), urban chronicles (Carlos Monsiváis, Elena Poniatowska, José Joaquín Blanco) and films (Amores perros, Todo el poder, Vivir mata). Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 489 Cities of the Past Future: Literary Institutions & Peripheral Modernity in the Latin American Avant-Garde

This class proposes a study of the Latin American avant-garde as a phenomenon of "peripheral modernity" and as a critique of the "institution literature" developed by 19th century and modernista liberalisms. This reading, rather than merely proposing a one-by-one reading of canonic texts, seeks to engage the avant-garde as a global cultural phenomenon with impact in literature, art, society and ideology. To achieve this, the class focuses on four regional contexts of the avant-garde. First, we visit post-Revolutionary Mexico, to understand the way in which the avant-garde redefined notions of literature in Latin America by carefully analyzing the stakes of groups such as the estridentistas or the contemporaneos. Second, we analyze the reinvention of Buenos Aires as a literary city in the 1920s and 1930s to understand the impact of "peripheral modernity" in the constitution of the avant-garde as a specifically Latin American phenomenon. Third, we discuss the impact of the semana de arte moderno of São Paulo, to understand how the idea of "antropophagia" created an articulation of the avant-garde with debates of cultural identity and transculturation. Finally, we go to the Andes to understand how avant-garde phenomena dealt with the questions of "divergent modernities." Authors discussed include Arqueles Vela, Manuel Maples Arce, Jorge Cuesta, Xavier Villaurrutia, Jorge Luis Borges, Oliverio Girondo, Roberto Arlt, Mario de Andrade, Oswald de Andrade, Manuel Bandeira, César Vallejo, Pablo Palacio, César Moro and José Carlos Mariátegui. Scholarship includes Peter Bürger, Matei Calinescu, Renato Poggioli, Rubén Gallo, Pedro Angel Palou, Beatriz Sarlo, Fernando Rosenberg, Haroldo de Campos, William Rowe and Roland Forgues. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM, LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 490 Spanish Women's Fiction on the Edge of the Millennium

The course focuses on the narrative fiction of Spanish women of the post-Franco era: those who began to publish shortly after Franco's death and continue to write into the new century (Cristina Fernandez Cubas, Rosa Montero, Soledad Puertolas and Carme Riera), as well as the more recent crop of writers who emerged on the literary scene in the past decade (Nuria Amat, Lucia Etxebarria, Belen Gopegui). We consider not only the aesthetic innovations of these writers, but also their preoccupation with the following sociopolitical and cultural issues: connections between gender, sexuality and writing; their response to feminist literary criticism and politics; and their relationship to the market and consumer society in the context of globalization. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD Art: HUM


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L38 Span 491 18th- to 19th-Century Literature

Readings in various genres covering significant figures and works in neoclassicism, romanticism and realism. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 4921 The Avant-Garde in Spain: Poetry/Visual Art/Cinema

This course examines the development of the avant-garde in Spain during the two decades prior to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) from an interdisciplinary perspective, including poetry, the visual arts and cinema. We first study the development of the historical avant-garde through a study of four key avant-garde movements either developed by Spanish artists or taking place in Spain: Cubismo (Pablo Picasso, Juan Gris), Creacionismo (Vicente Huidobro, Gerardo Diego), Ultraísmo (Gomez de la Serna, Cansinos-Assens, Pedro Salinas) and Surrealismo (Luis Buñuel, Salvador Dalí, Rafael Alberti, Luis Cernuda, Federico García Lorca and Joan Miró). We then analyze different connections with the historical avant-garde traceable in the work of a later generation of experimental Spanish poets and artists working under the strict censorship existing during Franco's fascist dictatorship, such as Jose Val del Omar, Joan Brossa, Antoni Tàpies, José Angel Valente, Pere Gimferrer, Jose Miguel Ullán and José Luis Guerin. We also incorporate in our discussion theoretical writings by various critics including Ortega y Gasset, Peter Burger, C. Brian Morris, and Román Gubern. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308D and at least two 300-level literature/culture courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates only; in Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: LA A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


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L38 Span 494 20th-Century Poetry

Examination of 20th-century Spanish poetry from Machado and Juan Ramon Jimenez to the Generation of '27 and younger poets. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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L38 Span 495 Honors

Students who meet the requirements work closely with a member of the faculty on an individual basis on a project of mutual interest. Emphasis on a tutorial on a regular basis. Prerequisite: permission of director of undergraduate studies. Preregistration not permitted.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units. A&S: TH


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L38 Span 4951 Honors

Students who meet the requirements work closely with a member of the faculty on an individual basis on a project of mutual interest. Emphasis on a tutorial on a regular basis. Prerequisite: permission of director of undergraduate studies. Preregistration not permitted. Pass/fail.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH EN: H


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L38 Span 498 Contemporary Spanish Novel

A study of modern novels by established authors, such as Benet, Goytisolo and Martin Gaite, and new figures such as Landero, Millas and Puertolas. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH


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L38 Span 499 Contemporary Spanish Novel II: 1965 to Present

A study of modern novels by established authors, such as Benet, Goytisolo and Martin Gaite, and new figures such as Landero, Millas and Puertolas. Prerequisites: Span 307D, Span 308E and at least two 300-level literature courses taught in Spanish. One-hour preceptorial for undergraduates. In Spanish.

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: HUM


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