The Bachelor of Science in Journalism provides an academic and experiential foundation to help launch a career in print, broadcast, and web-based journalism and other news media fields. One of the earliest degree programs to be offered by University College, the Bachelor of Science in Journalism remains grounded in liberal arts imperatives: critical thinking and analysis; clear and thoughtful writing and discourse; discerning use of information; ethical decision-making; appreciation for human diversity; and as an extension of the liberal arts tradition, an understanding of the civic role of media in a free society.

The study of journalism at University College is multidisciplinary and contextual, integrating concepts and resources from other academic fields in Arts & Sciences such as anthropology, English, economics, history, political science, and psychology. The program also provides tools and strategies to help students prepare for the digital transformation of journalism that demands proficiency with social media, entrepreneurial and business skills, and the ability to quickly synthesize, analyze, and disseminate information, local to global.

Contact:Repps Hudson
Email:rehudson@wustl.edu
Website:http://ucollege.wustl.edu/programs/undergraduate/bachelors-journalism

Bachelor of Science in Journalism

All University College undergraduate students must satisfy the same general-education requirements.

The Bachelor of Science in Journalism is a 45-unit program of study that includes 18 units of required core courses, a 12-unit concentration in a related discipline or division of Arts & Sciences, a required internship or independent study, and 12 units of elective courses. Additionally, candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Journalism are encouraged to fulfill the advanced writing requirement in University College with an appropriate course in English Composition that is relevant to their interests in journalism.

Required Core Courses: 18 units

JRN 210Foundations of Journalism3
JRN 211Introduction to Journalism: Research to Writing3
JRN 345Effective Editing3
JRN 378Communications Technology and New Media3
JRN 381The Business of Communications3
Comm 416Communications Ethics and Law3
Total units18

Concentration: 12 units

Students explore the contextual and applied value of journalism by selecting 12 units of advanced course work in a single discipline or division of Arts & Sciences (e.g., anthropology, business, economics, English, health care, history, international studies, political science, psychology, sustainability, or a division of humanities, social sciences, natural sciences).

Internship or Independent Study: 3 units

Electives: 12 units

Elective course work, chosen primarily to sharpen writing skills, may include 3 units of advanced course work in English Composition, in addition to the advanced course taken to fulfill the advanced writing requirement for the Bachelor of Science degree.

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for U49 JRN.


U49 JRN 210 Foundations of Journalism

This course reviews the history and values of modern journalism from the American colonial period through present, with an emphasis on how journalism serves society. We will explore the relationship between journalism and democracy in the United States and other countries. We consider challenges to journalism throughout history, from various forms of censorship to generating revenue in today's business models for print and broadcast journalism. We also study how technology has transformed the industry and how people get news, from the first press to the nightly newscast to Twitter. We look at bad practices such as checkbook journalism, and discuss the work of Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, Missouri Sunlight Coalition, ProPublica and Investigative Reporters and Editors.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 211 Introduction to Journalism: Research to Writing

This course provides an overview of hands-on journalism skills with an emphasis on clear, accurate, and persuasive writing. Students will learn how to get the story, conduct interviews, report the story, and proofread their work. We will study and practice the art of pursuing a story, digging up and verifying facts, sorting fact from opinion, and uncovering information using principles of fairness, truth, and accuracy. As the format for news distribution varies and changes regularly, the course prepares students to use all platforms, including newspaper, television, radio, Facebook, Twitter, social media, citizen journalism, blogs, vlogs, and all other formats.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 226 Broadcast Journalism

This course examines the three most important elements of broadcast journalism: the mechanics of broadcasting, with an emphasis on television news; the crucial relationship between the media organization and its website; and the controversial relationship between news and entertainment. We cover the dynamics of local and national news, including local origination programming and its future. We also study electronic newsgathering and compare broadcast news writing to writing for newspapers.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 3001 Independent Study in Journalism

Requires proposal approved by instructor, department coordinator and dean in University College.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 315 Sports Reporting and Writing

The fundamentals of sports reporting. Includes formats ranging from "play-by-play" to interpretive or personal opinion pieces commonly printed as sports columns.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 316 Sports, Media, and Society

This course is aimed at preparing journalists for the challenge of covering contemporary sports in America, but it is not a class about sportswriting so much as a class about the issues sportswriters — and intelligent sports fans — need to understand. We will take a critical look at a number of sports-related issues and study the role of the media in the multibillion dollar industry that is big-time spectator sports. Discussion also of the roles sports serve in modern American culture.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 3161 Entertainment Journalism

This course teaches students how to report on arts and entertainment in newspapers and all other forms of modern media. We will learn to write persuasive criticism, arts and entertainment features, reviews, and other related articles for a mass-market publication. In doing so, we will acquire and sharpen important skills for this and all other forms of journalism: identifying the audience; writing effective leads; and developing interviewing skills.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 322 Special Topics in Journalism: Writing about the World of Food

This course examines food writing from literary, journalistic, and corporate communications perspectives, surveying great food writers from Pliny the Elder to Ruth Reichl. Students learn about techniques and resources for developing proper background knowledge of food-related subjects, and discuss different approaches in writing about food for print, broadcast, corporate, or public-relations applications. Based on each student's interest, assignments may include writing food-related articles, press releases, restaurant reviews, chef profiles, new-product press kits, nutritional analyses, recipe collections, and cookbooks.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 328 Online Journalism

The internet continues to have a major impact on the practice of journalism. All major newspapers now maintain websites; journalists routinely use the World Wide Web for research and communication purposes, including interviews; many newspapers maintain themselves online as information portals; and the web itself has given birth to a wide variety of online journals, magazines, and newsletters. Some have said that the internet is "democratizing" journalism, in that a major capital investment is no longer necessary to participate in the journalism marketplace. This course will examine the rapidly developing state of online journalism, including how traditional print newspapers and news magazines are utilizing the World Wide Web; "webzines" and other online publications; how online journalism differs from print and broadcast journalism in style, technique and content; and how the web both simplifies and complicates journalistic research.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 330 Photojournalism

This course introduces students to the tools, techniques, and concepts of visual journalism; the mechanics of photography and its uses as a language of communication. Students develop an awareness of photography and a point of view through shooting assignments. The benchmark for success is understanding concepts, not photographic expertise. No darkroom work. Access to a digital or film camera and a flash is required. No disposable cameras.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 3301 History of Photography

This course traces the history of photography from its beginnings in the early 19th century to the present. Throughout the intensive short course session, we will study the invention and applications of photography for scientific, artistic, and documentary purposes. We will study key inventors, pioneers, innovators, and artists and how they used photography to document their interpretations of social and cultural concerns. We will examine enduring iconic photos and contextualize the stories behind these images and examine how their impact continues to be generationally influential. We also will study the relation between photography and the visual arts in general, and examine the solidified endurance of photography as a medium by the late 20th century. The course ends with a consideration of the present-day state of photography into the 21st century and the effects of digital and cell phone photography.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 331 Travel and Outdoor Writing

In this creative writing class we will read and practice the techniques essential to crafting engaging travel and outdoor writing of the type found in magazines, newspapers, literary journals, blogs, and books. Readings come from authors such as Bryson, Krakauer, Powell, Theroux, Twain, Salak, and Steinbeck, and publications such as Orion, Outside, National Geographic, Travel + Leisure, and Wend. Topics balance creative nonfiction and journalistic approaches, including story concepts, angles & themes, voice & tone, detail & description, narrative arc & inverted pyramid structure, titles & subtitles, chronology & pacing. Students will complete a travel writing portfolio of pieces of varying lengths and concepts, including one experiential field-based assignment of the student's design.
Same as U11 EComp 330

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 340 The Magazine Feature: Idea to Finished Product

This course will explore the process of conceiving, reporting, drafting, revising, and placing a magazine feature story. We will read exemplary long-form magazine journalism — sometimes called literary journalism or narrative nonfiction — with an eye to process and craft. How do we find stories? What is the relationship between reporting and the published piece? How do we shed new light on common themes and approach storytelling in innovative ways? During the term, each student will develop a feature profile: securing a subject, devising a reporting strategy, incorporating research, and ultimately, exploring voice, theme, and structure through multiple drafts. The course will include literary analysis and discussion, writing exercises, workshop-style discussion of student work, and will prepare interested students to pitch their stories for publication.
Same as U11 EComp 340

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 344 Writing Feature Articles

Newspaper feature writing combines the best of daily, fact-driven reporting with the lyricism of elegant prose. In this course, students will be taught how to report a story, organize the material, and write with a flair. There will be an emphasis on close one-to-one instruction and rewriting to achieve a more readable story.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 345 Effective Editing

Today's communicators don't just write, they also must edit their work for posting on a website or publishing in print. Learn about editing, including the basics of professional-grade grammar, punctuation and style usage. Most editing today involves not just copyediting, however. Communicators must know how to spot sexist and racist language, poor organization and imprecise sentences. This class will help students edit others' work, and, most importantly, their own.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 346 Storytelling through Video

Storytelling is increasingly about showing, rather than telling a story. Cheap HD cameras and simple software enable nearly anyone to create video. In this class, which emphasizes journalistic and documentary creation, students will use established visual storytelling techniques with common technology to tell their stories through video. Students will study what works (and doesn't) in others' work to learn how to make compelling video content. Students will use their video-capable smartphone, GoPro, dslr or any camera they have available along with iMovie or similar software on their computers. Weekly assignments will hone production skills and build understanding of how to create short documentaries or other video stories.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 356 Freelance Writing: Process, Publishing and Platform

Writing for newspapers, magazines, public relations operations, and other specialized publications. How to begin a career in freelancing, build a portfolio, find new assignments, write query letters, and deal with editors. Basic writing is not taught. Emphasis on advanced writing skills and student's ability to carry a project from concept to published piece.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 357 Writing for Online Publication: Writing Blogs and Columns

Increasingly, blogs and columns are the primary outlet for writers to reach interested readers. Students will write and share, via workshop, their own blog and column entries. Readings will span published blogs and celebrated columnists, from Gawker to Herb Caen. Course activities will include planning new blogs, proposing to publishers, online vs. print columns, self-publishing blogs, hyper-linking, interactivity, search-engine optimization, single vs. multi-author blogs, photo/video-blogs, and micro-blogging.
Same as U11 EComp 357

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 358 Writing About Science and Healthcare: Tools for the 21st Century

This fully online course will focus on science, medical, and health reporting in newspapers and magazines. We will examine developments in the fields that result in headlines, and then look at researching, writing, and marketing articles. Students will conduct interviews with health and science professionals, and analyze popular publications. This is an online course. Only University College students may receive credit for online courses.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 361 The Story of Murder

Murder rivets our attention whether it's leading the news or portrayed in literary fiction. This course investigates homicide from the professional points of view with guest lecturers including the police checking the crime scene; the prosecutor and defense attorney who grapple with legal issues; a forensic psychologist who examines the killer; crime victim advocates who help the suffering families; and the programs to stop the violence. We will consider the First Amendment Right to a free media and the Fourth Amendment Right to privacy and why even the most heinous killer deserves in a fair trial.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 371 Advanced Photojournalism

Successful visual journalism demands an informed understanding of a subject and its context. In this course students will learn to think like a reporter with a camera, and to gather accurate information to produce high-quality visual journalism. We will study the works of accomplished photojournalists and shoot a lot of pictures for critique by both fellow students and the instructor. Students will produce photo essays, complete with text, and the best pictures will be exhibited on campus. Students provide their own film or digital camera. Recommended for the Liberal Arts and Business (LAB) Certificate. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photojournalism.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 378 Communications Technology and New Media

This course explores concepts, production, design, publications, strategies and practical applications of interactive media. The course focuses on emerging topics and technologies to help students develop strategies for addressing and resolving both basic and complex issues associated with interactive media. Case studies and guest speakers will be introduced to examine a range of interactive media topics including SEO, web advertising, social media marketing, interactive public relations, web design and development, media measurement, email marketing, and games and entertainment.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 381 The Business of Communications

This course presents the business side of journalism and media organizations, from publication and creation of content to day-to-day operations. Students will study business practices and procedures of all types of media organizations, with emphasis on sales and marketing, product distribution, production, and audience identification and engagement. We also will learn to develop publications and products which speak to readers and viewers.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 387 Your Health and What the Media Tell You About It

Communication efforts between health professionals and consumers are sometimes undermined because of the barrage of media health messages that bombard us daily. This course studies media's reporting on health, medicine, and science, to help discern fact from fiction. We will learn specific reading, viewing, and listening skills to help address this issue, and analyze traditional and digital media (TV, radio, film, print, internet) to become better aware of codes and conventions used in a variety of media representations of health-related topics.

Credit 3 units.


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U49 JRN 452 Media Internship

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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