About Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering

Our department focuses on environmental engineering, energy systems engineering and chemical engineering. We provide integrated and multidisciplinary programs of scientific education. Our mission is accomplished by: instilling a tradition of "lifelong learning"; a curriculum of fundamental education coupled with applications in advanced focal areas and strengthened by our breadth in other disciplinary areas; participation in cutting-edge research with faculty and industrial partners; and access to state-of-the-art facilities and instrumentation. Most undergraduate students in the department pursue the BS in Chemical Engineering degree, accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. Other students pursue the BS in Applied Science degree with a major in chemical engineering. The department offers a minor in environmental engineering science and, in collaboration with other engineering departments, we co-sponsor a minor in energy engineering and a minor in nanoscale science and engineering. Graduate degrees (Master of Engineering and Doctor of Philosophy) in Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering are offered by the department.

Chemical engineers are involved in the transfer of scientific discoveries to modern technologies and novel products that benefit society and minimize the impact on the environment. They deal with multiscale aspects of generating clean energy, producing novel and superior materials, and utilizing the biological revolution to manufacture new products. They are involved in the development and manufacture of consumer products, as well as in design, operation and control of processes in a variety of industries (e.g., petroleum, petrochemical, chemical, consumer products, food, feed and pharmaceuticals). Their broad training in basic sciences (e.g., chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics) coupled with a strong foundation in chemical engineering principles (e.g., thermodynamics, mass and energy balances, transport phenomena, kinetics, separations, reaction engineering, control, product development and process design) makes them invaluable team members and leaders in any engineering enterprise. It also prepares them well for graduate studies in biochemical, biomedical, chemical, environmental and materials engineering. In addition, the BS degree in Chemical Engineering is a great starting point for pursuing a degree in business, law or medicine.

The curriculum is planned so as to provide students with a strong background in basic chemical engineering concepts, while allowing individual latitude to emphasize study in a specialized area or obtain added breadth both within and outside chemical engineering. A contemporary approach to chemical engineering is focused on the multiscale aspects of the discipline, consistent with modern developments in computer-supported problem solving. Molecular-level understanding is utilized in product development and process design, which in turn are evaluated in terms of their impact on the environment and society according to the principles of green engineering.

Mission Statement

The mission of the department is to teach chemical engineering principles and their application in an inspiring learning environment and to prepare students for engineering careers by developing the skills of critical thinking, analytical abilities and communication proficiency, and by instilling a sense of professional ethics and societal responsibility.

Program Objectives

The Chemical Engineering program Educational Objectives are as follows.

(a) Graduates who are employed in chemical process and related industries will perform tasks related to plant operation, control, engineering decision making, and process and product design. Other graduates who are not employed in chemical process and related industries will be employed in diverse professions including other engineering fields, management, consulting, etc., using their engineering and analytical backgrounds. All will engage in activities that promote professional growth and fulfillment.

(b) Graduates pursuing doctoral studies or other professional degrees will make reasonable progress toward completing the degree requirements and will engage in activities that promote professional development and fulfillment.

Advising

The department takes pride in the mentoring of undergraduate students. Each student who declares chemical engineering as a (potential) major is assigned an academic adviser from the full-time department faculty. Typically, the same adviser follows the student's academic progress and serves as a mentor from the first year through graduation.

Phone:314-935-5545
Website:http://eece.wustl.edu/undergraduate/programs

Please refer to the sections below for information about the Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, double majors and the pre-medical program, and the Bachelor of Science in Applied Science (Chemical Engineering).

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering

The BSChE degree program is designed to provide students with comprehensive training in chemical engineering fundamentals. This degree program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. Program objectives are stated in the overview. The BSChE degree requires satisfactory completion of a minimum of 126 units as indicated in Table 1. From the courses listed in Table 1, the humanities and social sciences courses (except Engr 450X courses) may be taken pass/fail. A sample year-by-year BSChE curriculum is shown in Table 2.

The program of study consists of 26 units of physical and biological sciences (i.e., biology, chemistry and physics); 21 units of mathematics and engineering computing; 40 units of core chemical engineering courses; 21 units of humanities, social sciences and technical writing; and 18 units of chemical engineering electives. The chemical engineering electives permit students to tailor their studies toward specific goals such as obtaining more depth in a chemical engineering subdiscipline (e.g., materials) or increasing breadth by choosing courses from different subdisciplines. Some of these 18 units may be taken in other engineering departments or in the natural sciences or physical sciences. Students in collaboration with their advisers design a course of study (subject to certain requirements) for the chemical engineering electives. Consult the EECE department website for more details, including the requirements that must be satisfied by these chemical engineering electives.

Please refer to Table 1: BSChE Requirements.

Please refer to Table 2: Sample BSChE Curriculum.

The curriculum is designed to provide opportunities for students to explore areas of interest within chemical engineering. In addition to the accredited BS degree in Chemical Engineering, another choice is to pursue the course of study leading to the BS degree in Applied Science with a major in chemical engineering.

Double Majors and Pre-Medical Program

Some students may be able to take more than the 126-unit minimum during a four-year program, especially if they have Advanced Placement units. This permits the choice of additional free electives from such areas as biology, computer science, humanities, social sciences or other engineering courses. It also provides an opportunity to pursue a double major. The rules for combining majors in engineering and multiple majors involving other university divisions are described in the Combined Majors and/or Multiple Degrees section of the School of Engineering & Applied Science. Particularly popular with chemical engineering students is the combined degree program in Process Control Systems.

Traditionally, the undergraduate chemical engineering degrees (both the accredited degree and the applied science option) have been popular with students interested in medicine because the curriculum automatically satisfies many of the pre-medical requirements. Many of the additional needed courses can be taken as electives.

Bachelor of Science in Applied Science (Chemical Engineering)

This degree serves students who wish to be exposed to key chemical engineering principles yet seek a more flexible curriculum. The BS in Applied Science (Chemical Engineering) requires 18 units of 300-level or higher chemical engineering core courses. Consult the EECE department website for the specific requirements needed to earn this degree.

Please refer to the sections below for information about the minor in environmental engineering science, the minor in energy engineering, and the minor in nanoscale science & engineering.

The Minor in Environmental Engineering Science

The EECE department sponsors an undergraduate minor in environmental engineering science. This 21-unit program prepares the student to seek an entry-level position as an environmental engineer, scientist or analyst. The minor also provides a solid foundation for undertaking graduate study in environmental engineering. Visit the EECE department website for more information.

Units required: 21

Required courses:

Select from the following menus:

Introduction1 (3 units):

EECE 101Introduction to Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering (fall)3
EECE 210Introduction to Environmental Engineering (spring)3

 Environmental Chemistry2 (3 units):

EECE 505Aquatic Chemistry (fall)3
EECE 531Environmental Organic Chemistry (fall)3

Environmental Engineering electives2 (9 units):

EECE 311Green Engineering (fall)3
EECE 425Environmental Engineering Laboratory3
EECE 504Aerosol Science and Technology (fall)3
EECE 512Combustion Phenomena (fall)3
EECE 514Atmospheric Science and Climate (spring)3
EECE 533Physical and Chemical Processes for Water Treatment (spring)3
EECE 534Environmental Nanochemistry (spring)3

Additional eligible courses (new courses, special offerings) will be posted on the EECE website as they become available.

Natural Science (3 units):

Biol 381Introduction to Ecology (spring)3
EPSc 323Biogeochemistry (spring)3
EPSc 413Introduction to Soil Science (spring)3
EPSc 428Hydrology3
EPSc 444Environmental Geochemistry (fall, even years)3

Environmental Policy and Social Science (3 units):

EnSt 310Ecological Economics3
EnSt 357Environmental Problem Solving3
Econ 451Environmental Policy (fall)3
EnSt 539Interdisciplinary Environmental Clinic (fall/spring)3 max
Pol Sci 340Topics: Environmental Justice3
Pol Sci 3752Topics in American Politics3

1Freshmen potentially interested in majoring in chemical engineering should take EECE 101; all other students working toward the minor in environmental engineering science should take EECE 210.

2Students taking both environmental chemistry courses can count one of them toward the environmental engineering electives.

Committee to Oversee Environmental Engineering Science Minor:

Daniel Giammar (EECE, Coordinator); John Fortner (EECE); Brent Williams (EECE)

The Minor in Energy Engineering

Objective: The goal is to provide students a course work experience that will enhance their background, knowledge and skills in the topical area of energy engineering. The minor covers classes in several fields of science and engineering which encompass the Department of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering; the Department of Electrical & Systems Engineering; and Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science.

A minor in energy engineering requires the completion of 18 units selected from the following menus. It is open to any undergraduate student pursuing an engineering major, students from the sciences (biology, chemistry, physics) in Arts & Sciences, and the environmental studies major.

Interested departments should expose students to energy and related concepts in their introductory courses.

Basic and Applied Sciences (fundamental content) (two courses):

EECE 203Thermodynamics I in EECE (fall)3
or MEMS 301 Thermodynamics
EECE 301Transport Phenomena I: Basics and Fluid Mechanics3
or MEMS 3410 Fluid Mechanics
EECE 303Transport Phenomena III: Energy Transfer Processes (spring)3
ESE 332Power, Energy and Polyphase Circuits (spring)3

Social Science/Policy/Economics Elective (one course):

EnSt 451Environmental Policy (fall)3
EnSt 350WEnvironmental Issues: Writing (spring)3

Electives:

Choose three courses. One of the courses is required to be chosen from outside the student's major degree department. A partner department may approve the use of a course listed under basic and applied sciences as an elective.

EECE 311Green Engineering (fall)3
EECE 411International Experience in EECE (summer/fall)3
EECE 413Energy Conversion and Storage3
EECE 512Combustion Phenomena (fall)3
EECE 552Biomass Energy Systems and Engineering (spring)3
EECE 591Energy and Buildings (fall)3
ESE 434Solid-State Power Circuits and Applications (fall)3
ESE 435Electrical Energy Laboratory (spring)3
ESE 437Sustainable Energy Systems (spring)3
MEMS 412Design of Thermal Systems (spring)3
MEMS 5420HVAC Analysis and Design I (fall)3
MEMS 5421HVAC Analysis and Design II (spring)3
MEMS 5422Solar Energy Thermal Processes (summer)3
MEMS 5423Sustainable Environmental Building Systems (fall)3
MEMS 5705Wind Energy Systems (spring)3

Committee to Oversee Energy Engineering Minor

Pratim Biswas (EECE, Coordinator); Hiro Mukai (ESE); David Peters (MEMS)

The committee ensures that any course added to the above lists contains a significant amount of energy topics and that the entire program be cohesive.

The Minor in Nanoscale Science & Engineering

The minor in nanoscale science & engineering will enhance a student's background, knowledge and skills in the topical area of nanotechnology. This minor covers classes in several fields of science and engineering, encompassing all the departments in the School of Engineering & Applied Science and several in the College of Arts & Sciences. It is open to any undergraduate student pursuing an Engineering or Arts & Sciences (chemistry, physics, biology, environmental studies) major.

The minor in nanoscale science & engineering involves the following components: fundamentals; synthesis and applications; characterization, structures and modeling (CS&M). Two additional requirements are the Cleanroom Lab class entitled "Principles and Methods of Micro and Nanofabrication" and completion of a faculty supervised Independent Study "Project" for at least two semesters.

Units required: 18

Required courses:

Select from the following menus:

Fundamentals (choose one course):

Biol 4810General Biochemistry I3
Chem 401Physical Chemistry I3
Chem 465Solid-State and Materials Chemistry3
EECE 305Materials Science3
MEMS 3601Materials Engineering3
MEMS 5606Soft Nanomaterials3
Physics 217Introduction to Quantum Physics3
Physics 352Physics of Biomolecules3
Physics 472Solid State Physics3

Synthesis & Applications (choose one course):

CSE 568MImaging Sensors3
EECE 504Aerosol Science and Technology3
EECE 534Environmental Nanochemistry3
ESE 438Applied Optics3
ESE 532Introduction to Nano-Photonic Devices3
MEMS 463Nanotechnology Concepts and Applications3
MEMS 5609Electronic Materials Processing3
MEMS 5801Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems I3

Characterization, Structure and Modeling (choose one course):

BME 461Protein Structure and Dynamics3
Chem 478Molecular Modeling3
Chem 543Physical Properties of Quantum Nanostructures3
Chem 550Mass Spectrometry3
EECE 420Properties of Materials3
EECE 536Computational Chemistry of Molecular and Nanoscale Systems3
MEMS 5602Non-metallics3
MEMS 5603Materials Characterization Techniques I3
MEMS 5604Materials Characterization Techniques II3

Nanotechnology Laboratory Class (required):

MEMS 5611Principles and Methods of Micro and Nanofabrication3
or CSE 506M, EECE 595

Independent Study Project (required):

Students should sign up for at least 2 semesters of Independent Study and work on a project related to nanotechnology under the supervision of a faculty member. A list of projects with potential faculty mentors will be circulated in the spring semester every year. Students will have to be signed up for the nanoscale science and engineering minor and must have completed at least two of the classes from the above categories before doing the Independent Study Project. Students can also come up with their own ideas for projects but need to get approval from the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Minor Committee and a faculty mentor.

The classes listed above will count for elective credit for all Engineering majors; however, students should check with their major advisers to confirm this.

Committee to Oversee Nanoscale Science and Engineering Minor

Rohan Mishra (MEMS, Coordinator), Pratim Biswas (EECE), Jung-Tsung Shen (ESE)

Visit the minor in nanoscale science and engineering documentation (PDF) for more information.

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for E44 EECE.


E44 EECE 100 Independent Study

Independent investigation on topic of special interest. Interested students are encouraged to approach and engage faculty to develop a topic of interest. A form declaring the agreement must be filed in the departmental office. Petitions are generally considered in the semester preceding the independent study experience. Prerequisite: freshman standing.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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E44 EECE 101 Introduction to Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering

Key technical issues that face our society and some of the emerging technologies that hold promise for the future are examined and discussed. Relationship to chemical engineering principles is emphasized. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 146A.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 200 Independent Study

Independent investigation on topic of special interest. Interested students are encouraged to approach and engage faculty to develop a topic of interest. A form declaring the agreement must be filed in the departmental office. Petitions are generally considered in the semester preceding the independent study experience. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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E44 EECE 201 Engineering Analysis of Chemical Systems

Introduction to the use of mathematics and methods of engineering in analysis of chemical and physical processes. Use of conservation balances and basic rate laws to describe processes with and without chemical reaction in both transient and steady state conditions. Prerequisites: Chem 112A, Math 233. Corequisites: EECE 203, Math 217. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 351.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 202 Computational Modeling in Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering

Modeling and numerical methods to solve engineering, design and scientific problems encountered in thermodynamics, transport phenomena, separation processes and reaction kinetics. Use of conservation principles in model building, dimensionless representation of problems, multi-scale modeling and transient modeling. Numerical methods for solution of common problems in linear algebra, regression analysis, non-linear algebraic equations, ordinary and partial differential equations, and boundary value problems. Use of Matlab as a computational tool. Brief introduction to statistical techniques and Monte-Carlo methods. Use of various Matlab toolboxes. Illustrative application examples. Prerequisites: Math 233 and Math 217, or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 275.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 203 Thermodynamics I in EECE

Classical thermodynamics. First and second laws, properties of pure substances, mixtures, and solutions. Phase equilibria, chemical reaction equilibria. Prerequisites: Chem 111A, Math 132, Physics 117A. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 320.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 204 Thermodynamics II in EECE

Molecular motions, kinetic theory of gases, kinetic theory of dense phases, chemical kinetics. Prerequisite: EECE 203. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 359.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 210 Introduction to Environmental Engineering

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the field of environmental engineering. The course emphasizes basic principles of mass and energy conservation which govern physical, chemical and biological processes. Applications include the estimation of contaminant concentrations and the design of environmental controls. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 262.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 300 Independent Study

Independent investigation on topic of special interest. Interested students are encouraged to approach and engage faculty to develop a topic of interest. A form declaring the agreement must be filed in the departmental office. Petitions are generally considered in the semester preceding the independent study experience. Prerequisite: junior standing.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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E44 EECE 301 Transport Phenomena I: Basics and Fluid Mechanics

Engineering principles involved in the exchange of heat and matter in chemical processes. Laws governing the flow of liquids and gases in laboratory and plant equipment. Prerequisites: EECE 202, EECE 203, Math 217, ESE 318, or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 367.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 302 Transport Phenomena II: Mass Transfer

Engineering principles involved in the exchange of heat and matter in chemical processes. Laws governing the flow of liquids and gases in laboratory and plant equipment. Prerequisite: EECE 301 (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 368.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 303 Transport Phenomena III: Energy Transfer Processes

Introductory treatment of the principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection or radiation. Mathematical analysis of steady and unsteady conduction along with numerical methods. Analytical and semi-empirical methods of forced and natural convection systems. Boiling and condensation heat transfer. Radiation between black-body and real surfaces. Radiation network analysis. Corequisite: EECE 302 or equivalent. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 369.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 304 Mass Transfer Operations

Stagewise and continuous mass transfer operations, including distillation, gas absorption, humidification, leaching, liquid extraction, and membrane separations. Prerequisites: Math 217, EECE 201 and EECE 203. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 357.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 305 Materials Science

Introduces the chemistry and physics of engineering materials. Emphasis on atomic and molecular interpretation of physical and chemical properties, the relationships between physical and chemical properties, and performance of an engineering material. Prerequisite: Math 217, Chem 111A. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 325.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 311 Green Engineering

Strategies and methods for waste minimization and pollutant emission reduction. Principles of green engineering. Environmental transport and fate modeling. Design of heat and mass exchange networks for energy and waste reduction. Prerequisite: EECE 203 or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 345.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 313 Engineering Economics, Analytics, and Policy Analysis Tools

Introduction to basic engineering economics, cash flow modeling, and investment or policy analysis tools/frameworks applied to resource allocation problems with significant technical aspects. Tools developed with applications to case study examples and projects including practical spreadsheet modeling, economic and financial metrics, and basic decision sciences tools. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 382.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 314 Air Quality and Pollution Control

Generation, transport and fate of gaseous and particulate air pollutants. Meteorology and its coupling to air quality. Photochemical smog formation, visibility impairment, pollutant dispersion modeling, and source apportionment. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 344.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 400 Independent Study

Independent investigation on topic of special interest. Interested students are encouraged to approach and engage faculty to develop a topic of interest. A form declaring the agreement must be filed in the departmental office. Petitions are generally considered in the semester preceding the independent study experience. Prerequisite: senior standing.

Credit variable, maximum 6 units.


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E44 EECE 401 Chemical Process Dynamics and Control

A state-of-the-art industrial virtual plant is used for the development of dynamic simulations, selection of instrumentation, statistical analysis of variability, and implementation of process control to improve process operation and efficiency. Prerequisites: Math 217 and EECE 201. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 462.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 402 ChE Capstone

Application of engineering science and design, fundamentals of process and product development, computational techniques and economic principles to design of chemical and biological processes and procedures. A design project and/or an AIChE national design contest is included. Prerequisites: EECE 203, 301, 302, 304 and 403. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 478A.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 403 Chemical Reaction Engineering

Introduction to chemical reaction engineering principles and applications in process and product development. Evaluation of reaction rates from mechanisms and experimental data, quantification of pertinent transport effects and application to reactor and product design. Prerequisites: EECE 201, 203, 204, 301. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 471.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 405 Unit Operations Laboratory

Laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the principles of transport (heat, mass and momentum), thermodynamics, kinetics and reaction engineering, and separations that apply to chemical and biological systems. Experiments include traditional chemical engineering unit operations and emerging areas such as biotechnology, bioenergy and materials. One laboratory period and one workshop are alternating once a week. Lecture session(s) on process engineering components and process safety are scheduled every week. Prerequisites: EECE 301, 304. Corequisite: EECE 403. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 473A.)

Credit 4 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 411 International Experience in EECE

This course provides undergraduate students with an international experience related to energy, environmental and/or chemical engineering. The country visited varies from year to year with one or more EECE faculty members developing the program in collaboration with McDonnell Global Energy and Environment Partnership (MAGEEP) universities. Example activities include conducting field or laboratory research, attending short courses taught by MAGEEP university faculty members, and visiting attractions relevant to the course focus (e.g., industrial facilities). Students also gain an understanding of the local culture and history of the country visited. Course content includes a seminar series in the spring semester prior to the international experience, a two-to-three week visit to the location of study, and a follow-up student project and presentations during the fall semester which draw upon the experience. Students enroll in EECE 411 for the fall semester following the trip. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 401.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 412 Sustainability Exchange: Community and University Practicums

The Sustainability Exchange will bring together students working in transdisciplinary teams to tackle real-world energy, environmental, and sustainability problems through an experiential form of education. Students will participate in projects with clients and partners on- or off-campus, developed with and guided by faculty advisers drawn from across the university, with the intention of delivering an applicable end-product that explores "wicked" problems requiring innovative methods and solutions. These projects matter to the client or partner. The team-based project will be complemented by a seminar that will explore the field of design and design thinking through problem solving strategies and methodologies drawn from a wide range of creative practices, including design, engineering and science, as well as contemporary topics in energy, environment and sustainability. Students will draw on these topics to influence their projects. This course is open to all undergraduate juniors and seniors. An application is required; students will be accepted off the wait list following the application process.
Same as I50 InterD 405

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


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E44 EECE 413 Energy Conversion and Storage

This course takes a thermodynamics perspective to analyzing electricity production and distribution systems, which are imperative to modern society. The course contains a hands-on laboratory component. Traditional and advanced heat engine cycles will be discussed. Opportunities and challenges with renewable energy technologies will be covered. Essential to the widespread adoption of renewable electricity sources, and also to increasing energy efficiency, are smart grid and smart building technologies. The goal is to give the student a quantitative overview, while focusing in on the details of a few important technological examples. Prerequisites: E44 EECE 203 or E37 MEMS 301 and E44 EECE 301 or E37 MEMS 3410; or instructor permission.

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 414 New Product and Process Development

An overview of product development, innovative solutions to technical problems, designed experimentation, evaluation of abstract data, product design, and the basics of intellectual property. Prerequisites: junior standing and Chem 251, EECE 203 or by permission of the instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 450.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 416 Industrial Process Safety

Analysis and management of fire and explosion hazards. Control of human exposure to toxic materials. Codes, standards, and regulations. Transportation and disposal of noxious substances. Analysis of drift from clouds, flares, and stacks. Venting of pressure vessels. Hazard evaluation and safety review of processes. Emergency plans for accidents and disasters. Prerequisite: EECE 203 or Chem 421 or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 479/569.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 418 Principles of Surface and Colloid Science

Interfacial phenomena play key roles in such industrial operations as emulsification, catalysis, and detergency. Introduction to principles of surface science. Particular attention to describing the nature of the liquid/gas, liquid/liquid, solid/liquid, and solid/gas interfaces. Specific topics include methods of measuring surface tension, interfacial adsorption, surface area and particle size determinations, dispersion stabilization/flocculation, emulsification, and wetting. Prerequisite: EECE 203 or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 480.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 420 Properties of Materials

A detailed look at the mechanical, chemical and surface properties of materials. Topics include elastic properties; plastic deformation; viscoelastic behavior; chemical resistance; corrosion resistance; and the electromagnetic properties of metal, plastic, ceramic and composite systems. Prerequisite: EECE 305. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 476.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 421 Advanced Energy Lab

Laboratory experiments to illustrate the application of engineering fundamentals to the study of advanced energy generation, storage, distribution and delivery systems. Modules include both lecture and laboratory components and explore topics such as fossil fuel combustion, solar PV and solar thermal systems, wind-derived energy, biofuels production, electrochemical energy storage. Extensive metering of energy use in Brauer Hall is used to study systems performance including energy efficiency. Prerequisites: EECE 203 or MEMS 301, and EECE 301 or MEMS 3410; or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 439.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 423 Senior Thesis

Research project to be selected by the student with the permission and recommendation of a faculty supervisor and the approval of the department chair. At conclusion of project, student prepares a report in the form of a senior thesis. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 499.)

Credit variable, maximum 6 units.


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E44 EECE 424 Digital Process Control Laboratory

Applications of digital control principles to laboratory experiments supported by a networked distributed control system. Lecture material reviews background of real-time programming, data acquisition, process dynamics, and process control. Exercises in data acquisition and feedback control design using simple and advanced control strategies. Experiments in flow, liquid level, temperature, and pressure control. Term project. Prerequisite: ESE 441 or EECE 401 or equivalent. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 433.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 425 Environmental Engineering Laboratory

Laboratory experiments to illustrate the application of engineering fundamentals to environmental systems. Applications of experimental design and data analysis principles. Introduction to relevant analytical instrumentation and laboratory techniques. Laboratory work supported by theoretical analysis and modeling as appropriate. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 408A/508A.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 426 ChE Honors Design Project for AIChE Student Contest Problem

Application of engineering science and design, fundamentals of process and product development, computational techniques and economic principles to design of chemical and biological processes and procedures in solving the AIChE national student contest problem. Up to two single and up to two group (2-3 per group) solutions may be chosen for national competition. Concurrent with EECE 402. Prerequisites: EECE 203, 301, 302, 304 and 403. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 478B.)

Credit 1 unit. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 500 Independent Study

Independent investigation on topic of special interest. Interested students are encouraged to approach and engage faculty to develop a topic of interest. A form declaring the agreement must be filed in the departmental office. Petitions are generally considered in the semester preceding the independent study experience. Prerequisite: graduate-level standing.

Credit variable, maximum 9 units.


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E44 EECE 501 Transport Phenomena in EECE

The aim of the course is for students to develop skills in applying principles of momentum, heat and mass transport in an unified manner to problems encountered in the areas of energy, environmental and chemical processes. A systems approach is followed so that the general principles can be grasped, and the skills to develop mathematical models of seemingly different processes are emphasized. This provides the students with a general tool which they can apply later in their chosen field of research. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 501.)

Credit 3 units.


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E44 EECE 502 Advanced Thermodynamics in EECE

The objective of this course is to understand classical thermodynamics at a deeper level than is reached during typical undergraduate work. Emphasis is placed on solving problems relevant to chemical engineering materials science. Prerequisite: E63 ChE 320 or E44 203 or equivalent. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 511.)

Credit 3 units.


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E44 EECE 503 Mathematical Methods in EECE

The course introduces students to mathematical principles essential for graduate study in any engineering discipline. Applied mathematical concepts are demonstrated by applications to various areas in energy, environmental, biomedical, chemical, mechanical, aerospace, electrical and civil engineering. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 502.)

Credit 3 units.


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E44 EECE 504 Aerosol Science and Technology

Fundamental properties of particulate systems — physics of aerosols, size distributions, mechanics and transport of particles: diffusion, inertia, external force fields. Visibility and light scattering. Aerosol dynamics — coagulation, nucleation, condensation. Applications to engineered systems: nanoparticle synthesis, atmospheric aerosols, combustion aerosols, pharmaceutical aerosols. Prerequisites: EECE 301, ESE 318 and 319. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 518.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 505 Aquatic Chemistry

Aquatic chemistry governs aspects of the biogeochemical cycling of trace metals and nutrients, contaminant fate and transport, and the performance of water and wastewater treatment processes. This course examines chemical reactions relevant to natural and engineered aquatic systems. A quantitative approach emphasizes the solution of chemical equilibrium and kinetics problems. Topics covered include chemical equilibrium and kinetics, acid-base equilibria and alkalinity, dissolution and precipitation of solids, complexation of metals, oxidation-reduction processes, and reactions on solid surfaces. A primary objective of the course is to be able to formulate and solve chemical equilibrium problems for complex environmental systems. In addition to solving problems manually to develop chemical intuition regarding aquatic systems, software applications for solving chemical equilibrium problems are also introduced. Prerequisite: Chem 112A. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 443/543.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 506 Bioprocess Engineering I: Fundamentals & Applications

The course covers the fundamentals and provides the basic knowledge needed to understand and analyze processes in biotechnology in order to design, develop and operate them efficiently and economically. This knowledge is applied to understand various applications and bioprocesses, such as formation of desirable bio and chemical materials and products, production of bioenergy, food processing and waste treatment. The main objective of the course is to introduce the essential concepts and applications of bioprocessing to students of diverse backgrounds. An additional project is required to obtain graduate credit. Prerequisites: L41 Biol 2960 or equivalent or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 453/553.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 507 Kinetics and Reaction Engineering Principles

The course is aimed at a modern multiscale treatment of kinetics of chemical and biochemical reactions and application of these fundamentals to analyze and design reactors. Application of reaction engineering principles in the areas related to energy generation, pollution prevention, chemical and biochemical processes are studied and illustrated with case studies and computer models. Description of the role of mass and heat transport in reacting systems is also provided with numerous examples. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 503.)

Credit 3 units.


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E44 EECE 508 Research Rotation

First-year doctoral students in EECE should undertake research rotation as a requirement prior to choosing a permanent research adviser. The rotation requires the student to work under the guidance of a faculty member. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 508.)


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E44 EECE 509 Seminar in Energy, Environmental, and Chemical Engineering

All graduate students in EECE should attend the Departmental Seminar Series to gain exposure in various diverse fields of research. Students are also expected to participate in journal clubs and other discussion formats to discuss topical research areas. The course is required of all graduate students every semester of residency in the program. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 509.)

Credit 1 unit.


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E44 EECE 510 Advanced Topics in Aerosol Science & Engineering

This course is focused on discussion of advanced topics in aerosol science and engineering and its applications in a variety of fields — materials science, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, and environmental engineering. Prerequisite: EECE 504. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 592A.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 512 Combustion Phenomena

Introduction to fundamental aspects of combustion phenomena including relevant thermochemistry, fluid mechanics, and transport processes. Emphasis is on elucidation of the physico-chemical processes, problem formulation, and analytical techniques. Topics covered include ignition, extinction, diffusion flames, particle combustion, deflagrations, and detonations. Prerequisites: graduate standing or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 5404.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 513 Topics in Nanotechnology

This course is focused on the discussion of topics in nanotechnology — with a focus on nanoparticles and their applications in a variety of fields — materials science, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, environmental engineering, medicine. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 526.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 514 Atmospheric Science and Climate

This course covers current research topics in atmospheric chemistry and climate change. Topics include atmospheric composition, chemistry, transport, dynamics, radiation, greenhouse gases, natural and anthropogenic primary pollution sources and secondary aerosol production, and measurement techniques. Focus is placed on how our atmosphere and climate are altered in a world of changing energy production and land use. Prerequisites: Chemistry 112A, Physics 118 or 198, and junior or higher standing. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 547.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 515 Dynamics of Air Pollution

Physicochemical processes governing the dynamics of pollutants from point and non-point sources: generation, transport and decay. Application of fundamental thermodynamics, mass/heat transfer and fluid mechanics principles to environmental systems. Prerequisites: EECE 203, ESE 317 or ESE 318 and 319, and EECE 505, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 510.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 516 Measurement Techniques for Particle Characterization

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the principles and techniques of particle measurement and characterization. Practical applications of particle technology include air pollution measurement, clean manufacturing of semiconductors, air filtration, indoor air quality, particulate emission from combustion sources and so on. The course focuses on (1) integral moment measurement techniques, (2) particle sizing and size distribution measuring techniques, and (3) particle composition measurement techniques. The related issues such as particle sampling and transportation, the instrument calibration, and particle standards also are covered. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 563.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 518 Sustainable Air Quality

Introduction to sustainability and sustainable air quality. Systems science as an organizing principle for air quality management. Setting of air quality goals. Observing the status and trends. Establishing causal factors: energy use and chemical processing. Natural sources and variability. Corrective actions to reach air quality goals. Process design for emission reductions. Adoptive response to air pollution episodes. A web-based class project is conducted through the semester. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 549.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 531 Environmental Organic Chemistry

Fundamental, physical-chemical examination of organic molecules (focused on anthropogenic pollutants) in aquatic (environmental) systems. Students learn to calculate and predict chemical properties that are influencing the partitioning of organic chemicals within air, water, sediments and biological systems. This knowledge is based on understanding intermolecular interactions and thermodynamic principles. Mechanisms of important thermochemical, hydrolytic, redox, and biochemical transformation reactions are also investigated, leading to the development of techniques (such as structure-reactivity relationships) for assessing environmental fate or human exposure potential. Prerequisite: Chem 112A. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 448/548.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 533 Physical and Chemical Processes for Water Treatment

Water treatment is examined from the perspective of the physical and chemical unit processes used in treatment. The theory and fundamental principles of treatment processes are covered and are followed by the operation of treatment processes. Processes covered include gas transfer, adsorption, precipitation, oxidation-reduction, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, and membrane processes. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 588.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 534 Environmental Nanochemistry

This course involves the study of nanochemistry at various environmental interfaces, focusing on colloid, nanoparticle, and surface reactions. The course also (1) examines the thermodynamics and kinetics of nanoscale reactions at solid-water interfaces in the presence of inorganic or organic compounds and microorganisms; (2) investigates how nanoscale interfacial reactions affect the fate and transport of contaminants; (3) introduces multidisciplinary techniques for obtaining fundamental information about the structure and reactivity of nanoparticles and thin films, and the speciation or chemical form of environmental pollutants at the molecular scale; (4) explores connections between environmental nanochemistry and environmental kinetic analysis at larger scales. This course helps students attain a better understanding of the relationship between nanoscience/technology and the environment — specifically how nanoscience could potentially lead to better water treatments, more effective contaminated-site remediation, or new energy alternatives. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 534.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 536 Computational Chemistry of Molecular and Nanoscale Systems

This course explores the structure, properties and reactivity of molecular and nanoscale systems in engineering using computational chemistry tools. The science behind density functional theory (DFT) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is explained and applied in the context of multiscale modeling. Special emphasis is placed on solid-state materials and aqueous/biological systems found in engineering. Students are encouraged to apply the methods discussed in class to their own research topics. Prerequisites: EECE 203 and 204, or permission of the instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 591.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 551 Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology

Synthetic Biology is a transformative view of biology from "observation approach" to "synthesis approach." It is a new "engineering" discipline and aims to make the engineering of new biological function predictable, safe and quick. It will pave a wide range of applications to transform our views on production of sustainable energy and renewable chemicals, environmental problems, and human disease treatments. The field intersects with Metabolic Engineering in areas such as the design of novel pathways and genetic circuits for product generation and toxic chemical degradation. In this course, the field and its basis are introduced. First, relevant topics in biology, chemistry, physics and engineering are covered. Second, students will participate in brain-storming and discussion on new biology-based systems. Last, students will design and present new synthetic biology systems to solve real-world problems. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 596A.) No prerequisite. Both undergrad and graduate students can take this course.

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 552 Biomass Energy Systems and Engineering

This course offers background in the organic chemistry, biology and thermodynamics related to understanding the conversion of biomass. In addition, it includes relevant topics relating to biomass feedstock origin, harvest, transportation, storage, processing and pretreatment along with matters concerning thermo- and biochemical conversion technologies required to produce fuels, energy, chemicals and materials. Also, various issues with respect to biomass characterization, economics and environmental impact are discussed. The main objective of the course is to introduce concepts central to a large-scale integrated biomass bioconversion system. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 495D/595D.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 554 Molecular Biochemical Engineering

This course is set for junior-level graduate students to bridge the gap between biochemical engineering theory and academic research in bioengineering. It covers common molecular biotechnologies (molecular biology, microbiology, recombinant DNA technology, protein expression, etc.), biochemical models (enzyme catalysis, microbial growth, bioreactor, etc.) and bioengineering methodologies (protein engineering, expression control systems, etc.). These theories and technologies are introduced in a manner closely related to daily academic research or biochemical industry. Areas of application include biofuel and chemical production, drug discovery and biosynthesis, bioremediation, and environmental applications. This course also contains a lab section (20~30%) that requires students to apply the knowledge learned to design experiments, learn basic experimental skills and solve current research problems. Prerequisites: EECE 101, Biol 2960, Biol 4810. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 595C.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 556 Bioenergy

A broad overview of the flow of energy, captured from sunlight during photosynthesis, in biological systems, and current approaches to utilize the metabolic potentials of microbes and plants to produce biofuels and other valuable chemical products. An overall emphasis is placed on the use of large-scale genomic, transcriptomic and metabolomic datasets in biochemistry. The topics covered include photosynthesis, central metabolism, structure and degradation of plant lignocellulose, and microbial production of liquid alcohol, biodiesel, hydrogen & other advanced fuels. Course meets during the second half of the spring semester. Prerequisites: Biol 4810 or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 4830/5830.)

Credit 2 units.


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E44 EECE 571 Industrial and Environmental Catalysis

Major industrial and environmental catalytic processes. Principal theories of heterogeneous catalysis. Experimental methods and techniques used to develop modern catalytic systems. Examples from the petrochemical industry, automotive exhaust systems and industrial emissions abatement. Prerequisites: Chem 112, 262. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 525.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 572 Advanced Transport Phenomena

Analytical tools in transport phenomena: Scaling, perturbation and stability analysis. Numerical computations of common transport problem with MATLAB tools. Low Reynolds number flows and applications to microhydrodynamics. Turbulent flow analysis and review of recent advances in numerical modeling of turbulent flows. Convective heat and mass transfer in laminar and turbulent flow systems. Introduction to two phase flow and multiphase reactors. Pressure-driven transport and transport in membranes, electrochemical systems, double layer effects and flow in microfluid devices. Prerequisites: EECE 501 (Transport phenomena) or equivalent senior level courses in fluid mechanics and heat transfer. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E63 514.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 574 Electrochemical Engineering

This course will teach the fundamentals of electrochemistry and the application of the same for analyzing various electrochemical energy sources/devices. The theoretical frameworks of current-potential distributions, electrode kinetics, porous electrode and concentrated solution theory will be presented in the context of modeling, simulation and analysis of electrochemical systems. Applications to batteries, fuel cells, capacitors, copper deposition will be explored. Pre-/corequisites: EECE 501-502 (or equivalent), or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 589.)

Credit 3 units.


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E44 EECE 576 Chemical Kinetics and Catalysis

This course reflects the fast, contemporary progress being made in decoding kinetic complexity of chemical reactions, in particular heterogeneous catalytic reactions. New approaches to understanding relationships between observed kinetic behavior and reaction mechanism are explained. Present theoretical and methodological knowledge are illustrated by many examples taken from heterogeneous catalysis (complete and partial oxidation), combustion and enzyme processes. Prerequisite: senior or graduate student standing. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 598.)

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 591 Energy and Buildings

There is a $2 trillion U.S. market in energy efficiency with paybacks of 4-5 years. This course is an introduction to energy use in the built environment and means and methods for evaluating and harvesting these financial benefits. It is based on fundamentals of energy usage in building systems. Building sciences for architectural envelope, heating and cooling systems, lighting and controls. Building/weather interaction and utility weather regression analyses. Building dynamics and rates of change in energy usage. Students work in groups to perform an energy audit for a building on campus. Prerequisite: senior or graduate student standing, or permission of instructor. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 495/595.)

Credit 3 units.


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E44 EECE 593 Energy and Environment

This course sets out to instruct the student on how to understand decision-making regarding energy and the environment, and provides a unique educational experience, wherein the challenges and potential solutions to meeting future energy needs are clearly elucidated via lectures and experiential learning. Topics include: overview of energy and the environment and associated challenges; description of power generation from coal, natural gas, biomass, wind, solar, hydro, geothermal and nuclear; political, environmental and social considerations; regulations, economics, decision-making; students gain experience with software capable of analyzing renewable energy projects worldwide, from backyard to power-plant scale systems. (Prior to FL2015, this course was numbered: E33 500A.)

Credit 3 units.


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E44 EECE 595 Principles of Methods of Micro and Nanofabrication

A hands-on introduction to the fundamentals of micro- and nanofabrication processes with emphasis on cleanroom practices. The physical principles of oxidation, optical lithography, thin film deposition, etching and metrology methods will be discussed, demonstrated and practiced. Students will be trained in cleanroom concepts and safety protocols. Sequential microfabrication processes involved in the manufacture of microelectronic and photonic devices will be shown. Training in imaging and characterization of micro- and nanostructures will be provided. Prerequisite: graduate or senior standing or permission of the instructor.
Same as E37 MEMS 5611

Credit 3 units. EN: TU


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E44 EECE 597 EECE Project Management

An introduction to the theory and practice of engineering project management, with an emphasis on projects related to environmental protection and occupational health and safety. Topics include: project definition and justification; project evaluation and selection; financial analysis and cost estimation; project planning, including scheduling, resourcing and budgeting; project oversight, auditing and reporting; and effective project closure. Students will be introduced to commonly used project management tools and systems, such as work breakdown structures, network diagrams, Gantt charts, and project management software. Topics will also include project management in different organizational structures and philosophies; creating effective project teams; and managing projects in international settings. Prerequisites: enrolled in MEng program; senior or higher standing.

Credit 3 units.


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E44 EECE 599 Master's Research

Credit variable, maximum 9 units.


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