International Studies explores economic, political, social, and cultural issues. If students are interested in achieving a greater understanding of the world and the diversity of its cultures — useful in business, law, teaching, and governmental careers — the international studies major in University College is for them.

Contact:Toni Loomis
Phone:314-935-5073
Email:aloomis@wustl.edu
Website:http://ucollege.wustl.edu/programs/undergraduate/bachelors-international-studies

All University College undergraduate students must satisfy the same general-education requirements.

Bachelor of Science in International Studies

Total number of units required: 42 minimum

Required Introductory Courses: 6 units. May be substituted with a core course when unavailable. Each will be offered every other year.

  • US Perspectives on International Studies (IS 200). May be substituted with a Category B course when unavailable.
  • World Perspectives in International Studies (IS 205). May be substituted with a Category A course when unavailable.

Required Core Courses: 6 units

  • 3 units from Category A, and 3 units from Category B

Category A

Hist 101Western Civilization3
Hist 102Western Civilization II: 1650 to the Present3
CompLit 225World Literature3
Anthro 160Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3

Category B

PolSci 103Introduction to International Politics3
Bus 240Introduction to International Business3
Bus 330International Management: Leadership Across Cultures3

Required Concentration: 30 units, choose one of the concentrations noted below.

Concentration in Comparative Culture and Identity (30 units)

The concentration in comparative culture and identity requires 30 units of authorized course work from at least three different academic departments or programs in the humanities, social sciences, or others with approval. At least 18 units must be in advanced course work at the 300 or 400 level, including, with authorization, a maximum of two graduate courses in the University College master's program in International Affairs. All courses require authorization by the International Studies coordinator in University College.

Concentration in International Political Economy and Business (30 units)

The concentration in international political economy and business requires 30 units of authorized course work from at least three different academic departments or programs in the social sciences, humanities, business, or others with approval. At least 18 units must be in advanced course work at the 300 or 400 level, including, with authorization, a maximum of two graduate courses in the University College master's program in International Affairs. All courses require authorization by the International Studies coordinator in University College.

Foreign Language Requirement

All students who major in international studies must satisfy a foreign language requirement, defined as proficiency through four semesters of study.

The Minor in International Studies

Total number of units required: 18 minimum

Required Courses: 9 units

Three of the following courses:

IS 200US Perspectives on International Studies3
or IS 205 World Perspectives in International Studies
One course in Category A (below)3
One course in Category B (below)3
or their authorized substitute

Elective Courses: 9 units
These must be advanced-level courses from at least two different academic departments or programs in the humanities, social sciences, or others with approval. At least one course must focus on a country or region of interest.

Category A

Hist 101Western Civilization3
Hist 102Western Civilization II: 1650 to the Present3
CompLit 225World Literature3
Anthro 160Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3

Category B

PolSci 103Introduction to International Politics3
Bus 240Introduction to International Business3
Bus 330International Management: Leadership Across Cultures3

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for U43 IS.


U43 IS 101 Western Civilization I

European institutions and thought from the early Middle Ages to the 17th century. The church, feudalism, cities and commerce, universities and learning; rise of dynastic states; Renaissance and Reformation, capitalism, mercantilism, and early modern politics.
Same as U16 Hist 101

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 1010 Beginning Modern Irish I

No prior knowledge of the Irish language required. This class will provide a great opportunity for students to explore the vibrant language and culture of Ireland. Basic language skills are taught. Students learn to engage in active conversational Irish and to read authentic works of literature. Songs, poetry, culture and language! Instructor is from Co. Tipperary in Ireland.
Same as U47 IRISH 101

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 102 Comparative Politics

One of the primary goals of a course in comparative politics is to familiarize students with a broad array of political systems. The approach taken in this course can best be characterized as the active acquisition and use of a set of tools for looking at the political world. In other words, instead of putting emphasis on what textbook writers think political scientists know, in this course the emphasis is on "how we know what we know" and on building knowledge. This approach equips students with a set of tools to use long after the course is over. These comparative tools are focused on historical, recent, and current events, and students are provided the opportunity to delve more deeply into a study of the parts of the world most they find most interesting.
Same as U25 PolSci 102

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS Art: SSP BU: BA, IS


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U43 IS 1020 Beginning Modern Irish II

In this second course in modern Irish, students will continue to develop reading, writing, and grammar skills and will become more fluent in spoken Irish. Prerequisite: Beginning Modern Irish I with grade of "C" or higher.
Same as U47 IRISH 102

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 1021 Western Civilization in the Modern World

This course examines social, cultural, economic, and political development in European society from the 17th century to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the evolving relationship between the individual and the state during their period.
Same as U16 Hist 102

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 126 Beginning Modern Irish II

Students must have taken Irish I. Second semester of instruction in the Irish language. More emphasis will be placed on reading simple texts in Irish. We will read a short book called Dúnmharú ar an Dart. Much emphasis on grammar.
Same as U47 IRISH 120

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 127 Elementary Czech I

An elementary Czech course, intended for students who have no prior or little knowledge of the Western Slavic language. Each lesson focuses on pronunciation, specific grammar structure, comprehension and conversation skills. Students should be able to communicate well enough at the end of the course to communicate on a basic level.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 129 Beginning Modern Irish III

This is a third course in modern Irish (Gaeilge), designed to help students further increase their fluency in the language. We will continue to work on pronunciation, reading and writing skills. In addition to the textbook, we will read at least one e-book. Students will be given a choice of recent top-sellers and the class will then decide which book(s) to read. We will read newspapers, watch TV in Irish, listen to programs on Irish radio and at the end, students will complete a real Leaving Certificate exam in Irish.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 130 Beginning Modern Irish IV

Irish IV aims at developing and improving student's oral and written communication through the continued study of the language, literature, and culture of Ireland. It also aims to improve students' ability to read and appreciate both literary and nonliterary texts in Irish, and to enhance awareness and understanding of the culture of the country. Close attention will be paid to the Irish media, and we will stay in touch with current affairs via Irish newspapers, TV, and radio.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 131 Beginning Modern Irish V

This class is suited to students that have already completed four semesters of Irish. We will discuss literary and nonliterary texts, with emphasis on written and spoken communication.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 150 Introduction to Human Evolution

The fossil evidence for human evolution, the genetics of human variation and evolution, the study of living nonhuman primates, and the fossil record and its interpretation.
Same as U69 Anthro 150

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 160 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Equality, hierarchy, and stratification in tribal, peasant, and industrializing societies from past and present cultures. Comparison of the ways in which different cultures legitimize social difference; myth and ritual in relation to the social order and social process; patterns of authority and protest; theories of sociocultural change and evolution.
Same as U69 Anthro 160

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 1620 Introduction to the History and Culture of China and Japan

This course surveys the major historical developments from ancient to modern times in the countries of China and Japan. Themes and continuities developed in dynastic or shogunate periods that have carried over into modern times will be emphasized. Students will also explore the art, literature, and philosophy of these two nations through visual presentations and extensive reading in their classic literature.
Same as U16 Hist 1620

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 164 Introduction to World History

As an introduction to the theories and methods of world history, this course is a tour of the world of the mid-19th century. This was a time of expanding and multiplying contacts between diverse human societies from the far reaches of the globe. After a short theoretical introduction to the field, we will tour and survey a representative sample of the peoples and cultures of the period. We will compare and contrast how societies in Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia coped with similar problems and innovations, and will explore the processes of cultural interaction and globalization as they encountered one another with ever increasing frequency.
Same as U16 Hist 164

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 165 Introduction to European Studies

This course focuses on Europe since 1945, but uses an historical approach to explore the experiences, traditions, and ideas that have created contemporary European civilization. Most of the semester will be spent in examining thematic topics (such as demography, religion, human rights, economic traditions, militarism, and war); and the latter part of the semester will look at major topics of Europe since 1945 (such as the Cold War, decolonization, the welfare state, immigration, and the European Union). Class meetings will stress the analysis and discussion of historical texts and data.
Same as U16 Hist 165

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 190 Introduction to Japanese Popular Culture

This course will consider Japanese popular culture through contemporary Japanese animated movies (anime), either dubbed or with English subtitles. A critical viewing of selected films will enable students to explore the cinematic techniques that reflect Japanese sentiment, moral beliefs, urban life styles, environmental issues, and aspects of popular culture. Students will read selected essays from books on Japanese society and popular culture in preparation for each film viewing. We will analyze how the anime genre deals with major social issues.
Same as U78 EAsia 190

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 200 US Perspectives on International Studies

This course is an introduction to current views on international studies produced in the U.S.-based academy and media. The course is divided in three sections. First, students will be exposed to influential theoretical approaches in international studies in the U.S. Second, students will work with academic perspectives on international studies, focused on current university-produced work from interdisciplinary approaches. Finally, students will engage with public intellectuals who exercise influence in contemporary international studies in the media. The course, thus, aims to expose students to the different ways in which knowledge in international studies is produced in the United States.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 201 World Literature

This course is designed to be an introduction to or survey of world literature from roughly the eighth century BCE to the European Renaissance. Because in America we follow a Western trajectory of thought, many of the courses herein are Western. However, the goal of our work together is to compare and contrast how different cultures have theorized and created works with/about/concerning: birth, death, religion, self-image, the cosmos, ethics, love, etc., in various forms including but not limited to: drama, poetry, epics, folklore, and various mythoi, in such a way that we must consider printing, translation, court behavior, local (and aesthetic) boundaries, visual documents, etc.; in short, we will frame our look at various cultures' oral and written works so as to form an idea of how and why literature has worked and is capable of working. Our work together will result in all of us becoming better readers, more alert to variations on themes, vital differences, intuitive comparisons, the limits of logic (and of poorly deployed rhetoric), and the vitally important specifics of works that make them all but impenetrable.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 2040 Intermediate Modern Irish IV

Irish IV aims at developing and improving student's oral and written communication in Irish through the study of the language, literature and culture of Ireland. Close attention will be paid to the Irish media, and we will stay in touch with current affairs via Irish newspapers, TV and radio.
Same as U47 IRISH 204

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 205 World Perspectives in International Studies

This course is an introduction to current views on international studies produced outside the U.S. The course provides an interdisciplinary and transnational perspective of how the world and relations between nations are perceived in other regions. Students will be exposed to theory, academic work and media figures from around the world, and the course will represent knowledge produced in regions such as Latin America, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. Authors discussed include Raewyn Connell, Benedict Anderson, Arundhati Roy, and Emir Sader, among others.

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 208 Environmental Science: Global Perspectives

This course examines the interrelationships between humans and their environment from an integrated, global perspective. Taking a case study approach, we will explore environmental conditions and issues both within the US and in other countries and cultures. Through critical thinking activities we will investigate the environmental, social and economic conditions and drivers of environmental change. A major goal of the course is to view environmental issues as challenges with solutions, and to explore potential solutions to these challenges.
Same as U29 Bio 208

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 210 Bugs, Drugs and Global Society: Topics in Global Health

Humans and microbes have coexisted for thousands of years. While some microorganisms are innocent bystanders in the body, others have the potential to become a dangerous pathogen. Some microbes are highly infectious and have been responsible for major global health epidemics and millions of deaths. This course will take a historical perspective to investigate major global health issues and discuss how bacteria, protists, fungi, prions, and viruses have contributed to major epidemics or pandemics. We will we discuss the basic biology of these organisms, and address the ecological, social, and political implications of these infectious diseases. Material from this course will provide useful background for someone considering further study in medicine, social work, or health policy, as well those interested in better understanding the health issues specific to each geographical region. This course may be of particular interest to students with background in political science, sociology, and epidemiology. Discussion of current events/outbreaks, readings from mainstream and scientific literature, and group projects will be integral parts of this course. There are no prerequisites for this course and no prior knowledge of biology or chemistry is required.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 211 Chief English Writers I

Introduction to major writers: Chaucer through Milton in U65-211; post-Milton to Joyce in U65-212.
Same as U65 ELit 211

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 214 Backgrounds of Modern Literature: Modern American and European Poetry - Envisioning the New


Same as U32 CompLit 214

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 225 Literature from Around the World

This course examines a selection of contemporary literature of Africa, South America, the Middle East, and Europe. We will explore how the literature embodies some of the social upheavals experienced by these regions in the 20th century, and how it depicts the changing roles of individual and family in the face of shifting patriarchal orders and intercultural influences. Readings include Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Najib Mahfuz's Midaq Alley, Isabel Allende's The House of the Spirits, Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Tayeb Saleh's Season of Migration to the North, Orhan Pamuk's My Name is Red, Albert Camus' The Stranger, Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, and Wole Soyinka's Death and the King's Horseman. Recommended for the Liberal Arts and Business (LAB) Certificate.
Same as U32 CompLit 225

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 240 Introduction to Modern East Asian Literature

This course will introduce modern East Asian literature through a selection of works from China, Japan, and Korea. Following an overview of East Asian cultural history, we will explore the manner in which these works reflect upon the modern circumstance of the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people. Topics will include cultural conflict, the status of women and minorities, social and political contexts, nationalism, war, and the fate of colonialism. Our readings will include works by Natsume Soseki, Mishima Yukio, Lu Xun, Xinran, Kim Hyejin, and Shin Kyung-sook. We will also read a variety of modern poetry in both traditional and contemporary styles, and a selection of literary essays.
Same as U78 EAsia 240

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 241 Masterpieces of Literature I

This course covers masterpieces of Western literature in English translation: Homer through Dante. Other authors may include Sophocles, Virgil, and Rabelais.
Same as U65 ELit 241

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM UColl: ENE


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U43 IS 245 Doing Business in Contemporary China: Culture, Politics, and the CCP

This course will examine the intersection of the Chinese Communist Party, business, culture, and politics. Drawing from the interdisciplinary scholarship of political scientists, economists, historians, and anthropologists, as well as the views of business leaders and journalists, we will investigate the integral role the Chinese Communist Party plays in everyday business interactions in contemporary China.
Same as U78 EAsia 245

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 2501 Cultural Encounters: Speaking Behind the Veil: Middle Eastern Women's Literature

This course examines Middle Eastern fascinations with the West in Persian, Arab, Turkish, and Israeli literature of the 20th century since World War I. Topics include the perceived influence of Western culture on the Middle East; the difficult status of Middle Eastern women caught between two cultures; Iran's pre-revolutionary attempts to emulate Western models of education and the post-revolutionary backlash; and the effects of colonialism on the Arab concept of self. Students will read authors such as al-Hakim, Saleh, Jamalzadeh, Mahmud, and Rachlin. Literary works will be read in English and supplemented with excerpts from such cultural critics as Fanon, Said, Al-e Ahmad, and Behrangi.
Same as U32 CompLit 250

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 2845 Globalization, Liberalism, and Reform in the Modern World

This course examines the mid-19th century, a time of expanding and multiplying contacts between diverse human societies from all reaches of the globe. After a short introduction to the fields of world and comparative history, students will tour and survey a representative sample of the peoples and cultures of the period. The course will compare and contrast how societies in Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia coped with similar problems and innovations, and will explore the processes of cultural interaction and globalization as they encountered one another with ever increasing frequency. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.
Same as U16 Hist 2845

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HTR


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U43 IS 300 Art and Violence: Visual Culture in Latin America

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the topic of violence as social, economic and political phenomenon and to explore the different forms the representation of violence has assumed in Latin American art.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 301 The NAFTA Partner: Understanding Mexico for Culture and Business

This is an introduction to current issues in Mexico, our third largest trade partner, with an emphasis on its culture, economy, and related business matters. The course will provide an overview of 20th- and 21st-century Mexican history, then turn to topics associated with economics and democracy (including Mexico's transition from single-party system to electoral democracy and the introduction of neoliberal and free-market reforms) to better understand the country's political and financial systems. We also will examine contemporary Mexican culture, focusing on practices (such as Mexico's engagement with American culture, popular urban cultures like punk and the arts) that characterize Mexico's cultural capitals. The course will also deal with some of the most controversial issues of U.S.-Mexico relations: immigration and the drug trade.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 302 Artistic Reflections on Violence: Dictatorships in Argentina, Uruguay, and Chile

This course will introduce students to the study of indigenous and African-based societies, resistance, and politics in Latin America and the Caribbean from the colonial period to the 19th century. Often treated as figures with no political vision or power, black and indigenous people were long relegated to the margins of our understandings of history. However, recent works have shown how these very people engaged with revolutionary ideas, challenged their enslavement, and expanded the meaning of what it meant to be a citizen, thereby playing a fundamental role in the shaping of colonial and modern Latin America and the Caribbean.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3020 Modern British History 1688-2000

This course is concerned with the transformation of Britain from a thinly settled, mainly rural, economically underdeveloped, and politically unstable island in the late 17th century into a thickly peopled and heavily urbanized nation renowned for political stability in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Same as U16 Hist 302

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U43 IS 3024 International Institutions

This course surveys in historically and theoretically informed fashion the role of various international institutions in international relations. It addresses the fundamental question of the contribution of international institutions to world order. The course first traces the historical evolution of international organization before turning to international institutions since World War II. It then focuses on the following: the most important regional international organization, the European Union; the most important international organizations dealing with the issues of peace and security, the United Nations and NATO; and the major international economic institutions, the WTO, the IMF and the World Bank. Prerequisites: Intro to International Politics.
Same as U25 PolSci 3024

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 303 Global Masculinities

An interdisciplinary survey of expressions of masculinity and male gender in global per-spective with a strong emphasis on non-Western cultures. Themes and topics include the increasingly global culture and economy, terrorism, international relations, development policy, colonization/imperialism, and war/militarism, as well as specific cultural, social and national expressions of masculinity across wide geographical range.
Same as U92 WGSS 303

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 304 Street Art: International Currents

This course will examine street art as an international cultural, social and political phenomenon; from its beginnings as a fringe, underground movement in urban centers to its rise in the contemporary commercial art scene. We will discuss the socioeconomic circumstances as well as the political underpinnings behind the work of such artists as Blek Le Rat (France), Banksy (UK), Os Gemeos (Brazil), Swoon (USA), Shepard Fairey (USA) and others. The course will explore the evolution of street art, from its roots as graffiti, its influences in hip-hop, rap, and punk music, its societal and cultural context in the ghettoes of metropolitan centers to its rise into mainstream popular culture and its prevalence in the most prominent galleries and museums nationally and internationally.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 305 Topics in Literature and Culture: Literary & National Identities in Contemporary Literature

Topics vary by semester.
Same as U65 ELit 305

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U43 IS 3050 Politics of International Law

In this course, we will focus on key issues of international law and international politics, and how issues of law and politics intersect at the international level. This will include a focus on theories of international relations, theories of international law; conflicts regarding resources, territory and ideology; the military-industrial complex; globalization, privatization and commercialization; international trade; international treaties; international institutions; the limits of international law; customary international law; the law of the sea; space law; the concept of empire; unilateralism; human rights; and war law.
Same as U25 PolSci 3050

Credit 3 units. UColl: PSI


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U43 IS 306 The Modern Mediterranean: Facts and Fictions

The countries and cultures around the entire Mediterranean basin have provided, and have been the scene of, much of the world's recorded history. In the 20th century, however, writers set out to explore, either by actual travel or else in their imagination alone, many of its lesser known corners: forgotten imperial ruins in Tunisia; remote and semi-primitive mountain villages of Crete; dusty and disease ridden towns in the Sahara; the secretive souks of Alexandria. In doing so, they often found many fascinating, if previously hidden places, peoples, behaviors and customs, or sometimes instead, simple symbolic fodder for an oftentimes implied critique of their own native lands and social mores. In this course, we shall consider examples of the former in works like Andre Gide's Immoralist, Nikos Kazantzakis' Zorba the Greek, Paul Bowles' The Sheltering Sky and Lawrence Durrell's Justine. As for the latter, our attention will turn to even more contemporary works, such as Derek Walcott's Omeros, which is partially based on the Homeric tale of Ulysses' wanderings around the Mediterranean, but which aims primarily at questioning the history of colonialism and cultural memory of his own Caribbean island of Saint Lucia. While students will pay attention to the stylistic features of these works, to understand better the role rhetoric plays in such fiction, they will also study closely the various important sociopolitical, economic, religious and philosophical concerns raised by their authors. Some excerpts of film adaptations will also be used.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3061 Advanced Modern Irish VI


Same as U47 IRISH 306

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 307 Latin American Migrations

Latin America has been, historically, a region defined by its migrations. Throughout its history, Latin America has received waves of immigrants from around the world and has been the site both of internal migrations (country to city and country to country) and a considerable diaspora that has created new communities in the United States and Europe. Through the reading of scholarship, fiction, film, art, and memoirs, this class seeks to study the cultural impact that different waves of migration have had both on the establishment of political and imaginary borders and in the constitution of new national, regional and transnational identities. The class will approach case studies that encompass the effect of internal migrations in the region (such as the racial politics of Andean immigration to Argentina), the social redefinitions of Latin American countries due to new waves of immigrants (such as the increasing Asian immigration to Panama), the articulation of a Latin America in exile and the construction of new "Latino" identities in the United States and Europe. Through these case studies, students will not only get snapshots of different "Latin American Crossings." The class will also tackle the question of new, fluid notions of Latin American culture and identity, as well as changing notions of race, ethnicity, class and gender, as they are being redefined in the contemporary world.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3081 Looking East, Looking West: Stereotypes & Misconceptions in the Exchange between China and the West

This course explores the misconceptions, mutual ignorance and arrogance, and the stereotypes in the exchange between China and the West in general and China and the United States in particular. We will read some seminal works theorizing the problems of cross-cultural communication and the question of the Other. China's exchange with the West will be seen not only theoretically, but also historically. We will read Chinese works concerned with the West and Western writings on China. We will watch movies devoted to the problems of understanding and adapting to a foreign culture. In analyzing the works, we will ask how the images of China and the West created in these works relate to prevalent clichés in China's interchange with the West. Our goal will be to develop sensitivity to the way in which cultural heritage and political ideology shape the perceptions of the Other. Each session will begin with a brief introduction by the instructor, and after that we will have group discussions.
Same as U78 EAsia 3081

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 309 US-Latin American Relations: Culture and Politics

This class is an exploration of the relations between the United States and Latin America in the contemporary world. The class will begin with a brief discussion of the history of relations between North and South America. Secondly, we will discuss some central issues of current multilateral continental relations: immigration, the drug trade, economic development, the "new left", etc. Finally, the last part of the semester will be dedicated to the cultural exchanges between both regions.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3100 Food and Culture in Latin America: Colonialism, Transculturation, Nationalism, Globalization

The rising field of Food Cultural Studies provides new insights on a diversity of topics regarding culture, race, colonialism and everyday life across the world. This course proposes a reading of the main topics of Latin American culture (colonialism, nationalism, race, cultural mixture, globalization, migration and others) through the lens of food history and social practices. With a particular focus on Mexico, and additional case studies from Peru, Brazil and other countries, students will explore topics such as the idea of intangible patrimonies, cultural heritage, the rise of the celebrity chef and the conflict between tradition and innovation. Students will engage with the subject through the reading of food history, recipe books, historical documents and academic scholarship, along with documentaries, fiction films and television shows capturing culinary culture, as well as discussions on the presence of Latin American food in St. Louis.
Same as U67 LAS 310

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3101 Modern Balkans

This course surveys Balkan history from 1900 to the present, with special emphasis on economic, political, and religious institutions. Topics include: the assassination of Franz Ferdinand; the "Catastrophe"; guerrilla insurgencies; Cold War alliances; the Cypriot question; and Kosovo independence.
Same as U16 Hist 310

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 312 The Culture of Brazil

Brazil is the fifth largest country in the world and one of the most culturally diverse countries in Latin America. In this course we will study Brazilian culture through its language, writings, folklore, religion, politics, music, cuisine, art, and film. These topics, along with other elements of Brazilian culture, will be examined both historically as well as through the lens of contemporary issues. The course will be taught in English, though depending on students' backgrounds, it also may help students improve their spoken Portuguese.
Same as U26 Port 312

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3120 Constructing French Identity: Topics in French Culture and Society

This course examines various aspects of modern France ranging from literature, art, performance, and cuisine to contemporary popular culture (songs, cinema, fashion, etc.). Through an analysis of primary materials such as novels (in translation), cook books, songs, films, art objects and material artifacts from France, this class explores the meaning and preservation of French culture and identity. We also study areas of social debate from a French perspective, including the identity crisis generated by globalization. Each week we will analyze a specific cultural phenomenon or aspect of French material culture, using the methodology of literary and cultural studies. This course may not count toward the major or minor in French.
Same as U12 Fr 312

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3121 Ancient Civilizations of the Old World

The development of the earliest complex societies in the Old World; emphasis on Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, and China.
Same as U69 Anthro 312

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3124 Persians, Babylonians and Assyrians: Archaeology of Ancient Mesopotamia

The valleys of the Tigris and the Euphrates rivers are often collectively referred to as "the cradle of civilization." Many cultural "firsts" emerged from this area: the first writing, the first state-level societies, the first cities, and the first agricultural- and pastoral-based economies. The societies of the Tigris and the Euphrates also played a strong influential role in the development of the societies around them. Given these particular features, the study of the ancient societies of the Near East can offer insight into the development of state-level society in general, and the ancient cultures of the Near East in particular.
Same as U69 Anthro 3124

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 313 Korean Literature and Film


Same as U78 EAsia 312

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 314 Reading Culture: Exploring Dystopias

In this course we will explore why the conditions in Russia during the 19th and 20th centuries paved the way for the first dystopian novel and why, perhaps, the U.S. was only a close second in this regard. We begin with such authors as Fyodor Dostoevsky and Yevgeny Zamyatin, and then move on to examine the ways in which later authors, such as Ray Bradbury and George Orwell, interpreted the pressing current events of their times — the Cold War, the rise of technology and bio-technology, and the ecological crisis — through the dystopian lens, with an emphasis on the role that Russia and Russian literature played in the development of this particular mindset. We will extend our exploration to include recent dystopian ideas prevalent in China and Latin America, as well as to address the popularity of such multimillion dollar media franchises as The Hunger Games and The Maze Runner. We conclude with a discussion of current dystopian discourse in such areas as politics, technology, and trauma narratives. The course is discussion based. All readings are in English.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 315 Latin American Pop and Media Culture: Languages of Modernity

Studying Latin America's pop and media culture from the 1950s onward, this course will focus on the way in which cultural texts assist Latin Americans in engaging with the social transformations created by processes of capitalist modernization, such as urbanization and globalization. We will study cultural genres such as popular and pop music (including bolero and reggaeton), commercial cinema, television, and comic books, learning to read these productions critically and historically. We also examine methods for reading and interpreting these works.
Same as U67 LAS 315

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 316 The Creation of Modern Japan

This course will explore the development of modern Japan from the Tokugawa Shogunate through the Meji Restoration and culminates in Japan's role in World War II. Besides the history of this period, there will be an extensive exploration of the cultural expression which took place in Japan during this time period. A core text will be used, but there will be significant reading in Japanese fiction, drama, and poetry.
Same as U16 Hist 3168

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEA, HSM, HSP, NW


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U43 IS 3161 Chinese Civilization to 1911

China is the next frontier for U.S. business and is probably the single most powerful nation in the world, militarily, aside from America itself. The unique continuity of Chinese culture over thousands of years and its historically strong link to Chinese politics and power enables this course to lay a foundation of understanding China by tracing traditional Chinese thought, literature and art from its beginnings in Shang bronzes and the Yijing to the "surrealism" of the eccentrics and the New Text School at the end of the imperial period.
Same as U16 Hist 3161

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3165 The Classic Dynasties of China

This course focuses on the T'ang, Song, Ming, and Qing Dynasties of China — the period roughly from the eighth century through the 19th century. This is an incredibly rich period in Chinese history in terms of cultural and historical pattern setting. The class is historically based but will include an array of readings in poetry and philosophy. Students are expected to analyze primary sources from the period under study, complete a research paper, and read between 5-7 books.
Same as U16 Hist 3165

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEA, HSP, NW


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U43 IS 3166 An Introduction to the History and Culture of China and Japan

This course surveys the major historical developments from ancient to modern times in the countries of China and Japan. Themes and continuities developed in dynastic or shogunate periods that have carried over into modern times will be emphasized. Students will also explore the art, literature, and philosophy of these two nations through visual presentations and extensive reading in their classic literature.
Same as U16 Hist 3166

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3168 The Creation of Modern Japan, 1568-1945

This course will explore the development of modern Japan from the Tokugawa Shogunate through the Meji Restoration and culminates in Japan's role in World War II. Besides the history of this period, there will be an extensive exploration of the cultural expression which took place in Japan during this time period. A core text will be used, but there will be significant reading in Japanese fiction, drama, and poetry.
Same as U16 Hist 3168

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEA, HSM, HSP, NW


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U43 IS 317 Transnational Chinese: Migration, Ethnicity and Identity

This course is an introduction to overseas Chinese studies. We will begin with an overview of Chinese migration, exploring historical patterns of Chinese migration, the latest waves of Chinese immigrants, and their migration, settlement and integration among various others in worldwide communities over different historical periods. The readings and discussions in this course will cover a range of topics and issues in diaspora and ethnic studies, particularly in overseas Chinese studies, from cultural assimilation and integration, identity and ethnicity, to gender, intergenerational relationships of immigrant families, ethnic enclaves, citizenship, transnationalism, Chinatown, and China and the overseas Chinese. The major goals in our survey of overseas Chinese are (1) to question and reconsider the concept of "Chineseness" and Chinese identity, paying special attention to how personal and community identity is constructed and reconstructed by negotiations, conflicts and transformations among diasporic Chinese, and (2) to comprehend the dynamics, diversity and heterogeneity among various Chinese communities in a transregional and transnational perspective, while deconstructing the category of "Chinese" as one complete cultural unity. The course is designed to help the students develop a theoretical basis in migration/diaspora and ethnic studies based on the studies of overseas Chinese. Basic vocabulary terms and concepts in this field will be explained and discussed in class.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 318 Reading Culture: 19th-Century Russian Literature in Context

Developing the skills necessary to navigate an increasingly interconnected world is becoming a crucial part of today's education. This course provides an opportunity to explore and increase global competency by reading short stories and novellas written by Russia's greatest writers — Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Turgenev, Chekhov, and Zamyatin. We use these works of 19th- and early 20th-century Russian literature as tools to explore not only such questions as the nature of good and evil, life and death, gender, identity, and cultural differences, but to understand our own contemporary culture as well. At all times, we use literature to inform how we make sense of our world. The course ends with a discussion of dystopias and the global crises facing us today. All readings are in English, although we will learn to recognize some basic words and phrases in Russian. This course will count toward the foundational requirement for the Global Certificate, (global.wustl.edu). Freshmen and sophomores are welcome.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 320 Islam and the West

This course will study the historical and contemporary international interactions between Islam and the West from medieval times to the modern world. The course will shed a light on the birth, rise and the decline of Islam, and its impact on foreign relations with the West. The main focus of the course, however, will be Islam and the West interactions in the Modern era. For centuries, Islam and the West have been neighbors and cultural contestants with a history of conflict and coexistence, but terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, have aggravated discussions regarding the "clash of civilizations." Globalization, on the other hand, has created an interdependency that requires greater cooperation, understanding, and dialogue.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3221 The Making of Latin America: From Conquest to Independence


Same as U16 Hist 3221

Credit 3 units. BU: IS


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U43 IS 3223 Hindu Medicine and Indian Food

Hindu medicine cannot be separated from Hindu religion and philosophy; one cannot understand Hinduism without understanding the basics of Hindu medical and nutritional theory. The course covers the development of South Asian medicine, nutritional theory, and foodways, from prehistory to the present, with attention to their religious significance. Indian civilization is introduced by exploring systems of belief concerning food, and the mutual relations between the cuisines of India and other world civilizations are examined. Special topics include: the controversy concerning Soma, the Indo-Roman spice trade, diffusion of food items throughout Asia and the world, Ayurvedic and Chinese theories of nutrition, alchemy, vegetarianism, classical culinary texts, culinary systems of South Asian religious minorities, New World influences, Southeast Asian cuisines, and the anthropology of food. Prerequisites: none.
Same as U66 RelSt 3223

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 324 Intercultural Communication

This course is designed to further students' sensibility toward cultural variables and to cultivate their practical skills in managing cultural diversity in everyday life and business. Our interrogation focuses on how cultural variables affect the thought, behavior, value systems, the transmission and interpretation of messages, and characteristics of interpersonal and cross-cultural communication. We learn key concepts in this field (verbal and nonverbal communication, individualism and collectivism, stereotypes and ethnocentrism, etc.) and issues of particular concern in the current world (inter-ethnic/racial relations, and intercultural communication in classrooms, medical care, and international business, etc.).

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 325 Byzantine Empire

Survey of Byzantine history from the deposition of Maurice to the fall of Constantinople. Special emphasis on Slavic migrations and settlements in the Balkans. Additional topics include urban continuity-discontinuity, iconoclasm, rise of Islam, and the Crusades.
Same as U16 Hist 325

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3252 Benefits and Challenges of Globalization

This class focuses on the benefits and challenges of globalization to the most influential issues of world politics such as human rights, terrorism and weapons proliferation, climate change, global trade, migration, global crime, and pandemics. Some view globalization as a means for promoting democracy, improving social conditions, and protecting the environment. In contrast, its critics focus on how cultural globalization imposes Western values on others and destroys their traditions, religious beliefs, and identities, and how it enables terrorists to move easily from one country to another. The class will explore these issues and evaluate their weight and validity.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 326 The Doctor Is In: Anton Chekhov and Narrative Medicine

Anton Chekhov was one of the greatest Russian writers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He was also a successful practicing physician. How did he manage to balance both of these full-time careers? How did being a trained physician affect his writing and how did being a writer affect his medical practice? Why did he emerge as arguably the most influential short story writer of the 20th century? Did being a doctor and scientist have anything to do with this, or did he achieve success in spite of having a second career? Understanding the ways in which Chekhov was able to integrate and express cultural attitudes toward illness, mortality, medicine, and healing at a time of great change and social upheaval will be the subject of this class. Equally important will be applying some of his wisdom and techniques to understanding our own current cultural narratives about medicine, as both an ideal and a real practice.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3274 Weimar Germany: Economics, Politics, Culture


Same as U16 Hist 3274

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 329 Religion, Ritual and Worldview


Same as U69 Anthro 329

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 330 International Management: Leadership Across Cultures

This course examines international business organizations and their managerial practices, with attention given to cultural differences, including leadership style, decision-making, negotiating, risk-taking, and training. Students also explore how cultural differences influence perceptions of corporate social responsibility, and the difference between ethical and corrupt managerial practices. Required for the Business Certificate and recommended for the Liberal Arts and Business (LAB) Certificate.
Same as U44 Bus 330

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3310 Society and Culture in Renaissance Italy

The intention of the course is to gain a solid knowledge of and appreciation for early modern or "Renaissance" Italy. The course will provide historical background for the understanding of the early modern Italian world. Not only will interesting details about individual people, places and things will be explored, but also, and more importantly, their function and meaning in early modern Italian society will be set into context and examined. Lectures will begin by broadly introducing selected early modern Italian topics including: marriage and the family; children and teenage culture; religious life; architecture and civic space; artists and artisans; pre-university education; humanism; the universities; popular culture; festivals; dance; and elements of early modern daily life including the use of domestic space, clothing and food.
Same as U16 Hist 3310

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3323 Jews and Christians in Nazi Germany

This course examines how religion, culture, and ideology shaped the lives of Jews and Christians living in Germany during the Third Reich. We will examine the reactions of German Protestants and Catholics to the Nazi regime's oppression of Germany's Jewish population and attempt to annihilate European Jewry. We also focus on the experiences and reflections of German Jews living in these desperate times. Questions addressed include: To what degree did German Protestants and Catholics, who represented nearly 95 percent of the German populace, support Nazi policies? How did their identity as Germans inform their views of Jews? How did German Jews view their Christian neighbors and Christianity during this time?
Same as U16 Hist 3323

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U43 IS 335 Migration, Networks and Transnationalism: The Chinese Case

This course explores Chinese migration and transnationalism both historically and ethnographically. We will examine the flows and actions of the Chinese diaspora from the mid-19th century to the contemporary era. The topics of our readings and discussions will range from Chinatowns and surname/native place associations to citizenship, ethnicity and the concept of "Chinese-ness", and how those movements affect the development and transformation of the communities they left and those to which they moved. This course aims to provide the students who are interested in international and global studies of migration and ethnic studies with a theoretical foundation in these areas, as well as practical training in applying a dynamic, comprehensive and global perspective.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 336 Cultures of Contemporary East Asia

This course aims to help students to obtain competent knowledge about contemporary East Asian cultures and societies. We will explore a wide range of topics in a transregional setting, from consumer and popular culture to gender, kinship, and filial piety. Our interrogation examines cultural variables, transregional dynamism, local receptions of "Western" influences, and the global impact of cultural movements in East Asia.

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 337 Culture, Politics, and Social Organization

Evolution of political systems and social organization in small-scale as well as complex societies. Theoretical and empirical examination of human social and political organization in light of historical processes, human agency, and cultural context.
Same as U69 Anthro 337

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 338 The Internet, Politics and Society

This course examines how the internet is transforming the way people around the world participate in politics. We will look at specific controversies in online politics such as the Wikileaks scandal, Iran's "Twitter revolution," social media in the Arab uprisings, and the "Great Firewall of China," as well as investigate broader questions of how people obtain knowledge, communicate, and mobilize in the digital age. Students will think critically about the internet as a communicative medium and analyze how it is employed in different cultural contexts. Topics to be covered include: national and transnational political movements; state secrets and political transparency; dictatorship and revolution; media and censorship; activism and mobilization; memory and knowledge; and digital personhood. Students will write brief responses to weekly readings and complete an original research project on digital politics.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 340 History of World Cinema

The course surveys the history of cinema as it developed in nations other than the United States. Beginning with the initially dominant film-producing nations of Western Europe, which soon found themselves threatened by the economic power of the Hollywood film industry, this course will consider the development of various national cinemas in Europe, Asia, and Third World countries. The course will seek to develop an understanding of each individual film both as an expression of a national culture as well as a possible response to international movements in other art forms. Throughout, the course will consider how various national cinemas sought ways of dealing with the pervasiveness of Hollywood films, developing their own distinctive styles, which could in turn influence American cinema itself. Weekly meeting time includes required film/video screening and classroom meetings. Restricted to University College students.
Same as U18 Film 340

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM, IS


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U43 IS 3410 Art in Japanese Society

This course offers an overview of Japanese art and culture from prehistoric times through the contemporary era. Topics will include prehistoric art and archaeological materials, fifth-century monumental tombs, serene Nara temples, the art and culture of flamboyant Heian aristocrats, contemplative yet witty Zen Buddhist art, the bold and energetic paintings created for Momoyama samurai, the highly spirited Edo prints, Japonisme, contemporary controversial artists, and the world of anime. Incorporated into the course will be videos and sound recordings, which introduce Japanese performing arts and music, along with various resources located within St. Louis.
Same as U10 ArtArch 3410

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3433 Conflict and Post-Conflict Societies in Africa

Violence in African societies has often been labeled "tribal" or "ethnic," but the ethnic dimension of these and all contemporary African wars and conflicts is just one small part. Drawing on case studies, ethnographies, journal and newspaper articles, novels, and films we will explore the very complicated nature of conflict and post-conflict settings and societies around the African continent. From various ethnographic, social scientific and theoretical perspectives, we will explore the processes leading to large-scale violence and war, to crisis management and intervention in these circumstances, and to the small and large-scale efforts toward peace-making, healing, and community rebuilding.
Same as U69 Anthro 3433

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 346 Future of International Business Development

This course will help students understand and implement international business development practices and strategies. We will focus on business strategies associated with Asia and Europe, with special emphasis on financial investments in Germany and China. Our study of contemporary international business development will help us identify trends and strategies for future success in a global business environment.
Same as U44 Bus 346

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 347 International Marketing

This course will provide information and skills that extend basic marketing principles to a global business environment. We will examine the international marketing mix of product/service, pricing, distribution, and promotion. Additionally, we will cover a range of key topics in the field of international marketing, including emerging issues in international trade, major trading blocks such as the European Union and NAFTA, global trade agreements, the emerging China market, and the issue of standardization versus adaptation.
Same as U44 Bus 347

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3490 The Age of Extremes: A Global History of the 20th Century

The 20th century, declared historian Eric Hobsbawn, was an "age of extremes" — of great idealism, along with brutal militarism; of humanitarian crusades, along with calculated genocide; of unprecedented prosperity, along with crushing poverty. No part of the world escaped the extremes of the century. This course will look at the big picture of social, political, cultural, and economic changes, while also considering how those changes affected individual lives. The course begins with the high point of European imperialism on the cusp of World War I and closes with our current era of economic globalization alongside religious fundamentalism. Particularly important to this course will be the ideas that shaped history and the history of the 20th century from a global perspective.
Same as U16 Hist 3490

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HTR


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U43 IS 350 Chinese Religions


Same as U66 RelSt 350

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3520 Happy Wars and Sad Love Songs: The History of Ireland

Through a broad range of primary sources — including imaginative literature and music — this course examines Ireland's relations with, and contributions to, the wider history of the British Isles and Europe, as well as the consequences of the Irish diaspora in the modern era. The course is arranged thematically and chronologically, and lessons address the major trends in the history of Ireland from earliest times to the present day, with roughly two-thirds of the semester focusing on the last two and a half centuries. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.
Same as U16 Hist 3520

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U43 IS 355 20th-Century Britain


Same as U16 Hist 355

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM


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U43 IS 3562 20th-Century Russian History

A survey of Russian history from 1900 to the present. The course emphasizes the Russian Revolutions at the beginning and end of the century, Stalinism, de-Stalinization, and post-communist society. Much attention will be given to the assumptions and conclusions of schools of historical analysis, Marxist, totalitarian, Kremlinologist, and revisionist.
Same as U16 Hist 3562

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3564 Forbidden Sexual Practices in Medieval Europe

During the middle ages, sexuality was seen as a force of evil that constantly threatened human salvation and called for severe acts of penance. Although many assume that the sexual was not much spoken of in a culture so dominated by religion, different legal, medical, political, and literary discourses not only discussed sex, but they showed particular interest in illicit sexual relations and transgressions. This course focuses on some of these discussions and particularly their treatment of the so called "unmentionable sins": incest, sodomy, prostitution, homosexual love, adultery, and sexual abuse. By examining a variety of literary, historical, and scientific texts, the course will explore the construction of certain forbidden sexual identities, attitudes, and practices during the medieval period, and show how "unnatural sex" became a preferred tool in the propoganda of religious ideals.
Same as U16 Hist 3564

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3570 Rise of the Atlantic World

Columbus's voyage to the Americas inaugurated the rise of the Atlantic World, characterized by an unprecedented exchange of peoples, plants, and pathogens. Thus, the Atlantic Ocean after 1492 should not be seen as a barrier, but instead as a vibrant frontier of cultural and economic exchange which shaped the histories of five continents: Europe, Africa, North and South America, and Asia.
Same as U16 Hist 3570

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3575 US Foreign Policy: Theory and Practice

In this class we will focus on the procedures and institutions that shape U.S. foreign policy decisions. This course examines major aspects of domestic politics that influence U.S. foreign policy decisions: public opinion, electoral politics, and interest groups. This course is fully online. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 357B Gender and Politics in Global Perspective

This course uses research from the women and politics and comparative politics literatures to expose students to important contemporary topics and debates in political science. Integrating the "traditional" comparative politics, the class addresses questions regarding government institutions, political culture, parties and elections, political representation, and social movements. Through class discussion and assignments, students will also have the opportunity to apply what they have learned to important current event issues, such as the role of gender in the conflict in Darfur, the increase in female leaders cross-nationally, and the role of female voters in the 2008 presidential election. Thus, focusing on gender and politics issues in a comparative perspective, the course draws on examples of the status of women from various world regions and time periods to analyze topics central to comparative and international politics.
Same as U25 PolSci 357B

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 358 Gender and Globalization

This course examines how gender is integral to contemporary political economies. We will look at how the meaning of family is changing, with a retreat from marriage in some places and an expansion in others. We also examine gender in the areas of public health and the economy, and political leadership and social change across the globe.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3610 The Shape of Women and Gender in Renaissance Italy

The intention of the course is to gain a solid knowledge of and appreciation for the experience of women who lived in early modern or "Renaissance" Italy. We will explore what is distinctive about the Renaissance era for women and underline the unique contributions that women have made to early modern Italian society and culture and how their roles and participation in their world differed from those of the men with whom they interacted. Specifically we will examine: theories, ideas, and laws about women; women and the creation of high culture; women and religion; homemakers, working women and women's economic roles; and women, their bodies, and the longue durée of women's history. This is a fully online course. Only University College students can receive credit for fully online courses. Instructor will email registered students with instructions.
Same as U16 Hist 3610

Credit 3 units. UColl: HEU, HSM, OLI


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U43 IS 3612 Population and Society

This review of population processes and their social ramifications begins with an introduction to the basic terminology, concepts, and methods of population studies, followed by a survey of human population trends through history. The course then investigates biological and social dimensions of marriage and childbearing, critically examines family planning policies, deals with the social impacts of epidemics and population ageing, and looks at connections between population movements and sociocultural changes. The overall objective of the course is to understand how population processes are not just biological in nature, but are closely related to social, cultural, political, and economic factors.
Same as U69 Anthro 3612

Credit 3 units. BU: IS


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U43 IS 364 Global Sustainability

Global Sustainability explores our relationship with planet earth. Taking an ecological systems perspective, this course provides students with the knowledge and understanding of the scientific, cultural, social, political, economic, and technological conditions that affect the quality of life on our planet. Due to the cross-disciplinary nature of these conditions and issues, the course will touch on many different subject areas, including ecology, conservation biology, economics, and political science. The overarching theme of environmental sustainability will be interwoven throughout the course. Topics covered include an overview of the global commons, ecosystem integrity and health, the human footprint, biodiversity and human health, the pollution and degradation of the global commons, ecological economics, the international system and environmental politics, resource management, and sustainable development.
Same as U29 Bio 364

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 366 Global Human Rights

The past century has shown some of the worst atrocities against humanity on an international scale, as well as some of the strongest mobilizations to protect and champion the rights of everyday people. This course offers a critical look at the trends and debates concerning global human rights. We will focus on: 1) the lived experience of human rights, especially for groups that are marginalized according to gender, race, class, sexuality, and nation; 2) the social conditions under which human rights violations are committed and human rights policies are drafted; 3) counter-movements to protect human rights, by official actors from above and grassroots activists from below. Our topics will range from food and starvation; genetic testing and access to drugs; sweatshops and corporate responsibility; sex trafficking and the 100 million "missing women"; homophobic violence and hate crimes; racial apartheid and ethnic genocide; Occupy movements, the Arab Spring, and the World Social Forum. Course materials will reflect a wide range of sources, from theoretical essays, to state declarations, to academic research, to onsite reports from nonprofit organizations. Assignments include weekly written critiques of the readings, leading discussions, and a research paper. CET course.

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 3669 The Making of Modern Europe, 1945 to the Present

This course examines the history of Europe from the end of World War II to the present day. Topics include: the place of Europe in the Cold War; the divergent paths and experiences of Western and Eastern Europe; the emergence of the European Union from economic and political treaties and arrangements; the 1968 student uprisings throughout Europe; the "revolutions" of 1989 throughout Eastern Europe; the collapse of the Soviet Union and reunification of Germany; the Balkan Wars of the 1990s and current social problems related to minority ethnic and religious groups living the places such as Britain, France, and Germany.
Same as U16 Hist 3669

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 368 Confronting Weapons of Mass Destruction: New Developments and Challenges

International Studies students come to grips with the global Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) problem. They encounter the specter of acquisition and use of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and their respective means of delivery not only by sovereign states but also by terrorists and other non-state actors. They examine and assess the viability of states' current individual and collective anti-WMD policies and strategies. In that light they seek comprehensive answers to the following questions: Is nuclear deterrence obsolete? How much nuclear-weapons modernization is enough? Will the nuclear nonproliferation regime survive? If so, under what conditions? Is the Iran Nuclear Deal viable? How can North Korea's WMD threat be diminished? Is nuclear security attainable? How can chemical and biological weapons threats be successfully addressed? Why are counterproliferation strategies necessary complements to nonproliferation strategies? Why is ballistic-missile defense a prime counterproliferation strategy? What cyberchallenges must be addressed in the anti-WMD/WMD nonproliferation realm? In light of the responses to the foregoing questions, what is the future for global WMD control/elimination?

Credit 3 units. UColl: OLH, OLI


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U43 IS 3682 The Cold War and the Modern Spy

This course studies the Cold War through the lens of modern espionage. We begin by studying how technology developed in World War I, such as the use of codes and code-breaking machines, enabled the growth of intelligence organizations with the goal of collecting information against the Germans. World War II spawned a new age of electronic surveillance, spies and counterspies, as tensions increased between democratic and communist allies. We will examine the creation of the CIA and KGB; NATO and the Warsaw Pact; the use of secret tunnels; aerial and satellite reconnaissance; embedded spies and moles; the "Atomic Spy"; and the use of military intelligence in government covert activities.
Same as U16 Hist 3682

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HTR, OLI


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U43 IS 3701 Topics in Politics: The United States of Europe?


Same as U25 PolSci 370

Credit 3 units. UColl: PSC


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U43 IS 372 Women's Literature and Global Feminism: 1975 - Present

In this course we will examine, through the lens of global feminism, women's literature in translation, as well as women's works written in English in postcolonial societies. Literary readings will be supplemented by viewings of related films that explore the intersections of gender with race, class, and ethnicity. Discussions of these works of literature and film will center on such issues as poverty, human rights, domestic and political violence, sex trafficking, and immigration, in relation to women's social place and identity, in a diversity of historical, social and cultural contexts. We will also analyze the literary forms (epistolary, autobiography, testimonial, etc.) and strategies through which women writers give voice and expression to their vision of reality, often to articulate a "feminist" consciousness or politics. Writers to be discussed include Marguerite Duras (France), Luisa Valenzuela (Argentina), Rigoberta Menchú (Guatemala), Clarice Lispector (Brazil), Mariama Bâ (Senegal), Nawal El Sadawwi (Egypt), Ismat Chughtai (India), among others. Class assignments will include a book/film review, an oral presentation, and a portfolio project.
Same as U92 WGSS 372

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3742 U.S. Foreign Relations, 1914-1989

This course will explore the goals, content, and conduct of U.S. Foreign Policy from 1914 to 1989, a span of 75 years that not only witnessed two world wars and the "Cold War," but also actions by U.S. policy makers and others that set the stage for national security crises of the early 21st century. We will examine the international presence of the United States as it took shape in every region of the world, from Latin America and Asia to the Middle East and Europe.
Same as U16 Hist 3742

Credit 3 units. UColl: HSM, HUS


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U43 IS 375 Seminar in Comparative Literature I


Same as U32 CompLit 375

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3761 Warriors, Merchants, Monks, and Courtesans: Ancient Narratives of Globalization in Google Earth

This course examines the history of globalization through the texts and narrative accounts of those who lived and traveled along the trade routes of the Old World. Using hands-on tutorials and projects in Google Earth, we will examine how day-to-day local interactions and the experiences of individuals contributed to broader cultural exchanges and the shaping of ancient cosmopolitan centers. The course will cover four broad anthropological themes related to Old World history and globalization in conjunction with weekly lessons in Google Earth: globalization; culture and power; the intersection of commerce, politics, and religion; and the impact of climate and geography on history.
Same as U69 Anthro 376

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 377 Peoples and Cultures of South Asia

An introduction to contemporary societies and cultures of the South Asian sub-continent including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. Topics include religion and ritual, work, family organization, concepts of person, caste and gender, the cultural impact of colonialism, and political/religious conflict. The course will examine ethnographic and historical writings on these topics for two purposes: to gain basic knowledge about the peoples of the area and to consider the impact of anthropological theory on that knowledge.
Same as U69 Anthro 377

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3771 Aspects of Indian Society: Myth and Reality

This course attempts an understanding of some aspects and institutions of Indian society, questioning common misconceptions regarding these. The nature of the Indian village, caste, and family are examined with a view to dispel common misconceptions about them. The nature and consequences of industrialization and urbanization in the Indian context are examined in the context of Western theories on the subjects.
Same as U69 Anthro 3771

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3772 Islamic Spain (Al-Andalus): Three Faiths, One Land

From the VIII to the XV century, while northern Europe floundered in the Dark Ages, the Iberian Peninsula flourished under Islamic control. "Al-Andalus" became a place in which three different cultures and religious faiths — Muslims, Jews and Christians — coexisted and interacted in productive eras of peaceful coexistence enlaced with periods of violent confrontation. This complex and important period in Spain's history is the focus of this course. We will study historical events that shaped the period, along with social, cultural, intellectual, and linguistic dimensions of al-Andalus. We also will use this historical backdrop to address issues and questions associated with the social and political relationship between Spain and Arabic/Muslim countries today.
Same as U94 JINE 377

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3773 Culture and Society in East Asia

This course presents an overview of cultures and contemporary social/political changes in East Asia. In Western society, East Asia has often been viewed as a place of enduring cultural identities, but it has also been a region of one of the world's most dynamic and rapid transformations. In this course, we'll examine both the continuity and change of cultural and social patterns in this region. Students will compare anthropological and ethnographic studies of the Peoples' Republic of China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan, supplemented by selected research from sociology, history, and political science. The course will focus on specific areas of cultural and social change in each society, including kinship and family, gender, ethnicity, economic and political development, and health and social policy.
Same as U69 Anthro 3773

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 381 Cross-Cultural Psychology

An overview of social, developmental, and organizational forces from a cross-cultural perspective with a focus on culture as a variable, and its relationship to attitudes and behavior. A review of historical biases in the discipline of psychology will preceed the study of research methodologies best suited to cross-cultural work. Also emphasized is the manner in which social and cultural forces shape the human experience. Prerequisite: Psych 100.
Same as U09 Psych 381

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 3840 Modern European Art in Context, c. 1850-1950

When displayed against pristine white gallery walls, modern art may seem detached from everyday reality. However, modern artists responded strongly to the drastic technological, social, economic, political and cultural changes that transformed Europe from 1850-1950. The period between the revolutions of c. 1848 and the end of World War II, therefore, witnessed the rapid development of new artistic styles and movements. This course considers movements ranging from Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism to the Bauhaus. By practicing careful visual analysis of artworks — including painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture and architecture — and weighing the historical contexts in which they were created, it aims to clarify the relationship between modernist aesthetics and modern life. No prerequisites. Does not count toward the art history major.
Same as U10 ArtArch 3840

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3842 Latin American Art & Architecture, 1910 - 2010

This course surveys major movements in art and architecture in Latin America, from the early 20th-century avant-gardes to the most recent developments in contemporary art. With the understanding that the term "Latin America" is a geopolitical construct that has been applied to a region of tremendous ethnic, historical, economic, and linguistic diversity, this class will focus on a selection of significant artistic movements and historical figures in and of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela, as well as major architectural projects in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela. Artistic and architectural discourses have often played an important role in processes of modern state formation in the region, and we will be especially attentive to cases in which artists and architects worked (at least initially) in the service of governmental regimes — as in Mexican muralism in the 1920s and the construction of Brasília, a new national capital for Brazil, in the 1950s — as well as those cases in which artworks and artistic networks offered a means of challenging or subverting official repression in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, and Mexico. Beyond politics, we will focus on the tensions — indigenous vs. cosmopolitan, urban vs. rural, rich vs. poor — and transnational dialogues that have informed the production and reception of art and architecture in Latin America. No prerequisites. Intro to Western Art (L01 112/113), Intro to Modern Art (L01 211/211E/215), or Survey of Latin American Culture (L45 165C) suggested. Does not count toward the major in art history and archaeology.
Same as U10 ArtArch 3842

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3850 Modern European Women's History

This course explores the lives of European women from the 17th century to the present day. Throughout the course, we shall consider how women's history can change and complicate conventional understandings of patriarchy, modernity, and political and economic progress. Topics of the course include: the patriarchical household; changing patterns of family life; women's roles in the industrial revolution; and the rise of feminism.
Same as U16 Hist 3850

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3854 Women, Work, and Economic Change in Early Modern Europe

The early modern period (1500-1800) witnessed the birth of a consumer society, the rise of nascent capitalism, and the beginnings of the industrial revolution. Because women played crucial roles of course as consumers, but also as retailers and producers, an understanding of women's history is central to any account of the rise of the first modern economy. This was no pre-industrial "golden age" of women's work: patriarchal institutions and misogynistic prejudice severly constricted women's economic opportunities throughout the period. This course explores the lives of ordinary working women, and the ways in which those women found accomodation with or resisted patriarchal authority and economic change.
Same as U16 Hist 3854

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 3880 The Russian Revolution

The "Ten Days that Shook the World" inaugurated the worldwide march of communism in the 20th century, which divided Russian, European, and American society from 1917 until the dissolution of the USSR in 1991. This reading and discussion course examines the causes, actors, and especially the major interpretations of the Russian Revolutions of 1905 and 1917 through readings and written exercises, including an analytical research paper.
Same as U16 Hist 3880

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 395 Shakespeare

Detailed discussion of a number of plays representative of different types: comedy, tragedy, history, romance. Shakespeare as a poetic dramatist and the plays as functioning stage pieces.
Same as U65 ELit 395

Credit 3 units. BU: HUM UColl: ENE


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U43 IS 398 Who Owns the Cultural Heritage of the World?

Have you ever wondered why the Parthenon (Elgin) Marbles are in the British Museum and not in Athens? Or why the beautiful bust of Nefertiti resides in Berlin and not in Cairo? Pitting museums, dealers, and private collectors against source nations, archaeologists, and academics, ownership of the world's cultural heritage is one of the most serious and controversial issues facing the art world today. Looted or plundered artifacts from the distant past are increasingly vetted for undocumented provenance as source nations implement reclamation policies intended to repatriate cultural property to its native land. This course explores the legal, ethical, philosophical and overlapping issues surrounding the sensitive yet provocative subject of cultural patrimony while examining the complex history of specific works in question. Case studies include debated artifacts from Greece, Egypt, Italy, Iraq, and Native America. Students analyze the impact of modern nation political motivations and ramifications in light of the 1970 UNESCO Convention and Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990/2010, and are encouraged to use critical inquiry in evaluating the implications for future global access to this common heritage of the world.
Same as U69 Anthro 398

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 400 Independent Study in International Studies - Honors Thesis

Part II of the 6-unit Honors Thesis.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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U43 IS 4140 Sustainable Development and Conservation: Madagascar

This course focuses on sustainable development in rural subsistence economies, using Madagascar as case study. Students from diverse disciplines are challenged to develop and assess the feasibility of projects that can have positive impact on communities constrained by poverty traps. The span of projects includes topics such as forest conservation and use, nutrition, health, food security, clean water, education, and bottom up economic growth. Students in Humanities, Social Sciences, Business, Design, Engineering, Physical Sciences, Law, Social Work, Economics, Political Science, Public Health and others use their different perspectives to search for answers. Teamwork and peer teaching are central to the course. Competitively evaluated projects will be field-tested in Madagascar. Selected teams will travel to Madagascar in May and work with the Missouri Botanical Garden Community Conservation Program to adapt projects to conflicting environmental, cultural, economic, and political factors. Poster board sessions for students taking the trip occur in the fall term. Project teams selected to go to Madagascar will be assessed a lab fee at the time their participation in the trip is confirmed. The lab fee covers the cost of airfare, in-country transportation, and approximately three weeks of in-country lodging and food. Undergraduate students should register for the course using one of the undergraduate cross-listed course numbers.
Same as U85 IA 5142

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 422 The Media at War: Covering Conflicts from Vietnam to Iraq


Same as U48 Comm 422

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 427 Economic Systems in Theory and Practice

Theory and practice of mercantilism, capitalism, and socialism. Historical and contemporary examples considered, with contemporary focus on Latin America, Eastern Europe, and Hong Kong. Primary emphasis on choices open to individuals; pecuniary and non-pecuniary prices paid to exercise those choices. Statistical evidence and case studies will be used. Course requirements include weekly written critique. Prerequisite: U07 Econ 103 or 104.
Same as U07 Econ 427

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 440 Soldiers of God: Religion, Fundamentalism, and the Modern World

This course examines the relationship between religion and politics in an era of globalization. We also will consider whether a "clash of civilizations" exists between Islam and the West. Texts include The Clash of Civilizations, Religion and Foreign Affairs, The Battle for God, Taliban, and others.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 4449 Russian Intellectual History

This seminar-style discussion and research course examines major currents in Russian intellectual life from the age of Peter the Great to the revolutions of 1905. Its primary focus is on Russians' perception of themselves as part of Western Civilization. Authors include: the Ukrainian humanists; the so-called Russian Enlightenment; romantic nationalists; Slavophiles and Westernizers; the literature of the Golden Age; nihilists; and the early Marxists. Students enrolling in the course should attempt to acquire a copy of (out of print) Marc Raeff, ed., Russian Intellectual History: an Anthology.
Same as U16 Hist 4490

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 445 Language Across Cultures

Cultures inevitably encompass many linguistics variations (pronunciation, vocabulary, dialects) and, quite often, many different languages. This class will examine the ways in which communication within a culture is affected by multilingualism, how language and culture act to change one another, and the ways in which linguistic imperialism develops within a society and between societies. This course will consider empirical findings and theoretical frameworks from research on sociolinguistics, communication, and cultural studies. This course can be used toward certification in English education or TESOL.
Same as U91 Ling 445

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 448 History of Russia to the 18th Century

A study of two distinct civilizations: Kiev Rus and Muscovy.
Same as U16 Hist 448

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 450 From Sweatshops to Sex Trafficking: Labor in Global Perspective

This course examines contemporary employment practices and how they extend across national borders. We will study multinational firms, global assembly lines, migration, and outsourcing. Topics include sweatshops, sex trafficking, low wages, and suicide. Transnational labor is also illicit, like the lucrative market in sex trafficking from Russia, Eastern Europe, and North Africa to the wealthier countries in the west and north. We will discuss how these kinds of cross-border practices are regulated through local, national, and international bodies.

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 458 Gender and Globalization

This course is an examination of how gender is integral to contemporary political economies. We'll look at how the meaning of family is changing, with a retreat from marriage in some places (why can a person get a temporary divorce in Iran?) and an expansion of marriage in other places (the granting of marriage to lesbians and gays in South Africa; the ability of American men to buy a bride from the Philippines on the internet). We'll look at health and economy: How are women central to food production worldwide, yet the most typical victims of food scarcity? Alternatively, we'll see advances in women's leadership worldwide, and ask why Rwanda tops the list of countries with the greatest share of women in parliamentary bodies. We'll see women at the forefront of social change. How were several hundred women activists able to thwart Exxon Corporation in Nigeria? Why did Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Matthai see planting trees as an act of feminist, environmental and political activism?

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 459 Topics in European History: East-Central Europe: 1918-2010

This course will examine the histories of Poland, Hungary, Czech, and Slovak republics from 1918 to 2010. It will make use of a broad range of primary source materials presented to students in the form of weekly vignettes that span the gamut of issues from politics, economics, environment, gender, and post-industrialization to the status of ethnic and religious minorities in these countries. The course will begin with an exploration of 19th century intellectual currents that played a seminal role in shaping national consciousness in east-central Europe, a necessary precondition and first step toward eventual independence. It will then explore the tragically-flawed peace settlement at Versailles that gave birth to new nation-states on that continent, but in reckless fashion, thereby planting the seeds for the next war. Next, it will investigate the turbulent inter-war, world-war, and Cold-War years, during which the inhabitants of this region experienced appalling hardships. Finally, it will examine existing tensions in new Europe since 1989 and EU accession. Topics include: West Pan-Slav intellectual constructs, the Versailles system, the Nazi occupation, the Hungarian Revolution, Prague Spring, the Solidarity Movement, the Velvet Revolution, and the Lisbon Treaty.
Same as U16 Hist 459

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 460 Indian Barbie, Asian Tigers and IT Dreams: Politics of Globalization and Development in South Asia

This course will explore how South Asia is at the heart of current debates about globalization, development, empire, gender, sexuality, and ethnic identity. We'll ask how changes in technology, medicine, and the economy correspond with those in society and human rights. Topics include the growth of markets, religious fundamentalism, bio-piracy and water wars, farmer suicides, consumerism, information and communication technology outsourcing, and reproductive technology. Readings, films, and discussions will take us to countries of Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and India. Assignments include weekly written critiques of the readings, leading discussion, and a research paper.

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 463 Sacred Performance, Sacred Dance

The aim of this course is to examine through text, film, audio, and movement experience the functions and purposes of sacred performances and sacred dances in societies around the world. The course will examine the nature of ritual as performance and the relation of ritual performance to the religious belief systems and communal structures. Some of the key performance/dance rituals will include the Monkey Dance (Kecak) of Bali; the Kumbh Mela in India; the Mani Rimdu of Nepal/Tibet; the Tewa Turtle Dance of New Mexico; the Catholic High Mass; the Whirling Dervishes; and Hasidic ecstatic dance. Parallels to contemporary theatrical dance and performance, rock concerts, Raves, and sporting events will be touched on.
Same as U66 RelSt 463

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U43 IS 464 South Asian Societies: Politics and Culture in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan

The course focuses on the relationship between ethnic and cultural issues and political processes in the South Asian subcontinent. In both democratic and non-democratic nations, ethnic and cultural heterogeneity has a significant effect on the way that political institutions develop and operate. We look at the historical legacy of British rule, contemporary religious and ethnic conflicts and their role in politics, and the effects of economic development and globalization on traditional culture.
Same as U25 PolSci 464

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 4662 Central American Geographies of Violence

This course provides an in-depth examination of the geographies of violence in Central America. As a region frequently characterized as endemically prone to violence, it is vital to analyze and contextualize the violence. Approaching violence in Central America from a geographic perspective involves not only locating and "placing" the violence, but also thinking relationally about the multiple, overlapping scales of activity, both within and beyond the region. The course is divided into five parts. In the first two sections of the course, we begin with an overview of the physical and human geography of the region and outline key historic moments and their legacies, including colonization, international relations (with an emphasis on U.S. interventions), civil war, genocide and torture. Simultaneously, we delve into various theoretical approaches for understanding the nature of multiple types of violence. In the third section of the course, we focus on neoliberal violence, insecurity and development and address issues such as urbanization, violent crime, issues with free trade and labor, and environmental issues. For the final two sections, we draw from contemporary case studies in the region (reading four required books). We will address identity and violence (discussing indigenous issues, racism, genocide and gender) and in the last section we will cover migration, gangs, drug-trafficking, U.S. security responses, and re-militarization. While we will continue to consider these types of violence through the various theoretical frameworks introduced in the first part of the course, we will also examine and analyze reports on contemporary violence and policy recommendations from multiple sources (multilateral organizations, governments, think tanks, and other nongovernmental organizations). Throughout the course we will also discuss current events occurring in Central America and how they directly or indirectly relate to the topic of geographies of violence.
Same as L97 IAS 4662

Credit 3 units. A&S: CD, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SD EN: H


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U43 IS 470 Topics in Religious Studies: Utopias and Distopia East and West


Same as U66 RelSt 470

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 478 Topics in Religious Studies: Religion and Violence

This seminar seeks to explore the relation of religion and violence. Major themes include sacrifice, the scapegoat, martyrdom, scarification, forms of ritual circumcision and piercing, cannibalism, holy militias, holy terror and holy war. Concrete examples will be discussed. Viewpoints range from the anthropological, to the psychological, sociological and theological. Among key writings to be studied are Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of Religious Life; Freud, Totem and Taboo; Hubert & Mauss, Sacrifice: Its Nature and Function; Robert Lowie, Primitive Religion; René Girard, Violence and the Sacred; and Mark Juergensmeyer, Terror in the Mind of God.
Same as U66 RelSt 478

Credit 3 units.


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U43 IS 489 Honors Research in Global Leadership and Management

Acceptance into the Honors Program is required for enrollment and the written agreement of a member of the faculty of the department (or other approved supervisor) to supervise an Honors project. The student must complete 6 units of Honors work and submit an acceptable written thesis.

Credit 3 units.


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