This is an exciting time to be studying history. The transition to the 21st century has prompted intense questioning about the past, the future, and the nature of change. Many old certainties and conventional wisdoms have been challenged, and America's role in an increasingly complex and contentious world demands that we, as citizens, acquire the skills that will allow us to analyze and comprehend that world. This is precisely what the study of history — of human experience contextualized temporally, culturally, politically, and geographically — is designed to do.

The Department of History at Washington University offers students the opportunity to examine human experience across time and in a wide variety of cultural, political, regional, and social contexts. The curriculum is global in scope, and students are encouraged to sample courses across time and space while achieving depth of knowledge in selected areas. Through the major in history, students also can develop important analytic skills used in law, business, communications, and other professions. These skills include the ability to organize and interpret data, to develop logical and convincing arguments, to do research and sift the significant from the insignificant, to read for comprehension, and to write with precision and clarity. Historians aim for a broad understanding of any problem and gain empathy for people in different times, places, and situations.

Contact:Margaret Williams
Phone:314-935-5450
Email:mwilliam@wustl.edu
Website:http://ucollege.wustl.edu/programs/undergraduate/bachelors-history

Bachelor of Science in History

The major in history consists of at least 27 units.

All University College undergraduate students must satisfy the same general-education requirements. Requirements specific to this major include:

Introductory Courses (6 units)

  • One introductory course chosen from:
Hist 101Western Civilization3
Hist 102Western Civilization II: 1650 to the Present3
Hist 163Introduction to the History of the U.S.3
Hist 164Introduction to World History3
Hist 209America to the Civil War3
Hist 210America from the Civil War3
  • One additional introductory course, chosen from any 100- or 200-level History course.

Advanced-Level Courses

At least 18 units of 300- or 400-level courses, to include:

  • One course designated "premodern" and one course designated  "modern"
  • One course from three of the following geographical areas: Africa, East Asia, South Asia, Europe, Latin America, Middle East, the United States, or Transregional History.*

*If a student chooses to count a transregional course toward the geographical requirement, at least one of the two other geographical areas must cover a region that is not included in the transregional course. For example, a student who has completed courses in U.S. and Latin American history could not count toward this requirement a transregional course that examines the comparative history of the U.S. and Latin America.

Capstone Experience

A capstone experience, consisting of either one specifically designated Research Seminar or an Honors Research Project. The Honors Research Project is reserved for students admitted to the University College Undergraduate Honors Program.

  • Research Seminars are upper-level, limited-enrollment courses that emphasize engagement with primary sources. Course assignments will feature texts and images from a variety of published and manuscript materials, and students will research and write a substantial paper over the course of the semester from independently selected and analyzed primary sources. All research seminars will be so designated in the course title.
  • The Honors Research Project requires enrollment in U16 Hist 399 during both fall and spring semesters (3 credits per semester). As a result, for students admitted to the University College Undergraduate Honors Program, the history major will consist of a minimum of 30 units.
    • It is highly recommended that, before undertaking the Research Project, students enroll in one or more Research Seminars (which would, in this case, count toward the required 18 units of advanced-level courses).

The Minor in History

The minor in history consists of at least 18 units.

Introductory Courses (6 units)

  • One introductory course chosen from:
Hist 101Western Civilization3
Hist 102Western Civilization II: 1650 to the Present3
Hist 163Introduction to the History of the U.S.3
Hist 164Introduction to World History3
Hist 209America to the Civil War3
Hist 210America from the Civil War3
  • One additional introductory course, chosen from any 100- or 200-level History course.

Elective Courses

  • 12 units of 300- or 400-level History courses.

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for U16 Hist.


U16 Hist 101 Western Civilization

European institutions and thought from the early Middle Ages to the 17th century. The church, feudalism, cities and commerce, universities and learning; rise of dynastic states; Renaissance and Reformation, capitalism, mercantilism, and early modern politics.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 102 Western Civilization II: 1650 to the Present

This course examines social, cultural, economic, and political development in European society from the 17th century to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the evolving relationship between the individual and the state during their period.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 1620 Introduction to the History and Culture of China and Japan

This course surveys the major historical developments from ancient to modern times in the countries of China and Japan. Themes and continuities developed in dynastic or shogunate periods that have carried over into modern times will be emphasized. Students will also explore the art, literature, and philosophy of these two nations through visual presentations and extensive reading in their classic literature.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 163 Introduction to the History of the U.S.

This course offers a broad survey of American history, from the era immediately prior to European settlement in the Western Hemisphere all the way to contemporary life in the United States. It introduces students to the critical, analytical skills required for historical scholarship and should be regarded as a prerequisite for courses of a higher number in American history. As a survey, this course strives to introduce students comprehensively to current knowledge about the American past, but some degree of special focus is always necessary. In this case, we will aim to understand the historical background to contemporary American politics, broadly speaking: We will study the social, economic, and cultural affairs that helped to create division and conflict as well as alliance and consensus among groups of Americans. We will also study the development of political doctrines, electoral procedures, constitutional standards, public policy, and the status of American society and government in the world.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 164 Introduction to World History

As an introduction to the theories and methods of world history, this course is a tour of the world of the mid-19th century. This was a time of expanding and multiplying contacts between diverse human societies from the far reaches of the globe. After a short theoretical introduction to the field, we will tour and survey a representative sample of the peoples and cultures of the period. We will compare and contrast how societies in Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia coped with similar problems and innovations, and will explore the processes of cultural interaction and globalization as they encountered one another with ever increasing frequency.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 165 Introduction to European Studies

This course focuses on Europe since 1945, but uses an historical approach to explore the experiences, traditions, and ideas that have created contemporary European civilization. Most of the semester will be spent in examining thematic topics (such as demography, religion, human rights, economic traditions, militarism, and war); and the latter part of the semester will look at major topics of Europe since 1945 (such as the Cold War, decolonization, the welfare state, immigration, and the European Union). Class meetings will stress the analysis and discussion of historical texts and data.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 2016 The Obama Preseidency and the 2016 Election

Hope and change? Or polarization and more of the same? Eight years into the Obama presidency and on the cusp of the 2016 presidential election, critical distance is difficult to come by. Yet, as the nation chooses a new president, the events of the past eight years — deep recession, uncertain recovery, profound social changes and renewed fears — already are crying out for historical perspective. Using the tools of historical inquiry, this course will offer just such a perspective on Obama and his presidency, while also providing critical context on the unfolding presidential campaign.The course will put particular emphasis on comparisons with past administrations and elections while offering a comprehensive look at what actually happened after Obama took office. This hybrid course will be conducted mostly online, with weekend meetings occurring at the start of the course, right after the November presidential election, and again at the end of the semester.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 209 America to the Civil War

The American experience from the age of Columbus to that of Lincoln; development of distinctive American patterns of thought, culture, society, politics, and religion. Topics include efforts to cope with the wilderness; colonial maturity and the development of revolutionary ideology; defining the American character; literature and art for a new republic; the impulses of religion, idealism, and perfectionism.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 210 America from the Civil War

Survey in American history from the end of the Civil War to the recent past. Combines readings, primary sources, film, and images to convey and interpret the social, economic, cultural, and political history of the nation.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 214 The Atlantic World 1000-1800

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 2154 American Legal History

The law is the prior statement of how a government will respond when it faces situations of competing interests within the society it governs. The study of the history of a nation's law is indeed the study of the history of that nation's ever changing needs and desires. This is especially true for the legal history of the United States. American law serves as a forceful mirror, reflecting the changing values of the American people. This course is intended to provide students with a broad view of how and why the institutions and principles of American law developed into their present form.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 216 History of the American South

The American South remains the most distinctive region in the United States. It has been celebrated and reviled — mythologized and stereotyped. Some people imagine the South as a land of moonlight and magnolias, others as a land of "rednecks" and revivals. Southern history, though, is more than this. It is a story of the interplay of black and white cultures. This course explores the history of the American South from the colonial era to the present. Course topics include: plantation life; the "War Between the States"; Jim Crow; the blues; country music; and the Civil Rights Movement. We will consider how definitions of the South have changed — and how the South has influenced American history. Lastly, we will discuss representations of the South in popular culture.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 2161 The American South in Black and White

The history of the American South is a story of the interplay between black and white cultures. This course explores this distinctive American region from the colonial era to the present. Topics include Southern plantation life, the war between the states, Jim Crow, the blues, country music, and the Civil Rights Movement. Using film, photography, and other media, the course also explores representations of the South in popular culture. Particular attention is paid to how images and stereotypes of the South have evolved, and how the region's history has influenced the nation as a whole. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 2216 Books and Bodies

Books and Bodies is a five-week course held in the Special Collections department of the Bernard Becker Medical Library. The course explores how changes in medical knowledge and print technology have influenced depictions of the human body from the 15th through the 19th centuries. Each week students will explore an aspect of print and medical history by examining the library's rare materials and carrying out exercises that require them to make use of the library's resources. The course will not only provide students with an overview of the development of anatomical illustration, but will also provide them with an understanding of special collections research. This course counts toward the medical humanities minor.

Credit 1 unit.


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U16 Hist 2435 Saints and Society in Europe and the Americas

This course will investigate the social and cultural factors surrounding saints and sanctity in Roman Catholic societies, with particular attention given to Europe and the Americas. The course begins by looking at saints in a medieval context, from roughly 1100 AD to the present day. Particular attention will be given to contested holy figures, those who achieved legitimacy within their societies but not the church, or vice versa. Students will examine why certain saints became popular at particular historical moments and examine the influence canonization has had in shaping saints and their cults.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 2561 The World of Jane Austen: Exploring the Novels in Historical Context

In this seminar, students will read the major works of Jane Austen. Through a combination of class discussion, written assignments, and other projects, students will explore the social, cultural, economic, and even the political themes of the novels in their original context. The course will also consider the resurgence in popularity of Austen's works in recent years, especially film and television protrayals of her novels. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 2659 The History of Food in America

Why do we eat what we eat? Through an examination of food — its preparation, economics, social implications and changes over time — we gain a greater understanding of the impact of industrialization and transportation, gender, race, and emerging national identity in the United States primarily during the 19th and 20th centuries.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 2845 Globalization, Liberalism, and Reform in the Modern World

This course examines the mid-19th century, a time of expanding and multiplying contacts between diverse human societies from all reaches of the globe. After a short introduction to the fields of world and comparative history, students will tour and survey a representative sample of the peoples and cultures of the period. The course will compare and contrast how societies in Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia coped with similar problems and innovations, and will explore the processes of cultural interaction and globalization as they encountered one another with ever increasing frequency. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HTR


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U16 Hist 300 Independent Study

Credit variable, maximum 4 units.


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U16 Hist 301 Women in 19th-Century America

Credit 3 units. UColl: HUS


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U16 Hist 3016 Slavery and Freedom in Latin America and the Caribbean

This course surveys the history of slavery and freedom in the Atlantic world of Latin America and the Caribbean. It focuses on slavery as an economic system and the relations of power it created. The course moves forward chronologically, with each week organized according to a particular theme and geography. Students will learn how British, French, Spanish and Portuguese settlers established slavery in the new world; how different social and legal practices developed around particular labor patterns and commodity production; how the enslaved edured and resisted enslavement; and what it meant to be free in a slave society.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HLA, HSM, NW


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U16 Hist 302 Modern British History, 1688-Present

This course is concerned with the transformation of Britain from a thinly settled, mainly rural, economically underdeveloped, and politically unstable island in the late 17th century into a thickly peopled and heavily urbanized nation renowned for political stability in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 3022 Religion and Politics in Early America

This course investigates the intersection of religion and politics in early America from the colonial era to the Civil War. We will focus our studies on five major themes: colonial visions, Christian foundations, evangelical reform, anti-Catholicism, and civilizing missions. Students will analyze the changing relationships between religion and politics in the early American republic as well as the various ways in which contemporaries and recent historians of the period have treated American religion and politics.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3031 Wining and Dining in the Classical World: Food Culture in Classical Antiquity

The focus of this course will be food culture in Greek and Roman societies from the Archaic to the late Roman period. However, foodways from adjacent contemporary cultures will also be briefly examined. Sources will include textual evidence, as well as ethnographic studies of ancient people, iconographic and archaeological evidence, specifically osteological and botanical remains from archaeological sites. Experimental studies will be conducted in class to augment the learning experience of students.
Same as U02 Classics 3031

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 304 Homunculus: A History of Childhood

How have children been understood and valued over time? How have they been "used," cared for, taught, and depended upon by adults? In this seminar, we will explore children and childhood from Antiquity to the present with particular attention to issues in education, labor, illness and medicine. We will examine a wide range of historical arguments about the nature of childhood and child-rearing from Plato to Dr. Spock, approaching the history of childhood in Western thought and social practice both in terms of human development and the child's place in society.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3045 Globalization, Liberalism and Reform in the Modern World

This course examines the mid-19th century, a time of expanding and multiplying contacts between diverse human societies from all reaches of the globe. After a short introduction to the fields of world and comparative history, students will tour and survey a representative sample of the peoples and cultures of the period. The course will compare and contrast how societies in Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia coped with similar problems and innovations, and will explore the processes of cultural interaction and globalization as they encountered one another with ever increasing frequency. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3077 Civil Liberties in Wartime

This course will examine the history of American civil liberties in times of war and international tension. The class will begin by examining how English political traditions, Enlightenment philosophies, and the experience of the American Revolution helped to forge American principles of civil liberty as defined in the Bill of Rights. Students will explore how the experience of war and international conflict places these principles under stress, focusing in particular on the following episodes: the 1798 Alien and Sedition Acts; the Civil War; the American governance of the Philippines; the two World Wars; the Cold War; and the response to terrorism.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3080 Jacksonian America

When he won the election of 1828, Andrew Jackson rose as an emblem of the age. The era in which Jackson lived was one of change in America, a transformation from the days of the founding fathers that was marked by revolutions in industry and transportation, westward expansion, the emergence of a new political and partisan order, and new calls for reforms in the social and political order. This course will examine the period in American history that bears the name of the seventh president, the reasons Jackson became such a symbol of the period, and the issues and events leading to the era we call the Age of Jackson and its aftermath.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 309 Chinese Thought

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 310 Modern Balkans

This course surveys Balkan history from 1900 to the present, with special emphasis on economic, political, and religious institutions. Topics include: the assassination of Franz Ferdinand; the "Catastrophe"; guerrilla insurgencies; Cold War alliances; the Cypriot question; and Kosovo independence.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3100 Modern China: 1890s to the Present

This course examines political, socioeconomic and intellectual-cultural developments in Chinese history from the end of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) to the present. Major course themes include nationalism and communism, the processes of reform and revolution, and the urban-rural dichotomy in the formation of the Chinese nation-state in the 20th century.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEA, HSM, NW


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U16 Hist 3101 History of American Journalism


Same as U48 Comm 3101

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3132 Apocalyptic Movements in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

A general survey of the recurrent theme of "the end of history" in the three main monotheistic traditions. The course provides a review of the most important apocalyptic currents in the three great religions, starting with the Jewish Book of Daniel and ending with the modern prophecies about the imminent end of time, still prevalent among present-day Jews, Christians and Muslims. Selected apocalyptic texts and secondary historical sources will be used to help understand the appeal of apocalyptic movements in specific sovial-historical settings and the common features which make them part of a recurrent historical phenomenon.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3141 Africa to 1800: Environment, Society, and State Formation

This course examines Africa in the precolonial period with a view to understanding the composition of African life and society prior to the formal colonization of the continent by Europeans. Focusing on the role of the environment and trade, it looks at how societies around the continent formed and interacted. Working from the premise that Africa was never a continent separate and distinct from the rest of the world, the course presents the history of the continent in the larger context of a world system in which the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, the Mediterranean and Red Seas served as transportation networks for the circulation of goods and people.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3142 African Civilization from 1800 to the Present Day

Course is an in-depth investigation of the intellectual and material cultures
Same as U84 AFAS 322

Credit 3 units. Arch: HUM BU: IS UColl: NW


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U16 Hist 3143 African American History I Through 1877

This course surveys the first half of African-American history from ancient African civilizations through Reconstruction. It covers the slave trade and the Middle Passage; life in northern, middle and southern colonies during the 17th and 18th centuries; African-American experiences during the Revolutionary era; African American's contributions to the creation of a new republic; the "peculiar institution" of slavery; the abolitionist movement; sectional conflicts in the antebellum period; the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3144 African American History I: 1600-1865

This course is a survey of the history of African Americans since colonial times through the Civil War. Topics of study include: the transatlantic slave trade; the arrival of the first Africans; slavery; acculturation and assimilation; miscegenation; free black communities; abolitionism, resistance and rebellion; the Civil War and emancipation.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3153 Women and Slaves in Classical Antiquity

This course investigates the lives of women and slaves in ancient Greece and Rome. It will explore not only the limitations imposed on women and slaves by the ruling male citizenry, but also the power and privileges each group exercised. We study how the society and economy formed the roles of women and slaves, how women and slaves were portrayed in literature and the arts, and how writers from Classical antiquity influenced later generations beyond the Roman Empire.
Same as U02 Classics 3151

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSP


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U16 Hist 3160 From Dice to Mahjong: A Cultural History of Gaming in China

This course examines games played in China and the circumstances that helped create and shape them. We will study games and material culture as a lens through which to examine Chinese society, including how daily life was shaped by the broader social environment.

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U16 Hist 3161 Chinese Civilization to 1911

China is the next frontier for U.S. business and is probably the single most powerful nation in the world, militarily, aside from America itself. The unique continuity of Chinese culture over thousands of years and its historically strong link to Chinese politics and power enables this course to lay a foundation of understanding China by tracing traditional Chinese thought, literature, and art from its beginnings in Shang bronzes and the Yijing to the "surrealism" of the eccentrics and the New Text School at the end of the imperial period.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3165 The Classic Dynasties of China

This course focuses on the T'ang, Song, Ming, and Qing Dynasties of China — the period roughly from the eighth century through the 19th century. This is an incredibly rich period in Chinese history in terms of cultural and historical pattern setting. The class is historically based but will include an array of readings in poetry and philosophy. Students are expected to analyze primary sources from the period under study, complete a research paper, and read between 5-7 books.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEA, HSP


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U16 Hist 3166 An Introduction to the History and Culture of China and Japan

This course surveys the major historical developments from ancient to modern times in the countries of China and Japan. Themes and continuities developed in dynastic or shogunate periods that have carried over into modern times will be emphasized. Students will also explore the art, literature, and philosophy of these two nations through visual presentations and extensive reading in their classic literature.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3168 The Creation of Modern Japan, 1568-1945

This course will explore the development of modern Japan from the Tokugawa Shogunate through the Meji Restoration and culminates in Japan's role in World War II. Besides the history of this period, there will be an extensive exploration of the cultural expression which took place in Japan during this time period. A core text will be used, but there will be significant reading in Japanese fiction, drama, and poetry.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEA, HSM, HSP, NW


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U16 Hist 3221 Latin America in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Credit 3 units. BU: IS


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U16 Hist 325 Byzantine Empire

Survey of Byzantine history from the deposition of Maurice to the fall of Constantinople. Special emphasis on Slavic migrations and settlements in the Balkans. Additional topics include urban continuity-discontinuity, iconoclasm, rise of Islam, and the Crusades.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3255 Religious Minorities of South Asia


Same as U66 RelSt 3255

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3256 The History of the Indian Subcontinent: Colonization to the Present

This course surveys the history of the Indian subcontinent from 1600 to the present. Topics will include: the rise of British colonialism; anti-colonial movements; the birth of Indian nationalism; Gandhi; Hindu-Muslim relations; independence and the partition of India and Pakistan; the evolution of present-day political systems; the movement for Bangladesh; Bollywood; urbanization; and the Kashmir conflict. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of identity in the historical processes that shaped the region.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEA, HSM


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U16 Hist 327 Topics in History of Developing Areas: Latin American Civilization

A general survey of Latin American history from the European arrival in the Americas to the present. The course will analyze the historical development of Latin American societies and will cover such topics as: race-class relations; revolutions; inter-American relations; and the challenges of globalization.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3274 Weimar Germany: Economics, Politics, Culture

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 328 Topics in History of Developing Areas

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 329 Topics in South Asian History: India, from Empire to Democracy: 1500 to the Present

A study of cultural, social, economic, and political change in South Asia, from early Mughal rule in the 16th century to the challenges that today face the world's largest democracy. Major events and personalities will be placed in the context of current historical debate and closely examined from multiple vantage points. Stress will be placed on diverse forms of cultural interaction through time, the legacy of the colonial era, and the means by which values and structures have been modified to meet expectations engendered by economic and political change. Women's roles will be recognized and voices from India's villages will join those at the highest levels of national dialogue.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3301 Gender, Sexuality and the Atlantic World

"Gender" is a complex term, informed by social and cultural expectations as well as physical anatomy, and this complexity was central to the creation of the Atlantic World, as historians have dubbed the exchange of ideas and people between Africa, Europe, and indigenous Americans after Columbus's 1492 voyage to the New World. Men and women behaved and were expected to behave differently, and contact between these populations revealed that there was more than one way of understanding male and female bodies. This inspired fear, entrenchment, opportunism, and curiosity in Atlantic World residents before 1820, most of whose daily lives were heavily influenced by expectations for their sex. This course will look at these reactions, and it will use the lens of gender to explore experiences like first contacts, power, religion, race, labor, and family in the early Americas. This course examines the experiences of African, European, and Indigenous individuals as their lives were shaped by gender and sexuality between 1400 and 1820. These groups increasingly came into contact during this period, and their varying expectations of how men and women should behave provided comfortable languages for understanding new situations and offered sites of acute conflict. Gender also was used by empires to govern overseas settlers. This course will look at such phenomenon, and it will use gender as the lens to explore experiences like first contacts, power, religion, race, labor, and family formation in the early Americas.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HSP, HTR


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U16 Hist 3308 Pirates, Princes, Popes: The Medici and Florence's Forgotten Centuries

This course explores the history of Florence and the dynasty which struggled to govern it over the course of three centuries. Between the death of Lorenzo the Magnificent in 1492 and the end of their line in 1737, the Medici transformed Florence from a weak, strife-ridden city-republic to a state powerful enough to hold its own against the major continental monarchies. From the inventions of Leonardo to the attractions of the Grand Tour, Florence and Tuscany shaped the course of western civilization. Students will learn about the Medici and their world and study key Renaissance and early modern developments in art and patronage; gender, sexuality and power; and the emergence of nation-states and national identities. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSP


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U16 Hist 3310 Society and Culture in Renaissance Italy

The intention of the course is to gain a solid knowledge of and appreciation for early modern or "Renaissance" Italy. The course will provide historical background for the understanding of the early modern Italian world. Not only will interesting details about individual people, places and things will be explored, but also, and more importantly, their function and meaning in early modern Italian society will be set into context and examined. Lectures will begin by broadly introducing selected early modern Italian topics including: marriage and the family; children and teenage culture; religious life; architecture and civic space; artists and artisans; pre-university education; humanism; the universities; popular culture; festivals; dance; and elements of early modern daily life including the use of domestic space, clothing and food.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3312 From Magna Graecia to the Mafia: History and Culture of Southern Italy

This course is about the rich history and culture of Southern Italy also called Il Mezzogiorno or Il Meridione. We will begin by discussing differences between the concepts of "South" and "North" in Italy and beyond. We will examine the foundation of civilization by studying Magna Graecia (Ancient Greater Greece) and Roman culture (through Vesuvius, Pompeii, Herculaneum). We will study the world of Federico II "il Barbarossa," the infamous Medieval queens of Naples, and the magnanimous Renaissance King Alfonso of Aragon. We will examine life in the South under Spanish and Bourbon rule and at the time of Italian Unification. The second half of the course will concentrate on a more contemporary South and the "Southern Question" through analysis of cultural and literary texts, film exerpts and video clips. We will conclude with the consequences of a distant Roman government and powerful substitutes for it (i.e., various types of mafia including the role of women in such activities). This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3320 Explosion on Contact: Combustible Politics of Medical Science in America from Colonial Times-Present

This course examines the complex relationship between politics and medical science in American history, using examples from Cotton Mather's stance on smallpox vaccinations to today's stem cell debate. We will analyze arguments about the nature of medical science and the relationship between science and public policy as reflected in debates about issues such as immigration, race, imperialism, gender, sexuality, reproduction, crime, land use, ethics, and religion. We also will look at the political consequences of controversial medico-scientific paradigms and practices throughout American history, such as vaccination, germ theory, midwifery, anesthesia, focal sepsis, phrenology, contagionism, quarantine, osteopathy, animal magnetism, eugenics, abortion, embryology, the Tuskegee syphilis study, and genetic mapping. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3321 The American Jewish Experience Within the Context of U.S. History, 1654-2009

This course traces the emergence of Judaism as it grew to become one of the three major religions in the United States, beginning with 23 original settlers' accidental arrival in 1654 in Dutch New Amsterdam (New York). Topics covered include: The Jews; slaves and the slave trade; obstacles to equality and missionary activity; Jewish participation in major American wars and events and their impact on all or portions of the Jewish community in the United States and the Confederacy (1861-1865); the established Jewish German-speaking community vs. the Jewish Russian & southeastern European immigrants to the United States; immigration restriction in 1924; the Holocaust; the State of Israel; Jewish support for the Civil Rights Movement; Black Jewish relations; and Anti-Semitism.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3322 American Jewish History, 1654-1865

This course will cover early American Jewish history. It will seek to grapple with the underlying factors that drove Jewish immigration to the U.S. from different parts of Europe and beyond. The course will also seek to understand the cultural, demographic, economic, and political dimensions and the broad context that defined the American Jewish experience during this period.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3323 Jews and Christians in Nazi Germany

This course examines how religion, culture, and ideology shaped the lives of Jews and Christians living in Germany during the Third Reich. We will examine the reactions of German Protestants and Catholics to the Nazi regime's oppression of Germany's Jewish population and attempt to annihilate European Jewry. We also focus on the experiences and reflections of German Jews living in these desperate times. Questions addressed include: To what degree did German Protestants and Catholics, who represented nearly 95 percent of the German populace, support Nazi policies? How did their identity as Germans inform their views of Jews? How did German Jews view their Christian neighbors and Christianity during this time?

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 336 Age of Discovery or Conquest? America Before Jamestown

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 340 Crisis and Creativity: European Intellectual History, 1890-1930

Through an examination of social and political theory, as well as literature and art, this course will explore the related crises of reason, selfhood and society experienced in the period of European modernism. Topics include: critiques of liberalism, democracy and reformulations of socialism; thematic and formal experimentation in the novel, drama, art and music; Freud and the exploration of the unconscious; and the fragmentation signaled in intellectual and cultural responses to the First World War.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 345 Popularizing History: The Holocaust and Memory


Same as U94 JINE 345

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3460 European Revolutions, 1789-1989

From the French Revolution in the late 18th century through the events in Eastern Europe in 1989, the history of modern Europe has been decisively shaped and arguably defined by revolutionary ideologies and actions. This course examines the ideas and practices of revolution by examining these and other significant revolutionary movements in Europe since 1789, including nationalistic and democratic revolutions of 1848 and the 1917 Russian Revolution that brought Soviet communism to power. Through a combination of lectures and primary and secondary readings, we will study each of these historical moments to understand the origins and consequences of these revolutionary events on politics, economy, society, and culture. We will also compare revolutionary movements and attempt to develop a working definition and broad understanding of "revolution" as a concept.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3461 Europe in a Dark Age, 1918-1940

An intensive survey of European history from the end of World War I to the Fall of France in 1940. This course will cover the political and diplomatic developments, but will also consider the cultural, economic and social conditions. The evolving traumas of this unhappy two decades will be the central theme, connecting events and moods in different countries and among different classes, but the less baleful situations will not be overlooked.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 347 Europe in the Age of Liberalism and Nationalism

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3471 The Balkans in Transition: Macedonia in Crisis

This course will examine the origins of political turmoil in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), with special reference to the wars of Yugoslav secession. Additional focus is on ties between the Kosovo Liberation Army and Osama bin Laden. Topics include broader issues such as Islamic Fundamentalism, Caspian Sea oil, trans-Balkan pipelines, the Clinton Doctrine, KLA insurgency in Greece, the Hague Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, Voislav Kostunica, and Western Reportage.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3472 Religious Violence in Western Europe, 1000-1700

This course examines religious violence in Europe from 1000 to 1700. Despite popular images of the premodern period, religious violence was the exception, rather than the rule. Students will focus on violence between Christians, heretics, Jews and Muslims during the medieval period, and among Christian groups following the Reformation. We will also examine violence on a smaller scale through an examination of the witch-craze.

Credit variable, maximum 4 units.


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U16 Hist 3473 The American Wars in Asia and the Pacific, 1898-1975

This course will examine the causes, conduct, and consequences of four wars that the United States has fought in Asia since 1898: the Philippine-American War; the Pacific theater in World War II; the Korean War; and the Vietnam War. We will focus on the political, diplomatic, and military aspects of these conflicts and explore how these wars shaped the history of Asia and the United States. The course provides an opportunity for students to conduct their own research and to hone their analytical and writing skills.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 349 Europe in the 20th Century

Examination of the development of Europe, including the impact of the World Wars, the Russian Revolution, Fascism, 3rd economic recovery and the development of the European Community after 1945.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3490 The Age of Extremes: A Global History of the 20th Century

The 20th century, declared historian Eric Hobsbawn, was an "age of extremes" — of great idealism, along with brutal militarism; of humanitarian crusades, along with calculated genocide; of unprecedented prosperity, along with crushing poverty. No part of the world escaped the extremes of the century. This course will look at the big picture of social, political, cultural, and economic changes, while also considering how those changes affected individual lives. The course begins with the high point of European imperialism on the cusp of World War I and closes with our current era of economic globalization alongside religious fundamentalism. Particularly important to this course will be the ideas that shaped history and the history of the 20th century from a global perspective.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HTR


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U16 Hist 3500 The St. Louis Mind

This course is intended to be an overview of the life of the mind in St. Louis from its founding to the present. The goal of the course is to examine key ideas and thinkers that have shaped St. Louis life and culture.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3504 Gandhi: The Man and His Methods

Few individuals have held as prominent a place in the historical imagination as Mohandas K. Gandhi. In this course, students will examine all facets of Gandhi's life and ideas in order to better address his role in history. Students will hone the fundamental skills of historical scholarship and research through a combination of traditional and creative assignments.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSA, HSM, NW


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U16 Hist 351 England under the Tudors

The late medieval collapse of order and the Tudor reaction, with the assertion of a strong personal monarchy. The nature of protest and its limitations; the Crown's consolidation of its authority; and the impact of the Reformation and the rise of Puritanism.


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U16 Hist 3510 The History of the Civil Rights Movement: Jamestown to Ferguson

This course examines the origins, evolution, and impact of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement beginning with the North American slave trade in Jamestown, Virginia, in 1619, through civil disobedience and race riots in the mid-20th century, to the response, locally and nationwide, to Michael Brown's violent death in Ferguson. Special emphasis is placed on tracing its impact and continuing legacy on contemporary ideas and social policies about race, ethnicity, culture and national origin.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ACH, ACS, HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3511 Religion, Race and the Culture Wars

This course traces the relationship between American religion and politics from the Cold War through the Civil Rights Movement and up to the present. We will explore how faith has driven diverse, often conflicting forms of political engagement. We will devote particular attention to civil rights activism (and opposition) in the 1950s and 1960s and to the growing prominence of evangelical Christianity since the 1970s. The course will allow students to critique interpretations of the place of religion in American life, exploring links (as well as differences) between the recent past and present headlines.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3512 Tudor-Stuart Britain, 1485-1688

This course will consider the development of a distinctly British state from the reign of Henry VII to the Glorious Revolution of 1688. The role which religious change (the Reformation and Protestant nonconformity), two political revolutions, and the beginnings of the "commercial revolution" played in this process will be examined. Through extensive use of contemporary readings, the course will also address the social and cultural changes that both influenced and reflected these wider political and religious transformations.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3513 Social History of Modern Britain in Literature

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3514 Early Modern England Under the Tudors and Stuarts

This course will examine the transformation of England and its people from the 16th to the 18th century and consider how the English came to terms with their changing world. Over the course of 200 years, England went from being a second-rate kingdom on the periphery of Europe to a world power with far-flung colonies. Politics, religion, society, and the economy were all transformed. The power of the sovereign was eclipsed by Parliament, the Church of England broke away from Rome, and a largely agrarian society became increasingly urban and commercial.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 3517 A History of Youth in the United States

Throughout the history of the United States, youth has been feared for its power and desired for its potential. The position of young people in American society has evolved in relation to assumptions about race, class, and gender, as well as developments in politics and culture. This course uses the history of the ideals and experiences of youth to understand changes in the requirements for autonomy. Emphasis will be placed on moments when youth exerted power, both real and imagined, in American society, and how leaders have used the fear and desire of youth to motivate cultural, political, or economic change.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 352 Ireland and England Since 1800

This course will explore the relationship between Ireland and England during the course of the Union between the two nations, 1801-1923. It will consider a variety of political, economic and social factors which shaped both nations and how the "Irish Question" was perceived on both sides of the Irish Sea.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3520 "Happy Wars and Sad Love Songs": A History of Ireland

Through a broad range of primary sources — including imaginative literature and music — this course examines Ireland's relations with, and contributions to, the wider history of the British Isles and Europe, as well as the consequences of the Irish diaspora in the modern era. The course is arranged thematically and chronologically, and lessons address the major trends in the history of Ireland from earliest times to the present day, with roughly two-thirds of the semester focusing on the last two and a half centuries. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 3525 U.S. Environmental History

Environmental history is the analysis of the interplay between human beings and their environment over time. This course will examine this interplay throughout the history of the United States, paying specific attention to the St. Louis region. Major topics will include: the impact of humans on the environment before and after European colonization; environmental changes brought about by the transportation and commercial revolutions; environmental consequences of rapid urbanization and industrialization in the second half of the 19th century; environmental reforms during the Progressive era; social consequences of pollution in the 20th century; and contemporary environmental movement(s).

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3526 Science and Society

Science, considered as a body of knowledge and as a social fact, has profoundly shaped our society and culture. This course examines the nature of how issues of science-related risk have been tackled in the U.S. over time, especially in the area of hazards to environment and health. We take as our point of entry some contemporary scientific issues with far-reaching implications, both for the public welfare and for more specific constituencies or interest groups.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3527 United States History of Medicine

This course offers an overview of the history of medicine in the United States from contact to the present. We will not only look at the science of the disease, but the social and cultural impact of the experience for individuals, social groups, and political institutions. Epidemics we will discuss include: cholera, smallpox, tuberculosis, swine flu, polio, and HIV/Aids, to name a few. We will also explore the professionalism of doctors; competition from other medical practioners; the development of the hospital; changes in public health; the evolution of health insurance; and the emergence of chronic diseases. We will pay particular attention to issues of race, class and gender.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3528 America Meets the Atom: U.S. Nuclear History, 1895-Present

We will take a holistic view of America's evolving acquaintance with the atom, examining cultural, economic, political, scientific, and environmental facets of nuclear development since 1895, including public and official responses to related problems. The course will place nuclear technology in both national and international context, considering its relation to U.S. foreign relations and national security concerns, as well as domestic circumstances.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 354 Victorian Britain

A survey of British history from the 1830s to the modern period, with an emphasis on society and politics.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3540 Reconsidering the Victorians

While the label "Victorian" often conjures up images of decorum, prudery, and restraint, the 63-year reign of Britain's Queen Victoria has also been characterized as an age of progress, empire, and confidence — even arrogance. Through a selection of primary sources and secondary scholarship, this seminar will explore (and challenge) many of the attitudes, ideals and values associated with Victorian Britain. In the process, we will examine themes of reform, modernization, and periodization, and develop provisional definitions of what it meant (and means) to be "Victorian." This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3541 Crime, Misery and Vice: The Victorian Underworld

In this seminar, students will read a selection of late-Victorian novels, plays and novellas. Through a combination of class discussion, written assignments, and other projects, students will explore in their original contexts the social, cultural, economic and political themes of works such as: The Moonstone; The Return of Sherlock Holmes; Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; The Time Machine; and Dracula. In the process, students will explore (and challenge) many of the attitudes, ideals and values associated with the era, and develop provisional definitions of what it meant (and means) to be "Victorian." This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3542 Crime and Punishment in England, 1500-1800

In this course, we will study the history and cultural role of crime and punishment in early- modern England. We will examine attitudes to crime and criminality; we will also explore the relationships between laws and the people who made, broke, enforced, or selectively ignored them. The smaller size of a summer class allows for vibrant discussion, and our meetings will be built around conversation, intensive engagement with primary and secondary sources, and ongoing small-group projects that are fueled by the digital humanities. After the first two days of introduction to the topic and historical context, the course will follow a pattern that alternates assignments of academic articles or book chapters with in-class discussion of primary sources such as pamphlets, ballads, prison sermons, trial records, and illustrations. Written assessments each Friday will be followed by films; from Arden of Faversham to Moll Cutpurse, crimes and criminals had a fierce hold on the imagination of early modern authors and audiences alike, and print and theatrical culture influenced both criminal and legal practice. Through analysis and discussion of these and other primary sources, we will gain insight into the social relations, gender dynamics, power structures, religious tensions, and political dealings of early-modern England.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 355 20th-Century Britain

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 3560 20th-Century Europe

In 1914, several European nations dominated much of the world through vast overseas empires in which they exercised military, political, and economic power. Today, an increasingly united Europe has reemerged as a major geopolitical entity that some see as a serious challenger to American global supremacy. This course explores the decline, fall, and slow return of the "new Europe" by examining the history of Europe from the First World War to the present. It considers the decline of Europe brought about by two devastating wars, and the crucial impact of war and genocide in shaping European politics, society, and culture; the place of Europe in the Cold War; and the European retreat from empire in the postwar era. It also examines the development of a new idea of Europe through the formation of economic and political institutions that have created the European Union. Throughout the course, special emphasis will be placed on changing concepts of "Europe" and the meanings of European identity in the 20th and into the 21st century.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 3562 20th-Century Russian History

A survey of Russian history from 1900 to the present. The course emphasizes the Russian Revolutions at the beginning and end of the century, Stalinism, de-Stalinization, and post-communist society. Much attention will be given to the assumptions and conclusions of schools of historical analysis, Marxist, totalitarian, Kremlinologist, and revisionist.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3564 Forbidden Sexual Practices in Medieval Europe

During the middle ages, sexuality was seen as a force of evil that constantly threatened human salvation and called for severe acts of penance. Although many assume that the sexual was not much spoken of in a culture so dominated by religion, different legal, medical, political, and literary discourses not only discussed sex, but they showed particular interest in illicit sexual relations and transgressions. This course focuses on some of these discussions and particularly their treatment of the so called "unmentionable sins": incest, sodomy, prostitution, homosexual love, adultery, and sexual abuse. By examining a variety of literary, historical, and scientific texts, the course will explore the construction of certain forbidden sexual identities, attitudes, and practices during the medieval period, and show how "unnatural sex" became a preferred tool in the propoganda of religious ideals.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3570 The Rise of the Atlantic World, 1492-1830

Columbus's voyage to the Americas inaugurated the rise of the Atlantic World, characterized by an unprecedented exchange of peoples, plants, and pathogens. Thus, the Atlantic Ocean after 1492 should not be seen as a barrier, but instead as a vibrant frontier of cultural and economic exchange which shaped the histories of five continents: Europe, Africa, North and South America, and Asia.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 358 The British Empire, 1783-Present

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3580 The History of the British Empire

This survey course will help students situate the British Empire within its global context, explore the dominant personalities and their roles in shaping British policy, and understand the background to some of the major conflicts occurring today. Britain at one time controlled nearly 40 percent of the world's territories. She was a major participant in World War I and II and ranked as the premier naval power in the world. The end of the British Empire in the 1960s led to the creation of numerous new nation-states around the globe.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 3591 No Fail-Safe: America, the Atomic Bomb, and the Cold War

In this discussion-based course, we will examine a vivid array of source material to explore how Americans experienced the Cold War, taking as a point of entry perhaps the most worrisome obsession of the period: the atomic bomb. We will revisit developments on the local level in St. Louis that fundamentally shaped national events, as well as those on an international stage even further removed. From the earliest representations of nuclear weapons in fiction, to their actual use and proliferation, we will consider the "public imaginary" of aspiration and fear surrounding the atom. We will analyze science, policy, politics, and culture to grapple with one of the most powerful influences in American life at mid-century, reaching a deeper understanding of what it meant to witness these difficult, dangerous, and truly formative years.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3601 The Dissolution of Yugoslavia: 1945-2001

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3609 Italian Style: A History of Italian Fashion and Design

The intention of this course is to gain an introductory knowledge of and appreciation for the stunning material culture produced in Italy in the form of fashion and design. Students will explore early Italian fashion, sumptuary legislation, and an early modern Itallian costume manual. Students will also examine what is distinctive about Italian fashion through the ages and underline the unique contributions that stylists have contributed to the Italian and international fashion capital, Milan. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3610 Women and Gender in Renaissance Italy

The intention of the course is to gain a solid knowledge of and appreciation for the experience of women who lived in early modern or "Renaissance" Italy. We will explore what is distinctive about the Renaissance era for women and underline the unique contributions that women have made to early modern Italian society and culture and how their roles and participation in their world differed from those of the men with whom they interacted. Specifically we will examine: theories, ideas, and laws about women; women and the creation of high culture; women and religion; homemakers, working women and women's economic roles; and women, their bodies, and the longue durée of women's history. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 3611 The Emergence of Modern Afghanistan

This course is an overview of major themes in 19th- and 20th-century Afghan history, including Islam, modernization, centralization, tribalism, invasion, social change, ethnicity, and resistance.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3612 Artisans & Crafts in the Workshops of Renaissance Italy

This course will study the antichi mestieri (old world trades) and the artisans behind the production of material culture in Renaissance Italy. In addition to studying the crafts produced in that society, we will discuss the relevant terminology, defining and discussing words and concepts such as artisan, artifex, art, craft, minor and major arts, and work. We also learn about goldsmiths, woodworkers, bakers, construction workers, ceramicists, apothecaries, and painters of the time. We will conclude the course by examining the old world yet necessarily avant-garde artisan culture still alive in Rome today despite the consequences of globalization and industrialization. Fully online course. Only University College students may receive credit for fully online courses.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HTR


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U16 Hist 3620 Research Seminar: Liberals and Conservatives in Recent American History

This course explores the interplay of modern American liberalism and conservatism, the two ideologies/political worldviews that have defined U.S. politics since the 1930s. It is impossible fully to understand one without also studying the other. Modern liberalism became a political force during the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, while modern conservatism emerged as a viable movement during the early Cold War years. Looking at political thought, grassroots activism, and electoral politics, the course will trace the evolution of both political perspectives, along with their frequent intersections, from the New Deal through the postwar and Reagan eras and up to the present.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ACH, ACS, HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3621 Colonial America to the Revolution

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3631 The New American Metropolis

This course provides a multidisciplinary introduction to urban studies and more specifically, the modern American metropolitan region. We draw on elements of the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and visual arts to explore a range of topics, including the city in history, the city as an idea, design with nature, urban politics, urban economics, urban design, managing the city, urban neighborhoods, and the future of the city. We balance more conventional reading and written assignments with field research to provide a deeper, more comprehensive understanding of this most important American artifact, and to develop more critical perspectives on the challenges facing present and future communities.
Same as U89 AMCS 363

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3632 Age of the Robber Barons

Perhaps no group of business leaders has captured the popular imagination to the extent of Gilded Age industrialists. They were the architects of a period of rapid and profound economic growth in the United States that created networks of transcontinental railroads, huge factories and urban centers, fundamental transformations in the lives of workers and consumers, and vast fortunes. Naturally, historians' interpretations of this group and age have varied widely — were they "captains of industry," as they liked to fashion themselves, or "robber barons"? This course will examine the rise of these industrial leaders and the age they helped create.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3633 Creating a National Memory, 1790-1840

In this course, we will analyze differences between history as the best evidence suggests it occurred and culturally constructed versions of the past. We will explore the forgotten, sometimes bizarre (in retrospect, often humorous) "bodily turn" in American memory culture from 1790 through 1840, when patriotic Americans collected historical artifacts, including bodily relics, of their country's dying Revolutionary war heroes. Topics include: African-American Revolutionary War veterans' memories; the popular science of memory in the early republic; influential theologies of memory; the pedagogy of memory; feminist linkage of politics to memory; and traveling "freak shows." This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 364 American Social Reform, 1820-1920

This course has two primary goals — to survey a variety of reform efforts from 1820 through 1920 and to use these as a lens through which to examine changes in American culture and social thought during this period. We will explore such movements as the Second Great Awakening, abolitionism, women's suffrage, institutional reforms, Progressivism, Populism, feminism, racial reforms (including African Americans, Native Americans and immigrants), and prohibition. Throughout the course we will consider the roles of gender and of local, state, and federal governments in reform. Furthermore, the course will address how the development of social science affected social thought.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3640 America Between the Wars

This course will examine the United States during the decades between World War I and World War II. In the years between 1919 and 1945, Americans experienced significant economic, political, and cultural change. The great wealth and excess of the Roaring '20s came to an abrupt halt with the stock market crash and the deprivation of the Great Depression. The government's restorative efforts in the '30s and America's entry into World War II led to the emergence of the U.S. as a superpower in 1945. The '20s and '30s defined the generations that lived through them and forged a modern national identity. Students will gain a better understanding of how the country was changed and modernized by these two decades.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3641 A Social History of World War I: Reconsidering the Great War in Global Context

World War I changed the course of world history. It brought about the disintegration of four vast empires and seriously undermined the stability of two others. At the same time, World War I confirmed the arrival of the United States onto the world stage and re-drew the political and territorial frontiers of central and southeast Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and the Pacific. We will place the First World War in a global context, examining it from social, political, economic, and military viewpoints, and consider its continuing legacy into the 21st century. This course is fully online. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM


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U16 Hist 3642 World War I: 1908-1923

This course will examine one of the great tragedies of recorded human history, for the First World War was a global affair not confined to European battlefields alone. It will begin with the annexation crisis of 1908 and conclude with the Treaty of Lausanne in 1923. In addition, there will be an epilogue on the origins of World War II. By 1923, no less than four of Europe's great empires had gone the way of all flesh, and revolutionary fervor was in the air from Bavaria to Siberia. A new political order rose on the ashes of the old, an order that planted the seeds for the next epic struggle that began in September of 1939. Recent scholarship has brought to light many fascinating details about WWI that necessitate a rewriting of accepted orthodoxy. This course will seek to stimulate fresh discussion by examining some of that source material up close.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3643 Science and Society

Science, considered as a body of knowledge and as a social fact, has profoundly shaped our society and culture. This course examines the nature of how issues of science-related risk have been tackled in the U.S. over time, especially in the area of hazards to enviroment and health. We take as our point of entry some contemporary scientific issues with far-reaching implications, both for the public welfare and for more specific constituencies or interest groups.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3644 World War II in Global Perspective

This course will examine the origins, conduct, and consequences of the Second World War. Topics include political, diplomatic and military strategies, the experience of civilian populations, and the role of resistance movements. The course will also explore how the war reshaped the politics and culture of peoples around the world — fueling nationalist movements in Asia and Africa and transforming attitudes toward military conflict in Europe. The course provides an opportunity for students to conduct their own research into historical topics and to hone their writing skills.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HTR


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U16 Hist 3645 Pursuing Happiness in America

This course considers how and why Americans' beliefs about the nature and sources of happiness have changed. Topics include: colonial American preacher Jonathan Edwards' theology of joy; early American political revolutionaries' reasoning from the universality of human "pursuit of happiness," and subsequent revolutions in economy, sentiments, sexuality, psychology, and pharmacology that, during the following two centuries, were successively billed as lodestones toward popular happiness.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3647 Merchant Empires From 1450-1750

In the early modern period, European merchants sailed across the globe in search of exotic goods. What began as trading voyages soon became the colonization, and sometimes conquest, of distant lands. This course will trace the development of early European overseas empires from their commerical roots. Students will compare Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, and English approaches to trade and empire in Asia, Africa, and the New World. Topics will include piracy, slavery, and corporate power.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3651 The British Empire in India and Africa

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3652 Women in Victorian Britain

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3659 The History of Food in America

Why do we eat what we eat? And what does it tell us about the American historical experience? Through an examination of food — its preparation, economics, social implications and changes over time — we can gain a greater understanding of the American historical experience. This course will use historical foodways as a vehicle to gain a greater understanding of the impact of industrialization and transportation, gender, race and emerging national identity in the United States. The primary focus will be on the 19th and 20th centuries, combining readings, demonstration and discussions in a seminar-format class.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3660 The Politics of New Communications Practices in America, 1760-Present

From town criers in pre-Revolutionary America to internet viral videos in the 21st century, changing communications technologies and practices in America shaped and reshaped not only political style but also political substances and outcomes. To learn how this was so historically, we consider such themes as: the gendering of rumor and innuendo in early America; "grapevine" communication by African-American slaves; the telegraph and 19th-century "spiritism"; Alexander Graham Bell and how intertwined politics of race, ethnicity and nation in Gilded Age America were affected by the emerging phonograph, telephone and cinematic technology; and social and political affects and cache of emergent radio, television, CB radio, ham radio, and the still-changing internet. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3661 The Politics of Medical Science in America: Colonial Times to the Present

This course examines the complex relationship between politics and medical science in American history, using examples from Cotton Mather's stance on smallpox vaccinations to Michael J. Fox's role in today's stem cell debate. We will analyze arguments about the nature of medical science and the relationship between science and public policy as reflected in debates about issues such as immigration, race, imperialism, gender, sexuality, reproduction, crime, land use, ethics and religion. We will also look at the political consequences of controversial medico-scientific paradigms and practices throughout American history, such as: vaccination; germ theory; midwifery; anesthesia; focal sepsis; phrenology; contagionism; quarantine; osteopathy; animal magnetism; eugenics; abortion; embryology; the Tuskegee syphilis study; and genetic mapping. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3662 The Politics of Transportation in America, 1790-Present

Hope in the early United States that canals and railroads would "conquer space," bringing Americans together as one, proved ironic when these technologies were used to fight a continentwide Civil War. This course explores how throughout American history, new transportation habits, methods, regulations, and infrastructure affected politics and society in unforeseen ways. Topics include: railroads and the creation of modern sensibilities about time; the automobile and changing courtship mores; federal use of the interstate commerce clause to regulate contraceptive products; race and gender in early American avionics; creation of the Ellis Island immigrant processing station; the military justification for the Interstate Highway System; "freedom rides" and the Civil Rights movement; newly declassified revelations about the 1960s "space race," and the politics of gasoline production and consumption.

Credit 3 units. UColl: OLI


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U16 Hist 3663 Panics, Recessions, and Depressions in America, 1789-Present

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3665 The Politics of Secrecy in America, 1790-Present

From fears of secret machinations by British colonial ministers that underwrote the American Revolution to conspiratorial theories about the intent of Lincoln and his "Black Republicans" that precipitated southern secession in 1860 and 1861 to contemporaneous conspiracy theory about the 2000 and 2004 elections, the 9/11 attacks and the present "War on Terror," secrets — real and imagined — have dramatically influenced political attitudes, beliefs and practices in American history. When and why did "openess" and "privacy" become key American values? Have then-secret happenings and decisions shaped American history as much as contemporaneous overt choices and occurrences? How have changes in the repertoire of secrets that Americans keep from, and suspect about, each other shaped and revealed contemporaneous American politics and society? This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS, OLI


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U16 Hist 3666 The History of Eating in America from Colonial Times to the Present

This course is a history of the myriad ways that Americans have used food to mark class, gender, style, region, patriotism, dissent, politics, and personality, from the "starving time" in colonial Jamestown to today's "Fast Food Nation." Topics include the Boston Tea Party, African-American foodways, race and assimilation in regional food cultures, "clay-eaters" in antebellum America, the creation of food-regulation agencies in the late-19th century, cooking as a gendered activity and the rise of "dieting." This course is fully online. Only University College students may receive credit for fully online courses.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3667 The Politics of Eating in America, Colonial Times to Present

From the "starving time" in colonial Jamestown to today's "Fast Food Nation," food has been a subject and scene of fierce social and political contestation. This course explores the myriad, surprising ways, that Americans across the centuries have used food to mark class, gender, style, region, patriotism, dissent, politics, and personality. Topics include the Boston Tea Party, tavern culture and the American Revolution, African-American foodways, race and assimilation in regional food cultures, "clay-eaters" in antebellum America, the creation of food-regulation agencies in the late 19th century, "Americanization" of once "foreign" foods, cooking as a gendered activity, military use of prepared food in World War II and in American homes after the war, and histories and politics of vegetarianism, of concepts of nutrition, of smoking, of obesity, dieting and eating disorders. This course is fully online. Only University College students may receive credit for fully online courses.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3668 The Politics of Natural Disasters in America from Colonial Times to the Present

From a series of back-to-back 1775 hurricanes and other meteorological happenings that contestants in the American Revolution interpreted as divine interventions in — and commentary about — the political and military storms of their era, to the New Madrid earthquakes of the early 19th century, "Dust Bowl" conditions in the 1930s and the physical and cultural devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina early in this decade, natural disasters have provoked intense social and political reactions in the United States. This course explores historically how such events have made pressing provocative questions about the relief role of government in a democracy, how human beings interact with and alter their natural environments, whether natural disasters are ultimately to be understood meteorologically or as "acts of God." This course is fully online. Only University College students may receive credit for fully online courses.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3669 The Making of Modern Europe, 1945 to the Present

This course examines the history of Europe from the end of World War II to the present day. Topics include: the place of Europe in the Cold War; the divergent paths and experiences of Western and Eastern Europe; the emergence of the European Union from economic and political treaties and arrangements; the 1968 student uprisings throughout Europe; the "revolutions" of 1989 throughout Eastern Europe; the collapse of the Soviet Union and reunification of Germany; the Balkan Wars of the 1990s and current social problems related to minority ethnic and religious groups living the places such as Britain, France, and Germany.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 367 Modern America: 1877-1929

Concentrates on the period between the labor turmoil of 1877 and the economic collapse of 1929. Emphasis on rising industrialism and the ambivalent and varied American responses to it.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3670 The Conservative Movement in America

Over the last several decades, the conservative movement has grown into an influential force in American society. How did this come about? What do we now mean by "conservatism," and how does this differ from the conservatism of 50 years ago? This class traces the evolution of the many forms of American conservatism from the 1930s to the present, looking at political thought, grassroots activism, and electoral politics.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3671 Liberals, Conservatives, and American Presidents - from Roosevelt to Reagan to Obama

As the nation chooses a new president, the events of the Obama years — recession, recovery, divided government, profound social changes, and renewed fears — already are crying out for historical perspective. This course offers such perspective by exploring the political worldviews that have defined U.S. politics since the 1930s, along with the presidential administrations that have shaped their development. Modern liberalism became a force during the presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Modern conservatism came of age with the election of Ronald Reagan. By tracing the evolution of liberalism and conservatism, this course offers a chance to compare the Obama presidency with past administrations and to put the unfolding presidential campaign in context.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3672 The Native American Experience

This course will examine the histories of North America's native peoples from the period of contact through the 19th century. We will begin by reconstructing the great diversity of cultural practices and political orientations in Native America during the era of European colonization, and will move on to discover how various Indian peoples responded to the coming of the Europeans. We will use examples from around North America, seeking whenever possible to construct the past on Indian terms, using sources created by the natives themselves. Students will come away from the course with a thorough overview of the Indian experience in early America, as well as a better sense of how the interaction of cultures shaped American nationhood.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3677 The History of Natural Disasters in America from Colonial Times to the Present

Natural disasters have provoked intense social and political reactions in the United States. This course explores how such happenings have raised questions about the relief role of government, human interaction with natural environments, and the natural or divine source of these disasters. In exploring these questions, we will take a look at a number of natural disasters in American history: back-to-back 1775 hurricanes that were interpreted as divine interventions; the New Madrid earthquakes of the early-19th century; the 1889 Johnstown flood; the 1895 Charleston earthquake; the Galveston Hurricane of 1900; "Dust Bowl" conditions in the 1930s; and the recent Hurricane Katrina. This course is fully online. Only University College students may receive credit for fully online courses.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3678 Colonial America: Representation and Reality

This course explores the history of continental North America from the time of European exploration until the 1776 Rebellion of the future United States. Students will read and analyze a variety of lesser-known primary sources that challenge traditional histories of this era. Relatedly, students will learn to separate historical opinions from their complex contexts and to identify how the narratives we often take for granted became standard. In the process, students will also take a detailed look at the complex roles played by race, gender, religion, cultural contact, economic development, and politics in early America.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3680 American Environmental History

This course examines United States environmental history and the relationship between American culture and the natural world. We explore how people have shaped and thought about the environment, and how they have both protected and polluted it. As we consider how the natural world has influenced American history, society, and policy, we study topics such as the emergence of ecological consciousness, the development of the environmental movement, the impact of industrialization and urban growth, and the birth of environmental justice.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3688 A History of the Death Penalty in American Society

To examine the evolution of capital punishment in American Society from colonial times to the present day. Special focus will be paid to the following areas: (1) the evolving philosophical justifications for the death penalty and how these evolving philosophical roots were reflected in actual practice; (2) societal factors that created variances in capital punishment from region to region; (3) the role of race in the evolution of the death penalty; (4) the evolution of the opposition movement; and (5) the evolution of constitutional attacks upon capital punishment itself.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 369 American Urban History: Colonial Times to World War I

The location and development of cities from colonial times to World War I. Topics include colonial urban settlements, the influence of towns in the Revolution and establishment of the new nation, the role of cities in the development of West, urban industrialization, the impact of immigration and internal migration, urban governmental patters, corruption of reform movements, planning and beautification movements, the development of utilities and transportation systems, the growth of suburbs, and urban culture.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3690 Sports in American History

This course examines American sports from the colonial period through the 21st century, with emphasis on the rise of organized sports institutions, as well as individual and team play, and their role in shaping and influencing American society and culture. Students also will examine the relationships of race, class, gender, ethnicity, and religion in sports. These issues will be discussed in the context of baseball, football, basketball, tennis, and soccer, as well as the Olympics and other international sport.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3691 Greed, Injustice, and the Desire for More in the Ancient Mediterranean


Same as U02 Classics 369

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3692 Great Books that Changed American History

Literature has history. Literature reflects history. But literature also makes history, and it is to the role of published texts in affecting the flow of U.S. history that this course is dedicated. We will read and historicize a wide selection of canonical works from 1776 through the 1980s, and see how they reflected and affected the American Revolution, slavery and abolitionism, industrialization and its discontents, settling the West and the rise of conservatism. We will consider the question of causality in history, and how we understand the role of intellectuals, writers and reading publics in molding the worlds in which they live.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 370 American Cities Since World War I

This course will examine dramatic changes and crises in U.S. cities since the First World War. Topics include the impact of the automobile and highways on urban areas, effects of the Great Depression and World War II, radical innovations in industrial production and consumer culture, federal involvement in municipal government, competing urban renewal strategies, 20th-century ethnic and racial changes, growing suburban predominance in many metropolitan areas, and the development of contemporary urban economy and culture.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3700 The History of the Modern Civil Rights Movement in the United States: 1950-1970

This course examines the emergence, development, and results of the modern Civil Rights Movement, as well as its continuing legacy for contemporary ideas about race, ethnicity, and national origin.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3702 The Rear View: Automobility in American Culture

This course treats the automobile as a technological invention that has transformed American landscape, industry, and culture. Using maps, films, archival sources, literature, and cultural criticism, we will trace the impact of automobility on 20th-century America by exploring a wide range of topics.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3703 The Apollo Moon Landings in American History

This course explores historically not only the familiar accomplishments and adventures of the Apollo moon landings, but their once-classified cold-war contexts and purposes, including questions the missions raised: What is the proper place of "big science" and "big government" in a liberal democracy? Do scientific understandings threaten or complement religious and aesthetic ways of comprehending nature and humanity? As machines are made more sophisticated, do they augment, or upstage, the human beings who produce them? Can we explore nature scientifically without conquering it imperially? Topics include: gender, race and regionalism within the space program; "Operation Paperclip" and the once-classified Nazi pasts of dozens of key German expatriate engineers and scientists who spearheaded the design of the Saturn V; the politics of space-program funding; the role of media, especially television, in influencing popular understandings of Project Apollo; the Soviet Union's efforts to get to the moon first; and why the United States has not returned to the moon since Apollo. This course is fully online. Only University College students may receive credit for fully online courses.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ACH, HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 371 The History of the British Isles

This course examines the history of the British Isles from earliest times to the present-centuries in which Britain was repeatedly conquered, and conquered others. The course traces the political, social, and cultural developments of islands, and places that history in wider European, Atlantic, and even world contexts.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3710 Environment and Health in the U.S. — A History of Controversies

Do dirty hands really make you sick? Could your local swimming pool kill you? What does the atom really mean to you, to your health, and to your security? Popular answers to all of these questions have changed over time, but nevertheless, they have emerged at the intersection of scientific expertise and public understanding. This course explores the social, cultural, and political contextualization of scientific knowledge in the United States, focusing on two pivotal issues: the environmental origins of disease and the rise of nuclear technologies. We will explore key developments in both areas while taking a close look at some potent controversies: germ theory; industrial health and safety; toxic chemicals and asbestos; nuclear power, fallout, and the radioactive workplace.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 373 History of U.S. Foreign Relations to 1914

The development of the United States from colony to hemispheric empire and to the threshold of world power. Investigation of historical traditions with particular attention to domestic influences.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3740 U.S. Women's History

This is a survey course of the history of women in America from the colonial era to the present. Students will analyze the political, social and economic factors that influenced women's experiences and their role in shaping the development of our nation. We will look at the impact that race, class and region had on different groups of women over time. Topics include: the witchcraft craze; the suffrage movement; the impact of industrialization; women's roles during wartime; the impact of the media and commercialization; and the role of women in the Civil Rights Movement and its impact on the feminist movement.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3742 U.S. Foreign Relations, 1914-1989

This course will explore the goals, content, and conduct of U.S. Foreign Policy from 1914 to 1989, a span of 75 years that not only witnessed two world wars and the "Cold War," but also actions by U.S. policy makers and others that set the stage for national security crises of the early 21st century. We will examine the international presence of the United States as it took shape in every region of the world, from Latin America and Asia to the Middle East and Europe.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 375 Topics in Women's History

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3751 Topics in Women's History

A comparative survey of United States and British women's history from the 19th century to the present, focusing on suffrage, work, legal advances, family, sexuality, and citizenship. Extensive primary source readings with an emphasis on discussion

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3755 Topics in Women's History: U.S. Women's History from 1869 to the Present

This course examines women's social, political, cultural and economic status in the United States since 1869. In this class, we pay special attention to the changing ideological foundation for women's roles. We investigate how the social and economic transformations that accompanied industrialization and urbanization influenced women's lives and look closely at the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's experiences. We explore how women used their defined roles to create positions of influence in American society and thereby overcame constraints they faced in achieving social and political equity. This class utilizes race and class as critical categories for understanding women's experiences while exploring the ways in which racial and economic boundaries limited notions of "sisterhood." Topics discussed include: women's domestic and family roles; political status and public activities; access to education; sexuality and reproductive history; and participation in the labor force.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 376 Landmarks in the History of Christianity


Same as U66 RelSt 356

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3761 Warriors, Merchants, Monks, and Courtesans: Ancient Narratives of Globalization in Google Earth

This course examines the history of globalization through the texts and narrative accounts of those who lived and traveled along the trade routes of the Old World. Using hands-on tutorials and projects in Google Earth, we will examine how day-to-day local interactions and the experiences of individuals contributed to broader cultural exchanges and the shaping of ancient cosmopolitan centers. The course will cover four broad anthropological themes related to Old World history and globalization in conjunction with weekly lessons in Google Earth: globalization; culture and power; the intersection of commerce, politics, and religion; and the impact of climate and geography on history.
Same as U69 Anthro 376

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 377 Ideologies in American Society: From the Colonial Period to Reconstruction

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3770 Advertising and American Society, 1790-Present

Surprisingly "restless in the midst of abundance." Thus the French visitor Alexis de Tocqueville characterized Americans in the 1830s. This course explores how advertising and its antecedents helped to create and sustain this characteristic American angst. Topics include: early American runaway-slave advertisements and political propaganda; coded Victorian-era advertising; connections between religious revivalism and the professionalization of advertising in the 1920s; the history of efforts to use medical and psychological principles to make advertising irresistible; advertising and the creation of the "teenager" as a common concept; Lady Bird Johnson's crusade against excessive billboard advertising; controversies about tobacco and other "vice" advertising; and how race, class, gender ethnicity, sexuality, and aesthetics have, by turns, been reinforced, obscured, illuminated, exemplified, and transformed through advertising. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS, OLI


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U16 Hist 3771 Islamic Spain (Al-Andalus): Three Faiths, One Land

From the VIII to the XV century, while northern Europe floundered in the Dark Ages, the Iberian Peninsula flourished under Islamic control. "Al-Andalus" became a place in which three different cultures and religious faiths — Muslims, Jews and Christians — coexisted and interacted in productive eras of peaceful coexistence enlaced with periods of violent confrontation. This complex and important period in Spain's history is the focus of this course. We will study historical events that shaped the period, along with social, cultural, intellectual, and linguistic dimensions of al-Andalus. We also will use this historical backdrop to address issues and questions associated with the social and political relationship between Spain and Arabic/Muslim countries today.
Same as U94 JINE 377

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3776 History of American Business, Management and Technology

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of the sociocultural aspects and elements in American business, management and technology. Its primary focus and emphasis, therefore, is directed to understanding how the sociocultural elements and aspects of American business, management and technology have developed and evolved over time. This course will also examine how business and management have helped to influence and shape how American society and culture have developed and been influenced by these evolutions in business and management.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3780 St. Louis Past and Present

This course is an overview of the history of St. Louis from 1764 to the present. Main topics include: colonial St. Louis; St. Louis as an "urban frontier"; St. Louis in the Age of Steam; slavery in St. Louis; St. Louis during the Civil War; St. Louis during the Gilded Age; the 1904 World's Fair; the 1907 and 1917 master plans; the Great Migration and the emergence of African-American St. Louis; the impact of the automobile on the city; St. Louis during the Depression & World War II; postwar suburbanization; the turmoil of the '60s; metropolitan fragmentation; and the growth of St. Louis' "edge cities."

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3782 Medicine and Magic in Europe in the Early Modern Period

This course will explore the European medical world in general and the European-Jewish medical world in particular from the Middle Ages to the threshold of modernity. Throughout the course we will focus on the place of "magic" in the early modern medical "marketplace," and its relations to the emergence of modern "science" and medicine. Further discussion will be dedicated to the role of the magical healers, their methods of treatment, and to the attitudes toward them in the Jewish and Christian societies. We will also examine the connection between gender, the great witch-hunt and the process of "Medicalization," discuss the phenomenon of exorcism as a medical treatment, and address the attitude of the Enlightenment toward magic and the "irrational."

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 379 Transforming Ideologies in American Life II: From Reconstruction to the Present

This course is an overview of the ideologies that transformed American life from Reconstruction to the present. Main topics include: Social Darwinism, pragmatism, the social gospel, progressivism, religious fundamentalism, liberalism, the civil rights movement, feminism, the new left, environmentalism, and new conservatism.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 380 African-American History since 1865

Examination of the economic, political, social, and cultural factors that shaped the African-American experience in the United States from the close of the Civil War to the present time.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3801 Topics in Religion


Same as U66 RelSt 380

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3803 Ben Franklin's America

In this course, students will explore Ben Franklin's America, from the earliest stirrings of political and religious dissent in the first decades of the 18th century to the post-Revolutionary debates over the meaning of republican virtue, American character, and representative government.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 381A History of Early Far Eastern Civilization

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 383 Studying Roots

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 384 Before Lewis and Clark: Upper Louisiana in Colonial Times

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3842 The Age of Lewis and Clark

This course will place the Corps of Discovery and its aftermath into a series of broader historical perspectives by examining the expedition in different contexts. It will examine the political milieu, economic issues, international relations, and interactions with Native Americans so that students gain a greater understanding of not just the journey but its time period as well. The course will be a seminar-like format, encouraging discussion and examination of both primary and secondary sources. Students will be reading extensively from the Journals, of course, but also the writings of their contemporaries as well as the most current scholarship in this highly popular subject.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3849 A Comparative History of Socialism in the U.S. and Europe

In 1906, the German sociologist Werner Sambart published "Why is There no Socialism in America?", a seminal study that tried to account for the weakness of the workers' movement in the United States. The issues raised in the book continue to interest scholars to this day. Is there really no socialism in America? Has there ever been? Is Europe better suited for socialism? Is there something "un-American" about it, as the right still argues? Are the lack of welfare legislation and nationalized health care, for example, signs that socialism has "failed"? This class will explore these topics through a comparative history of socialism in Europe and the United States since the beginning of the 19th century. Students will acquire a comprehensive knowledge of the various interpretations of the terms and the application of its ideals in different historical and geographic contexts.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 385 The History of 20th-Century American Social Movements

This course will examine the history and impact of social movements in 20th-century America. Some of the movements and topics covered will be: the Progressive Era; Women's Suffrage; the rise of labor unions; Civil Rights; student protests of the 1960s; and environmentalism. In doing so, the course will consider how these movements were defined by particular leaders and reflected the identities of the participants, how and why the movements succeeded and failed, how opposition to these movements formed, how issues of race, gender, and class defined the movements, and finally, what changes occurred as a result.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3850 Modern European Women's History

This course explores the lives of European women from the 17th century to the present day. Throughout the course, we shall consider how women's history can change and complicate conventional understandings of patriarchy, modernity, and political and economic progress. Topics of the course include: the patriarchical household; changing patterns of family life; women's roles in the industrial revolution; and the rise of feminism.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3851 Topics in American History: The United States Since 1945

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3854 Women, Work, and Economic Change in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800

The early modern period (1500-1800) witnessed the birth of a consumer society, the rise of nascent capitalism, and the beginnings of the industrial revolution. Because women played crucial roles, of course, as consumers, but also as retailers and producers, an understanding of women's history is central to any account of the rise of the first modern economy. This was no pre-industrial "golden age" of women's work: patriarchal institutions and misogynistic prejudice severely constricted women's economic opportunities throughout the period. This course explores the lives of ordinary working women, and the ways in which those women found accommodation with or resisted patriarchal authority and economic change.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3860 War, Rebellion, and the Formation of American Identity, 1754-1865

This course will survey the United States' experiences with rebellion and organized armed conflict from the origins of the American Revolution until the Civil War. Though the class will deal with war, its focus will not be on military tactics or the outcome of battles — indeed several of the conflicts it will consider were entirely bloodless. Rather, the course will utilize war and rebellion as a prism through which to view the ways in which Americans conceived of themselves.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3870 The History of the Holocaust

This course deals with the Nazi regime's attempt to annihilate European Jewry. Important points of focus are antisemitism, the Nazi world view, and the examination of pivotal events on the path to the "Final Solution." We will also address a number of significant debates in the historical literature about the Holocaust. Was Nazism a "political religion"? Should we compare the Holocaust to other genocides, or was it a historically unique event? Can or should we consider the Holocaust as an event separate from the Second World War? To what extent did antisemitism factor in the actions and beliefs of perpetrators of violence against Jews? How deep did support for Hitler and the Nazis run among the German populace? For example, did intellectuals legitimize the anti-Jewish policies of the regime? Did the Enlightenment lead initially to the emancipation of Jews in Europe and yet more than a century later result in their dehumanization and murder? To what degree did German Protestants and Catholics, who together represented nearly 95 percent of the German populace, support Nazi policies? Can the evil perpetrated by the Nazis be considered "banal"? The course will incorporate a historical approach that is significantly informed by other disciplines, including sociology and religion. We will seek to achieve historical literacy about the Holocaust and attempt to consider this seemingly unfathomable series of events as part of a broader investigation of history.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 3871 Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe

A survey of social and intellectual developments in health care in Europe from the Black Death to the Enlightenment. Students will study popular and learned medicine, the role of magic in healing, and "modern" developments, such as the emergence of hospitals and the professionalization of medicine.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 388 Society and Culture in Modern Britain, 1815-present

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3880 The Russian Revolution

The "Ten Days that Shook the World" inaugurated the worldwide march of communism in the 20th century, which divided Russian, European, and American society from 1917 until the dissolution of the USSR in 1991. This reading and discussion course examines the causes, actors, and especially the major interpretations of the Russian Revolutions of 1905 and 1917 through readings and written exercises, including an analytical research paper.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3907 Philosophy of History

For the curious scholar, the historical enterprise raises a wide variety of important questions. Can we truly know the past? Is objectivity possible, or must we accept some sort of relativism? What does it mean to say that something "explains" an event, or "causes" it? Does history have a meaning or purpose? Should history aspire to be like science, or are its methods, goals, and subject matter entirely different? In this course, we will examine these and other philosophical questions concerning history by engaging with key texts from the major thinkers in the philosophy of history, from Vico to Hegel to Collingwood.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 391 Film and History: The Holocaust

Film has been a testimony to the history of its time since the earliest days of cinema. The focus of this course will be to view films dealing with the Holocaust in order to examine what they tell us about the Holocaust as history, about popular attitudes concerning the Holocaust, about the context of the period in which the films were produced, and about the function of the cinema in its depiction of historical material. Selected films and required reading in appropriate texts relating to film and the Holocaust. A paper and oral presentation by students is expected.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 3920 History of the Mafia in Italy and the United States

This course examines the changing structures of power in the Mafia, along with its relationship to politics and religion, from its beginnings in the Middle Ages to its influence today in the United States. Our study takes us to the roots of the Italian Mafia, the migration of Sicilians to the United States, the growth and decline of organized crime under fascism. We also look at the resurfacing of the Mafia during World War II, the rise of the Cosa Nostra and drug trafficking from Sicily to the United States, and the Mafia's arrival in the United States. The course concludes with a discussion of organized crime families and syndicates in a global context.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 3972 Riots and Revolutions: A History of Modern France, 1789-Present

This course surveys the history of France from the Revolution of 1789 through the beginning of the 21st century. From the political revolution that kicked off the modern era of French history through the race riots of 2005, this history is punctuated by popular protest and political revolution. Major popular uprisings or political revolutions occurred in 1789, 1799, 1815, 1830, 1848, 1852, 1871, 1917, 1939, 1958, 1968, and 2005. In this class we will examine the long history of the modern era through the lens of riots and revolution. Political rights, labor standards, the rise of the middle class, avant-garde art movements, the Algerian War, the cultural fallout of colonialism: All of these historical phenomena can be read through the contestable politics that have shaped modern France.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U16 Hist 3975 Dark Continent: Europe in the Age of Total War, 1914-1945

The First World War led to the deaths of some 20 million people. While it has since been viewed as a senseless waste, at its outset it was seen in a generally positive light: a war for defense against aggression, for the liberation of occupied territories and for national glory. In this course, students will explore European politics, society and culture during a period dominated by two world wars. Topics include: imperialism and great power competition; the Great War; the Russian Revolution; Nazism and Fascism; World War II and the Holocaust. Particular attention will be payed to the ways in which religion, ideology and nationalism appreciably shaped the lives of people living in an era of total war.

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U16 Hist 400 Independent Study

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4001 Directed Fieldwork in Historical and Archival Professions

A fieldwork project under the direction of a History faculty.

Credit variable, maximum 6 units.


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U16 Hist 4002 Directed Fieldwork in Historical and Archival Professions

A fieldwork project under the direction of a History faculty.

Credit variable, maximum 6 units.


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U16 Hist 4010 Research Seminar: British Liberalism and the Scottish Enlightenment

Much of modern democratic, economic and religious thinking across the world traces its origins directly to 17th- and 18th-century Britain, including the philosophical and political foundation of the United States. Among the broad themes which this course surveys are: the development of the idea of state sovereignty; the role of government; the nature of the commercial economy and capitalism; and the debates over morality and religion.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 417 Medieval Europe I

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 428A Topics in the History of Developing Areas

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 429 Genesis of Western Values

A discussion of representative classical, Jewish, and Christian values.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 431 Christianity and Classical Culture 300-600

A Study of the intellectual synthesis of Christianity and Classical thought forming the basis of Western values, to the Council of Nicaea 325.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4310 A History of Freedom of Speech in the United States

Freedom of speech and the press are among the most esteemed and contested principles in American governance. Through a close study of some of the best historical scholarship on the topic, we will consider the evolution of free speech philosophy, law, and practice from the colonial years through the 20th century. We will focus predominately on the shifting boundaries of political speech and the press, and explore the impact and interplay of federal and state law; judges and legal culture; extralegal organizations and the public in setting those boundaries. We will examine several seminal legal cases and ponder the historical context and forces which contributed to high court legal opinions. We will reflect on whether there has been progress in free speech doctrine and practice, and what, if anything, Americans have contributed to a broader European philosophy and tradition of free speech.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4351 The Ancient Papacy

A historical study of the early papacy to 600 AD based largely on contemporary documentation. The rise of the papacy, its response to contemporary classical influence, its position in early experimentation in Church government, and its influence on the rise of "orthodoxy."

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4400 Women in the History of Higher Education


Same as U08 Educ 440

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4402 Gateway to the Atomic Age: St. Louis and Nuclear Legacies of the Cold War

This course studies radioactive waste sites and illness in the vicinity of St. Louis arising from the region's contribution to nuclear weapons production in the 20th century. We will examine the context of Cold War nuclear production and subsequent attempts to address its consequences for environment and health, with attention to political pressures, public understanding, and scientific knowledge, together with the universe of federal regulation and compensation emerging around the atom since 1945. Source material will include federal reports and correspondence produced by state agencies, journalistic and scholarly accounts, and mass media evidence generated from the early 20th century to the present. Includes field trips to local sites.
Same as U89 AMCS 4402

Credit 3 units. UColl: ACH


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U16 Hist 4421 The British Empire, 1783 to the Present


Same as U16 Hist 358

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 444 European Intellectual History 1930-70


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U16 Hist 4442 The Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe

An examination of Jewish culture, society, and politics in Central and Eastern Europe (the Czech lands, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and Romania) from the 16th through the 20th century. Among the topics we will cover are: economic, social, and political relations between Jews and non-Jews; varieties of Jewish religious culture; Russian and Habsburg imperial policies of control, integration, and repression; European nationalisms and Jewish identity; anti-semitism and popular violence; national and radical movements among Jews; the Jewish experience in war and revolution; and the transition from Soviet dominion to democracy.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 448 History of Russia to the 18th Century

A study of two distinct civilizations: Kiev Rus and Muscovy.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4480 Russian Intellectual History

This seminar-style discussion and research course examines major currents in Russian intellectual life from the age of Peter the Great to the revolutions of 1905. Its primary focus is on Russians' preoccupation with themselves as part of European and Western Civilization. Authors include the Ukrainian humanists such as Peter the Great's house intellectual Prokopovich, the so-called Russian Enlightenment, romantic nationalists (Karamzin), Slavophiles and Westernizers (Chaadaev, Aksakov, and others), the literature of the Golden Age, nihilists, and the early Marxists.

Credit 3 units. BU: IS


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U16 Hist 4481 History of Russia to the 18th Century

Same as History 448.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4490 Russian Intellectual History

This seminar-style discussion and research course examines major currents in Russian intellectual life from the age of Peter the Great to the revolutions of 1905. Its primary focus is on Russians' perception of themselves aspart of Western Civilization. Authors include: the Ukrainian humanists; the so-called Russian Enlightenment; romantic nationalists; Slavophiles and Westerizers; the literature of the Golden Age; nihilists; and the early Marxists. Students enrolling in the course should attempt to acquire a copy of (out of print) Marc Raeff, ed., Russian Intellectual History: an Anthology.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4562 Russian History in the 20th Century

Students wishing to take U16-3562 for graduate credit should register for this course, U16-4562. Additional class-time, writing, and research will be expected.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 459 Topics in European History: East-Central Europe: 1918-2010

This course will examine the histories of Poland, Hungary, Czech, and Slovak republics from 1918 to 2010. It will make use of a broad range of primary source materials presented to students in the form of weekly vignettes that span the gamut of issues from politics, economics, environment, gender, and post-industrialization to the status of ethnic and religious minorities in these countries. The course will begin with an exploration of 19th-century intellectual currents that played a seminal role in shaping national consciousness in east-central Europe, a necessary precondition and first step toward eventual independence. It will then explore the tragically-flawed peace settlement at Versailles that gave birth to new nation-states on that continent, but in reckless fashion, thereby planting the seeds for the next war. Next, it will investigate the turbulent inter-war, world-war, and Cold-War years, during which the inhabitants of this region experienced appalling hardships. Finally, it will examine existing tensions in new Europe since 1989 and EU accession. Topics include: West Pan-Slav intellectual constructs, the Versailles system, the Nazi occupation, the Hungarian Revolution, Prague Spring, the Solidarity Movement, the Velvet Revolution, and the Lisbon Treaty.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 460 Topics in European History

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4690 A Transnational History of the '60s

This course examines the turbulent 1960s from a transnational perspective, drawing on American, German, French and British experiences. We will situate the decade within the emerging global order and the social and cultural transformations of the time, and trace the fateful influence of such processes as Third World decolonization struggles and the Cold War on such movements as the evolving American civil rights and European student protest movements, the birth of the New Left, second wave feminism, and the green and gay rights movements. We will explore the widening generation gap and follow the ensuing political unrest and experimentation in youth culture, music, art, psychedelic drugs and sexual freedom. Finally, we will consider the historic legacies of the '60s, including the fracturing of protest politics into a "movement of movements" and the revival of American conservatism.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 476 Landmarks in the History of Christianity


Same as U66 RelSt 458

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4771 Love, Sex and Marriage in Christian Tradition


Same as U66 RelSt 477

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 480 Europe Today

Political and economic developments in Europe since 1945, concentrating on such issues as the development of the welfare-state and the European Community. Includes consideration of European relations with the U.S., both with regard to the Cold War and distinct political and social systems.

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4841 Before Lewis and Clark: Upper Louisiana in Colonial Times

(Graduate version of U16-384.)
Same as U16 Hist 384

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4915 Diplomacy and War in Europe 1815-1914


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U16 Hist 4931 British Imperial Policies 1750-1914


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U16 Hist 4937 U.S. Foreign Relations from the Great War to the Cold War


Same as U85 IA 4122

Credit 3 units.


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U16 Hist 4955 Development Strategies in Latin America Past and Present

Credit 3 units.


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