Air Force ROTC — Aerospace Studies

Professor

Michael Cook
Lieutenant Colonel, U.S.A.F.

Military Aerospace Science. Our Core Values: Integrity First, Service Before Self, Excellence In All We Do. Air Force operations are currently conducted in the technologically demanding environments of air, space and cyberspace.

AFROTC is a four-year officer development program, producing the leaders of tomorrow's Air Force. The program's purpose is to train and develop outstanding college students to earn commissions as U.S. Air Force Officers. Numerous Washington University students have participated in Air Force ROTC and gone on to distinguish themselves as Air Force aviators, engineers, physicians and astronauts.

In AFROTC, Washington University students have the opportunity to be challenged within a unique leadership environment, with the potential to earn a commission as a second lieutenant. Participation in Air Force ROTC is available to freshman and possibly sophomore Washington University students and will not obligate a student to serve in the U.S. Air Force.

Air Force ROTC attracts the very best and brightest college students. The categorization of officer candidates within Air Force ROTC is based upon competitive selection criteria.

For more information, contact the AFROTC Detachment 207 in St. Louis at 314-977-8227 or from our website; or 888-4-AFROTC or from the AFROTC website.

For AFROTC scholarship information, refer to the Scholarship Funds section of this Bulletin.

Army ROTC

Military Science. Army ROTC is a program designed to develop leaders for life. In doing so, it develops leadership, management and training skills regardless of a student's career plans. Those who successfully complete the program earn a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army, Army Reserve or Army National Guard.

All students are eligible to participate in Army ROTC courses. Introductory courses are available in which students develop confidence, self-esteem and motivation. The intent is to develop and refine a student's leadership traits and skills to enable their future success. Instruction also includes the role of the military in national defense strategy. The number of ROTC credits that may be counted toward graduation requirements depends upon the student's program of study. ROTC students should consult with their academic adviser to determine if or how ROTC course work satisfies graduation requirements. Once a student accepts a scholarship or enters the advanced courses (300 and 400 levels), he or she incurs a military obligation.

For more information, write the Military Science Department, Washington University in St. Louis, 700 Rosedale Ave., Suite 1120, St. Louis, MO 63112, or call 314-935-5521, or visit the Washington University Army ROTC website, or contact the Army ROTC Scholarships and Enrollment Officer, Mr. Lee Rodriguez.

For Army ROTC scholarship information, refer to the Scholarship Funds section of this Bulletin.


Air Force ROTC — Aerospace Studies

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for I02 MAIR.


I02 MAIR 101 Foundations of the United States Air Force I

A survey course designed to introduce students to the U.S. Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, group leadership problems, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets, and it complements this course by providing students with followership experiences and prepares them for Field Training. Classroom activity, one hour per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 101 through MAIR 202) are basic courses designed to acquaint students with the U.S. Air Force and the opportunities available as an officer.


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I02 MAIR 102 Foundations of the United States Air Force II

A survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, group leadership problems, and an introduction to communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for Air Force ROTC cadets, and it complements this course by providing students with followership experiences and prepares them for field training. Classroom activity, one hour per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 101 through MAIR 202) are basic courses designed to acquaint students with the United States Air Force and the opportunities available as an officer.


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I02 MAIR 201 Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power I

A survey course concerned with the beginnings of manned flight and the development of aerospace power in the United States, including the employment of air power in WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War and the peaceful employment of U.S. air power in civic actions, scientific missions and support of space exploration. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for Air Force ROTC cadets and it complements this course by providing cadets with their first opportunity for applied leadership experiences and prepares them for Field Training. Classroom activity, one hour per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 101 through MAIR 202) are basic courses designed to acquaint students with the United States Air Force and the opportunities available as an officer.


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I02 MAIR 202 Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power II

A survey course concerned with the beginnings of manned flight and the development of aerospace power in the United States, including the employment of air power in WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War and the peaceful employment of U.S. air power in civic actions, scientific missions and support of space exploration. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for Air Force ROTC cadets and it complements this course by providing them with their first opportunity for applied leadership experiences and prepares them for Field Training. Classroom activity, one hour per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 101 through MAIR 202) are basic courses designed to acquaint cadets with the United States Air Force and the opportunities available as an officer.


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I02 MAIR 301 Air Force Leadership Studies, Principles of Leadership and Management I

This course is a study in the anatomy of leadership, the need for quality and management leadership, the role of discipline in leadership situations and the variables affecting leadership. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts. Cadets deal with actual problems and complete projects associated with planning and managing the Leadership Laboratory. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving cadets opportunities to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Classroom activity, three hours per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 301 through MAIR 402) are advanced courses designed to improve communication and management skills required of Air Force officers.


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I02 MAIR 302 Air Force Leadership Studies, Principles of Leadership and Management II

This course continues the study in the anatomy of leadership, the need for quality and management leadership, the role of discipline in leadership situations and the variables affecting leadership. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts. Cadets deal with actual problems and complete projects associated with planning and managing the Leadership Laboratory. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving cadets opportunities to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Classroom activity, three hours per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 301 through MAIR 402) are advanced courses designed to improve communication and management skills required of Air Force officers.


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I02 MAIR 401 National Security Studies and Preparation for Active Duty I

Cadets learn about the role of the professional military leader in a democratic society; societal attitudes toward the armed forces; the requisites for maintaining adequate national defense structure; the impact of technological and international developments on strategic preparedness and the overall policy-making process; and military law. In addition, cadets study topics that prepare them for their first active-duty assignment as officers in the Air Force. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course. Leadership Laboratory provides advanced leadership experiences and gives cadets opportunities to develop and apply fundamental leadership and management skills while planning and conducting corps activities. Classroom activity three hours per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 301 through MAIR 402) are advanced courses designed to improve communication and management skills required of Air Force officers.


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I02 MAIR 402 National Security Studies and Preparation for Active Duty II

Cadets learn about the role of the professional military leader in a democratic society; societal attitudes toward the armed forces; the requisites for maintaining adequate national defense structure; the impact of technological and international developments on strategic preparedness and the overall policy-making process; and military law. In addition, cadets study topics that prepare them for their first active-duty assignment as officers in the Air Force. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course. Leadership Laboratory provides advanced leadership experiences and gives cadets opportunities to develop and apply fundamental leadership and management skills while planning and conducting corps activities. Classroom activity three hours per week; Leadership Laboratory two hours per week. Aerospace Studies courses (MAIR 301 through MAIR 402) are advanced courses designed to improve communication and management skills required of Air Force officers.


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Army ROTC

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for I25 MILS.


I25 MILS 101C Leadership and Personal Development

Students examine the challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Students learn how the personal development of life skills such as cultural understanding, goal setting, time management, mental/physical resiliency, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the U.S. Army profession. MILS 101C is open to all students, and enrollment does not require a commitment to join the U.S. Army. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall, Room 303) to have 2 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.

Credit 2 units.


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I25 MILS 102C Introduction to Tactical Leadership

Students investigate leadership fundamentals such as problem solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. Students explore dimensions of leadership attributes and core leader competencies in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. Students also learn fundamental military concepts and explore the Army’s leadership philosophy. Aspects of personal motivation and team building are practiced by planning, executing and assessing team exercises. MILS 102C is open to all students, and enrollment does not require a commitment to join the U.S. Army. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall, Room 303) to have 2 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.

Credit 2 units.


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I25 MILS 201C Foundations of Leadership

Students explore the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and leadership theories. The course continues to build on developing knowledge of leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation and squad tactics. Enrollment in MILS 201C does not require a commitment to join the U.S. Army. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall, Room 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.

Credit 3 units.


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I25 MILS 202C Foundations of Tactical Leadership

Students develop greater self-awareness as they assess their leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. Students examine and practice the challenges of leading teams in complex operational environments, and study dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army Leadership Requirements Model explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. Case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world scenarios. Enrollment in MILS 202C does not require a commitment to join the U.S. Army. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall, Room 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.

Credit 3 units.


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I25 MILS 301C Adaptive Team Leadership

This is an academically challenging course where students study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of leadership; Army values and ethics; and small unit tactics using the service learning model in leadership labs and assigned leadership roles. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes and actions. Based on such feedback, as well as their own self-evaluations, cadets continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities as well as their physical fitness and ability to manage stress. At the conclusion of this course students will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a squad in the execution of tactical missions during classroom practical exercises, leadership labs, and during military situational training exercises in field environments. Prerequisite for this course is the successful completion of MILS 101C through 202C; or attendance at the Leader’s Training Course. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall, Room 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.

Credit 3 units.


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I25 MILS 302C Applied Team Leadership

Students continue to learn and apply the fundamentals of Army leadership, officership, Army values and ethics as they hone their leadership abilities in a variety of environments including classroom instruction, leadership labs, and assigned leadership roles while utilizing the service learning model. At the conclusion of this course, students will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a platoon in the execution of tactical missions during classroom practical exercises, leadership labs, and during military situational training exercises in field environments. Successful completion of MILS 302C helps prepare students for success at the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) which cadets attend during the summer at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes, values and core leader competencies from instructors, other ROTC cadre, and senior cadets. Prerequisite for this course is the successful completion of MILS 301C. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall, Room 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.

Credit 3 units.


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I25 MILS 401C Adaptive Leadership

The MILS 401C course transitions the focus of student learning from being trained, mentored and evaluated as a military science 3 cadet to learning how to train, mentor and evaluate underclass cadets. This course focuses on practical application using the service learning model to gain knowledge of adaptive leadership. Students are assigned key battalion leadership roles and are responsible for the daily operation, assessment, and development of the cadet battalion. Throughout the semester, students learn the duties and responsibilities of an Army staff officer, apply the principles of training and management, utilize the military decision making process, design and employ a comprehensive fitness program, mentor underclass cadets, and use effective verbal and written communication. Students study ethics, the law of war, risk management, counseling, and the Army officer’s role in the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Cadets also learn about the special trust reposed to Army Officers by the U.S. Constitution — a special confidence given to no other civilian profession. Prerequisite for this course is the successful completion of the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) or permission of the Professor of Military Science. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall, Room 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.

Credit 3 units.


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I25 MILS 402C Leadership in a Complex World

This course builds on the lessons of MILS 401C. Students continue to use the service learning model to gain leadership experience and knowledge while serving in assigned key battalion leadership roles and are responsible for the daily operation and development of the cadet battalion. MILS 402C explores the dynamics of leading Soldiers in Full-Spectrum Operations in the current operating environment. Students examine military customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in a complex environment against an adaptive enemy. Students also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. Military science 4 cadets develop and present a battle analysis and participate in a Staff Ride to Pilot Knob, an historic military site. The course also places significant emphasis on preparing cadets for their first unit of assignment. It uses case studies and exercise scenarios to prepare cadets to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as commissioned officers in the United States Army. Prerequisite for this course is the successful completion of MILS 401C or permission of the Professor of Military Science. Engineering students may petition Engineering Student Services (Lopata Hall, Room 303) to have 3 units display on their transcripts; however, the units will not count toward their degree program.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


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