Breathtaking changes in political, economic and social relations have taken place over the past several centuries. Living and working in a rapidly changing global environment presents great opportunities to advance the human condition, promote growth and development, create political liberties, recast bargains between governments and their societies, transform social welfare, and advance the boundaries of knowledge and scientific exploration.

Yet, the same context presents great risks as people fear loss of identity, worry about economic subordination and loss to those beyond their borders, encounter environmental degradation, and confront potential decline in personal and social autonomy. Our heightened economic, political, social, cultural, and environmental interdependence generates serious challenges in areas such as social justice, health, security, development, human rights, social welfare, inequality, diversity, and technology. The challenges create the possibility of conflict, but also for cooperation and compromise.

The Masters of Arts in International Affairs offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding global issues. The program draws on teaching and expertise from Washington University faculty and experienced practitioners in the St. Louis region, and it provides knowledge and skills for understanding and working with some of the most difficult international and cross-cultural problems that states, societies, and communities face. Students have the opportunity to tailor their studies to explore topics such as global politics, global economics, development, international security and conflict, international business, human rights, the role of gender, the environment and sustainability, and issues of regional importance.

Whether students are studying full-time or part-time, a range of on-campus and online courses makes it possible for them to shape their degree according to their interests and schedules.

Contact:Andrew Sobel
Email:sobel@wustl.edu
Website:http://ucollege.wustl.edu/programs/graduate/masters-international-affairs

Master of Arts in International Affairs

Total Requirements: 30 units

The Master of Arts in International Affairs is a 30-unit program that includes four core courses and a capstone project, which is either a Directed Research Project (3 units) or a Master’s Thesis (6 units). The purpose of the required core courses is to develop a coherent structure underpinning the AM by ensuring some common theoretical foundations, knowledge, and language shared by students in this program and with graduates of similar programs around the world. This contributes to the building of a professional community and identity. In addition to the required courses and the capstone project, at least three courses must be home-based in International Affairs. Remaining electives may be chosen from International Affairs seminars or from other graduate-level courses approved by University College.

Required Core Courses: 12 units

Students must take four core courses aimed at students acquiring a common understanding of foundational knowledge and skills for analyzing international affairs, enhancing their abilities to be thoughtful and critical users of academic research in applied settings, and pursuing careers in the field. One required course is a research writing and methods seminar that helps students develop systematic tools for use as practitioners who write and present their work. The other three core courses, selected from a list of core courses, provide a theoretical and substantive foundation for the analysis and understanding of international affairs. These are designed to enable students to develop expertise and understanding of dominant analytical frameworks, tools, and common language in the field of international affairs to engage with other professionals in the field. A selection of three core courses, which are overlapping, ensures that this foundation will be sound and robust.

  • Methods and Research Design (IA 524). Students work to produce a research proposal for a significant question in global affairs, which can be academic or applied. The workshop proceeds step-by-step: assessing what good research looks like from different disciplinary perspectives, building a "doable" research question as a puzzle to be explored and one that engages others, elaborating different theoretical approaches that might help explain the puzzle, constructing a literature review relevant to the research question, deciding what type of data/information is best to answer the proposed question, speculating about what pitfalls might threaten confidence in the research, and determining what are some of the potential implications of the research. The workshop will be highly structured and highly interactive with fellow students providing critique and input at each step of the process.

  • At least three of the courses listed below:

International Organizations (IA 509)

International Law and the Use of Force (IA 511)

International Economics (IA 5181)

International Growth and Development (IA 519)

American Foreign Policy (IA 535)

Politics of Global Finance (IA 5571)

International Political Economy in Theory and Practice (IA 559)

International Relations (IA 574)

State Failure, State Success and Development (IA 5772)

Global Political Economy (IA 5780)

Capstone Project: 3-6 units

After completing formal course work, all students are required to complete a capstone research project under the supervision of a Washington University faculty member. The research project is either a 3-unit Directed Research Project, or especially strong students can opt for a 6-unit Master’s Thesis.

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for U85 IA.


U85 IA 500 Independent Study

An independent research project under the supervision of a member of the faculty of the International Affairs program Approved proposal must be presented at the time of registration. Open only to students admitted into the IA program. For more information, contact the Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs at 314-935-6700.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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U85 IA 5002 Internship in International Affairs

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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U85 IA 5024 International Organizations

This course surveys in historically and theoretically informed fashion the role of various international institutions in international relations. It addresses the fundamental question of the contribution of international institutions to world order. The course first traces the historical evolution of international organization before turning to international institutions since World War II. It then focuses on the following: the most important regional international organization, the European Union; the most important international organizations dealing with the issues of peace and security, the United Nations and NATO; and the major international economic institutions, the WTO, the IMF and the World Bank. Prerequisites: Intro to International Politics.
Same as U25 PolSci 3024

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5030 Levels of Analysis: Thinking Theoretically

A theory is a set of propositions and concepts that combine to explain phenomena by specifying the relationships among the propositions. Theory's ultimate goal is to predict phenomena. Good theory can explain events across space and time (e.g., it works just as well in Iran as in Columbia; and just as well today as in the Peloponnesian War). Theories provide a framework through which to understand everyday events in international relations, and to answer the basic foundational questions in the field-how can human nature be characterized? What's the relationship between the individual and society? What are the characteristics and role of the state? How's the international system organized? Theories abound in international relations: classical realism, structural realism, liberalism, constructivism, Critical Theory, Feminism, English School, post-structuralism, post-modernism, to name some of the more prominent ones. These different theoretical approaches help us see international relations from different viewpoints. No single approach can capture all the complexity of contemporary world politics. The list of possible explanations a theory provides can be usefully organized according to three levels of analysis-individual, state, international. Dividing the analysis of international politics into levels helps orient our questions and suggests the appropriate type of evidence to explore. Each level privileges certain variables, while abstracting others. This workshop explores the value of thinking theoretically in international relations; highlights what we gain (and lose) with theory; and analyzes the utility of each level of analysis for what it illuminates (and what it neglects). The written assignment will involve applying the three levels of analysis to a contemporary event.

Credit 1 unit.


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U85 IA 5041 Islam and Politics

Blending history and ethnography, this course covers politics in the Islamic world in historical and contemporary times. Topics include history of Islam, uniformity and diversity in belief and practice (global patterns, local realities), revolution and social change, women and veiling, and the international dimensions of resurgent Islam. Geographical focus extends from Morocco to Indonesia; discussion of other Muslim communities is included (Bosnia, Chechnya, sub-Saharan Africa, U.S.).
Same as L48 Anthro 4041

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS


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U85 IA 5044 Modern Europe and the Slavs

The objectives of this course are twofold: to pursue a transnational and diachronic study of the modern Slavic states of Europe with reference to their historical, linguistic, political, and socioeconomic origins; and to explore their fraught relations with each other and with the EU. Our coverage will include: Russia, Poland, Ukraine, Belarus, Czech and Slovak Republics, Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, and Bulgaria.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5053 Cultural Policy and the Politics of Culture in Latin America

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 508 International Peacekeeping

The notion that the international community as a whole has a responsibility for the maintenance of peace is one of the most notable characteristics of the 20th century. This was the chief reason for the establishment of both the League of Nations and the United Nations. And although the United Nations has ranged far beyond that agenda, it has always done what it can do to contribute to international peace and security — generally by way of what became known as "peacekeeping." This activity has had a remarkably high international profile in the post-Cold War era. The object of this course is to analyze the nature of peacekeeping and place it in its political context (and hence to understand why its fortunes have changed so dramatically).

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 509 International Organizations

This course examines the role of major international organizations in the modern world — the UN, EU, NATO, IMF, WTO, MERCOSUR, and others. We explore the background for the creation of these organizations, the purposes they serve, and those whose interests they promote. We also consider how they adapt and evolve over time. Our survey centers on three broad areas of investigation: First, we examine how international organizations promote and maintain international security. Second, we consider organizations designed to regulate and promote economic growth and development. This entails a focus upon the process of globalization and the challenges presented in an era of heightened economic interdependence. Finally, we examine growing efforts at regional cooperation though the emergence of organizations such as NAFTA, the EU, and MERCOSUR.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5093 Politics of the European Union

This course provides a political overview of the European Union and its 27 member states. Attention is paid to the emergence of European supranational governance in the 1950s and its trajectory to the present day. We also consider the interplay of geographical, economic, and cultural factors, together with an assessment of the EU and its place in the larger global political sphere.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 510 UN and International Security

The aim of this course is to gain a deeper understanding of the United Nations (UN) and its role in world politics. Beginning with an examination of the history of the UN and its precursors, we will discuss the UN's structure and its three-part mission as outlined in the UN Preamble: international peace and security; human rights; and development. We will assess the strengths and weaknesses of the UN and its agencies in these three substantive areas, within the context of a rapidly shifting geopolitical climate. Attention will be paid to the ongoing debate among proponents and detractors of the UN, and the unique role played by the U.S. in this debate.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 511 International Law and the Use of Force

This course will combine legal and political science approaches to the study of international law. We will explore the source of international law, the law of treaties, the interaction of international and national law, international jurisdiction and sovereignty, state responsibility, the peaceful settlement of disputes, and the use of force. In addition, we will examine political science theories that seek to explain why international law does (or does not) influence the behavior of states in international affairs.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5111 Sexuality in Western Culture


Same as U98 MLA 571

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 512 Humanitarian Intervention in International Society

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5120 The American Media and Foreign Policy

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5122 Worlds of Higher Education

This course will examine institutions of higher education as they have developed throughout the world. Incorporating historical, cultural, ideological, and socio-political perspectives, we will compare and contrast university systems in Europe, Asia, America, and the Mideast. Emphasis will be placed upon the structure and function of contemporary educational systems and emerging trends in the internationalization of the academic marketplace.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 513 American Primacy in the World

This course will study the phenomenon of American primacy or "empire" since the Cold War, emphasizing the policies of the Bush presidency after September 11, 2001. We will examine the impact of American primacy on the U.S. economy, the "American ethos," multilateralism and the U.N., global security, and the structure of the world system.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5130 Dirty Wars and State Terrorism in South America

This course will explore the historical, political, and cultural impact of the so-called Operation Condor military dictatorships in 1970s and 1980s South America. We will focus on two of the most notorious dictatorships, those in Argentina and Chile, but we will also examine the examples of Bolivia, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Brazil. We will use historical accounts, remembrance sites, declassified U.S. government documents, literary works, and film to assess the various causes and results of a period that has marked these countries in ways that continue to influence national identities.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5131 Seminar in Comparative Politics: Qualitative Research Methods

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 514 Principles of International Law and Business

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5140 Community Development & Environmental Preservation through Entrepreneurial Collaboration I

This course helps students understand and implement grass roots community development concepts in Madagascar. Using case studies, speakers, and readings, we consider the complexity of balancing cultural, economic, environmental, and political factors in rural subsistence agriculture communities. We work closely with the Missouri Botanical Garden (MBG) to identify and test the feasibility of different approaches to conservation and community-based, self-directed, economic growth at different Malagasy sites. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach (e.g., anthropology, business, design, engineering, law, social work, economics, political science, etc.) to understanding and applying entrepreneurial skills in a community development context.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5142 Sustainable Development and Conservation: Madagascar

This course focuses on sustainable development in rural subsistence economies, using Madagascar as case study. Students from diverse disciplines are challenged to develop and assess the feasibility of projects that can have positive impact on communities constrained by poverty traps. The span of projects includes topics such as forest conservation and use, nutrition, health, food security, clean water, education, and bottom up economic growth. Students in Humanities, Social Sciences, Business, Design, Engineering, Physical Sciences, Law, Social Work, Economics, Political Science, Public Health and others use their different perspectives to search for answers. Teamwork and peer teaching are central to the course. Competitively evaluated projects will be field-tested in Madagascar. Selected teams will travel to Madagascar in May and work with the Missouri Botanical Garden Community Conservation Program to adapt projects to conflicting environmental, cultural, economic, and political factors. Poster board sessions for students taking the trip occur in the fall term. Project teams selected to go to Madagascar will be assessed a lab fee at the time their participation in the trip is confirmed. The lab fee covers the cost of airfare, in-country transportation, and approximately three weeks of in-country lodging and food. Students may not withdraw from this class after 2/28/17. Undergraduate students should register for the course using one of the undergraduate cross-listed course numbers.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 515 Business Strategy for Global Sustainability

This course will explore strategies of sustainable management, which has emerged as a significant goal for international business. While addressing the overall theme of sustainability, we will evaluate business strategies and government policies that aim at economic integration and the improvement of global environmental quality. Attention paid to the manner in which global industries are pursuing replacements for environmentally-destructive technologies, and the sweeping changes that will result from such reinvestment.

Credit 2 units.


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U85 IA 5152 Pluralism, Politics, and Religion

A graduate seminar for students in social sciences, history or philosophy, focusing on issues of multiculturalism, ethnic and religious pluralism, and governance of ethnic and religious diversity in European, Asian, and North American societies. Course is open to graduate students in all disciplines and is part of an exchange program with Societies, Religions, Laicites Laboratory in Paris. Independent research is expected; nature of research will vary by discipline but can include ethnographic, historical, or theoretical work, to be evaluated by instructor in consultation with appropriate departmental supervisors. Instructor's permission is required.
Same as L48 Anthro 5152

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 517 Bureaucracy in Global Perspective

Bureaucracies carry out much of the day-to-day work we associate with government: cleaning streets, mailing pension checks, and regulating workplaces. How comparable are bureaucracies across political systems with different histories, cultures, and resources? The course will begin by establishing a theoretical foundation for why politicians delegate authority to bureaucracies and why bureaucratic actions may diverge from politicians' expectations. We will then compare a variety of bureaucracies and bureaucratic structures including examples from Great Britain, Japan, and the U.S. Our goal will be to develop a set of theoretical tools that will enable us to understand the interface of bureaucratic and political structures, and the politics of bureaucracy itself.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5170 Gender and Globalization

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 518 International Political Economy

Same as U85 IA 418.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5181 International Economics

This course provides an analysis of the international economy, the economic theories that help explain it, and analysis of important current issues of international economic policy. When David Ricardo proposed his famous theory of comparative advantage in 1821, he set out to explain why England exported cloth to and imported wine from Portugal. Today, international trade is much more complex. Apple devices are designed in Silicon Valley while their most expensive component, the hard drive, is manufactured by Toshiba in Philippines before it is finally assembled in China. Can Ricardo's theory explain today's patterns of international production and trade? Today, the number of these currencies has been reduced through the formation of the European Union. What are the cost and benefits of currency unions?

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 519 International Growth and Development

Few subjects in international relations attract as much attention as growth and development. Why do some nations develop while others languish? What accounts for the disparities in the distribution of wealth and opportunity in the world? This is far more than an economic puzzle. This seminar explores the interaction of politics, history, culture, society, the environment and economics as we try to understand what governments and societies do to promote or hinder growth and development.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5190 Nationalism and the Development of the Modern State

This course will broadly examine how nationalism has helped define the modern experience. It will comprise three parts. First, a survey of theories of nationalism, utilizing the work of Marx, Ernst Gellner, and Benedict Anderson, among others. Second, a survey of key nationalist movements of the 18th-20th centuries — notably those of France, the U.S., Germany, Ireland, and Russia. Third, an exploration of contemporary nationalism. Here we will use case studies from Eastern Europe, postcolonial Africa, and Asia, together with current theories on nation-building and intervention, to analyze how nationalism has evolved and what effects it has had on our world.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 520 Political Economy of Multinational Enterprises

In this class we will explore the literature in political science and economics on the relationship between multinational enterprises and domestic governments. The four main themes of the course are: 1) defining and understanding multinational enterprises, 2) governments attracting and competing for multinationals, 3) the impact of multinationals on economic development and groups within society, and 4) attempts to regulate multinationals both domestically and internationally. Prerequisites: U25 101 and 102 or U25 103. A background in economics (micro and macro) is encouraged.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5210 The Immigration Crucible: Three International Perspectives

This course will investigate the issue of immigration in today's world from three perspectives. First, Mexican migration into the United States, with a focus on issues of labor and identity. Second, the Chinese diaspora on the American continent — specifically, a comparison of the United States and Panama with respect to notions of citizenship forged beyond national borders. And third, Muslim immigration in Europe, and the complex interface of politics, religion, and cultural conflict.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5211 African Civilization to 1800

Beginning with an introduction to the methodological and theoretical approaches to African history, this course surveys African civilization and culture from the Neolithic age until 1800 AD. Topics include African geography and environmental history, migration and cross-cultural exchange, the development of Swahili culture, the Western Sudanese states, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and the historical roots of Apartheid.
Same as L90 AFAS 321C

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH, CD A&S IQ: HUM, LCD Arch: HUM Art: HUM BU: HUM, IS UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5213 Latin America in World Affairs

This course examines Latin American foreign relations from the 1820s to the present with an emphasis on the period since 1945. Focusing on transnational relations, the course analyzes long term patterns and trends among Latin American states and between Latin America and the United States, Europe, and the global South. Attention will be paid to the way Latin Americans have sought to manage foreign influence. To this end we will analyze patterns of inter-American conflict and cooperation. The course will explore how elite culture, domestic social forces, development, and cultural identities influenced national political cultures, and how these in turn shaped Latin American foreign policies.

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U85 IA 5214 Voices of Latin American Literature

A study of the masterpieces of Latin American literature from the Conquest to the present. Themes include the Conquest from the perspective of the conquerors as well as the conquered; the challenge to religious authority from Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz in the 17th century; the crisis of national identity and the racial question in the 19th century; political turmoil during the period of "the Dirty War." Readings include selections from Columbus, Cortes, Leon Portilla, Sor Juana, Echeverria, Marti, Rodo, Paz, Fuentes, Vallejo, Neruda, Borges, Garcia Marques, Ferre, Gambaro, Dragun, and Menchu.
Same as U98 MLA 5214

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5215 Grand Strategy

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5216 Magical Realism in Latin American Literature and Film

We will explore some of the most intriguing and original works of the 20th century by major Latin American writers such as Jorge Luis Borges, Isabel Allende, and Nobel Prize winner Gabriel Garcia Marquez. As North America's exotic Other — geographically and culturally — Latin America is often depicted in terms of "magical realism," a style that combines fantastic, mythical, and dreamlike themes with artistic imagination. Our discussions will concentrate on magical realism in literary texts, but we will also draw from pertinent background materials, including a selection of feature and documentary films from Cuba, Mexico, and Argentina. Prerequisite: Consult Course Listings.
Same as U98 MLA 5216

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 522 The Arab Question and French-American Relations

This course examines the conflicting notions of national identity between France and America over the last three centuries and attempts to explain why these countries do not always see eye to eye. In addition, it examines the special colonial and postcolonial relations between France and its mainly Arabic areas of influence (North Africa and the Middle East) with a focus on how and why those relations have been interpreted and/or misinterpreted in many different ways in the international arena by the United States.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5221 Latin American History and Culture

A survey of Latin American history and culture from the time of the European conquest to the present. A focus on specific periods and events, including the conquest, the wars of independence, the emergence of authoritarianism, the Mexican and Cuban Revolutions, and the struggle to establish democratic institutions. Designed to acquaint students with the evolution of Latin American culture within an historical framework. Course materials include historical texts and essays, fictional literature, and videos. Same as U85 IA 475.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 523 International Relations of the Global South

This course will examine the "Global South" as a historical, sociopolitical, and economic entity in the context of the contemporary international system. We will first consider the legacy of colonialism, movements for national liberation, growing regional integration, and the impact of global economic reform. We will then explore a range of contemporary issues that have engendered conflict between North and South — international trade, economic development, environmental concerns, human rights, and military intervention. We will examine the viability of the notion of "Global South," given the great diversity of countries and peoples subsumed under this rubric.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5230 The Law of the Sea: Governing the Oceans and Marine Resources

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 524 Methods and Research Design in International Studies

This course introduces students in the International Affairs program to research design and methods and to the relationship of theory to research in the social sciences, with the aim of preparing students for writing research papers. Areas to be explored include overall research design, case selection, and literature reviews. The importance of theory is stressed.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 525 Societies in Comparative Perspective in Literature

The Western world, its diversified cultures, their worldviews and values, will be examined through relevant literary works. Novels from the 20th century will serve as sources for discussion of our contemporary social models and problems, and how our present expectations and hopes have been historically shaped.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 526 French Perceptions of Identity and "Otherness"

This course will demonstrate how people with direct or indirect historical and cultural ties to France regard themselves and cultural "others." To understand the mindset of French-speaking peoples, from the European mainland to Quebec and Louisiana, and from the Caribbean to West Africa, we will examine influential French texts of the past two centuries, by Alexis de Tocqueville, Jean Baudrillard, Roland Barthes, and Franz Fanon, among others. We will also consider the work of lesser known Acadian and French-Canadian writers, such as Gerard Leblanc and Jacques Poulin. Whether writing about Americans, Europeans, or Asians, these authors display noteworthy similarities when they articulate both their own national characters and that of a "foreign" people.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5264 Environmental Ethics

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 527 International Security

Historically, courses on international security have dealt with war and the grad strategies of the great powers. While such studies are important, there is much more to the modern day security environment. In this course, we will endeavor to learn about military strategy, terrorism, global health, and globalization. We will bring tools from economics and political science to bear on these issues in the hope of gaining a greater understanding of the security issues that confront the world today.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5270 Public Policy in the European Union

This course will examine public policy formulation in the European Union. Attention will be paid to the following topics: the evolution of EU policymaking and its key determinants and influences; the EU policy cycle (from agenda setting to evaluation); and the various models of public policymaking (institutional, rational, incremental, etc). The overall aim will be to understand the current structure of EU public policy and to assess likely developments in the future.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5273 Introduction to Israel Studies

An exploration of Israel in the Jewish experience from antiquity to modernity and in the history and culture of the Middle East. Special attention will be paid to the modern state of Israel and current issues in its politics, economy, and society. L75 5273 is intended for graduate students only.
Same as L75 JINE 3273

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM BU: IS


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U85 IA 528 Western Social Thought and Contemporary Social Problems

A study of the predominant ideologies and myths within Western social thought, their historical origins (Locke, Rousseau, and Marx), and how various societies and countries confront the modern dilemmas of our civilization: e.g. religious, racial, and national tolerance/intolerance; the welfare state and the market; technology and globalization; liberalism and individual rights; social stratification and inequality; work and/or unemployment; immigration; and the role of women.
Same as U98 MLA 5113

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 529 Terrorism and Political Violence

This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of terrorism, civil war, revolution, and other forms of domestic-level political violence. We will consider a variety of theoretical and empirical approaches to studying violence. The focus of the class is on learning how social scientific tools can be used to understand conflict. No mathematical background beyond high school algebra is prerequisite for the course. However, readings with technical content (both game theoretic and statistical) are assigned. Basic game theory and statistics will be introduced as necessary.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5290 China's Role in the 21st Century

This course will examine China's global impact in the 21st century. Beginning with an overview of its current political and economic configuration, we will explore China's complex global interactions, examining these from the perspective of Western and Asian nations, together with the view from within China. Drawing from the interdisciplinary scholarship of political scientists, economists, and anthropologists, as well as the writings of politicians, business leaders, and ordinary people, we will investigate how Chinese society and its mix of political and economic institutions have the potential to reshape international politics, the global economy, and the environment.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 530 Modern Middle East

This online course will explore the rapidly changing role of the media in Arab and Muslim societies in reporting about revolts and conflicts, the "Arab Spring," and the chronic impasse between Israel and the Palestinians. We will study the impact of social media, which have afforded greater access to "real-time" images of the Syrian civil war than was possible with previous conflicts. We will investigate the formation of public opinion in the Arab and Muslim worlds — in particular, the role of state-supported media operations such as Al Jazeera. We will compare the style and substance of Israeli and Arab media sources and the role of professional versus citizen journalists in covering newsworthy events.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5306 The Modern Mediterranean: Facts and Fictions

The countries and cultures around the entire Mediterranean basin have provided, and have been the scene of, much of the world's recorded history. In the 20th century, however, writers set out to explore, either by actual travel or else in their imagination alone, many of its lesser known corners: forgotten imperial ruins in Tunisia; remote and semi-primitive mountain villages of Crete; dusty and disease-ridden towns steeped in medieval customs in the Sahara; the secretive, aesthetically dazzling souks of Alexandria. In doing so, they often found many fascinating, if previously hidden and frequently disturbing places, peoples, behaviors. But sometimes, instead, they discovered mere symbolic fodder for an implied or sometimes even explicit critique of their own native lands and social mores. In this course, we shall consider examples of the former in works like Andre Gide's Immoralist, Nikos Kazantzakis' Zorba the Greek, Paul Bowles' The Sheltering Sky, and Lawrence Durrell's Justine. As for the latter, our attention will turn to even more contemporary works, such as Derek Walcott's Omeros, which is partially based on the Homeric tale of Ulysses' wanderings around the Mediterranean, but which aims primarily at questioning the history of colonialism and cultural memory of his own Caribbean island of Saint Lucia. While students will pay attention to the stylistic features of these works, to understand better the role rhetoric plays in such fiction, they will also study closely the various important sociopolitical, economic, religious, and philosophical concerns raised by their authors. Some excerpts of film adaptations of these works are also used. Primary readings should be mostly completed in advance of the course.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 531 The Intelligence Process

This course examines in detail the origins, structure, and functions of the U.S. intelligence community. One of the major goals is to understand the relationship between intelligence production and the development of national security policy. We also examine some of the major controversies concerning intelligence, including presidential and congressional oversight, the relationship between intelligence professionals and policymakers, and the need for reform. The course examines the intelligence process and its interaction with policymakers.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5310 National Security Decision-Making

This week-long intensive course will simulate our national security decision-making process. Students will embody the various perspectives and priorities of strategic decision-makers, gaining an appreciation for the interagency process and the challenges of making foreign policy in a complex and fast-paced environment. Students will hone professional writing, oral presentation, negotiation and collaboration skills as we explore potential flashpoints with two geostrategic rivals, China and Russia. We will consider our treaty obligations, alliances, and how to employ our diplomatic, military, economic and unconventional tools to achieve our nation's strategic goals.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 532 Contemporary Africa

Same as U85 IA 432.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5321 Africa and International Development Aid Policy

This course will examine the role that international actors play in the process of domestic development policy. With a focus on the nations of Africa, we will explore the history and evolution of key international entities, including financial institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, nongovernmental organizations such as OxFam, and multinational organizations such as the United Nations. We will consider competing theories and strategies on what constitutes the best development policy practices. A selection of case studies will help us assess the effectiveness of policy tools to promote or hinder development in poor countries. Readings will include works by Jeffrey Sachs, Paul Collier, Amartya Sen, and William Easterley.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5333 The Post-Cold War Order

This course will cover key developments in post-Cold War politics. Beginning with an assessment of the problem of achieving order in an international system lacking central authority, we will examine the emergence of international institutions intended to regulate global and regional security, nuclear weapons proliferation, the world economy, and the global environment. We will then consider ethnic and cultural sources of cooperation and conflict, including the "end of history" and "clash of civilizations" theses. Next, we will examine the challenge posed by American primacy, the development of international law and cooperation, and trends toward both globalization and regionalization. We will conclude by assessing approaches to the global war on terror.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA, IAI


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U85 IA 534 The Shaping of 20th-Century Africa

Foreign policy experts have increasingly identified Africa as a region of strategic importance. Ethnic tension and political instability, global trade and investment, international security, refugee flows, and public health crises have caused the world community to pay greater attention to the African continent. This course explores the historical roots of the problems and issues confronting contemporary African societies and international policymakers. Topics include the colonization and partition of the continent, systems of colonial administration, religion and mission work, medicine and education, decolonization and nation building, military instability, the Cold War in Africa, aid and dependency, apartheid and its legacy, and the historical roots of ethnic conflict. Same as U85 IA 434.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 535 American Foreign Policy

This course begins with a survey of the historical foundations of American foreign policy. Having established a broad understanding of the issues that have confronted the nation, we closely examine the current political climate, and the challenges that the United States faces both in terms of its economic and physical security. Finally, we consider strategies for dealing with the threats and challenges that beset this nation. Same as U85 IA 4123.

Credit 3 units. UColl: OLH


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U85 IA 5351 Middle East Communications and Politics

This course is a wide-ranging exploration of the political communications arena of Israel and its immediate neighbors: Egypt, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, the Palestinian Authority, Hamas, Hizballah, and some additional actors.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 537 Religion, Culture, and Society

The ways in which various religious traditions respond to general human needs, how they develop in specific social contexts, and their use of symbols and rituals. Study of religious practices of small-scale societies as well as some central ideas and activities in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and the religions of Japan. Same as U85 IA 426.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 539 China's Foreign Relations

This course will consider China's foreign policy through the examination of key issues that interact to inform China's actions internationally. These include domestic stability, nationalism, mainland-Taiwan relations and economic development. Within this context we will discuss China's expanding role in international and regional political and economic organizations as well as important bilateral relations, such as Sino-American and Sino-Japanese ties. In the end, the goal is twofold: to gain a broader understanding of what motivates much of China's foreign policy and to determine whether China is a rising power willing to play by Western "rules of the game" in order to peacefully develop its economy and society or whether the government believes that international relations are a zero-sum game that it can win in an effort eventually to rewrite those rules.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5392 Capitalism and Culture: New Perspectives in Economic Anthropology

Capitalism is perhaps the most important historical and social phenomenon in the modern world. In tribal settings and major cities alike its complex impacts are evident. Through rich case studies of how capitalism touches down in diverse cultures, this course provides an introduction to anthropological perspectives on the economy and economic development. Themes covered include the history of capitalism and globalization, the cultural meanings of class and taste, the relationship between capitalism and popular culture, major artistic responses to capitalism, social movements such as environmentalism, and the field of international development. No background in anthropology or economics is required.
Same as L48 Anthro 4392

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, SD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC, SD Art: SSC


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U85 IA 5399 Jewish, Muslim, and Christian Scriptures: The Formation of Community

Reading the sacred texts of the Abrahamic religions, we will examine how Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions use cultural symbols to create community. Since Christianity arises from and in opposition to Judaism, and since Islam both extends and also breaks with Judaism and Christianity, we will explore how the development of "difference" contributes to perceptions of religious identity. Noting that one of the important functions of cultural symbols is to counter threats of chaos and meaninglessness, we will further consider how Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities use symbols to construct a humanly-meaningful sense of "world" and of "history," concepts that are essential for maintaining group cohesiveness.
Same as U98 MLA 5399

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 540 The Ball is Round: The Global Culture of Soccer

First played in China 2000 years ago, the game of soccer has become the ultimate team sport worldwide (with the exception of the U.S.). Like no other sport, soccer has generated a notoriously fanatic fan culture, it has created a billion dollar entertainment industry organized in a multinational corporate association (FIFA) with more than 200 member states, and it has replaced ideologies, religion, warfare, or conquest as a source for national as well as local identity and pride. In this course we study the basic rules, techniques, and strategies of soccer, analyze its development from primitive but powerful techniques, and strategies of soccer, analyze its development from primitive but powerful "kick and run" (England, Germany) to the artistic ball-handling of the whiz kid (South and Central America, Africa) and the art of controlling space (Netherlands, France, Italy, Spain). Further topics include soccer and politics, the good fan and the hooligan, racism and the multicultural team, women's soccer, the local club and the national team, ways of watching soccer, soccer and globalization. We read texts by Franklin Foer, Nick Hornby, Eduardo Galeano, and others. Films include classic soccer games, Bend It Like Beckham and Shaolin Soccer.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5400 NGOs in the International System

Over the past several decades, NGOs (nongovernmental organizations) have become an integral part of international politics, addressing crucial problems pertaining to environmental degradation, human rights, immigration, poverty, disease, and so forth. This course will explore ways in which NGOs influence the shaping and execution of policy in international affairs. We will first consider the rise of NGOs and the rationale for their emergence, then examine — through case studies in Africa, Asian, South America, and the former Soviet Union — how they have approached their mission and whether they have succeeded.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5401 Islam and Modernity

During the past three decades, the rise of political Islam in countries with Muslim majority populations has brought the Islamic tradition into the public limelight. Previously unknown Islamic terms such as 'jihad' and 'fatwa' have entered the English language, and media coverage of various aspects of Islam have become routine. This course offers a framework for understanding the place of Islam in the modern world by considering its global presence in social and cultural life, as evident in literature, art, religious practice, and politics. We consider the recent history of Muslims worldwide, the legacy of colonialism, political Islam, religious reform and modernism, gender, spirtuality, literacy and artistic expression, as well as religious and cultural pluralism. We also study the question of Islamic identity as informed by contemporary Muslim figures of divers leanings, such as Sayyid Qutb, Alija Izetbegovic, Shabbir Akhtar, Fatima Mernissi, Abdulkarim Soroush, Osama bin Laden, and Fethullah Gulen.
Same as U98 MLA 5401

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5402 Mathematical Modeling in Political Science

This course is designed to provide mathematical tools useful for the rest of the statistical methods sequence, as well as for other courses in formal theory or mathematical modeling. Throughout the course, the mathematical tools are motivated by applications to the general problem of how politics can be modeled for purposes of statistical analysis, deductive reasoning, or conceptual theorizing. This motivation is accomplished by means of a consistent focus on such processes as individual decision making, the representation of issues, statistical phenomena, and phenomena of change over time. The course assumes a sufficient background in elementary algebra, logic, functions, and graphs; remedial work in these areas will be offered through a review course during the last week or two of summer. Mathematical topics covered include: sets and relations; probability; differential calculus and optimization; difference equations; and linear algebra.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 5052

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5403 Global Collective Action: Why Do Nations Cooperate? Climate Change and Other Cases.

Nation-states act in their self-interest — so how and when do they come together to address global problems? From nuclear disarmament to small pox eradication to tackling climate change, nations must transcend or transform self-interest to deal with these problems. Collective action and concepts such as tragedy of the commons, free riders, and prisoner's dilemma, will be taught in the context of global problems. We will examine the role of the nation-state, non-state players and the sub-national players in the pursuit of global governance. With a focus on climate change negotiations, we will delve into what collective action means for the big economies (U.S., China, Russia), for the not-so-big economies and for the small island nation-states and indigenous peoples, and what this action means within the current international system and regimes.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI, OLI


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U85 IA 541 The Global Village in the 21st Century

This course will explore the structure, function, and impact of global communications media through a study of their historical, economic, political, social, and cultural aspects. A comparison of case studies across the global spectrum will facilitate an understanding of the impact of telecommunications, television, and the internet on economic relations, national sovereignty, the role of international organizations such as the UN and WTO, and on the daily lives of people around the world.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5410 Alternative Analytic Techniques for International Affairs

This course instills analytic rigor and imagination into the consideration of the most pressing issues in international affairs. Based on structured analytic techniques employed in the Intelligence Community, students in this course will hone critical thinking skills, consider overlooked ideas, and develop unique perspectives. Students will be given the tools to recognize and overcome biases, mental shortcuts and unstated assumptions, and challenge conventional wisdom, while exploring current national security topics. We will employ alternative analysis techniques — Devil's Advocacy, What If?, High Impact/Low Probability.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5411 The Internet and International Development

The course will explore the internet as a new tool for development, particularly in emerging nations. Sample topics include email, websites, web publishing, web advertising, internet phones, virtual classrooms, virtual libraries, and e-commerce. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of program coordinator in University College.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 542 The Roots of Globalization, World and Comparative History in Theory and Methods

The term "globalization" was first used in the 1940s and 1950s to describe the apparent shrinking of the globe through advances in communication and transportation. In reality, the world has long been knit together with bonds of trade, migration, evangelism, conquest, and biological exchange. This seminar examines the methods and theoretical tools that historians have developed to study global interactions among peoples, cultures, and nations. The seminar will be of interest to students in all historical fields and in related academic disciplines seeking to develop comparative historical models for their own areas of research.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5420 Indian Barbie, Asian Tigers, and IT Dreams: Politics of Globalization and Development in South Asia

This course will explore how South Asia is at the heart of current debates about globalization, development, empire, gender, sexuality, and ethnic identity. We'll ask how changes in technology, medicine, and the economy correspond with those in society and human rights. Topics include the growth of markets, religious fundamentalism, bio-piracy and water wars, farmer suicides, consumerism, and reproductive technology. Readings, films, and discussions will take us to countries of Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and India. Assignments include weekly written critiques of the readings, and several short papers.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA, NW


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U85 IA 5421 International Environmental Issues

With global warming high among the concerns of many, international environmental issues are becoming an integral part of national policy issues in the United States and other leading countries. This course will examine the global assault on several key resources — air, water, forests, fisheries, land and endangered species, among others — around the world and explore national and international policies that encourage poor or strong protection of those resources. A research paper will be required for this seminar-style class.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5422 Oil Wars: America and the Cultural Politics of Global Energy

This seminar explores the historical, cultural, and political relationship between America and global energy, focusing specifically on oil and natural gas. Our central objective is to examine how oil and natural gas shape our own lives and entangle us in the cultural, political, and economic lives of the rest of the world. We ask what anthropological and social science approaches might contribute to our understanding of a situation that has become, in most popular terms, a national "crisis" of global dimensions.
Same as L98 AMCS 442

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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U85 IA 543 Religion in a Global Context

Beginning with a genealogy of the idea of religion, we will concentrate on the emergence of the concept of "religion" shortly before and during the Enlightenment. We will then turn to the ways in which this newly emerging concept was applied to the study of non-Western cultures, which ultimately led to our current notion of "world religions," partly as a result of the "discovery" of Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, etc. We will then consider the secularism thesis and its current woes. Finally, we will examine religion and globalization, a topic addressed primarily by sociologists of religion. Prerequisite: admission to the Master's of International Affairs program or the permission of the Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5443 Drones, Surveillance, and Biometrics: Global Cyberwar in the 21st Century

This course examines how the practice of militarism is changing worldwide through the development of new technologies. How are governments reshaping the practice of war and diplomacy with the use of unmanned drones to fight wars, biometric eye and finger scanners to patrol borders and immigration, wiretapping on civilian populations to conduct surveillance of foreign terrorists, etc.? How are civilians and nonstate actors engaging in cyberwar, as in the network attacks from China on major corporations like Google? What does it mean that anyone (from militants to humanitarian groups) can now buy drones on the market from private firms? How has a former judge in Montana posed online as an Iraqi cyberspy for the U.S. government? We will assess theories and implications of these developments in readings from sociology, international relations, and science and technology studies. Guest speakers will be invited from institutions around the St. Louis region, such as the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, Boeing, legal specialists, and privacy advocates.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 545 Globalization and Its Discontents

Globalization has inspired great controversy, with hopeful forecasts of the development of a utopian, borderless civilization ranged against dire predictions of anomie and the breakdown of local communities. We examine many sides of the controversy, from the meanings of globalization itself and its antecedents in the 19th century to the impact of globalization on national economies, politics, identities, and the environment. Considering the intersection of information technology and the global economy, we assess the prospects for a society increasingly dependent on the instant continuous flow of information.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5450 Confronting Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD): International Legal, Political, & Military Frameworks

This course will examine and evaluate the mechanisms employed by states to address the global problem of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) — nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and their means of delivery. We will establish a framework of understanding about WMD while exploring relevant historical developments. We will focus on a comparison of states' WMD-control/nonproliferation strategies and their WMD-counter-proliferation strategies. We will also consider the matter of complementing the latter strategies with UN Security Council action. The course will conclude with a consideration of the nuclear-weapon abolition debate and viable WMD-control futures.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5451 Global Poverty

This course examines the contributions of economists and political scientists to analyzing the nature of poverty, to evaluating strategies for reducing or eliminating poverty, and to considering the effects of globalization on the poor. We also focus on ethical matters; namely, our moral obligation to the poor — both those in foreign lands and those who are fellow citizens. The relevant arguments and planning schemes will be assessed and compared.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 546 Assessing Economic Globalization

Credit 2 units.


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U85 IA 5461 Managing Global Resources and Environmental Sustainability

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5462 Globalization and National Politics

This seminar examines the intersection of globalization and national politics. The movement of ideas, capital, goods, services, production, and people across national boundaries produce globalization. These material linkages provide a skeletal framework for the global political economy, but also transmit effects across national borders. Politicians, policymakers, and societies discover new opportunities, but also dilemmas, as expanding interdependence challenges traditional notions of sovereignty and national policy autonomy.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 547 The Globalization and Development of Asia

This course is premised upon the notion of globalization as the favored paradigm for economic development and world economic integration. Focusing on China, India, and Indonesia — Asian nations deeply involved in economic integration — we will assess aspects of regional progress and the negative consequences of development such as social and environmental problems, political instability, and conflict. We will examine the implications of globalization for investments, business operations, geopolitics, and regional security.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 548 International Environmental Analysis and Assessment

Both economic and human costs incur when a region is forced to deal with environmental crises or major natural disasters. The impact of environmental and natural disasters can be assessed through an understanding of the physical, chemical, and natural processes in conjunction with an appreciation for the regional economic/cultural/political context. Using case studies from the Asian continent and elsewhere, this course is designed to provide an understanding of both man-made and natural environmental hazards/crises, the basic chemical and physical science underlying these crises, and the tools and techniques that permit both qualitative and quantitative analysis and assessment. Prerequisite: NIMA employees; MA students in International Affairs with special permission (on a space available basis).

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5481 International Environmental and Resource Management

Interdisciplinary seminar on prudent management of global environment and resources. Strategy and policy issues and options. Corporate environmentalism; economic globalization and environment. Problems and potential of international treaties; the role of U.N. agencies; resource wars. Population, resources, and environment. Common property resource management. Climate change and energy futures; transboundary pollution; ocean and coastal resource degradation; global deforestation and land degradation; fresh water scarcity. Food security, genetic resources, and species diversity. Same as U85 IA 445.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5490 Russian Intellectual History

This seminar-style discussion and research course examines major currents in Russian intellectual life from the age of Peter the Great to the revolutions of 1905. Its primary focus is on Russians' perception of themselves as part of Western Civilization. Authors include: the Ukrainian humanists; the so-called Russian Enlightenment; romantic nationalists; Slavophiles and Westernizers; the literature of the Golden Age; nihilists; and the early Marxists. Students enrolling in the course should attempt to acquire a copy of (out of print) Marc Raeff, ed., Russian Intellectual History: an Anthology.
Same as U16 Hist 4490

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5491 Terrorism and Terrorists

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5494 Indonesia: History, Society, Culture, and International Relations

Indonesia is the largest nation in Southeast Asia and the world's fourth most populous, with its largest Muslim population. This course will survey the history, politics, and culture of Indonesia. It will cover topics relating to religion, the arts and media, terrorism and ethnic violence, and a burgeoning economy that has generated serious ecological damage. In addition to studying the complexity and diversity of the Indonesian archipelago and its people, we will explore Indonesia's evolving presence on the global stage.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 550 Current Issues in International Affairs

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5500 Global War and Peace

This course offers a critical evaluation of the causes of international conflict. It begins by surveying some of the classic contributions to the study of war and peace by Thucydides, Aquinas, Hobbes, Machiavelli, Kant, and Keohane and Nye. The course then examines the historical development of the modern system of states from its origins in the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 until the end of the 19th century. The final section of the course looks at the origins of the major international conflicts of the 20th and 21st century, considering the First World War, the Second World War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the crisis in trans-Atlantic relations that developed during the 2003 Iraq War. The emphasis throughout the course is on the relevance of the theoretical and empirical material for issues facing contemporary American foreign policy.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5501 Civil War and Peace

This course examines the causes and consequences of civil war as well as potential solutions to it, drawing on examples from countries throughout the world. The potential causes of intra-state violence include ethnic and religious identities, economic and security concerns, elite manipulation, and international diffusion. The different tools for managing intra-state conflict that we examine include minority representation, power-sharing, decentralization, and partition.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 551 The Culture of Global Neoliberalism

This course will study neoliberalism, a key socioeconomic approach to the free market and influential model for development, as a phenomenon that has fundamentally affected politics, ideology, and culture across the global-local spectrum. We will explore concepts such as globalism, citizenship, consumerism, private governance, NGOs and the commodification of identity. Our coverage will incorporate the work of David Harvey, Aihwa Ong, Slavoj Zizek, Néstor García Canclini, and Kim Fellner.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5511 International Trade and Capital Movement

An analysis of the economic determinants of the movements of goods, services, and financial assets across international borders. Topics include why countries trade, who gains and who loses from trade, trade restrictions, the determinants of exchange rates, the effects of changes in exchange rates, and the determination and effects of capital flows.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 552 Cases in International Business, Finance, and Economics

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5521 Current Issues in Financial and Economic Globalization

The course surveys the integration of national economies by financial and trade flows and information networks. We will analyze policy debates that have arisen in the past three decades over globalization. Using economic theory, we will contrast current debates on globalization with the pre-World War I Gold Standard era, the interwar era, and the Bretton Woods era.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5522 Bridge at the Edge of the World: Crossing from Crisis to Sustainability

This course will explore the topic of sustainability in a global perspective. Topics for analysis include: major currents and tensions in world politics and global economics, as they impinge upon the notion of sustainability; demographic trends and implications for sustainability; natural resources and their utilization; environmental and ecological degradation and strategies for sustainable development.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5523 Planetary Problems: International Competition and Cooperation in Outer Space

This course will explore the crucial role of outer space in global affairs and the challenge of confronting potentially dire consequences of an increasingly crowded orbital environment. We will study three key decisions that shaped the American manned space program: Kennedy's Apollo program; Nixon's space shuttle; and Reagan's space station. We will also examine the role of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS). Most broadly, we will consider the growing importance of space to humanity at large and the attendant challenges that confront the international community.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 553 International Business

Today's business environment has become increasingly global, and it is imperative that business leaders understand the theories, institutions, and environmental elements that underlie international commerce. Globalization of businesses presents not only the opportunity to sell to world markets but also the challenges of potential competitors in nearly every industry. The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to economic theories, international commercial entities, and the political and cultural environments that form the context for global business. Topics include country-market differences, trade and investment patterns, the international financial environment, issues in business-government relations, and strategies for international business. We focus on opportunities for, threats to, and options facing the multicultural business enterprises.

Credit 2 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5550 Geopolitics of Oil: Dependency, Conflict, and Transition

This course explores global oil politics from several perspectives and contexts: America's military and economic primacy; increasing global turmoil; and China's rapid emergence as superpower and major oil consumer. We consider a range of topics, including the economic and foreign policy implications of the twilight of cheap oil, oil-centered conflicts, oil-related policies of the Bush administration, the status of the global-warming debate, and the challenge of moving away from oil dependency. Finally, we examine regional oil issues vis-à-vis the Middle East and Indonesia.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5551 Trade Strategies: Theory and Practice

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5552 Bananas, Beef, and Sweatshops: International Trade in Theory and Practice

Issues related to international trade have become increasingly contentious, as evidenced by the protests against the World Trade Organization and recent conflicts between the U.S. and its trade partners. This course examines the economic rationale for trade and its implications — who gains and who loses. It analyzes the reasons countries restrict trade and the effects of restrictions. Topics covered include the proliferation of regional trade agreements as well as current controversies related to labor standards, the environment, and health and safety. Prerequisite: Consult Course Listings.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5561 Tropical Field Biology and Primatology


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U85 IA 557 International Security II

This course develops the students' depth of knowledge of a few specific areas in security studies. Some of the topics we address include counter-insurgency and low-intensity conflict; the professionalization of the military services; and the development and evolution of military doctrine. Prerequisites: International Security (U85 527) or permission of the instructor.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5571 Politics of Global Finance

Global finance underwent stunning transformations over the past 40 years. The changes contribute to interdependence, challenge national sovereignty, alter state-society relations, affect economic development, and influence the distribution of wealth and power in the global political economy. The seminar examines the political economy of monetary relations, the globalization of capital markets, and their effects upon domestic and international affairs.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 558 The New Geopolitics of Oil and Gas

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5581 Domestic Politics and U.S. Foreign Policy Decision Making

This course examines U.S. foreign policy from the perspective of domestic politics, with the aim of understanding how our political institutions affect foreign policy outcomes. The first section of the course provides an overview of the paradigms that have been used to understand foreign policy decision-making and examines the electoral and interest group pressures that influence decisions. The second section studies the chief political branches of government (executive, legislative, judicial) and their role in foreign policy. The final section covers the major bureaucratic agencies involved in foreign policy decisions.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 559 International Political Economy in Theory and Practice

Globalization, the accelerating rate of interaction between people of different countries, creates a qualitative shift in the relationship between nation-states and national economies. Conflict and war is one form of international interaction. Movement of capital, goods, services, production, information, disease, environmental degradation, and people across national boundaries are other forms of international interactions. This course will introduce the study of global political-economic relations and will develop a theoretical tool kit that will help students explore the globalization of material and social relations.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5601 The Nativist Dimension in Modern Japanese Culture

This course will explore the domain of nativist expression in modern Japan. Through a wide-ranging survey of cultural artifacts and texts that promote the notion of Japanese uniqueness, we will consider the question of Japanese identity and the key role of "invented traditions" in its construction. Our study will take into account the evolving historical context within which the discourse on nativism was played out. We will also consider the manner in which foreigners have contributed to this "uniqueness discourse" over the past 150 years.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5603 Language in the Global Context

This course will explore the crucial role of language in the emerging international world order. Topics to be covered will include: the preeminence of English as a global lingua franca; the accelerating extinction of "marginal" languages; the emergence of competing linguistic hegemonies — for instance, Chinese. Attention will be paid to "global language" and its political, cultural, and economic interrelationships; to language vis-à-vis electronic media; and to the question of establishing global linguistic standards.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5611 Visions and Revisions: 19th-Century Arts and Society

In this multidisciplinary course we will examine how 19th-century literature, painting, and music reflected as well as affected contemporary Western life, both in Europe and the United States. We will consider how different artists attempt first to represent and then to modify, either directly or indirectly, several important sociopolitical and economic situations of their time. Included among the literary works to be studied are Romantic, Transcendentalist, and utopian texts by Balzac, Sand, Thoreau, Hugo, Baudelaire, and Owen. In the field of art history we will analyze the social impact of various paintings from the Realist and Barbizon schools and, in the areas of theater and opera, works by Ibsen, Maeterlinck, and Wagner.
Same as U98 MLA 5611

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5613 History of Modern Japanese Foreign Relations

This course focuses on a selection of episodes in the history of Japanese foreign relations in order to explore the priorities and the policymaking institutions that have shaped Japan's modern foreign policy.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 562 Culture and Politics of India

This course will explore the society and politics of modern India, in light of the nation's historical, cultural, and religious roots. Beginning with an introduction to the geography of the Indian subcontinent, we will examine key historical epochs (notably, the Mughal and British periods) and religions (Hinduism, Sufi Islam, Sikhism, Jainism), and the system of social castes. We will then survey the post-Independence (1947) political scene, focusing on both domestic issues and the foreign relations agenda. Students will pursue research on a topic related to contemporary Indian politics.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 563 Contemporary Japan: Issues and Challenges

This course provides an overview of contemporary Japan through an examination of key social, political, and economic issues. Topics include the "economic miracle" and its recent souring, changing women's roles, aging population and its impact on the family, U.S.-Japan relations, and the recent controversy over Japan's wartime responsibility. Same as U85 IA 4614.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5630 Inside the Intelligence Community

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 565 From Mikado to Makudo: A Literary View of Japanese Culture

This course will survey Japan's social and cultural history through selected literary works that span the seventh century (Mikado) to the present day (Makudo). Our readings — including fiction, poetry, drama, and personal writings — will serve as guides to key historical epochs: the aristocratic culture of the Heian era (Tale of Genji), the warrior society of the medieval era (Tale of the Heike), and the insular Tokugawa period (Basho's haiku). Novels by Soseki, Tanizaki, Mishima, and Oe will expose the complexities of modern Japan. Students will gain an appreciation of Japan's unique heritage, social complexity, and place in East Asia and the world today.
Same as U98 MLA 5565

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U85 IA 5651 Culture and Politics of China

Chinese politics and political behavior can be understood through the lens of Chinese culture — history, geography, religion, language, and the arts. For example, China as the Middle Kingdom is both a geographical and a mental construct. Concepts such as dynastic cycle and the Mandate of Heaven inform contemporary thought. As much as the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution might have tried to stamp out "old thought," Confucian thinking and ways are resurfacing in modern China. This course has two parts. In the first part, the student is introduced in broad strokes to the geography of China and its influence on political behavior; to the history of China — both imperial and revolutionary; to major religious influences, including Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism; and to language and the arts as insights into the structure of Chinese thinking. In the second part of the course, the student will survey post-1949 political history and be introduced to current political institutions and personalities. Students will research their choice of a modern political institution, a key political event or behavior, or an issue of public policy.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5652 Korea: History, Culture, and People

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of Korea — its long history, its cultural heritage, its people — and the complexity of Korea's place within East Asia and in the larger global context. Topics will include: the Korean War and its aftermath, the fraught North-South relationship, national and cultural identity, the gender question, collective memory, and the tension between tradition and modernization/globalization.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA, NW


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U85 IA 568 Public Policy Responses to Global Poverty

In this course, we examine the theoretical and empirical literature on the causes of global poverty and evaluate public policy responses from the international community and from domestic politicians. Topics include: foreign aid (including micro-finance), debt relief, trade reform, global health initiatives, and private-public partnerships. We begin each class discussion with an overview of the problem. The final projects for the course are an evaluation of one global initiative to reduce poverty, which includes an overview of the initiative, criticisms of both the theory and implementation, and a proposed set of reforms or an alternative initiative to solve the underlying problem.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5684 Globalism and Neoliberalism in Latin American Culture

This course examines the ways in which Latin American culture has engaged with new global realities and the neoliberal policies of the 1990s. We will use political, economic, and cultural theory to assess various artistic explorations of newly globalized Latin America cultural identities from the Caribbean to Argentina. The course will include extensive theoretical readings and a series of novels and films that create productive dialogues with that theory. Authors to be considered include, among others, Fredric Jameson, Edmundo Paz Soldán, Ricardo Piglia, Junot Díaz, and Alberto Fuguet.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA, NW


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U85 IA 569 Taiwan: Its Position in East Asia

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 570 The US in Vietnam, 1945-Present: The Challenge of Revolutionary Nationalism, Cold War Politics

This seminar will focus on America's involvement in and relationship with Vietnam from the era of French colonialism through the collapse of United States intervention and subsequent normalization of affairs at the end of the 20th century. Readings and discussions will address domestic political, cultural, and economic matters as well as military and ideological aspects, broader international implications, and the significance of the historical experience for both American and Vietnamese societies. Sources will include primary documents, articles, autobiographies, retrospective historical works, and film. Prerequisite: Consult Course Listings.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 571 The Rise and Fall of East Asian Economies

This course will provide an overview of the dramatic turnaround among East Asian economies, which until recently appeared poised to dominate the 21st century. Taught by a leading Japanese economic journalist, the course will focus on Japan while also considering the larger relationship between East Asian economies and the U.S.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5711 Issues in Applied Ethics

The aim of this course is to examine crucial ethical questions that have come to shape contemporary international relations. For instance, what is the responsibility of affluent countries to those in poverty? Should nations have a right to close their borders to immigrants seeking a better life? What is the normative justification for an international criminal court, and under what conditions should this court override the laws and sovereignty of nation states? We will survey the major ethical schools of thought and apply their approaches to prevalent moral debates. This theoretical background will facilitate our investigation of and reflection upon the challenging moral issues that confront us today.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 572 The Politics of International Trade

This course examines the politics and debates surrounding international trade. The course begins with a brief overview of the basic economic theory underlying the idea of free trade. With that as a background, we explore the distributional and political consequences of trade flows in terms of both the politics of trade liberalization and the politics of protectionism. The course then explores the World Trade Organization and attempts at regional integration such as the EU, NAFTA and the proposed Free Trade Area of the Americas. The course concludes with a series of in-class debates on several major trade policies, such as the issue of outsourcing, agricultural subsidies in developed countries, the recent Dubai sports deal, and the apparent resurgence of economic nationalism, as well as the relationship between increased trade and environmental protection.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5721 Energy, International Politics, and the Quest for Power

This course will examine the history and political implications of oil, the world's preeminent strategic resource. We will trace the "flow" of oil from its discovery in 1859 to its current role as fuel for the global economy. We will explore oil in relation to military conflict and to the energy competition among Russia, China, the U.S., and other powers. We will study the relation between energy resources, business strategies, political power, and foreign policy.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 5730 The Political Economy of Multinational Corporations

In this class we explore the literature in political science, management, and economics on the relationship between multinational enterprises and domestic governments. The four main themes of the course are: 1) defining and understanding multinational enterprises, 2) governments attracting and competing for multinationals 3) the impact of multinationals on economic development and groups within society, and 4) attempts to regulate multinationals both domestically and internationally.
Same as U25 PolSci 4730

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 574 International Relations

Globalization, the accelerating rate of interaction between people of different countries, creates a qualitative shift in the relationship between nation-states and national economies. Conflict and war is one form of international interaction. Movement of capital, goods, services, production, information, disease, environmental degradation, and people across national boundaries are other forms of international interactions. This course introduces major approaches, questions, and controversies in the study of international relations. In a small group seminar we will examine the building blocks of world politics, the sources of international conflict and cooperation, and the globalization of material and social relations.

Credit 3 units. UColl: OLH


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U85 IA 575 Introduction to Qualitative Analysis

This class is designed to introduce students to the use and application of statistics techniques frequently confronted in political science articles and books. The goal of the course is twofold. First, upon completion of the course, students should be able to better read and understand many of the articles found in other courses within this program. Second, the course introduces students to the computer software program STATA in order to allow students the opportunity to begin producing their own statistical analyses. Topics covered include: linear regression, logit, probit and, perhaps most importantly, the presentation of quantitative data itself. No previous knowledge of experience with statistics is assumed or required. A university computer lab is used in part for class room instruction in the use of STATA.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 576 Understanding Contemporary Germany

This course introduces students to the political, economic, social, and cultural issues and controversies that shape contemporary Germany. Topics include the problematic legacy of German history, Germany's constitution, political parties, and elections, the social market economy in times of globalization, the construction of post-unification German identity, and the tensions between provincialism and the emerging multicultural society. Special attention is given to the new international engagement of the Berlin Republic: United States-German relations, and Germany's changing role in EU, NATO, and UN. Same as U85 IA 436.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5772 State Failure, State Success and Development

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining the role governments play in development and economic outcomes. We will look at some of the competing arguments about governments in failed and successful states and compare those arguments to the empirical world, or data. In so doing we will recognize that how governments affect development and economic outcomes in society is neither straightforward nor consistent with any of the ideological screeds that often dominate public discourse.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 578 "Bananas is my Business": Latin American Affairs

We can learn a great deal from this famous phrase uttered by the "Brazilian bombshell" Carmen Miranda during the 1930s. The concept of "bananas" gives insight into the history, economics, politics, pop culture, social inequality, and outside intervention related to Latin America. In this course we will read a range of texts, which will challenge students to consider the complexity and global significance of this fascinating geographical area of Latin America — "our backyard." We will move through fields of political science, anthropology, popular culture, immigration, history, literature, and musicology.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5780 Global Political Economy

Global political economy has changed tremendously over the past 20 years. Research agendas in international and comparative political economy increasingly overlap with the awareness of open economy settings. With greater and greater frequency, investigators of comparative and global political economy employ common independent variables even as their dependent variables differ. I find this development exciting as we build models of political behavior that can apply across fields. We will consider important issues in the political arena, but in so doing we will focus on the design of social research and evaluate the readings from this perspective. This should help students develop an appreciation for important questions in political life, but also help construct a toolkit for their research. Building and conducting a research agenda requires creativity, but above all an appreciation for a question and hard work grounded in systematic exploration.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5781 Seminar in Political Economy I

This course will borrow on the insights of international relations scholarship and economic theory to develop a broad understanding of international economic relations. Specifically, this course attempts to address the following two sets of questions: 1) How do global economic relations fit into the broader category of international relations? How do the existing theories in international relations (liberalism, realism, and Marxism) help us understand international economic relations between nation-states? 2) What are the effects of these international economic forces (trade, finance, and multinational production) on domestic governments and societies?
Same as L32 Pol Sci 578

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5783 Israeli Politics

This course is intended primarily for sophomores and juniors. The topic of this course varies by semester, dependent on faculty and student interests.
Same as L32 Pol Sci 3781

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS, CD A&S IQ: LCD, SSC Art: SSC BU: IS UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5784 Global Leadership

This course will study leadership issues in various global and multicultural settings. We will focus on developing an understanding of global leadership skills and the means of fostering such skills. Attention will be paid to practices that advance ethical awareness, diversity, and effective conflict management. We will discuss exemplary leaders such as Bill Clinton, Bill Gates, and Nelson Mandela. The course will feature an in-depth coverage of relevant theories and research on leadership in global and multicultural organizations. We will discuss team leadership and team collaboration skills within a culturally diverse world, as well as current events relating to global leadership.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 579 Immigration Policies and Related Issues

This course examines immigration in three broad areas. First, we explore the issues and debates surrounding both legal and illegal immigration, as well as asylum and refugee status. The policies and practices of both the North American and European countries will be considered, along with the so-called "push" factors in much of the developing world. Second, the course examines the debate about guest worker programs, in part by exploring the German experience and lesson with Turkish guest workers in the 1950s and 1960s, as well as various such programs found today in the Persian Gulf states. The final section of the course looks at the issue of human trafficking and recent international attempts to police this activity. Students will write a short essay for each of the three sections.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 580 The Culture of Fascism East and West: The Case of Japan and Germany

This course will compare fascism as a cultural and intellectual phenomenon in Germany and Japan. A survey of texts drawn from intellectual history, philosophy, literature, and art history will reveal the cultural and intellectual conditions that gave rise to fascism in these nations, and the manner in which fascist policies were implemented in their respective spheres of influence. Attention will be paid to the quality of life in Germany and Japan under fascist rule and during the war that it precipitated. Finally, we will study the legacy of fascism in the postwar period — both within Germany and Japan and from the perspective of their erstwhile victims and the newly emerging international order.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 582 Russia at War in the 20th Century in Literature and Film

In this course we will read fiction, poetry, memoirs, and selected journalism from the period stretching from World War I to the current conflict in the Caucasus. We also will treat a selection of war films and exposure to other aspects of popular culture such as songs and propaganda posters. The course will be weighted toward treatment of the Russian Civil War period and World War II — the most mythologized and culturally significant conflicts for Russian and Soviet culture of the past century. Prior to World War II it was the Bolshevik Revolution and victory in the Civil War that justified the Soviet social and political order. After World War II, the special place of Stalin and the U.S.S.R. in world history was underwritten by the unparalleled suffering and triumph of its peoples in the war. Recently there has been an upsurge in the production of docudramas, television miniseries, and films about World War II, as Russia under Putin seeks to regain dignity and power in its perception of itself and on the world stage. At the same time, politically sensitive archives pertaining to the war, which began to be accessible under Gorbachev and with the breakup of the Soviet Union, are, according to Western historians, once again having their doors closed.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5820 Ukraine in Turmoil

This course will examine recent events in Ukraine and their underlying long-term causes. We will consider the riots of February of 2014 and how the subsequent overthrow of the scandal-ridden Yanukovich government became a bloody civil war in Eastern Ukraine. The class will study the geopolitical Ukraine in the Eurasian land mass, and the tension it has generated between the Russian Federation, United States, and western Europe.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5825 Cold War 2.0 and the Balkans

This course examines the prospects of reemerging Cold War tensions between the United States and the Russian Federation with the Balkans serving as the central focus of such tensions. We will examine these tensions within the broader context of power projection and energy initiatives that drive international relations in the region. Topics include: grand strategy, arc of instability, competing pipeline corridors, ethnic and confessional strife, non-state actors operating in Macedonia, Serbia, Kosovo, and Bulgaria.

Credit 1 unit.


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U85 IA 584 20th-Century Russian History

A survey of Russian history from 1900 to the present. The course emphasizes the Russian Revolutions at the beginning and end of the century, Stalinism, de-Stalinization, and post-communist society. Much attention will be given to the assumptions and conclusions of schools of historical analysis, Marxist, totalitarian, Kremlinologist, and revisionist.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 585 Europe Today

Consideration of the political, economic, and social developments in Europe since 1945. Particular emphasis on the development of the "welfare-state," the formation of the EC and the Eastern bloc, Europe's place in the Cold War, and the rapid transitions of the last 20 years. Consideration throughout will be given to the distinctions between European institutions, approaches, and attitudes and those of the United States.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5855 The European Union and the Question of Turkey

The aim of this course is to study the European Union (EU) with respect to the challenge presented by the candidacy of Turkey for EU admission. We will study the history and organization of the EU as the context for exploring Turkey — its history, society, and culture; and its complex relationship with Europe. We will consider key factors in the Turkey-EU relationship, including the Cyprus conflict, the EU's Copenhagen Criteria regarding democratic institutions, Turkey as bridge between Europe and the Middle East, and the phenomena of social identity and Euro-skepticism.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 586 Politics and Issues of the European Union

Study of European integration, the most significant political movement in Europe and the most advanced example of regional integration. The course will focus on the process of political union as well as the historical and institutional arrangements of the 12-member European Union (EU), including the policies and issues of contemporary European member states relating to integration. It will also include a brief look at those institutions which relate directly to the European Union like the Council of Europe (human rights), and the West European Union (WEU) for security. Topics include the Franco-German perspective; the Commission, Council, and Court; the European Parliament; the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP); the economics of integration; external policies of the EU; defense of Europe; and the United States and the EU.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5862 Economic and Monetary Union in Europe

In January 1999 the European Union entered the final stage of the process of economic and monetary union (EMU) with the creation of the euro. This course analyzes the economic implications of EMU for Europe and for the global economy. Topics include monetary and fiscal policy in EMU, the role of the euro as an international currency, the effects on businesses and financial markets, and the costs and benefits of EMU for both member and non-member states.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 588 Politics of East Europe

This course will examine recent political and economic developments in East Europe. We will first explore the collapse of communism (and the Soviet bloc), and the backdrop for the dramatic events of 1989. Next, we will examine the process of transition, focusing on the privatization of state-owned enterprises, and the influence of international organizations upon policymaking. We will then study the consolidation of both democracy and the market in the region. Here, using various cases studies, we will consider the nature and extent of corruption in the transition to a market economy. Finally, we will explore the region's incorporation into the European Union and NATO, together with a consideration of those countries unlikely to join either organization, and possible consequences that might create a new division in the region.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5881 Israel and the Middle East

Places Israeli political issues and events within the context of existing political theories. Discusses the politics and ideology of pre-state Israel and the foundation of the state. The creation of modern Israel political institutions, elections, and government coalitions. Also, Israeli foreign policy and international involvement. This is a fully online course. Only University College students may receive credit for online courses.

Credit 3 units.


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U85 IA 5888 International Affairs Through Film

This seminar explores key topics in international affairs — nuclear policy and brinkmanship, the Vietnam War and its legacy, genocide, the failed-state syndrome, among others — through the analysis of a series of films that dramatize major events and epochs in our recent history. The "primary texts" will be films such as Dr. Strangelove, Z, Hotel Rwanda, and The Fog of War. They will be supplemented by related readings.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 589 Topics in International Political Economy

This course is intended to provide a broad exploration of multiple topics in the field of international political economy. We will draw from the literature in international relations, comparative politics, and economics to develop an understanding of international politics. We will address the following topics: 1) politics of international trade, 2) exchange policies and central banking, 3) foreign aid and development, 4) financial crisis, 5) international institutions, and 6) migration.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 590 Old Europe: The Quality of Life

This course introduces students to the cultures of daily life in "Old Europe" (England, Benelux, France, Italy, Spain, Austria, and Germany). We study the fundamental differences between American and European ways of life as they manifest themselves in political, socioeconomic, environmental, and cultural issues. Topics include the social security net and consumer protection, living in urban landscapes and the provinces, relationships and body culture, nationalism and multiculturalism, travel and leisure time, the art of having a meal, and the frenzy of soccer. We analyze political and cultural essays, literature, and visual media.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 591 Islam and Muslim Societies in the World Order

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5915 Problems in International Politics: The Sick-State Syndrome

"Sick states" fail to function responsibly for both their citizens and their fellow states. Afghanistan is the most recent example of the phenomenon; we will also consider the disintegration of Yugoslavia, the Lebanese civil war, and the political failures of Somalia and Cambodia. Beginning with a general examination of the international system and various styles of government, we will identify the causes of state failure and the remedies offered by governments and international organizations, and consider why these remedies often fail. Finally, we will discuss the ways countries may recover from their sick — and therefore often threatening — condition. Readings will include recent journal articles as well as books by Hans Morganthau, Noam Chomsky, Chalmers Johnson, Robert Kaplan, and others.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAI


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U85 IA 592 Modern Russia and the International Community: New Cold War

The Cold War supposedly ended in the late 1980s, yet the United States and Russian Federation are on the brink of another period of escalating tensions. In a recent press conference the President of the Russian Federation, Vladimir Putin, issued a dire warning to the United States and its NATO allies. He said the forward deployment of U.S. "Aegis Ashore" missiles in Romania posed an offensive threat to Russia, and for this reason the world is in great danger. This course examines how this new era of strained relations between nuclear powers came to pass with special emphasis on U.S.-Russian relations from 1989 to 2016. Ancillary topics include the Ukraine crisis and Erdogan's volte-face with Moscow.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 5942 Israeli Politics: Israeli Politics in Broad Perspective

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 595 Politics of the Arab World

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U85 IA 596 Readings in African History

This course is a graduate reading seminar in African history. Selected topics will include: African geography and environmental history, the classical kingdoms of the Sahel, the development of Swahili culture, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the historical roots of Apartheid, the intellectual and material culture of colonialism, African resistance and adaptation to social change during the colonial era, decolonization, and roots of some of the major problems facing modern Africa. Prerequisite: admission to Master of International Affairs program or graduate program in History, or permission of the assistant dean for Graduate Programs.

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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