Because it speaks to our imagination, literature allows us to approach the moral, ethical, social, and political dilemmas of the human situation in an integrated way. The beautiful and the well-argued, the felt and the reasoned, the actual and the possible, the message and the medium: students of literature do not treat these spheres as distinct aspects of human existence. In our department, they bring them together. The result is that an English major is recognized as a strong foundation for careers in communications, business, law, social work, the fine arts, and teaching. Course work introduces students to important literary texts and to the development of the English language and the origins of Western literature and culture. Students develop reading and writing skills, rigorous critical thinking skills, and the ability to communicate complex ideas persuasively, all while obtaining a broad liberal education.

Phone:314-935-5190
Email:english@wustl.edu
Website:https://ucollege.wustl.edu/programs/undergraduate/bachelors-english

Bachelor of Science in English

Requirements for the Major

All University College undergraduate students must satisfy the same general-education requirements.

English majors are required to take 10 courses as noted below: two required introductory courses; four required 300-level courses; and four 300-level electives. Before enrolling in any literature course, students must satisfactorily complete Principles of Writing (EComp 101).

Two Introductory Courses

Intended to be taken first, these courses are critical surveys of the literary history of the major literatures in the English language. Along with an understanding of the historical movements in literature, these courses also will help students develop a vocabulary of critical analysis and literary criticism:

Four 300-Level Courses

plus three historical courses. Students must select at least one course from each of the following groups:

  • Group 1: Medieval, Early Modern
  • Group 2: the 18th Century, the 19th Century, the 20th Century and later

Four 300-Level Electives

Minor in English (15 units)

Required Courses (6 units)

  • Literature in English: Early Texts and Contexts (ELit 261)
  • Literature in English: Modern Texts and Contexts (ELit 262)

Elective Courses (9 units)

  • Advanced-level courses in English, one of which must be in literature pre-1700

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for U65 ELit.


U65 ELit 201 Introduction to Literature

This course requires close reading and classroom discussion of selected poems and short stories. We will examine major elements of poetry and fiction, and write a series of short analytical papers. This course is recommended for students who wish to improve their reading, writing, or analytical skills, or who plan to take other courses in literature or writing.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 202 Introduction to Literature

Close reading and class discussion of selected poems and short stories in U65-201 and of selected novels and plays in U65-202.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 207 Topics in English and American Literature


Same as U92 WGSS 207

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 211 Chief English Writers I

Introduction to major writers: Chaucer through Milton in U65-211; post-Milton to Joyce in U65-212.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 212 Chief English Writers II

Introduction to major writers: Chaucer through Milton in U65-211; post-Milton to Joyce in U65-212.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 215 Great Books: Study of Literary Masterpieces

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 217 Reading Sonnets for Pleasure and Understanding

For over 600 years, within the sonnet's small, formal frame, poets have written and are still writing poems that are clever, tense, passionate, funny, bitter, quiet, and always moving. In this course we will read many of these sonnets — first for enjoyment, then for understanding how they achieve their effects.

Credit 1 unit. UColl: ENE


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U65 ELit 219 Introduction to Literary Study: Modern Texts, Contexts, and Critical Methods

This course will provide an intensive introduction to a few important literary works published since 1700.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 241 Masterpieces of Literature I

This course covers masterpieces of Western literature in English translation: Homer through Dante. Other authors may include Sophocles, Virgil, and Rabelais.

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM UColl: ENE


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U65 ELit 257 The Art of Poetry

We will examine the tools of the trade from rhyme to reason in an effort to understand the value of poetry: how it works as an art form, why it is the purest expression of human feeling and thought, why and how its message is rendered in pictures made out of lines, stanzas, and musical sounds. We will learn how to explicate, maybe to imitate. Writers of fiction and the personal essay should benefit from our emphasis on the sense of concretion and condensation. Poets will get to study and practice.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENE, ENL


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U65 ELit 2571 "What's Love Got to Do with It?": Investigating the Love Poem

Just what is a "love poem"? Does it have to be romantic? In this course we will use these questions to develop a more nuanced appreciation of love poetry across cultures and ages. From the fragments of Sappho, the mystic poetry of India, and the erotically-tinged sonnets of Shakespeare and Donne, to modern and contemporary poets like William Carlos Williams, Sharon Olds, and Maya Angelou, this course will examine not only the varied conceptions of love across time and context but how the love poem has assimilated a vast diversity of verseforms and styles. Combining periodic on-campus meetings with a Telesis virtual platform, this course will not meet on a weekly basis. Instead, the course will proceed as a hybrid of online and in-class environments. A mandatory introductory class will be held at the beginning of the term. For more information and a course syllabus, contact instructor in the weeks preceding the start of the semester.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 260 Survey: American Literature: Literary History of the United States I (Beginnings to Civil War)

Designed for readers and writers who wish to assemble a "map" of American literature to help them locate authors and other artists in relation to key themes, decisive moments, and cultural developments which have shaped and defined our national character.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 261 Literature in English: Early Texts and Contexts

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 262 Literature in English: Modern Texts and Contexts

This course provides beginning students of English with a chronological outline of modern literature in English from Romanticism to the present. It introduces them to the central themes, genres, and forces that have shaped the modern history of literature as well as the tools, vocabularies, and critical practices of literary studies. We will organize our semester around five themes: literary revolutions; questions of genre; subjectivity and authorship; gender, sexuality, and identity; modernism. We will study texts from Britain/Ireland, the United States, and at least one example of global literature in English.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 300 Independent Study

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 301 Practical Criticism

Poetry and short fiction serve as texts for practice in close reading. Class discussions and frequent though brief papers encourage students to explore a variety of interpretive approaches. Strongly recommended for English majors.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 305 Topics in Literature and Culture

Topics vary by semester.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 307 The Writing of the Indian Subcontinent

The Indian subcontinent has in recent years yielded a number of writers, expatriate or otherwise, whose works articulate the postcolonial experience in the "foreign" English tongue. This course is designed to be an introductory survey of such writing, drawing on select subcontinental writers. Covering both fiction and nonfiction by several authors including R.K. Narayan, Salman Rushdie, Anita Desai, Amitav Ghosh, Sara Suleri, Micheal Ondaatjie and Romesh Gunesekera, we will discuss such issues as the nature of the colonial legacy, the status of the English language, problems of translation (linguistic and cultural), the politics of religion, the expatriate identity and the constraints of gender roles.
Same as L14 E Lit 307

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Art: HUM BU: HUM


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U65 ELit 308 Topics in Asian-American Literature

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 310 Topics: Power and Authority in Modern Literature

This course will examine the modern short story in Ireland. We will investigate themes of power, choice, connection, transformation, and epiphany as they pertain to these stories as read in their modern Irish context. Attention will also be given to the formal qualities of the stories, some tragic and some comic, including Frank O'Connor's notion of "organic form, something that springs from a single detail and embraces past, present, and future." Writers to be studied include: George Moore, James Joyce, Sean O'Faoláin, Frank O'Connor, Elizabeth Bowen, Liam O'Flaherty, Edna O'Brien, Mary Lavin, John McGahern, William Trevor, Eilis Ní Dhuibhne, Colm Tóibín, Colum McCann, Roddy Doyle, and Claire Keegan.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 311 Topics in English and American Literature

This course examines the representation of criminals and crime in the American novel during the 20th and 21st centuries, investigating American culture's fascination with outlaws, villains, and fiends from the legacy of the Wild West to the board rooms of Wall Street. Readings include Billy Budd, The Jungle, Absalom, Absalom!, Native Son, The Talented Mr. Ripley, The Confessions of Nat Turner, Blood Meridian, American Psycho, Gain, and Gone Girl. In particular, we will study how these novels depict justice and law, and how they depict antipathy and compassion toward criminals and those who seek to foil them.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 312 Topics in English and American Literature

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENE, ENL


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U65 ELit 3122 American Literature after the Cold War

We will read Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, The Mabinogion, The Tain, Margery Kempe, and Malory's Morte d'Arthur.
Same as L14 E Lit 3122

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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U65 ELit 3142 "What's Love Got to Do with It?": Investigating the Love Poem

Just what is a "love poem"? Does it have to be romantic? In this course we will use these questions to develop a more nuanced appreciation of love poetry across cultures and ages. From the fragments of Sappho, the mystic poetry of India, and the erotically-tinged sonnets of Shakespeare and Donne, to modern and contemporary poets like William Carlos Williams, Sharon Olds, and Maya Angelou, this course will examine not only the varied conceptions of love across time and context but how the love poem has assimilated a vast diversity of verseforms and styles. Combining periodic on-campus meetings with a Telesis virtual platform, this course will not meet on a weekly basis. Instead, the course will proceed as a hybrid of online and in-class environments. A mandatory introductory class will be held at the beginning of the term. For more information and a course syllabus, contact instructor in the weeks preceding the start of the semester.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENE, ENL


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U65 ELit 3153 Topics in American Literature: Contemporary American Narratives of Dislocation and Loss

Topics: themes, formal problems, literary genres, special subjects (e.g., the American West, American autobiographical writing). Consult Course Listings for offerings in any given semester.

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM


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U65 ELit 3181 Topics in American Literature: The Cultural History of the American Teenager


Same as L14 E Lit 318

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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U65 ELit 319 Topics in Women and Literature

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 320 Major American Writers

Introduction to basic American texts: The Scarlet Letter, Moby Dick, Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby. Readings by such authors as Poe, Whitman, Dickinson, James, Crane, Hemingway, and Faulkner.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 3211 American Literature I


Same as L14 E Lit 321A

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM EN: H


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U65 ELit 321B American Literature to 1865


Same as L14 E Lit 321

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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U65 ELit 328 Gender and the Victorian Heart

"Gender and the Victorian Heart" will explore the intersections of gender and Victorian literature, autobiography, and fiction, specifically with regard to the representations (or lack of representation) of emotions, and the ensuing perceptions of power and/or weakness that result from these intersections. We will read a variety of work from multiple genres in order to investigate how a number of major Victorian writers construct emotions, emotional characters, and unemotional characters. Emotions to be contemplated include platonic, romantic, maternal/paternal loves; desire; fear; shame, guilt, and embarrassment; pride; anger and rage; grief and joy; envy and jealousy. We will be particularly interested in the interactions and constructions of emotions and gender roles. How do these authors construct, envision, and re-envision emotions in the 19th century, and how do historical gender roles get reified or revised by these authors?
Same as U92 WGSS 318

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 330 Greek Drama

The first great age of drama, both for tragedy and comedy, both in practice and in theory, was in ancient Greece. We will read representative plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, as well as Aristotle's Poetics.

Credit 2 units.


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U65 ELit 334 The Golden Age of Children's Literature

A comprehensive survey of the major works for children written during this period.
Same as L14 E Lit 334

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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U65 ELit 340 Crisis and Creativity: European Intellectual and Cultural History, 1890-1930

Through an examination of social and political theory, as well as literature and art, this course will explore the related crises of reason, selfhood and society experienced in the period of European modernism. Topics will include: critiques of liberalism, democracy and reformulations of socialism; thematic and formal experimentation in the novel, drama, art and music; Freud and the exploration of the unconscious; and the fragmentation signaled in intellectual and cultural responses to the First World War. Readings and discussion of primary works form the period will supplement lectures.
Same as U16 Hist 340

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 346 Topics in English Literature:

This course will treat as a starting point the shooting of Michael Brown and the civil unrest that followed in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014 to trace the representation of African-American lives from the Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court decision in 1897 to the present. We will investigate how literary representations of African-American experience have changed — and remained the same — over the past 120 years. Our inquiries focus on the ways that essays, poems, and novels depict oppression, inequality, violence, and race. We read, among others, W.E.B. Dubois, Nella Larsen, George Schuler, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, John A. Williams, Ishmael Reed, Octavia Butler, Toni Morrison, Percival Everett, Colson Whitehead, and Ta-Nehisi Coates.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 348 Masterpieces of Literature: European Fiction

Masterpieces of Western literature in English translation: the 17th century through the 20th century.
Same as L14 E Lit 348

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: HUM


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U65 ELit 3501 Reading Plays: Major Dramatists


Same as U21 Drama 350

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 350W Literature of Leadership

Contemporary management and educational theory place a prime value on leadership and its associated skills. There is no such concept in ancient Greek literature, except perhaps "fate" or "fortune," in early Christian writing except perhaps "grace," or in the Bible except perhaps "God." From a literary and historical perspective, how has the modern view of leadership evolved and what models are found in Western culture? This writing-intensive course will examine a wide variety of works — ancient, medieval, and modern; literary, historiographic, and didactic; modern political and managerial theory — to assess leaders' dilemmas and decisions. The course will range from Jacob to Winston Churchill, from Leonidas to Lincoln, from Thucydides to Thatcher.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 351 Topics in English and American Literature

This course will take a broad view of the satanic in Western literary and cultural traditions. We will explore premodern beliefs concerning demons before reading excerpts from Dante's Inferno and Milton's Paradise Lost. Students will study how the Romantics adopted and adapted the satanic as a counterforce to rationalism and political repression. Often defining by negation, the devil in these books will expose us to core concepts in Western thought including servitude and freedom, cosmic evil and redemption, discipline and justice, possession and liberation. Authors will include Goethe, Blake, Byron, Shelley, Lewis, and Hoffmann. Finally, we will consider a few 20th-century manifestations of the satanic, each borrowing from earlier works and traditions, including Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita and Rushdie's The Satanic Verses.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 352 Topics in English and American Literature

This course examines the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries as they represent elements of dysfunctional families, and the political, religious, and social ideologies that produce these dynamics. We look at best-case scenarios in the comedy (Much Ado About Nothing) and then examine other representation of dysfunctional families — the tensions marital institutions place on relationships (Taming of the Shrew), a brother's obsession with his sister's sexuality (The Duchess of Malfi and The Revenger's Tragedy), disinheritance (Epicene and Philaster), political pressure placed on families (Richard II), incest ('Tis Pity She's a Whore), racism (Othello), and a fully dysfunctional family (Hamlet). In addition to reading scholarly works about the early modern family, we discuss more recent historical and anthropological theories about themes such as incest, patriarchal oppression, marriage, and family.

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 352K Topics in Literature: Reading for Meaning

Topics course which varies by semester.
Same as L14 E Lit 3522

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: IS EN: H


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U65 ELit 3552 Introduction to Literary Theory

This course introduces students to some of the most influential theoretical approaches to interpretation in Western culture, to the conceptual and historical debates about theory, and to the keywords used in these debates. Students will learn how to write and speak about theoretical texts and how to recognize the theoretical assumptions that underlie acts of interpretation. Theoretical approaches likely to be featured include: formalism; Marxism; psychoanalysis; gender and sexuality studies; structuralism and post-structuralism; postcolonial studies; critical race studies; new historicism and cultural materialism; cultural studies. This course fulfills the literary theory requirement for the major; no substitutions will be permitted.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 356 The Art of the Novel

Great novels that have redefined the genre, shaped modern sensibility, probed the psyche's darkness, and taught readers to see human experience anew. Consideration of what makes a novel great and what makes it modern. Readings from such authors as Flaubert, Dostoyevski, Proust, Woolf, Lawrence, Faulkner.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 357 American Poetic Experience

This course, conducted completely online, introduces students to the reading and appreciation of American poetry. We consider the importance of the poetic form as well as the significance of the contexts informing the poetic experience. This is a fully online course. Only University College students receive credit for fully online courses.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 358 The Art of the Drama

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 360 Topics in Film Studies

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 3601 Topics in Film Studies

Topics course in film studies.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 3602 Topics in Film and Literature

Topics course in film and literature.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 361 Topics in Film Studies

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 362 The Victorian Period


Same as L14 E Lit 376

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM


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U65 ELit 365 The Bible as Literature

Extensive reading in English translations of the Old Testament and the New Testament, with emphasis on literary form and ideas. Some attention is paid to the backgrounds of the Bible and to biblical influence on various aspects of Western thought and culture.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENE


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U65 ELit 365F The Bible as Literature

Extensive reading in English translations of the Old Testament and the New Testament, with emphasis on literary forms and ideas.
Same as L14 E Lit 365F

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM BU: ETH


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U65 ELit 370 The Writing and Representation of Pain

This course explores a range of discourses about pain, including theoretical and technical ones.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 371 Illness in Literature

Representations of illness in art influence our experience of illness. This course will begin with a look at philosophical and sociological studies of illness, including writing by Susan Sontag, Elaine Scarry, Floyd Skloot, and Barbara Ehrenreich. These writers try to imagine ways around the pervasive moralizing of illness. Thinking critically about the language we use to describe illness and the ways we try to make illness culturally meaningful, we will then turn to representations of illness in literature, reading short works from Henry James to Lorrie Moore. Films will include Wit and Rent. Throughout the course we will ask how representing illness demands new forms of expression.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U65 ELit 373 The Medieval Period: Writing and Representation of Pain

This course explores a range of discourses about pain, including theoretical and technical ones. To what extent has literature developed special modes of expression for pain, and to what extent is the literary construction of pain gendered and open to cultural change?

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 380 Rebel Poets: Verses of Dissent

From the "of-the-rough" Walt Whitman to the censored Anna Akhmatova, poets have long rebelled against authority — whether it be sociopolitical, academic, or the literary traditions of their times. This all-online course will examine an eclectic array of "rebellious verse" by Americans and, on occasion, their global counterparts. Literary greats like Emily Dickinson, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Gertrude Stein, and other moderns will be paired with contemporary voices such as Lyn Hejinian, Claudia Rankine, and Thomas Sayers Ellis. Poets often excluded from the canon, such as Patti Smith, Saul Williams, and Taylor Mali, will be considered in connection to a poetry thriving outside the "ivory tower." Rejecting monolithic conceptions of dissent, we shall consider the term "rebel" beyond its immediate connotations to include matters of experimentation with voice and form. Need a "rebellious poem" be by a "rebel poet"? What constitutes poetic dissent, and how can this change over time?

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 387 African-American Literature: Early Writers to the Harlem Renaissance


Same as L14 E Lit 387

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, SD A&S IQ: HUM, SD BU: HUM


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U65 ELit 388 African American Literature: Since the Harlem Renaissance

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 391 Chaucer

From the "gentle, perfect Knight" to the devout and humble Parson, from the learned Man of Law to the bawdy Wife of Bath, Chaucer's pilgrims tell stories to amuse, instruct, and enrage each other. The stories delighted Chaucer's immediate audience, the court of Richard II, and they still delight today. We will look at The Canterbury Tales individually, in the context of the work as a whole, and as part of a social milieu.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 395 Shakespeare

Detailed discussion of a number of plays representative of different types: comedy, tragedy, history, romance. Shakespeare as a poetic dramatist and the plays as functioning stage pieces.

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM UColl: ENE


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U65 ELit 395C Shakespeare

Introductory course emphasizing critical interpretation. Representative plays are studied in detail. Required of all English majors and minors.
Same as L14 E Lit 395C

Credit 3 units. Art: HUM BU: HUM


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U65 ELit 400 Independent Study

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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U65 ELit 403 Black and White in American Drama

This course explores race in America through 19th- and 20th-century drama by black and white American writers. There is an emphasis on uses of the Classical tradition, on melodrama, the modernist theater as well as the theater of the Black Arts Movement. Writers include Dion Boucicault, William Wells Brown, Marita Bonner, Eugene O'Neill, Lillian Hellman, Zora Neale Hurston, Leroi Jones/Amiri Baraka, Lorraine Hansberry, Adrienne Kennedy, Arthur Miller, and August Wilson.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 409 Directed Readings in English Literature


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U65 ELit 4171 Roman Remains: Traces of Classical Rome in Modern British Literature


Same as L93 IPH 4171

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM


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U65 ELit 423 Topics in English and American Literature

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 4244 Topics in African-American Literature

The Black Atlantic

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 424A Topics in American Literature II: Modernisms in America

This course offers an advanced introduction to both the literature and the concept of modernism, the "ism" used to mark the experimental verve of early 20th-century writing and to grasp its ties to modernity, or the modern social world. As the course title suggests, we will devote most of our time to the career of modernism in the United States, a place imagined as both the modernist nation par excellence and the desert modernism escaped to be born. Three groups of primary texts — early modernist experiments, 1920s modernist landmarks, and Great Depression revisions — will illuminate the grand ambitions of eccentric literary forms and sequestered avant-garde movements; the public disputes and buried alliances between "high" expatriate and Harlem Renaissance modernisms; and the influential Depression-era reinterpretation of modernism as reactionary self-indulgence. The syllabus will feature fiction, poetry, and drama by old and new literary celebrities: Djuna Barnes, John Dos Passos, T.S. Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Mike Gold, Ernest Hemingway, Nella Larsen, Meridel LeSueur, Claude McKay, Clifford Odets, Tillie Olsen, Ezra Pound, Jean Toomer, and Richard Wright. A shorter list of critical essays will highlight modernism's tendency to theorize itself while introducing 21st-century perspectives from the "New Modernist Studies." Satisfies the American requirement. For undergraduates, junior or senior standing is required.
Same as L14 E Lit 424

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: HUM


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U65 ELit 426 The American Renaissance

Literature of pre-Civil War 19th-century America — Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman — with attention to social and intellectual backgrounds and the character and literary influence of the transcendentalist movement.

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 428 Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 4281 Gertrude Stein and Richard Wright: The Poetics and Politics of American Modernism

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 458 The Modern Novel: What Does a Woman Want? Great Novels of Destiny, Choice, and Self-Definition

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 4602 The Shaping of Modern Literature: Writers as Readers

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 475 American Culture: Traditions, Methods, and Visions

Credit 3 units.


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U65 ELit 497 Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

Though we often read Shakespeare in isolation, he developed his art in the vibrant theatrical culture of late 16th- and early 17th-century London, whose audiences discovered his distinctive qualities in comparison with other playwrights. In this course, we will read plays both by Shakespeare and by some of his most interesting contemporaries — including Kydd, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Beaumont and Fletcher — and consider why some plays are "of an age" and others "for all time." This course will count toward the major in English literature for day students.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENE


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