Hillman Hall

Our Vision

To create positive social change through our path-breaking research and educational excellence.

Our Mission

  • To educate and prepare future social work and public health leaders in areas of policy, practice and research.
  • To pioneer research and apply results to impact policy and practice locally, nationally and internationally.
  • To collaborate with organizations to use evidence to improve access to and quality of social services and to address social and economic justice.

Message from Dean Mary M. McKay

Dean Mary McKay

The Brown School is a special community. We are distinguished by the energy and excellence of our faculty, the diversity and talent of our students, the strength of Washington University, and the deep ties to the local and global communities we serve.

We encourage our faculty, staff, students and alumni to be agents of change. We are committed to creating new knowledge to counter the effects of systemic oppression and racism, in order to build a more just and equitable world.

Our school has generated and disseminated influential ideas and policy strategies locally and globally. For example, Brown School faculty are leaders in asset creation, a fundamental social development strategy to address global poverty. We are also leading the charge in St. Louis to investigate and inform how to equitably distribute resources to support health and well-being across every community.

Our graduates are leaders in social work, public health and public policy, taking on the most challenging and important policy, practice and management roles in the country and around the world. I encourage you to learn more about what we have created at Washington University in St. Louis. I hope you will join us in this important pursuit of knowledge and social change.

Contact Information

Brown School
Washington University in St. Louis
CB 1196
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, MO 63130-4899

Phone:314-935-6600
Email:brownschool@wustl.edu
Website:https://brownschool.wustl.edu

Courses include:


S15 SWCR (Core)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S15 SWCR.


S15 SWCR 5007 Research Methods with Basic Statistics

Focuses on evaluation at a variety of levels (individual, group, organization, community). Includes problem assessment, specification and monitoring of interventions, validation of measurement methods, and analysis and presentation of data. Covers statistical methods that are necessary to be good consumers of research and that serve as a foundation for other statistics courses.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S15 SWCR 5011 Human Behavior

Approaches human behavior in the social environment from a life-span perspective. Foci include psychoanalytical theory and social learning theory. Implications of gender, race and socioeconomic status are considered. Pre/corequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S15 SWCR 5012 Social, Economic & Political Environment

Focuses on the effects of social, economic, and political factors on disadvantaged and at-risk populations. Sociological topics (stratification, race, gender, deviance), economic topics (wealth, employment, income) and political topics (representation, decision making) are explored. Pre/corequisites: S15-5005, S15-5015, S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S15 SWCR 5015 Social Justice and Human Diversity

Focuses on knowledge and skills for social work practice with economically disadvantaged and oppressed groups, particularly people of color, women, people with disabilities, gay men and lesbians, and other at-risk populations.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S15 SWCR 5038 Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups

Focuses on the basic knowledge and skills needed for social work practice with individuals, families and groups. Presents a historical view of social work practice with an overview of the values and ethics that characterize the profession. Capacity building approach will be discussed with an emphasis on evidence-based practice and a systems perspective.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S15 SWCR 5039 Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities

Focuses on the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for social work practice with organizations and communities. Historical views are presented along with contemporary theories and methods. Emphasis is placed on organizational and community assessment and development, with exposure to innovative strategies including social entrepreneurism, systems thinking approaches, and geographic information systems. Through applied group projects in partnership with community-based organizations, students apply the skills developed in research methods, human diversity, and individual practice as they develop skills in task group work, stakeholder engagement, evidence-based application, and capacity building. Students should expect to work with group members and community sponsors outside of class time to accomplish the project objectives. Prerequisites: S15-5005, S15-5015, and S15-5038. Preferred corequisite: foundation practicum.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S15 SWCR 5040 Social Welfare Policies and Services

Covers the development of U.S. social welfare policies and existing social welfare programs. Addresses social policy analysis and understanding of legislative processes.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S15 SWCR 5999 Evidence-Based Practice Skills for BSW Grads

This course is open only to incoming MSW students who have a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in Social Work.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS (History & Professional Theme)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S20 SWHS.


S20 SWHS 1011 Theoretical & Empirical Bases for Practice with Children, Youth & Families

This course exposes students to theoretically based, empirically supported interventions that guide the assessment, treatment planning, intervention selection, implementation, and evaluation of outcomes in social work practice with children, youth and families (CYF). Prerequisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS 1022 Intimate Partner Violence: Theories, Problems and Issues

Explores the theoretical and service issues related to violence in domestic relations and their impact on battered women, men who batter, and children who witness abuse. Examines the social and psychological aspects of domestic violence and discusses service integration approaches designed to work effectively with each of these population groups. Prerequisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS 2010 Theories and Issues in Aging

Examines the theoretical and service issues connected to the study of the elderly from the multidisciplinary approach of gerontology. Considered are the biological, social, and psychological aspects of aging, and the nature and extent of service delivery systems for the aged and their families. Prerequisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS 3022 Health Behavior and Health Promotion

The purpose of this course is to present fundamentals of social and behavioral science as a framework for using evidence-based approaches in addressing individual, families, and population health issues. Students will learn the role of social determinants of health problems, and theoretical approaches to guide the design and evaluation of health interventions. Prerequisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS 3030 Interrogating Health, Race, and Inequalities

Interrogating Health, Race, and Inequalities is intended for graduate students in the School of Social Work and in Arts & Sciences as well as advanced undergraduates in Arts & Sciences who have previous course work in medical anthropology, public health, or urban policy. The fundamental goal of the course is to demonstrate that health is not merely a medical or biological phenomenon but more importantly the product of social, economic, political, and environmental factors. To meet this goal the course is designed to examine the intersection of race/ethnicity and health from multiple analytic approaches and methodologies. Course readings will draw from the fields of public health, anthropology, history, and policy analysis. Teaching activities include lectures, group projects and presentations, videos, and discussions led by the course instructors. These in-class activities will be supplemented with field trips and field-based projects. By the end of the course it is expected that students will have a strong understanding of race as a historically produced social construct as well as how race interacts with other axes of diversity and social determinants to produce particular health outcomes. Students will gain an understanding of the health disparity literature and a solid understanding of multiple and intersecting causes of these disparities.
Same as I50 InterD 4001

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS 4011 Differential Diagnosis

Considers the concept of mental illness and mental health from a psychological/psychiatric perspective. Familiarizes students with and critically explores available models of diagnosis. Selected mental health problems are addressed in depth, including considerations of populations at risk. Prerequisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS 4992 The Business of Us All: In/Equality in Theory and Practice

This course uses a transdisciplinary approach to discuss in/equality and its interrelated topics of inequality, inequity and social justice. While the focus is on the U.S. predominantly, lessons learned from our global partners are important components of our discussions. The course will emphasize the implications of our findings for other ethnic/racial minorities around the world. Equality speaks to issues of priority, fairness and impartiality. On the other hand, inequality is defined as marked difference among individuals or groups of individuals in the distribution of social goods. Inequity, which considers bias, discrimination and injustice in distributive systems, pushes the discussion further. As the various forms of social, political and economic inequalities are mutually reinforced, we examine economic inequality, residential segregation and housing quality; dis/investment in neighborhoods and communities; resource allocation to low income, city and predominantly ethnic minority schools; academic underachievement of minority youth; access to and provision of appropriate health care; curtailment of social welfare programs; the presentation of stereotypical images of persons of color in the media and school curricula; morbidity, mortality, and longevity rates for persons of color; environmental hazards; the surge in incarceration related to substance abuse and escalating criminal prosecution, as well as discriminatory behavior of police and judges. All of the foregoing is made worse by race and gender status variables. Such factors cannot be considered inconsequential to social im/mobility and equality in the larger society. The collateral damage borne by the intergenerational transfer of social im/mobility and in/equality to future generations are integral to course discussions.
Same as I50 InterD 4992

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: LCD EN: H


View Sections

S20 SWHS 5013 Poverty & Inequality in America

Focuses on the extent and causes of poverty in the United States, the effects of poverty on individuals and families, and the search for solutions. Prerequisite: S15-5012.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS 5014 Social Justice: Exploring the Reality of America's Promise

This course is designed to explore the civic principles that have shaped America, and to juxtapose these principles with the reality of American life. Specifically, how have the values of "liberty," "equality," and "justice for all" been understood, and to what extent have they been fulfilled in contemporary American society? These questions will be pursued from both a philosophical and social science perspective in order to provide students with a broad framework for analyzing what it means to be an American and whether we have created a society that is consistent with these three core American principles. Prerequisite: S15-5012.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS 5017 Management & Leadership of Organizations

Examines organizational behavior and the management of human service organizations. Students study a variety of theories, concepts and functions including organizational structure, organizational culture, human resource and financial management, leadership and strategic planning. The course provides a foundation for all management practice courses. This course fulfills 3 credits in Leadership/Management. Corequisite S15-5039.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS 5018 Economic Realities of the American Dream

Exploration of the realities of economic life in the U.S. and how they correspond to the American Dream. Interdisciplinary perspectives from economics, sociology, and other areas of social inquiry. Emphasis on the consistency between empirical data and different concepts of the American Dream. Specific topics to include sources of economic growth and changing living standards, unemployment, impact of globalization on U.S. citizens, economic mobility, poverty and inequality, and social justice. This course may be substituted within the MSW Program Social & Economic Development Concentration curriculum for Economics of Social Welfare, S20-5011. Enrollment from the MSW Program is limited to 10 MSW students.
Same as I50 InterD 5003

Credit 3 units. EN: S


View Sections

S20 SWHS 5030 International Social Development

A comparative study of international social development, including patterns and issues in cross-national collaboration, selected problems in international social development, and a conceptual framework for analyzing social change. Prerequisite: S15-5012.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S20 SWHS 5079 Community Development and American Cities

The world is becoming increasingly urban. Recently for the first time more than half of the world's population lived in cities. While urbanization has brought great opportunities it also comes with significant challenges. The goal of this course is to introduce and analyze interventions that improve the quality of life of Americans by improving their neighborhoods, and that strengthen neighborhoods as essential components of competitive regional economies. We will focus both on strategies to alleviate urban poverty and on strategies to make urban neighborhoods attractive to large numbers of potential residents of all races and classes. The course will include a rigorous introduction to community development strategies with specific attention to the role of community organizations, the need for strengthening key service areas such as schools and safety, and the importance of density and place-making. While the focus of the course will be on St. Louis and other older industrial cities, the lessons learned are applicable to all cities throughout the world. In addition to St. Louis, we will also spend concentrated time on New York City as an example of a fast-growth, strong market city. Course pedagogy will emphasize intense interaction between students and between the students and instructor, using lectures, small group discussions and active debates. Class assignments will include the requirement to write five short (3-4 page) papers over the course of the semester. All papers will be based on class reading. For MSW Program SED Concentration students, this course fulfills the SED Theories, Problems, and Issues requirement. For MSW Policy Specialization students, this course fulfills the elective requirement. For Master of Architecture students, this course fulfills the Urban Issues elective requirement. For Master of Urban Design students, this course fulfills the MUD Track elective requirement. MSW Pre/corequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


View Sections

S20 SWHS 5751 American Indian Societies, Values, and Cultures

Surveys several major themes in the history and modern evolution of American Indian societies, cultures, values and laws. Examines indigenous societies and cultures before the arrival of Europeans. Explores the history of American Indians and Indian nations in the U.S. and their treatment by the U.S. Examines modern Indian governments, and legal systems, and the status of Indian nations as sovereign political entities within the U.S. Prerequisite: S15-5012.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP (Direct Practice)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S30 SWDP.

S30 SWDP 5325 Child Maltreatment Prevention

The purpose of this course is for students to develop an understanding of transdisciplinary perspectives and apply systematic problem-solving approaches to the prevention of child maltreatment. Answers to complex questions about child maltreatment requires a transdisciplinary problem-solving approach with public health, social work, and medical practitioners analyzing perspectives from diverse fields, and coming together to integrate knowledge across these disciplines.
Same as S55 MPH 5325

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 5453 Principles of Clinical Interventions in Health

This course will familiarize students with practice methods such as cognitive behavioral, psychosocial, applied group work and behavioral therapy with a special focus on health services. Special emphasis will be given to developing crisis intervention, brief therapy, decision-making, negotiation, advocacy, and teamworking skills. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 5502 Applied Behavior Therapy

Focuses on the application of behavioral techniques. Includes problem identification, specification and assessment, establishment of change objectives, identification of appropriate intervention techniques, implementation and evaluation. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 5503 Cognitive Behavior Therapy

Emphasis on the acquisition of direct practice skills using case examples, video and role-plays, with patients with depression, anxiety and personality disorders. Prerequisites: S15-5038 and pre/corequisite S30-5502.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 5505 Interpersonal Psychotherapy

This course will help students gain knowledge and basic skills in Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), an evidence-based treatment for depression. The course will include theoretical underpinnings of IPT, understanding the use of IPT in specific populations, and adaptations across cultures and psychiatric disorders. The course will review IPT techniques, common issues, and therapeutic skills. Specific opportunities to practice skills and techniques will be provided throughout the course.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 5702 Applied Group Work Practice

Builds on the theoretical foundation and focuses on the basics of group work practice, including how to select members, how to begin and terminate group sessions, and how to evaluate group member outcomes. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 6011 Brief Outcome Therapy

This course will focus on the time efficient treatment of individuals, groups and families through focused psychotherapy and case management. Ethical issues and indications and contra-indications for brief treatments will be explored. Various models of time limited treatment will be compared, with the Brief Efficient Therapy model explored in detail. Assessment, diagnosis, engagement, treatment and evaluation using the Efficient Brief Therapy model will be the central concern of the course. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 6211 Treatment of Mental Disorders

Focuses on treatment of persons with mental illness. Includes advanced skills in diagnosis (DSM-IV); treatment interventions for specific diagnoses; medications; commitment; legal and ethical issues; work with women, minorities, the homeless, and other populations at risk. Prerequisites: S15-5038 & S20-4011.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 6215 Global Mental Health

This course aims to provide participants with an in-depth understanding of the current debates that are shaping Global Mental Health (GMH) in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). It examines the history of GMH, its key principles, policies and practices alongside the challenges inherent to their implementation in some of the most challenging contexts. Using practical examples of GMH interventions in the area of stigma, depression, trauma and the mental health of marginalized populations, students will be encouraged to critically engage with concepts relevant to social work, public health, sociology and anthropology so as to reflect on the design, applicability and relevance of such interventions. Furthermore, the course will examine several key issues inherent to the field, such as the cultural validity of modern psychiatric diagnosis, as well as its research methods and assessment techniques. Guest speakers will include individuals working on the forefront of GMH application. The course is designed to compel future social workers to "think globally" but "act locally" when debating and addressing mental health issues in an international context.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 7206 Contemporary Family Therapy

Addresses contemporary family therapy, theory and practice, along with the therapists' use of self. Approaches include the work of Susan Johnson (EFT), Dan Wile (CCT), John and Julie Gottman (SRH) and other newer family therapy systems approaches. This course prepares students to work with families in all ages and stages of life. This course can be taken independently, simultaneously or following S30-7001. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 7325 Social Work Practice with Children in Families

Focuses on child development, major intervention approaches used with children, beginning practice skills for working with children and the assessment and treatment of major psychosocial problems experienced by children. Prerequisite: S15-5038. Prerequisite or Corequisite: S20-1011. Required Corequisite: Practicum with children or youth.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 7326 Social Work Practice with Youth in Families

Focuses on social work with youth, including assessment, relationship-building and intervention skills. Areas of conceptual emphasis include adolescent development, adolescent peer relations, and relationships with parents. Prerequisite: S15-5038. Prerequisite or Corequisite: S20-1011. Required Corequisite: Practicum with children or youth.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 7327 Aging Network Services

Reviews different models of social work practice within the continuum of health and long-term care for older adults. Emphasis on skill development to assist older adults and their families in accessing and appropriately using services along the continuum of care, while attending to the diversity in client and family needs, values and preferences. Emphasizes critical analysis of practice models service options, delivery models, and network systems related to evidence-based practice and capacity building, social work values and ethics, and social and economic justice outcomes. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 7330 Prevention and Promotion to Support Healthy Child Development Among At-Risk Families and Communities

This course provides students with a developmentally informed preventative approach to apply in their practice with and in at-risk communities. Synthesizing research from the fields of developmental science and prevention science, students will explore the research literature on the mechanisms through which exposure to adversity in childhood and adolescence undermines biological, socioemotional, and behavioral processes that endure to perpetuate health disparities in adulthood. Simultaneously, students will review evidence for preventive interventions targeting families, schools, and communities designed to foster resilience in the face of adversity. Emphasis will be placed on challenges to implementing programs and policies at scale. From this course, students will develop 1) a realistic appreciation for why programs and policies struggle to break the cycle of poverty, 2) the ability to think critically about implementing best practices within the settings in which they work, and 3) a language to translate strong science into practice and policy. This course builds upon foundational course work in human behavior or health behavior, as well as expands upon knowledge of other individual and public health interventions. Prerequisites S15-5011 or S20-3022/S55-5001.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 7502 Intervention Approaches for Treating Couples

Focuses on techniques used in treating couples who seek help for problems they are experiencing in their relationships. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 7815 Social Work Services in Public School Settings

Focuses on school social work services primarily in urban areas. Emphasis on service delivery models that stress collaboration and coordination approaches for working with children, adolescents and their families at high risk due to such problems as truancy; violence in the school, at home, or in the community; teenage pregnancy; poverty; and racism. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 7818 Social Work, Education, and the Exceptional Child

Focuses on understanding the characteristics, family and social context of the exceptional child, emphasis on educational settings. Practice approaches for working with exceptional children and their families will be discussed. Will include and overview of legislation and policies pertaining to exceptional children. Emphasis on assessing children, working with children and their families to maximize social and educational potential and providing support to individual children in a school setting. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 7821 International Child Welfare

This course aims to provide students with knowledge and skills about child well-being, child development and child care from an international perspective. The historical context of child and family services in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand and low- and middle-income countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America will be covered. Students will gain knowledge about the UN Convention of Child Rights and its role in bringing child-centered approaches and policies to the forefront in international child welfare. The importance of international perspectives of child development from both a system-centered and life-span perspective will be highlighted. International approaches related to child safety and security, and child protection will be analyzed. Ways in which poverty, war, disasters and globalization affect the lives of children will also be considered. How international policies, laws and programs facilitate or hinder children achieving optimal development will be discussed. Furthermore, the role of state, international non-government organizations and local agencies will be examined. Prerequisites: S15-5038 and S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 9125 Social Work Practice and Services in Health Care

Builds on the use of individual, group, and family approaches to social work practice in health care settings. Emphasis is on the context of practice, cross-cultural health practice and ethical/legal issues. Prerequisite: S15-5038. Pre/Corequisite: S30-5453.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 9150 Death and Dying

Covers concepts and clinical skills that help social workers deal effectively with dying and grieving people and other loss situations. Attention is paid to larger ethical and philosophical issues raised by death. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 9453 Substance Use Disorders

Focuses on factors that contribute to the abuse of drugs and alcohol. Emphasizes issues and perspectives relating to epidemiology, prevention and treatment. Prerequisites: S15-5038. Pre/Corequisite: S20-4011.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S30 SWDP 9455 Direct Social Work Practice with Older Adults

Teaches assessment and intervention practice skills commonly used with older adults in the areas of physical and mental health, social support and participation, and environmental assessments for home environments. Includes critical evaluation of assessment tools and intervention strategies in relation to their ability to adequately and appropriately address the concerns, needs, and preferences of diverse populations. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP  (Direct Practice)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S31 SWDP.

S31 SWDP 4000 Social Work & American Indians

Offered in conjunction with the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies. Addresses appropriate practice approaches, treatment modalities and skills, considers the history, culture and traditions of American Indian peoples, the impact of social policy and legislation on clinical interventions, and the importance of groups and families in clan and tribal systems. Pre/Corequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 4010 Social Work Practice in Early Childhood

Provides a solid grounding in early childhood development including normative milestones, key risk factors, and major disorders; screening measures and means of assessing need for specialized care; evidence-based approaches to working with caregivers of very young children; and major policy initiatives and service systems impacting services for this age period. Special attention is paid to diversity in family life. Emphasis is placed on working with young children and families from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. Prerequisite: S15-5038. Required Corequisite: Practicum with children or youth.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 4100 Social Work Practice with Refugees and Immigrants

Familiarizes students with the basic knowledge and skills for social work practice with refugees and immigrants. An historical view of international refugee policy and immigration is presented as context for present-day issues. Recent policies impacting immigrants presented as basis for advocacy and social and economic justice. Systems thinking, with an emphasis on application to multicultural oppressed and disadvantaged populations, is discussed. Special emphasis given to the development of ethnographic assessment and intervention skills for practitioners relevant to empowerment, capacity building and social change with refugees and immigrants. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 4111 Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)

PCIT is an evidence-based behavioral parent training intervention which uses a two-staged approach — child-directed intervention (CDI) and parent-directed intervention (PDI) — to intervene with parents and children together. This course, which includes a lab component, will train students in PCIT, including developing skills needed to gain mastery of both CDI and PDI. Assessment, coaching, and understanding and interpreting measures consistent with this approach will also be taught. This course may be used for elective credit in the MSW Program. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5122 Intervention Approaches with Women

Focuses on nonsexist ways to counsel women. Explores power and politics in the therapeutic relationship. Examines treatment modalities and skills for working with women. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5141 Human Sexuality & Therapeutic Interventions

Explores theories of human sexuality underlying the practice of sexual therapy. Reviews the etiologies of male and female dysfunctions and various approaches to treatment, including the treatment of special groups such as the disabled and the aged. Examines ethical issues in the field of sex therapy. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5147 Core Concepts in Trauma Treatment for Children and Adolescents

This course will introduce students to the common concepts, components (intervention and treatment elements) and skills underlying evidence-based treatment for traumatized children and adolescents. Trauma is broadly defined and includes natural disasters, war, abuse and neglect, medical trauma and witnessing interpersonal crime (e.g. domestic violence). The course will highlight the role of development, culture and empirical evidence in trauma-specific interventions with children, adolescents and their families. It will address the level of functioning of primary care giving environments and assess the capacity of the community to facilitate restorative processes. The course focuses on assessment and intervention; not treatment. Prerequisites: S15-5015 and S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5152 Sex, Society, and Social Work: Issues and Interventions

Researchers and theorists identify sexuality as a significant problem and important human potential across the life course but note it remains an infrequent area of intervention for social workers. While this course studies rape, sexual assault and coercion, incest, double standards, sexism, heteronormativity, trans- and homophobia as tools of oppression, it also examines sexual pleasure as a source of empowerment. Drawing on strengths-based developmental theories, models of health belief, literary hermeneutics, and principles of experiential and transformative learning, this course focuses on developing skills in designing and implementing positive sexuality interventions at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. The course introduces principles and best practices in sexuality counseling, education and therapy, while theoretical, empirical, and literary knowledge about sexuality provide a transdisciplinary problem-solving perspective. Interventions aim to counter sexual oppression by transforming clients' knowledge, attitudes and behavior and by shifting community perspectives toward greater sex/gender inclusiveness.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5153 Sexual Health Across the Life Course

Using a biopsychosocial perspective, this course will trace sexual development across the life course, examining sexual issues typical in childhood through the ninth decade. Looking at the ways sexuality is used oppressively will be balanced with views of sexuality as a source of empowerment. While rape, sexual assault and coercion, gender stereotyping, homophobia, and transphobia will be addressed, so will sexual sources of pleasure and agency. Students will familiarize themselves with tailoring sexual-history taking and interventions to fit clients' identities, strengths and vulnerabilities. A spectrum of sexualities will be studied, including straight, bi, intersexed, asexual, queer, gay, lesbian, transgendered and fluid. The course also considers how disability, race, class, ethnicity and other statuses intersect with sexualities. Theoretical articles, films, short stories, newspaper articles, and explicit material serve as catalysts for learning and classroom discussion. Tools and techniques studied include narrative therapies, motivational interviewing, asset and needs mapping, the sexual genogram, the sexual ecosystem questionnaire, solution-focused therapy, coaching, photovoice, intravention work, and critical incident analysis. Students examine how developing skills, knowledge and attitudes needed to discuss and work with sexuality are critical to personal freedom, human rights, social work ethics, and social work practice. This course is designed for the social work professional either preparing for a specialization in sexuality education and/or therapy or wanting to address sexual health issues in other social work specialties.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5154 Designing and Implementing Sexual Health Education: Service Learning

In this course, students will design and implement holistic, gender-neutral/gender-inclusive sex education sessions for individuals who wish to become sexuality peer educators for their organizations. The class is designed to improve sexual self-efficacy, as well as to develop expertise in teaching sexuality education. It will provide participants with opportunities for engaging in intergroup dialogue, expanding knowledge of sexuality, developing skills in creating learning experiences, clarifying values and attitudes toward sexuality and gender, and enhancing shared social support around positive sexuality. Students will adapt evidenced-based sexuality education programs to the populations with which they will be working. The first few weeks of the semester, students will concentrate on developing skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed to teach sexuality education and peer counseling. While continuing their own study in sexuality education, during the following weeks, students will facilitate small groups of participants wishing to become sexuality educators themselves. The course involves three hours of class time and up to two hours of practice teaching time each week. Students and their participants will read articles, journal, and participate in brief homework exercises weekly. Students may also enroll for supervision hours for AASECT certification as sexuality educators.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5155 Designing and Implementing Sexual Health Education, Part 2

Part II. Population is Washington University undergraduate student group. In this course, students will design and implement holistic, gender-neutral/gender-inclusive sex education sessions for individuals who wish to become sexuality peer educators for their organizations. The class is designed to improve sexual self-efficacy, as well as to develop expertise in teaching sexuality education. It will provide participants with opportunities for engaging in intergroup dialogue, expanding knowledge of sexuality, developing skills in creating learning experiences, clarifying values and attitudes toward sexuality and gender, and enhancing shared social support around positive sexuality. Students will adapt evidenced-based sexuality education programs to the populations with which they will be working. The first few weeks of the semester, students will concentrate on developing skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed to teach sexuality education and peer counseling. While continuing their own study in sexuality education, during the following weeks, students will facilitate small groups of participants wishing to become sexuality educators themselves. The course involves three hours of class time and up to two hours of practice teaching time each week. Students and their participants will read articles, journal, and participate in brief homework exercises weekly. Students may also enroll for supervision hours for AASECT certification as sexuality educators.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5157 Sex Trafficking

Focuses on knowledge and skills for social work practice with sex-trafficked individuals. The course examines the extent and nature of sex trafficking including prevalence, risk factors, experiences of survivors, methods of traffickers, responses to sex-trafficking victimization, and implications for practice. The aim of this course is to provide students with a holistic understanding of sex trafficking to guide practice with sex-trafficked individuals. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5200 Spirituality and Social Work

Explores the intersection between spirituality/religion and the profession of social work. Empirical literature associated with spirituality will be presented. Various spiritual/religious traditions will be highlighted, particularly those with the most applicability within North America. Implications for clinical and community practice will be examined. The profession's code of ethics will be used to frame the course material. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5230 Evidence-Based Child Welfare Practices

Practice in child welfare requires understanding of the complex intersection of client-system characteristics, services provided within and outside the child welfare agency, and policy. This course will focus on the child welfare system from point of referral through in-home services, foster care and adoption decisions. This course builds on content regarding child development available in the practice and theory courses in the Child Youth and Family or Violence Prevention Concentrations. This course focuses on intervention with families and children contacting child welfare. Primary prevention and research associated with abuse and neglect are covered in the TPS course on Child Maltreatment. Students will be exposed to select empirically supported best practices at the child, family and system levels and how these intersect with policy, client characteristics and community resources. Best and current practices will be explored through readings, guest speakers, interviews with regional agency staff, and course assignments. The role of social class, gender, ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, physical disability and mental disorder will be discussed. The values and ethical dilemmas of child welfare practice will be explored, especially around the assessment of parenting adequacy and permanency issues. The course is designed to expose students to cutting-edge practices to support both entry-level practice and future child welfare leadership. Prerequisites: S15-5038 & S20-1011.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S31 SWDP 5243 Social Work Practice with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Populations

Focuses on developing the knowledge and practice skills necessary for effective, evidence-based practice with gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (g/l/b/t) persons and their families. Covers five major domains of practice with g/l/b/t persons: (a) theoretical and empirical knowledge to understand g/l/b/t persons across the life span; (b) the unique psychosocial concerns and issues of g/l/b/t clients and their families of choice/origin. Particular attention paid to issues of race/ethnicity, culture, age, disability, religion and class as they impact sexual minority populations; (c) identification and implementation of capacity-building interventions with g/l/b/t persons; (d) social work values, ethics and social justice concerns surrounding g/l/b/t population; and (e) intervention strategies for building inclusive agencies, organizations and institutions. Students actively examine their own values and attitudes and their professional use of self in their practice with g/l/b/t populations. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP (Social Policy)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S40 SWSP.

S40 SWSP 5601 Comparative Health and Social Policy: China and the U.S.

This 2-credit seminar will cover the development of health policy reform in China and the United States, with an emphasis on policy analysis techniques and methods that can be used to draw conclusions about the development of health policy. The course uses the development of rapid changes in the Chinese health system over the last 10-15 years, and similar changes that also happened in the U.S. over the same time frame to draw important conclusions about the process, and the methods that can be used to apply to these comparative examples. Topics explored will include, but may not be limited to: the Rural Cooperative Medical System Reform in China, provider shortages in China and the U.S., demographics and the challenges this creates for health reform, health disparities across individuals and regions, and factors contributing to medical cost inflation. The course will be developed over two phases, with the first phase occurring in the classroom here in St. Louis, and with the culmination occurring with a short visit to Washington, D.C., where students will be able to observe the U.S. policy system in action. In addition, students will explore new areas of social work services such as those provided in the Army and to children and families of those serving for the Army, which is a new idea and has not been implemented in social work practice in China.

Credit 2 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5742 Health Administration and Policy

This course provides an overview of the structure and functions of the U.S. health care system, the relationship between the health care delivery system and public health, and an overview of the health care policy process in the United States. The existing and evolving financing, organizational structures, and delivery systems are described along with alternatives that have been discussed and developed domestically and internationally. The course also introduces key concepts in health care management. Finally, the course provides students with the tools necessary to evaluate and analyze health policy and health care systems in the U.S. MSW Prerequisite: S15-5040. Same as S55-5004.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5749 American Indian Social Welfare Policies and Administrative Practices

Studies United States policies on American Indian education, health, and mental health from early treaty provisions to the present. Discusses the impact of policy on service delivery and implications for the future. Pre- or corequisite: S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5751 American Indian Societies, Cultures, and Values

Surveys several major themes in the history and modern evolution of American Indian societies, cultures, values and laws. Examines indigenous societies and cultures before the arrival of Europeans. Explores the history of American Indians and Indian nations in the U.S. and their treatment by the U.S. Examines modern Indian governments, and legal systems, and the status of Indian nations as sovereign political entities within the U.S.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5771 Policy & Services for Children & Youth

Explores social policies and practice affecting the development and delivery of social services to children and youth. Explores limitations in current programs and points to the development of alternative policies and services. Prerequisite: S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5780 Social Policy & Aging

Examines social policies related to the aged as a dialogue between the public and private sectors. Explores the major policy areas of income security, health, employment, social services, taxes, housing, the environment; and the social and economic aspects of public and private retirement policies. Considers the place of social work in the public and private worlds of the aging. Prerequisite: S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5784 Regulating Sex: Historical & Cultural Encounters

Same as W76-784S (Law). Enrollment limit: approx. 10 law students + 10 social work students. This course explores sexuality, law, and social work as discourses and as regulatory instruments. Using this lens and emphasizing changing norms over time, we will examine a range of specific topics, such as America's historical slave economy and its impact on sexual values and practices; sexual violence and efforts to reduce it (on campus, in the military, in the home, and elsewhere); different understandings of sexual pleasure and the suppression of pleasure for socially devalued groups (women, the elderly, and individuals with disabilities); the medicalization of sex, pregnancy and childbirth; traditional marriage and various alternatives; sexual initiation and education; LGB, intersexual, asexual, and trans identities; and sex research. To support this course's explicitly transdisciplinary focus, we will study materials from law, social work, sexology, literature and popular culture and contrast conventional legal analysis with feminist and other frameworks, including queer theory, social constructionism, intersectionality theory, and symbolic interactionism. Professor Susan Appleton from the School of Law and Professor Susan Stiritz from the George Warren Brown School of Social Work will co-teach the course. Enrollment will include a mix of law students and social work students, with joint JD-MSW students and MSW students pursuing the specialization in Sexual Health and Education especially welcome. Law students will become acquainted with sources, methodologies, and frameworks that highlight the dynamic relationship between culture and law, privacy and legal regulation, and power and sexual citizenship. Social work students will become acquainted with the language of law, assumptions underlying legal regulation, and law and social work's aspirations and shortcomings. All students will have opportunities to converse across disciplines and to develop and to use both personal experiences and imagination to enrich understanding. The class will meet weekly for two hours, and class discussion of assigned readings will form a significant component of the course. Students' writing assignments will emphasize policy (in the form of law reform proposals, policy briefs, op-ed pieces, and/or reflection or reaction papers). Grades will be based on writing assignments and contributions to the class discussions. Field trips and films will supplement the curriculum. For social work students with individualized concentrations, this course may fulfill their policy requirement.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5809 Women's Issues in Social Welfare & Social Work

Examines a variety of women's issues in the social services arena and the social work profession. Focuses on women in American society, women as a special social service population group, and women as social work professionals. Prerequisite: S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5830 Policy Design Lab

It has been said that social policy design is an art of the possible. This course aims to equip students with a toolkit of policy design tools used by policymakers to respond to the very real problems and opportunities existing within society. Part one of the course will focus on uncovering policy problems and opportunities, as well as considering the role that globalization, politics and public opinion play in crafting a policy response. Part two will focus on understanding, selecting and implementing policy design tools. Part three will offer students an opportunity to employ their policy design toolkit during interactive lab sessions. This will be a hands-on course with direct application for policy advocacy, development and implementation. Prerequisites: S15-5040 or consent of the instructor.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5842 Social Policy Analysis & Evaluation

Evaluates the effectiveness of various state and federal policies regarding health, mental health, child welfare, aging, and income maintenance. Prerequisites: S15-5005 & S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5861 Domestic Social & Economic Development

Focuses on selected topics in development policy in the United States at local, state, and national levels, emphasizing implications of alternative policy approaches. Prerequisites: S15-5012 & S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5862 International Social and Economic Development Policy

Focuses on selected topics in international development policy emphasizing implications of alternative policy approaches. Prerequisites: S15-5012 & S15-5040. Pre/corequisite: S15-5012.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S40 SWSP 5863 Special Topics: Human Rights Policy

In this course, we will explore the history, key theoretical debates, policy implications, and advocacy strategies related to the human rights movement. The class will approach human rights issues and situations from the perspective of a social worker. We will examine the different formal and informal institutions that work to promote, as well as hinder, the realization of human rights using case studies. Finally, the class will explore the effectiveness of different advocacy tools to address human rights violations in various contexts. Prerequisite: S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S48 SWSP (Social Policy)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S48 SWSP.


S48 SWSP 5012 Mental Health Policy

Acquaints students with current state and national laws and regulations that affect mental health service delivery. Future trends in mental health policy are also examined. Prerequisite: S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA (Social Administration)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S50 SWSA.


S50 SWSA 5011 Economics of Social Welfare

Examines the economic aspects of social welfare policy, problems and programs. Micro and macro economic theories are applied to understanding the behavior of individuals and the government in the context of social welfare. Prerequisites: S15-5012 & S15-5040. Previously S20-5011.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5019 Managing People

Examines methods and procedures critical to the design and operation of a modern personnel management system. Includes job analysis; job descriptions; employee recruitment, selection, and performance appraisal; assessment of employee attitudes, job satisfaction and motivation; and organizational climate. This course fulfills 3 credits in Leadership/Management. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5020 Board Governance & Volunteer Management

Examines the roles and the effectiveness of board members and volunteers in not-for-profit (NFP) organizations, particularly social service organizations. Explores the policymaking and governance roles of boards of directors and the program support roles of other volunteers. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5030 Budgeting and Fiscal Management

Examines planning agency expenditures, keeping track of money, and financial reporting. Major topics include: the budgeting process, accounting methods and procedures, financial reporting procedures, audits, and financial evaluation. Values and ethics in financial management are emphasized. The course begins at an introductory level; no previous background in budgeting, accounting, reporting, or any aspect of financial management is assumed. This course fulfills 3 credits in Leadership/Management. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5033 Special Topics: Brown Consulting

This is an integrative experience for qualified MSW Management Specialization students and others with permission of the instructor. Working as a consulting team with group and individual assignments, students perform a broad and detailed leadership, management and organizational assessment of a local St. Louis human service organization; and present recommendations for change or improvement to the client's governing board. This course fulfills 3 credits in Leadership/Management. Prerequisite: approval by the instructor.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5050 Evaluation of Programs and Services

Examines issues and methods for evaluation of programs and services in both organizational and community contexts. Strengths and weaknesses of various evaluative models are discussed. Prerequisites: S15-5005 & S15-5040. Corequisite: Concentration Practicum. Corequisite with S50-5069 Developing Programs in Health and Social Services is not recommended due to extensive applied learning assignments in each course. Approval for concurrent enrollment must be sought from the instructors of both courses prior to enrollment.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5052 Leadership & Governance

Examines theories, processes, practices and attributes of organizational leadership (both position-based and informal) as well as governance and the role of the board in the nonprofit organization. Students will examine their own personal leadership style and strengthen their ability to lead. This course fulfills 3 credits in Leadership/Management. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5056 Implementing & Evaluating Evidence-Based Practice

Social service agencies and practitioners striving to improve client outcomes can draw on an increasing supply of interventions with demonstrated effectiveness. However, such interventions often prove challenging to implement and sustain in real-world settings, and robust methods to evaluate them often have a poor fit with traditional evaluation approaches. This course will help students gain knowledge and basic skills in the processes of implementing and evaluating evidence-based practices. This course fulfills 3 credits in Leadership/Management. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5060 Social Entrepreneurship

The course is designed for students who are interested in understanding the field of social entrepreneurship. It studies the entrepreneurial concepts and practices that are integral to successful innovation. Even if a student is not interested in starting a venture of their own, understanding the entrepreneurial process will enhance productivity for other programs and organizations. This course fulfills 3 credits in Leadership/Management. Prerequisite for SW students: S15-5038. Same as B63 MGT 500T, B63 MGT 500U.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5061 Business Planning for New Enterprises-The Hatchery

In this course, student teams pursue their own business idea or support outside entrepreneurs by researching, writing, and pitching business plans for new commercial or social ventures. Enrolled students can recruit a team to work on their own business idea, or can join a team working on another's idea. Outside entrepreneurs and scientific researchers wishing to recruit student teams must apply in advance to be considered for student selection. Most of the work is done outside the classroom with the support of mentors, advisers and the instructor. Classes are held once per week for the first half of the semester. Workshops and rehearsals are required in the second part of the term. Students make final presentations to a panel of outside judges including venture capitalists, angel investors, entrepreneurs and people involved with early-stage ventures. Prerequisites: Introduction to Entrepreneurship (MGT 421 or MGT 521), Social Entrepreneurship (MGT 500T or S-50-5060) or permission of the instructor.
Same as B63 MGT 524

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5063 Social Innovation

Humans are highly social and also highly creative. The progress of civilization rests on massive social innovations in living together peacefully, organizing work of all kinds, establishing rules of conduct, building knowledge, creating art and shared stories, distributing resources, governing fairly and effectively, and promoting health and well-being. In the absence of these social foundations, which are so often taken for granted, human technological and economic advancement would not be possible. Social innovation refers to establishing new patterns of social relationships, organization, services, products, programs and policies. The process of social innovation is constant and occurs at multiple levels. Social innovation changes basic patterns and routines, and changes resource and authority flows. Successful social innovation has broad impacts and durability, leading to meaningful and sustained change. This course focuses on the history of social innovation, the meaning of social innovation in our time, and practical strategies to build skills for social innovation. Detailed case examples of social innovation in different spheres and sectors will be presented, including the instructors' experiences in social innovation. The class will function as a large team and in sub-teams. Students will identify a social change goal, apply course ideas, co-create an innovative strategy, and design processes that can lead to implementation, testing, and eventual success. High levels of commitment, engagement, teamwork and performance are expected. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5066 Marketing, Resource Development & Community Relations

Examines how organizations develop and maintain support from the community. Three interrelated topics are addressed: marketing services, financial and other services, and community (public) relations. This course fulfills 3 credits in Leadership/Management. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5069 Developing Programs In Health and Social Service Settings

(Replaces S50-5067 and S50-5068.) Students must pre-register. Permission of instructor is required. This course will focus on the knowledge, skills and tools necessary to develop client-need-driven programs within a broad array of health and social service agency settings. Includes applied learning experiences. Prerequisites: S15-5015 & S15-5038. Corequisite: Concentration Practicum. Corequisite with S50-5050 Evaluation of Programs & Services is not recommended due to extensive applied learning assignments in each course. Approval for concurrent enrollment must be sought from instructors of both courses prior to enrollment.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S50 SWSA 5705 Geriatric Interdisciplinary Teams

Interdisciplinary collaboration is a foundation of geriatric care, yet students are often trained with little exposure to the theories, methods, and practice techniques of disciplines complementary to their own. The purpose of this course is to bring together students across schools and disciplines who are training to work with older adults. Students will learn about 1) the theories and methods typical of each discipline, and 2) features of effective interdisciplinary teamwork that are essential in high-quality geriatric care.
Same as I50 InterD 5001

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH (Public Health)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S55 MPH.


S55 MPH 4003 Global Burden of Disease: Methods and Applications

This 3-credit transdisciplinary course provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative methods used in the field of global health, as well as their applications for studying the global burden of diseases. Topics covered include infectious diseases, noncommunicable chronic medical illness and behavioral disorders. At the end of this course, students will have learned basic methods used in global health research and major trends in the global burden of diseases. Students will be able to apply the knowledge of measurements to forecast the future of the global burden of specific diseases and to develop needed policy recommendations. Students will also be able to address prevention and intervention strategies targeted to specific nations or regions, while drawing on perspectives and approaches from a range of disciplines. Students will learn sociocultural and economic factors that affect global and regional distributions of major disease categories and how they are linked to issues of global trade and political economy. The transdisciplinary knowledge and hands-on skills learned from this course will assist students with an interest in international research, and the acquisition of practical skills will benefit their pursuit of health professions. This includes cultural competency training as it applies to medicine and public health. This course is open to postgraduate scholars and fellows and graduate and advanced undergraduate students.
Same as M19 PHS 5656

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC EN: S


View Sections

S55 MPH 5000 Research Methods

Focuses on evaluation at a variety of levels (individual, group, organization, community). Includes problem assessment, specification and monitoring of interventions, validation of measurement methods, and analysis and presentation of data. MPH Program corequisite: S55-5003: Biostatistics.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5001 Foundations of Public Health: Health Behavior and Health Promotion

The purpose of this course is to present fundamentals of social and behavioral science as a framework for using evidence-based approaches in addressing individual, families, and population health issues. Students will learn the role of social determinants of health problems, and theoretical approaches to guide the design and evaluation of health interventions. Prerequisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038.
Same as S20 SWHS 3022

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5002 Foundations of Public Health: Epidemiology

The purpose of this course is to present fundamentals of epidemiology as a framework for using evidence-based approaches in addressing population health issues. Students will learn the role of epidemiological approaches for describing and quantifying health problems, and methodological approaches for assessing risk factors and disease etiology.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5003 Foundations of Public Health: Biostatistics
This course provides an introduction to quantitative data analysis as it is applied in public health. Biostatistics is one of the core disciplines of public health; but it also provides a set of analytic tools which are used across all the other core and associated public health disciplines. This course will teach students how to think about data clearly; how to describe important characteristics of public health data; how to design, implement, and interpret basic statistical analyses which are appropriate for the research question and the characteristics of the data; and how to communicate analysis results effectively.
Credit 3 units.


S55 MPH 5004 Foundations of Public Health: Health Administration and Policy

This course provides an overview of the structure and functions of the U.S. health care system, the relationship between the health care delivery system and public health, and an overview of the health care policy process in the United States. The existing and evolving financing, organizational structures, and delivery systems are described along with alternatives that have been discussed and developed domestically and internationally. The course also introduces key concepts in health care management. Finally, the course provides students with the tools necessary to evaluate and analyze health policy and health care systems in the U.S. MSW Prerequisite: S15-5040.
Same as S40 SWSP 5742

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5005 Foundations of Public Health: Environmental Health

This course presents a broad survey of the major environmental health issues facing contemporary society in first and third world countries. The course provides an overview of the interaction of the physical, psychological, and social environments of individuals in which they work and live. The course presents ecological concerns along with factors related to personal and community health.

Credit 3 units. EN: S


View Sections

S55 MPH 5010 Cross-Cutting Themes in Public Health

The purpose of this course is to introduce public health students to the crucial and timely cross-cutting themes in public health. The course will cover a range of topics, including: the role of transdisciplinary science and collaboration in the development, implementation and translation of science to the population at large; evidence-based approaches to decision making in contemporary public health practice; methods for dissemination and implementation of public health to policy and practice; the importance of health disparities to the study of public health, and the role of ethics in the profession of public health.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5011 Epidemiology Methods

This course extends the concepts and methods of epidemiology from S55-5002, providing an in-depth exploration of concepts and skills in epidemiologic research, including analytic reasoning and study design, execution, data analysis and interpretation. Prerequisites: S55-5002 and S55-5003 or equivalent.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5041 Skill Lab: Grantwriting: Foundation Grants

This course will provide the knowledge and specific skills to prepare a foundation grant proposal. It will examine how grantmakers operate, trends in foundation giving, the different types of foundations, how to research their interests and priorities, basic writing skills, how to build a working relationship with a foundation, elements of a strong grant proposal and customizing a grant proposal to various types of foundations. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.
Same as S81 SWIP 5041

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5042 Skill Lab: Grantwriting: Government Grants

This course will provide the knowledge and specific skills to research and prepare a grant proposal to a local, state or federal government funder. It will examine the different types of government funders, how to research their interests and priorities, basic writing skills, how to build a working relationship with funder staff, elements of a strong grant proposal and customizing a grant proposal to various types of government funders. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.
Same as S81 SWIP 5042

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5082 Foundations of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for the Applied Social Sciences

This course will familiarize students with the basic knowledge of geographic information systems (GIS) and their application to social work practice and research. The course is organized around three primary areas: 1) conceptual; 2) technical; and 3) data management. A conceptual overview of GIS is presented to provide students with foundational knowledge about the theory, purpose, function, and applicability of GIS in practice and research settings. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to devise research questions appropriate for a GIS, to develop a GIS, interpret the findings, and to evaluate the spatial relationships between variables.
Same as S65 SWCD 5082

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5102 Global Health

This course provides an overview of issues in international health, with a particular emphasis on those affecting health in low-income countries. It will cover the infectious diseases of malaria, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, acute respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, and neglected tropical diseases (e.g., helminth infection). Chronic diseases and risk factors will also be addressed. An overview of the biology, epidemiology, and intervention evidence base will be covered, drawing from the Disease Control Priorities Project.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5107 Global Health Governance and Policies

The course will introduce students to the role of power and politics in global health and provide them with analytical tools to critically examine this field. It will review key debates, issues, concepts, theories and case studies linked to current major health and development issues, highlighting their relationship to health. It is based on a multidisciplinary approach to analysis of these issues.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5114 Mental and Behavioral Health Epidemiology

This course covers the public health burden and potential causes of common mental and behavioral health problems, such as depression, anxiety disorders, and addictions. The course will be divided into three sections: I) defining and measuring mental and behavioral health problems; II) risk and causal factors for mental and behavioral health problems — from cells to society; III) the use of epidemiologic findings to inform mental/behavioral health policy and prevention. Prerequisites: S55-5002 & S55-5003 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5117 Translating Epidemiology Into Policy

Policy has a well-documented, powerful and sustained effect on public health indicators. This course covers the epidemiologic basis for health policy, types of policy evidence, policy theories, study designs for understanding the effects of policy, methods of policy communication, and current controversies. Course content will be covered through readings, individual and group exercises, case studies, lectures and discussions. Prerequisite: S55-5002 Foundations of Public Health: Epidemiology.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5120 Health Economics

In this course, students will learn how to apply economic tools to the study of health and medical care issues. The course will examine the special features of medical care markets, the demand for health and medical care services, the economic explanations for the behavior of medical care providers (i.e., physicians and hospitals), the functioning of insurance markets, cost and comparative effectiveness, the economics of public health, and technology diffusion. Also examined will be the role of, and economic justification for, government involvement in the medical care system. The tools developed in the course will be used in discussions of current policy topics such as health reform, insurance reform, incentives for health behavior, rationing, and price regulation.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5121 Advanced Health Policy Methods

This course will introduce students to additional methods and topics in economic evaluation of health (health care and public health) and health services research (HSR). Students will learn the differences, strengths, and weaknesses of different approaches at a "user" level. Students will produce a project in which they focus on either the economic evaluation or HSR side to evaluate public health policies or problems. Prerequisite: Health Economics (S55-5120) or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5122 Health, Politics, and Policy

Health, Politics, and Policy: This course focuses on how public policies are actually made in the United States, and in particular, health policies. The course is designed to introduce students to the literature, concepts, theories, and politics of the policy process and methods for analyzing this process. The emphasis in the readings will be on different concepts for studying the policy process and analyses. This course will focus on concepts related to policy processes including policymaking and politics.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5141 Skill Lab: Performance Management

This course will provide skills in selecting and applying widely used tools and best practices to yield effective and efficient organizational performance and continuous learning and quality improvement. These skills are applicable to diverse functions and settings areas such as intake and case management, clinic operations and volunteer management. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.
Same as S81 SWIP 5141

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5142 Skill Lab: Program and Project Management

This course focuses on key program and project management competencies and principles that are critical to executing successful projects. Students will learn about planning, scheduling, organizing, and controlling projects and will apply these concepts using case studies and small group projects. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.
Same as S81 SWIP 5142

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5143 Skill Lab: Volunteer Management

This course will provide skills in recruiting and retaining volunteers for a wide variety of organizational roles. It will provide training on the basic tasks of the volunteer manager, and volunteer supervision within a cycle of management from job design to evaluation. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.
Same as S81 SWIP 5143

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5144 Skill Lab: Fundraising Design and Management

This course will provide skills in developing and implementing a strategic fundraising program, including setting goals, choosing fundraising techniques, interfacing with staff and volunteers, data management and evaluating results. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.
Same as S81 SWIP 5144

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5145 Skill Lab: Budget Management

This course will provide skills in budgeting, budget management and reporting, using commonly available software. It will include both line item and program budgeting models, and the basics of grant reporting. It will connect budgeting to the overall process of financial management. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.
Same as S81 SWIP 5145

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5146 Skill Lab: Managing and Leading Teams and People

This course will provide the basic skills and best practices in managing people and leading teams. It will focus on task supervision including designing jobs and job descriptions, selecting and orienting job applicants, motivating and supporting employees, and measuring work performance. It will provide best practices in building effective, empowered, engaged teams. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.
Same as S81 SWIP 5140

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5147 Skill Lab: Effective Meeting Management and Group Facilitation

For organizations and communities, meetings large and small are a way of life. Making these meetings as productive, effective and efficient as possible increases organizational productivity, improves decision making and enhances community development. This course provides the basic theories and techniques for meeting planning and implementation and facilitation practice. The skills and practice methods are applicable in multiple settings and relevant to management and organizing arenas used in stakeholder input, community organizing, strategic planning, project evaluation, staff retreats and policy development. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.
Same as S81 SWIP 5147

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5177 Skill Lab: Effective Meeting Management and Group Facilitation

This course will help students gain knowledge and basic skills in strategic planning and execution. The course will include an examination of models of strategic planning; assessing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats; developing a vision, goals, and strategies for mission achievement and then translating them into action plans, dashboards, staff and board responsibilities. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.
Same as S81 SWIP 5177

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5230 Applied Linear Modeling

This course focuses on statistical modeling and analysis methods relevant to epidemiological and clinical research, as well as applied research in behavioral, social, and health sciences. A general linear models approach is taken to data analysis strategies using linear, logistic, and poisson regression, as well as ANOVA methods for repeated measures. Required Corequisite: Students enrolled in Section 01 must also be enrolled in Lab A. Students enrolled in Section 02 must also be enrolled in Lab B. This course can be taken through the cross-listed course number S80-5003 to fulfill the requirement formerly fulfilled by S80-5001 Advanced Statistics in the Research Specialization within the MSW Program.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5240 Planning, Implementation, & Evaluation Evidence-Based Programs & Interventions

This course focuses on program evaluation, outcomes research, cost effectiveness research, methods for executing and evaluating health education intervention plans, quantitative and qualitative methods and their application to public health practice. Prerequisite: S55-5000 Research Methods.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5305 TPS: Chronic Disease: Obesity Prevention and Public Health Policy

Students will be exposed to a wide range of perspectives from diverse disciplines about the various causes and potential solutions to key public health issues in the United States. Students will work in groups to integrate these transdisciplinary perspectives into a richer understanding of public health problems and propose new solutions that draw upon the contributions of at least three different disciplines.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5315 TPS: Tobacco Control in Public Health

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death and disease in the United States. The reduction of tobacco use by more than half is one of the most important public health successes in the 20th century. This course will explore tobacco control as a public health issue. The course adopts a cells-to-society approach, and students will study a variety of topics from the genetics of nicotine dependence to evidence-based national and international tobacco control policies. Students will work in groups and have access to relevant epidemiologic, economic, and policy data sets related to tobacco. Each student group will work on a semester-long project that will focus on an important current public health issue related to tobacco use.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5321 TPS: Global Hunger and Undernutrition

This course applies the transdisciplinary problem-solving approach to understanding and addressing the dual problems of hunger and undernutrition globally. Agriculture, health, economics, anthropology, and other fields of discipline will be drawn upon to characterize the problem and develop the solution. Throughout the semester, students will work in one of three groups that focus on research, programming, or policy to move through the TPS process of: defining the problem; developing a conceptual framework; describing the context; identifying intervention strategies and setting priorities; integrating a communications plan; and ultimately implementing and evaluating the solution strategy.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5322 TPS: Interrogating Health, Race & Inequalities

Interrogating Health, Race, and Inequalities is intended for graduate students in the School of Social Work and in Arts & Sciences as well as advanced undergraduates in Arts & Sciences who have previous course work in medical anthropology, public health, or urban policy. The fundamental goal of the course is to demonstrate that health is not merely a medical or biological phenomenon but more importantly the product of social, economic, political, and environmental factors. To meet this goal the course is designed to examine the intersection of race/ethnicity and health from multiple analytic approaches and methodologies. Course readings will draw from the fields of public health, anthropology, history, and policy analysis. Teaching activities include lectures, group projects and presentations, videos, and discussions led by the course instructors. These in-class activities will be supplemented with field trips and field-based projects. By the end of the course it is expected that students will have a strong understanding of race as a historically produced social construct as well as how race interacts with other axes of diversity and social determinants to produce particular health outcomes. Students will gain an understanding of the health disparity literature and a solid understanding of multiple and intersecting causes of these disparities.
Same as I50 InterD 4001

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5323 TPS: Climate Change and Public Health

This course will explore the real and potential impacts a changing climate will have on public health. The course explores methods for understanding and studying these effects as well as the role of public health (as a discipline) in planning for and mitigating potential effects. Topics covered will include, but are not limited to: theoretical underpinnings of climate change, changing patterns in infectious disease and vectors, exposure to temperature extremes, emergency response (e.g., more extreme weather events), public policy, and more.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5325 TPS: Child Maltreatment Prevention

The purpose of this course is for students to develop an understanding of transdisciplinary perspectives and apply systematic problem-solving approaches to the prevention of child maltreatment. Answers to complex questions about child maltreatment requires a transdisciplinary problem-solving approach with public health, social work, and medical practitioners analyzing perspectives from diverse fields, and coming together to integrate knowledge across these disciplines.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5335 TPS: From the Inside-Out: Public Health & The Built Environment

The built environment has contributed to and advanced public health and safety since the era of 2200 BCE when Hammurabi, the founder of the Babylonian Empire, proclaimed the "Code of Hammurabi." This code called for construction of "firm houses" that would not collapse on their owners and for the imposition of severe penalties on constructors whose buildings collapsed. The same basis of care and prudent practice is in force today in building design, construction, environmental engineering, and community and urban design in order to protect public health and safety and the natural environment. This Transdisciplinary Problem Solving course will discuss issues in the U.S. and within a global context of housing, healthy communities, sustainable design, environmental quality, and occupational health and safety. Students will prepare a health impact assessment (HIA) for a selected building or community development site. Prerequisite or corequisite for MPH Program students: S55-5005 or permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5340 TPS: Geriatric Interdisciplinary Teams

Interdisciplinary collaboration is a foundation of geriatric care, yet students are often trained with little exposure to the theories, methods, and practice techniques of disciplines complementary to their own. The purpose of this course is to bring together students across schools and disciplines who are training to work with older adults. Students will learn about 1) the theories and methods typical of each discipline, and 2) features of effective interdisciplinary teamwork that is essential in high-quality geriatric care.
Same as I50 InterD 5001

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5350 TPS: Criminal Justice Involved Adults: Practice & Policy Interventions

This course will extend our understanding of the how the U.S. adult criminal justice system intersects with social work and public health professions and client systems. The course will devote particular attention to the overrepresentation of people in prisons and jails with psychiatric and behavioral disorders and members of ethnic minority groups. The collateral consequences of criminal justice involvement such as health disparities, impact on families and children, increased risk for interpersonal violence, and intergenerational transmission of inequality will be emphasized. The ways in which working with adults in the criminal justice system (and their families) can promote social and economic justice and public health will be explored. This problem-solving course will focus on existing evidence-based practices as well as the development of multi-level evidence-based interventions pertinent to social work and public health professionals. This course is applicable to any social work or public health student regardless of whether the student plans to work in a criminal-justice-specific setting.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5351 TPS: Poverty, Law, and the Health of Communities

In today's legal system, many low-income citizens are often fined or jailed simply for being poor. A disproportionate number are also people of color. They are arrested for minor traffic violations, or stopped-and-frisked based on how they are walking, or where they are resting, sitting or sleeping. If they can't pay exorbitant amounts for tickets or citations, they are often jailed, sometimes for weeks at a time. Ultimately, their physical and mental health is negatively impacted, causing them to experience unfavorable health disparities, as compared to high-income individuals. This course will help students understand these disparities from a transdisciplinary perspective, combining legal, public health, medical, and social problem-solving skills and analytic methods. Students who anticipate working with individuals or communities in poverty will benefit from the course's framework that considers the impact of criminalization and mental scarcity on both health behavior and access to care. As part of their course work, students will do one short-term research assignment with a local community agency to determine whether low-income individuals have suffered health impacts as a result of their interactions with law enforcement.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5355 TPS: Popular Culture and Public Health

This course will use popular culture and popular media to: a) examine depictions of public health problems related to the social determinants of health and health behaviors and b) explore the use of popular media tools and techniques to enhance health information delivery and intervention design. Students will learn to be critical consumers of health-related popular media content, use popular media approaches to communicate across different demographic segments of the population, and take advantage of traditional and emerging media to shape and dissemination public health messages.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5365 TPS: Sexual Health Across the Life Course

Using a biopsychosocial perspective, this course will trace sexual development across the life course, examining sexual issues typical in childhood through the ninth decade. Looking at the ways sexuality is used oppressively will be balanced with views of sexuality as a source of empowerment. While rape, sexual assault and coercion, gender stereotyping, homophobia, and transphobia will be addressed, so will sexual sources of pleasure and agency. Students will familiarize themselves with tailoring sexual-history taking and interventions to fit clients' identities, strengths and vulnerabilities. A spectrum of sexualities will be studied, including straight, bi, intersexed, asexual, queer, gay, lesbian, transgendered and fluid. The course also considers how disability, race, class, ethnicity and other statuses intersect with sexualities. Theoretical articles, films, short stories, newspaper articles, and explicit material serve as catalysts for learning and classroom discussion. Tools and techniques studied include narrative therapies, motivational interviewing, asset and needs mapping, the sexual genogram, the sexual ecosystem questionnaire, solution-focused therapy, coaching, photovoice, intravention work, and critical incident analysis. Students examine how developing skills, knowledge and attitudes needed to discuss and work with sexuality are critical to personal freedom, human rights, social work ethics, and social work practice. This course is designed for the social work professional either preparing for a specialization in sexuality education and/or therapy or wanting to address sexual health issues in other social work specialties.
Same as S31 SWDP 5153

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5371 TPS: Using Participatory Approaches for Community Well-Being in Shirati, Tanzania

This course will be held on-location in Tanzania.This course is by pre-registration only. Application also required. In this course, students will gain direct experience using community development techniques, learn about the operation of a nonprofit organization in Africa, understand water and sanitation issues and interventions and become familiar with the Community Health Worker model. Students will work in close collaboration with staff of Maji Safi, an NGO based in Shirati, Tanzania, to design and implement a community engagement process using participatory techniques. Students will learn techniques such as social and resource mapping, seasonal diagramming, 24-hour day, institutional diagramming, vision matrices, historical timelines, problem identification and prioritization, and community action planning. In working teams, Maji Safi staff and students will use these techniques to conduct an appraisal of community well-being and needs among fishing communities in the Shirati area. Students will be involved in all stages of planning, implementing and documenting the process. Teams will produce visual products and reports of the process and discuss issues related to facilitation, rapport building, inclusive processes, challenges of participatory processes and next steps for community planning. Prerequisites: Second-year ISED and Global Health concentration students preferred, but not required. Students must apply online. Only students selected for the course will be allowed to participate.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5372 TPS: Gender, Poverty, and Global Health

This course comes in the wake of the new sustainable development agenda to end poverty by 2030, which includes a stand-alone goal on gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls. It explores the interconnections between gender, health, and extreme poverty within low- and middle-income countries. Specifically, students will examine a broad range of data and programmatic evidence related to how gender norms and inequalities influence health and development outcomes in and across various global health sectors, including: maternal and child health; nutrition; family planning; water, sanitation and hygiene; and agriculture. Further, by reviewing government policies, donor mandates and gender-based interventions, students will learn how to identify and explain health-related gender gaps, as well as how to address gender norms and power relations in program/policy planning, implementation, and evaluation. At the end of the course, students will use in-depth case studies to propose programmatic and policy-driven action to overcome current gender-related obstacles and advance global health and development.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5374 TPS: International Family Planning and Reproductive Health

This course will provide an overview of the critical issues in international family planning and reproductive health. We will trace the evolution of the field from its demographic roots to the current, broader perspective on sexual and reproductive health and rights. The main theoretical models to explain the determinants of fertility and reproductive mortality and morbidity will be presented, and demographic data will be used to describe global family planning and reproductive health trends and patterns over time. Students will be engaged in key topics related to what the field has achieved thus far, including: changes in policies, laws, and development approaches; the use of new technologies; the promotion of constructive male engagement; and overall improvements in outcomes related to family planning, fertility, maternal health, violence, sexually transmitted infections, and HIV/AIDS. Obstacles to progress such as waning political commitment, trends in funding, weakened health systems, and cultural opposition, will also be discussed.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5375 TPS: Pregnancy Outcomes: Social, Biological, and Environmental Determinants

This course will introduce students to general biological processes of pregnancy and birth outcomes, including pregnancy loss and preterm birth, in order to understand the epidemiology of reproductive and perinatal health. Subsequently, students will evaluate social and environmental determinants of birth outcomes with emphasis on racial and ethnic disparities, and traditional and modern environmental exposures such as lead, Bisphenol-A (BPA), and phthalates. The course also will explore community, social and behavioral interventions aimed at improving maternal and perinatal health. Prerequisites: S55-5000; S55-5002; S55-5003.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5701 Practicum-MPH Program

This course provides supervised experience in application of public health techniques through work in a public health agency or other health care organization.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5702 Practicum II for MPH Students

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5905 Culminating Experience - CACE Prep Course

During the final semester of study in the program, all MPH students are required to complete a Culminating Experience. The Case Analysis Comprehensive Exam (CACE) is a written exam centered on analysis of transdisciplinary public health cases. The Culminating Experience CACE Prep Course is a 1-credit hour course that will assist students in preparing for the exam. This course will review the public health core areas and transdisciplinary problem-solving competencies. In addition, practice exam(s) will be provided in order to support students' preparation approach and responses. The course is Pass/Fail. Attendance is required to complete the MPH program. This course is the first of two courses in the Culminating Experience sequence. Students should enroll in S55-5905 and S55-5906 concurrently.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5906 Culminating Experience - CACE Exam

During the final semester of study in the program, all MPH students are required to complete a Culminating Experience. The Case Analysis Comprehensive Exam (CACE) is a written exam centered on analysis of transdisciplinary public health cases selected by a faculty committee. The Culminating Experience CACE Exam is a 1-credit hour course in which students will complete this exam. The exam will be offered on one day only each semester. This exam will determine: (1) the student's mastery of the program competencies in public health core areas and transdisciplinary problem solving; (2) integration and synthesis of knowledge across public health disciplines; (3) ability to apply public health knowledge in real-world problem solving; and (4) mastery of specialization-specific competencies that vary based on each student's area of specialized study. Students will receive the case and all supporting materials in advance of the exam. The exam is Pass/Fail, and a passing grade is required to complete the MPH program. This course is the second of two courses in the Culminating Experience sequence. Students should enroll in S55-5905 and S55-5906 concurrently.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5910 Public Health Seminar I

In this seminar, students will work closely with faculty members in small groups to process, systematically analyze and discuss timely, real-world public health challenges and solutions.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5920 Public Health Seminar II

In this seminar, students will work closely with faculty members in small groups to process, systematically analyze and discuss timely, real-world public health challenges and solutions.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5925 Public Health and Urban Design Seminar I

This seminar brings together students from the MPH Urban Design specialization at the Brown School and MUD students (Master of Urban Design) from the Sam Fox School of Design for a monthly exchange with faculty from both programs as well as practicing urban design specialists. Sessions will engage students in discussions and analysis of real-world urban challenges, and provide the opportunity to process and apply skills from their specialization course work and experiences from their practicum and culminating experience. This seminar course is required for students in the Urban Design specialization.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5926 Public Health & Urban Design Seminar II

Semester 2. This seminar brings together students from the MPH Urban Design specialization at the Brown School and MUD students (Master of Urban Design) from the Sam Fox School of Design for a monthly exchange with faculty from both programs as well as practicing urban design specialists. Sessions will engage students in discussions and analysis of real-world urban challenges, and provide the opportunity to process and apply skills from their specialization course work and experiences from their practicum and culminating experience. This seminar course is required for students in the Urban Design specialization.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5960 Skill Lab: Statistical Analysis: SAS

This course will provide an introduction to the SAS statistical package in a Windows environment. Students will learn the basics of data management and manipulation through hands-on tutorials. Topic will include importing/exporting data, merging datasets, recoding variables, simple statistical analyses and troubleshooting. At the end of the course, students will have the skills necessary to use SAS for advanced biostatistics and epidemiology courses. Prerequisites for the course are the completion of S55-5003 Foundations of Public Health: Biostatistics and S55-5000 Research Methods. This course is strongly recommended for students taking S55-5011 Epidemiology Methods.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5961 Skill Lab: Statistical Analysis: Stata

This skill lab will introduce students to the Stata statistical software package. Students will learn data concepts such as opening/importing/exporting data, applying formats, using syntax, creating variables, graphs and more. Statistical analysis techniques will be covered for both continuous and categorical outcome variables, including chi-square, t-tests, regression and survey weights. Students will demonstrate acquired skills during a final project working with data and running a statistical analysis and interpretation.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5962 Skill Lab: Introduction to the R Statistical Programming Language and Environment

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of the R language and RStudio environment. The first session will cover how to obtain and install R and RStudio, import data, create descriptive statistics, and plot simple graphics. The second session will delve into data structures and classes, data manipulation and management, and common data analyses (t-tests, ANOVAs, correlations, regressions, etc.). Students will explore R's graphics capabilities and some of the publishing tools built into RStudio during the third session. Students are expected to have taken at least one introductory statistics course, but need no prior computer programming experience.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5963 Skill Lab: Data Management

This skill lab will introduce students to the basic aspects of data management, starting with planning their database, moving to collecting, entering and cleaning data. Other topics will include data types, creating and recoding variables, formats and value labels, data dictionaries, missing data, and merging data. Students will learn to use descriptive statistics to quickly assess data integrity. Course will be hands-on, primarily using Stata with other software where relevant. A majority of time spent working with data involves cleaning, manipulating, and preparing for analysis. This workshop will focus on these skills.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5965 Skill Lab: Qualitative Data Analysis

This intensive course focuses on analysis of ethnographic and other qualitative data in public health research. It will begin by introducing theoretical approaches to analysis including grounded theory and framework approach. We will then introduce a free Macintosh-based software for coding textual and visual data called TAMS Analyzer. We will use sample data for demonstration purposes initially, but students are welcome to bring their own data subsequently. Finally, we will discuss writing up results and publication strategies.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5966 Skill Lab: Introduction to GIS and Spatial Mapping

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a system for collecting, storing, displaying, and analyzing geographic information. This 1-credit course will serve as an introduction to applications of GIS and spatial mapping for social work and public health topics. Students will be introduced to the visual storytelling and data analysis power of creating maps. This course is intended to be a fundamental lab that provides hands-on experience in basic GIS skills. Methods for applying GIS techniques and other spatial mapping tools for data visualization will be introduced, and several examples of GIS in environmental and social domains will be analyzed. Students will learn about mapping terminology and skills to produce and analyze digital data maps. Students are not permitted to take this lab concurrently with the 3-credit GIS course.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5967 Skill Lab: Conducting Systematic Reviews

Students will learn a step-by-step method for conducting systematic reviews, in Academic Search Complete, and synthesizing findings. Students will also learn how to organize studies and use the write and cite feature in the free reference manager, Mendeley.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5968 Skill Lab: Communication: Core Skills

This course will help students enhance their skills and effectiveness when communicating ideas and information to professional and public audiences. Students will learn and apply specific strategies to achieve simplicity, clarity, engagement and impact. Skills learned in this class can be broadly applied across a range of media and communication-centric activities like presenting, grant writing and teaching to achieve goals in public health, social work and other professions.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5969 Skill Lab: Practical Consideration in Developing Health Policy

This course will look at real-world applications of public health principles as they apply to developing and proposing new health policy. The course will review basic public health principles as they apply to policy development and will provide students with an opportunity to work through the health policy development and proposal process. Possible guest lecturers.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5970 Skill Lab: Effective Teams

Effective Teams will help students understand the key attributes and behaviors needed for successful team collaboration when partnered with diverse styles and personalities. Who leads and how is power balanced? How can team members have equal responsibility when skill sets vary? How can communication gaps be closed? How can less-engaged team members be motivated?

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S55 MPH 5973 Skill Lab: Advanced Data Management

This skill lab will cover intermediate and advanced aspects of data management using Stata, however all concepts covered are transferable to similar software packages. Topics will include missing data, finding duplicate observations, repeated measures data, programming loops and data transformations such as merge, append, collapse, conversion from long to wide, etc. Prerequisite: successful completion of a previous Stata Skill Lab or by permission of the instructor.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S60 SWCD (Community Development)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S60 SWCD.


S60 SWCD 5016 Community Development Practice: Basic Concepts & Methods

Reviews the theory and practice of community development in the United States. Emphasis on programs in St. Louis and other major American cities. Course will expose students to both research findings and practical intervention strategies. Prerequisite: S15-5012. Pre/corequisite: S15-5039.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5018 State Level Lobbying

Offers an opportunity to investigate the practical application of such beliefs, explores how social workers can use community organizing, coalition building and lobbying to relate personal problems to public issues, link individual change to social change, and apply some of the problem-solving skills learned for working with individuals to addressing the larger political and community concerns of groups. Prerequisites: S15-5012 & S15-5039.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5019 Community Development with American Indian and Other Indigenous Communities

Student will become familiar with conceptual models for community development. The course will focus on the study and assessment of impoverished communities: their physical, social and institutional characteristics. Students will gain skills in application of Geographical Information Systems. Study will include the development of a conceptual framework for community analysis, move to an overview of conceptual models for intervention, and then will focus on the strategies and tactics specifically related to Indian reservation and other impoverished rural communities. Prerequisites: S15-5012 & S15-5039.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5027 Fundamentals of Community Organizing

This course will draw from Gamaliel's curriculum to provide students an understanding of the basics of community organizing. Students will learn to plan effective meetings, discern their own and others' self-interest, make a one-to-one fundraising ask, and create a plan to develop a team of leaders. Students will complete a power analysis on an issue of choice and create short-term tactical and longer-term strategic campaign plans.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5043 Special Topics: Global Anti-Poverty Interventions

In this course we will examine a number of anti-poverty approaches and interventions that are currently used widely around the world, particularly in countries in the global south. Interventions may include Participatory Poverty Strategy Reduction programs, microfinance, conditional cash transfers, and rural insurance schemes. We will critically analyze the theoretical underpinnings of each approach, the problem(s) that it aims to solve, experiences with implementation, and evidence of economic and social impact. In addition, we will consider the extent to which these anti-poverty interventions embody particular values such as social justice, diversity, sustainability, and self-determination. The course is meant as an advanced-level seminar for students with background in international development theory.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5056 Development Practice in International Settings

Building on topics covered in International Social Development and SED Policy courses, this course focuses on international development practice. Students will gain a deep understanding of contemporary approaches in the field such as participatory development and community-driven development, and related interventions in a range of substantive fields and contexts. Prerequisite: S15-5012.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5076 Social and Economic Development/Redevelopment Part 1

This is the first semester of a two semester course. In the spring semester students should enroll in S60-5086 Social and Economic Development: East Saint Louis Seminar Part 2. This course provides a theoretical and experiential understanding of the basic forces, factors and institutional dynamics that interface and persist to keep low income people in poverty, generationally. Students will preferably take this class along with an "internship" or practicum, to learn the "nuts and bolts" of how to build a depressed area and rise it to the status of a viable, economically and socially sustainable community. The class will be conducted in East St Louis, Lansdowne, at the Jackie Joyner Kersee Center. The area is called "The Helping Village." This unique class will be facilitated by Multi-Cross/Disciplines and experts from many academic, professional, skilled venues and facilitated by an expert. The students are being taught/trained to function in multiple roles, from consultants to city mayors and city managers to community and neighborhood groups as advocates and facilitators where that need is so currently and urgently required. Enrollment by permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5077 Urban Development Seminar

Project-based research and discussions focus on the legal policy, social and architectural issues affecting the redevelopment of St. Louis and suburban areas such as Darst Webbe, Clayton, Westminster Place and prototypical redevelopment of public housing projects of Carr Square, Darst Webbe and Vaughn into tenant ownership and market-rate housing neighborhoods. Topics include public policy issues affecting development, the availability and types of housing, transportation linkages, business, zoning issues, social and historical precursors. Through interaction with community leaders, teams of students from each discipline prepare a design proposal for an actual problem in the St. Louis area. This seminar is an interdisciplinary effort taught by faculty members of Washington University School of Architecture and the Saint Louis University School of Law, Social Work and Department of Public Policy Studies. Prerequisite: 400 level and above. Limit 8 students. Fulfills Urban Issues elective for MArch degree.
Same as A46 ARCH 564A

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI, UI


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5078 Developing Sustainable Urban Communities

Across the country, there is a drive to develop high-quality, economically and racially diverse, vibrant and sustainable urban communities. St. Louis is no exception to this trend. For reasons of sustainability, poverty alleviation and city building, community leaders and public officials in St. Louis are working to develop neighborhoods and communities that incorporate these factors. Developing Sustainable Urban Communities is a project-based course for graduate students and advanced undergraduates which asks interdisciplinary groups of students to contribute solutions to substantively and politically challenging place-based urban redevelopment challenges in St. Louis. Students will work in small teams to develop their projects over the course of the semester through research, dialogue with a team of interdisciplinary faculty, examination of relevant case studies, and engagement with client organizations in the community. Course participants will choose one of three semester-long projects, the subject of which will be developed by course instructors and client organizations in advance of the semester. The course will meet both on-campus and at various community sites. For MSW Program SED Concentration students, this course fulfills the SED concentration Practice Methods requirement. Enrollment is limited to 24 students with prior coursework in community development, urban design or related fields. Preference is given to graduate architecture and social work students; other students will be admitted by permission of the instructors. Upon registering in the course, please send a brief statement (1-2 paragraphs) about your interest in the course and previous coursework or experience that has prepared you for participation. Statements should be emailed to ljenks@wustl.edu.

Credit 3 units. Arch: GAMUD, GAUI


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5082 Mixed-Income Housing & Community Management: Fundamentals of Property & Resident Services Operations

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of directing the day-to-day operations of a mixed-income housing community, focusing on the professional roles that social workers play in this field as managers of properties and resident services. Students will be introduced to the following property manager roles: (a) organizational design, staffing and resident relations; (b) managing maintenance; (c) marketing, leasing and fair housing; (d) accounting and budgeting; and (e) managing and integrating resident services with property management. The course will begin with an overview of mixed-income housing as a key strategy in United States housing policy and practice, impacting low-income families and neighborhood development. It will also identify career opportunities for MSWs in particular in the fields of mixed-income and affordable housing. Students will visit different housing developments in St. Louis to interview and learn from stakeholders involved with those developments. From this concentrated one-week course, students will leave with a basic understanding of proven strategies and techniques in managing service-enriched mixed-income housing.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5083 Mxd Income Hsng: Evaluating & Maximizing Prop Perf & Srvc Del for The Long Term

This course will introduce students to the various elements of mixed-income housing including the roles of various stakeholders regarding a property's social, financial, physical and compliance goals; the tools that link property performance to overarching objectives for the housing and its residents; the basics of real estate economics and an introduction to the Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program that is responsible for one-third of all rental housing produced today. The first weekend will feature a national expert on mixed-income housing research. The second weekend will feature a site visit where students will have an opportunity to compare resident services performance "in the field" with classroom theory.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5084 Mixed Income Housing and Community Management: Financial Management and Sustainability

This course will introduce students to the range of financial tools and strategies utilized to operate mixed-income housing communities. Students will learn the key elements of a "deal structure," including typical sources and uses of funds related to the development of the properties as well as their anticipated multi-year projections of the revenues and expenses related to the planned delivery of ongoing operations, maintenance and resident services. Students will learn from case studies and practice property budgeting and other financial monitoring techniques (e.g., using Microsoft Excel) throughout this concentrated one-week course. Students will leave the course with a basic understanding of the key drivers in financing options and how to promote financial sustainability in housing and community management.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5086 Social and Economic Development: East St. Louis Seminar Part 2

Course is by pre-registration only. Complete application on Inside Brown. Consult Inside Brown for more information. This is the second semester of a two-semester course. It is a continuation of S60-5076 Social and Economic Development: East St. Louis Seminar Part 1 from the fall semester. This course provides a theoretical and experiential understanding of the basic forces, factors and institutional dynamics that interface and persist to keep low-income people in poverty, generationally. Students will preferably take this class along with an "internship" or practicum, to learn the "nuts and bolts" of how to build a depressed area and rise it to the status of a viable, economically and socially sustainable community. The class will be conducted in East St Louis, Lansdowne, at the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Center. The area is called "The Helping Village." This unique class will be facilitated by multi-/cross-disciplines and experts from many academic, professional, skilled venues and facilitated by an expert. The students are being taught/trained to function in multiple roles, from consultants to city mayors and city managers to community and neighborhood groups as advocates and facilitators where that need is so currently and urgently required. Enrollment by permission of instructor.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5087 Poverty: The Impact of Institutionalized Racism

Institutionalized racism has disenfranchised minority groups and communities concentrated in high poverty areas since the turn of century. This course will connect health and housing disparities, economic disadvantages, poor educational outcomes, and other areas of well-being as they relate to the constraints of poverty. Students will identify institutionalized racism and causes of poverty as they directly and indirectly uphold structural barriers for people in communities across the country. Students will work with cohort members, social service agencies, and community leaders over the course of one week. Through this course, students will gain understanding of how to advance economically sound community development and how to strategize in developing policies that can combat the effects of intentional urban blight and poverty. Students will be immersed in the community during the day and will have lectures and debriefing sessions in the evenings at the Hubbard House. Students will live in Hubbard House, owned and operated by the Diocese of Belleville, located in East St. Louis. (This is non-negotiable for students.) Students will need to complete an essay and basic application in order to be admitted into the course. A letter of reference or reference list may be requested by the professor. The program is limited to 15 students. If students are interested in the program and want to obtain an application, they should contact the program coordinator.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 5089 Poverty, Law, and the Health of Communities

In today's legal system, many low-income citizens are often fined or jailed simply for being poor. A disproportionate number are also people of color. They are arrested for minor traffic violations, or stopped-and-frisked based on how they are walking, or where they are resting, sitting or sleeping. If they can't pay exorbitant amounts for tickets or citations, they are often jailed, sometimes for weeks at a time. Ultimately, their physical and mental health is negatively impacted, causing them to experience unfavorable health disparities, as compared to high-income individuals. This course will help students understand these disparities from a transdisciplinary perspective, combining legal, public health, medical, and social problem-solving skills and analytic methods. Students who anticipate working with individuals or communities in poverty will benefit from the course's framework that considers the impact of criminalization and mental scarcity on both health behavior and access to care. As part of their course work, students will do one short-term research assignment with a local community agency to determine whether low-income individuals have suffered health impacts as a result of their interactions with law enforcement.
Same as S55 MPH 5351

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 6025 Leadership Development and Evaluation in Indian Country I

This course is for first-year students in the American Indian/Alaska Natives Studies concentration. Students will meet for two hours every other Friday (15 hours total) during their first semester to assist in the development of the Washington University in St. Louis annual Pow Wow. Additionally, students will review types of evaluation and data collection methods.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 6026 Leadership Development and Evaluation in Indian Country II

This course is for second-semester students in the American Indian/Alaska Native Studies concentration and for all students who have taken Leadership Development & Evaluation in Indian Country I. Students will meet for two hours each Friday (30 hours total) during the second semester to assist with the development, execution and evaluation of the Washington University annual Pow Wow. The content will focus on the theme of the event.

Credit 2 units.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 6027 Leadership Development and Evaluation In Indian Country III

This course is for second-year students. Students will meet for two hours every other Friday (15 hours total). During their first semester they will assist in the development of the Washington University in St. Louis annual Pow Wow. Additionally, students will review types of evaluation and data collection methods. The content will focus on the theme of the event.


View Sections

S60 SWCD 6028 Leadership Development and Evaluation In Indian Country IV

This course is for second-semester students, second-year in the American Indian/Alaska Native Studies concentration and for all students who have taken Leadership Development & Evaluation in Indian Country I. Or for first-year, second-semester students. The course will meet for two hours each Friday (30 hours total) during the second semester to assist with the development, execution and evaluation of the Washington University annual Pow Wow. The content will focus on the theme of the event.


View Sections

S65 SWCD (Community Development)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S65 SWCD.

S65 SWCD 5037 Domestic Violence and the Law

Enrollment limit: 20 (preferably 10 Law students + 10 Social Work students). This 2-credit interdisciplinary course will focus on the intersection of law and social work in relation to domestic violence and the law, with particular focus on Missouri. The course is designed for law students who may practice in this substantive area when they graduate/pass the Bar exam, social work students who may practice in this area as court advocates or directors of domestic violence agencies, and law students and social workers who may be doing public policy work in this area. This course will start with an overview of the nature & dynamics of domestic violence, and include subjects such as power & control, types of abuse, dangers when leaving, necessity for safety planning, and multiple oppressions. Thereafter, the course will lay the groundwork for an analysis of the law with an historical perspective by covering the state of the law prior to the passage of specialized criminal and civil laws, the necessity for these laws, and directed study of the laws that were passed and why. One area of concentration in this analysis will be how the law can be used to change social conditions and policy/practices of systems. In this analysis, we will cover Missouri's Adult Abuse Law (including Consents), Missouri's Criminal Law and Self-Defense and Post-Conviction Remedies, Full Faith and Credit, the Federal Violence Against Women Act and the Lautenberg Amendment related to firearms, and other selected topics. The course will also examine improvements made in conditions for domestic violence victims/survivors and system response as result of passage of the laws, and the unintended consequences that have resulted (e.g., mandatory arrest sometimes means arrest of victims/survivors, and may disempower or endanger victims/survivors). In relation to the unintended consequences, we will explore an emerging movement in responding to domestic violence that embraces an anti-essentialist victim perspective and an individualized response based on each victim's situation and needs. We will also cover the emergence of Domestic Violence Courts and emerging restorative justice responses to domestic violence. Areas where lawyers and social workers intersect will be covered, including: unauthorized practice of law, supervision by social worker of attorney, confidentiality, and domestic violence advocates as expert witnesses. Students will spend six hours in an observational/reflective practice immersion experience.
Same as W74 Law 608C

Credit 2 units.


View Sections

S65 SWCD 5047 Pharmacology for Social Workers

Acquaints students with the major categories of pharmacological agents used in medical practice. Emphasizes the mechanism, action, and common side effects associated with the administration of specific medications and the parameters used to monitor the clinical progress of disease and drug therapy. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S65 SWCD 5050 Community Based System Dynamics

This course introduces students to Group Model Building (GMB) as a method for facilitating organizational and team learning. The course will focus on the use of GMB as a practice method for working with organizations and communities using a set of structured small-group exercises or "scripts." The course draws on GMB methods being developed and used by the Brown School's Social System Design Lab, principles of system dynamics, and examples from both domestic and international settings. The course introduces students to the background and theory of GMB; feedback theories of organizational dynamics for management and strategic planning related to organizational startup, implementation and scale-up of innovations (e.g., evidence-based practices), project management, and sustainability; tools for designing, conducting, and evaluating group model-building interventions; and techniques for managing group dynamics involving power, interpersonal conflicts, and working with marginalized stakeholders. The course also provides opportunities for students to develop and hone GMB practice skills through in-class exercises and demonstrations; observation and participation in GMB sessions; and the design, execution, and evaluation of a GMB class-project with a client organization. Special attention will be given to understanding the dynamics of social and economic justice, value and ethical issues, as well as issues related to race, ethnicity, culture, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental disability or illness, age, and national origin. Prerequisites: S15-5005 & S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S65 SWCD 5075 American Indian Law

This course will explore the central aspects of federal and international law affecting American Indians. The course will begin by considering the status of Indian nations as sovereign political entities within the United States and examining the legal and political relationships these nations have with the U.S. and the several states. The course will then explore the development of federal Indian law over the past two centuries. Particular attention will be given to the doctrines of tribal sovereignty, self-government and self-determination; treaty-based rights to land, water, wildlife, and other natural resources; the preservation of Indian languages, cultures and religions; issues of economic development, including the right of Indian nations to operate gaming enterprises on their reservations; and jurisdictional conflicts between and among the U.S., Indian nations, and the states over authority to regulate the activities of Indians and non-Indians in Indian country. Special consideration will also be given to the evolution and modern status of Indian governments, their laws, and legal systems. The course will conclude with a survey of various international laws and the laws of other nations, including Canada and Australia, as they relate to indigenous peoples. The manner of evaluating students will be discussed and determined by democratic vote of the students in the first two weeks of class. In the past, students have elected to be evaluated based on their performance on examinations (including three-hour, open-book, in-class final examinations and multiple-day, open-book, take-home final examinations), papers, or some combination of both. Anonymous grading is preferred, but may not be possible if students elect to write papers on topics of their own choosing. No prerequisites.
Same as W74 Law 635D

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S65 SWCD 5082 Foundations of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for the Applied Social Sciences

This course will familiarize students with the basic knowledge of geographic information systems (GIS) and their application to social work practice and research. The course is organized around three primary areas: 1) conceptual; 2) technical; and 3) data management. A conceptual overview of GIS is presented to provide students with foundational knowledge about the theory, purpose, function, and applicability of GIS in practice and research settings. Students will develop critical thinking skills necessary to devise research questions appropriate for a GIS, to develop a GIS, interpret the findings, and to evaluate the spatial relationships between variables.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S65 SWCD 5660 Designing Sustainable Social Policies & Programs: A System Dynamics Approach

Focuses on designing sustainable policies and programs by using principles and practices of modeling dynamic systems in the sciences, social sciences, engineering, business and social work. Covers model structure and its relationships to prior knowledge and assumptions, measurable quantities, and ultimate use in solving problems. Application areas include social interventions, policymaking, business, and engineering systems. Prerequisites: S15-5005 and S15-5040.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR (Practicum)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S70 SWPR.


S70 SWPR 5006 Foundation Practicum, First Semester

Prerequisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038. Corequisites: concurrent enrollment or completion of S15-5005, S15-5012, S15-5015, & S15-5040. Required concurrent enrollment in S70-5102 Integration Foundation Field Practicum Seminar.

Credit variable, maximum 4 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5012 Foundation Practicum, Second Semester

Prerequisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038. Corequisite: concurrent enrollment or completion of S15-5005, S15-5012, S15-5015, S15-5040.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5013 Foundation Practicum, Third Semester

Prerequisites: S15-5011 & S15-5038. Corequisites: concurrent enrollment or completion of S15-5005, S15-5012, S15-5015, S15-5040.

Credit variable, maximum 2 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5014 Concentration Practicum, First Semester

Prerequisite: completion of Foundation Practicum.

Credit variable, maximum 5 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5018 Concentration Practicum, Second Semester

Prerequisite: completion of Foundation Practicum.

Credit variable, maximum 4 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5022 Concentration Practicum, Third Semester

Prerequisite: completion of Foundation Practicum.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5032 Concentration Practicum, Fourth Semester

Prerequisite: completion of Foundation Practicum.

Credit variable, maximum 2 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5036 Elective Practicum, First Semester

Credit variable, maximum 5 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5037 Elective Practicum, Second Semester

Credit variable, maximum 4 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5038 Elective Practicum, Third Semester

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5042 Concentration Practicum, Fifth Semester

Prerequisite: completion of Foundation Practicum.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5102 Integrative Foundation Field Practicum Seminar

This seminar provides an opportunity for students to integrate theoretical and research-based knowledge gained in the classroom with the applied knowledge gained from social work practice. It is designed to provide additional integration of course work and daily practice, enhance student knowledge and provide a safe and supportive environment for students to debrief on practice challenges and ethical issues. Required Corequisite: S70-5006 Foundation Practicum, First Semester.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S70 SWPR 5111 Social and Economic Development Concentration Seminar


View Sections

S80 SCWK (Social Work)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S80 SCWK.


S80 SCWK 5230 Applied Linear Modeling

This course focuses on statistical modeling and analysis methods relevant to epidemiological and clinical research, as well as applied research in behavioral, social, and health sciences. A general linear models approach is taken to data analysis strategies using linear, logistic, and poisson regression, as well as ANOVA methods for repeated measures. Required Corequisite: Students enrolled in Section 01 must also be enrolled in Lab A. Students enrolled in Section 02 must also be enrolled in Lab B. This course can be taken through the cross-listed course number S80-5003 to fulfill the requirement formerly fulfilled by S80-5001 Advanced Statistics in the Research Specialization within the MSW Program.
Same as S55 MPH 5230

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S81 SWIP (Independent Study)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S81 SWIP


S81 SWIP 5027 Art Therapy Skills

In this theory-based experiential lab, students will become acquainted with beginning literature in art therapy and will develop a beginning understanding of image formation and nonverbal processes in clinical practice. The lab will provide an overview of art methods and materials as an expression of the therapeutic holding environment; and practice in "visual listening" skills. Students should have some familiarity with art materials. A paper will be required. Weekend course. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5041 Skill Lab: Grantwriting: Foundation Grants

This course will provide the knowledge and specific skills to prepare a foundation grant proposal. It will examine how grantmakers operate, trends in foundation giving, the different types of foundations, how to research their interests and priorities, basic writing skills, how to build a working relationship with a foundation, elements of a strong grant proposal and customizing a grant proposal to various types of foundations. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management. Same as S55 MPH 5041.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5042 Skill Lab: Grantwriting: Government Grants

This course will provide the knowledge and specific skills to research and prepare a grant proposal to a local, state or federal government funder. It will examine the different types of government funders, how to research their interests and priorities, basic writing skills, how to build a working relationship with funder staff, elements of a strong grant proposal and customizing a grant proposal to various types of government funders. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management. Same as S55 MPH 5042.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5048 Motivational Interviewing Fundamentals

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a clinical method to help people resolve ambivalence about change by evoking intrinsic motivation and commitment. This course will review the basic spirit, principles, and strategies of MI, particularly ways to evoke change talk and handle resistance. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the skills in the classroom setting. The use of MI in conjunction with other counseling styles and interventions will also be discussed.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5049 Cognitive Processing Therapy

Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) is an evidence-based treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. This course will provide students with a basic working knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings of CPT, the structure of the treatment, and the empirical support for the protocol. Students will be given the opportunity to practice the basic clinical skills in the classroom. Prerequisite: S15-5038.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5050 MSW Research Seminar I

Prerequisites: S15-5005, and student has met Statistics prerequisite for MSW program, or completion of the S80-5003 Biostatistics course with a score equal to a B or better grade, or a passing score (70% correct) on the Statistics Proficiency Exam.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5051 MSW Research Seminar II

Prerequisites: S15-5005, S81-5050, and S80-5003 (Biostatistics) or completion of the Statistics prerequisite for the MSW program.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5061 English Language Support for Academic Communication in Brown School Programs

This course supports multilingual students as they strengthen the oral and written English communication skills needed for academic programs in the Brown School. Communication skills addressed in the course include participating in fast-paced small-group conversations and class discussions, building discipline-specific vocabulary, reviewing grammar issues that impact effective communication, handling a heavy reading load, understanding the U.S. conventions of academic integrity, and developing strategies for independently editing one's own academic writing. Placement by examination. Students assigned by Brown School Administrative Offices.

Credit 2 units.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5069 Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)

An introduction to Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), an evidence-based practice. Prerequisite: SS30-5502 or S30-5503. Weekend course. Class dates: TBA.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5079 Medical Terminology & Communication

Every profession has its own vocabulary, and medicine is no different. To function in the health care arena and advocate for patients and clients, social workers must be conversant with medical terminology and able to understand and communicate with doctors, nurses, health care administrators, and others in the field. This 1-hour course will provide a template for learning medical terminology in a variety of areas to help ensure that students are fluent in the language of health care delivery.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5080 Prolonged Exposure Therapy

Prolonged Exposure Therapy is an evidenced-based intervention shown to be effective in addressing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the anxiety, depression, and/or anger that PTSD often causes. Students in this skills lab will learn about current theories explaining the development and maintenance of PTSD, how to diagnose PTSD in children, youth and adults, and the broad spectrum impact of exposure to traumatic events. Prolonged Exposure as a viable treatment option for PTSD will be introduced, and students will learn about Emotional Processing Theory upon which this cognitive and behavioral intervention for PTSD is based, the specific component of PE, and how to implement this with clients.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5081 Brief Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (BCBT) for Anxious Youth

Anxiety disorders are the most common type of mental health disorder in children, affecting as many as ten percent of young people. The purpose of this skills lab is to help future clinicians: 1) identify and accurately diagnose children with anxiety disorders; 2) understand the principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT); 3) learn an evidenced-based CBT program and how to implement it effectively; and 4) understand how families are involved in the treatment process and identify and address potential barriers to treatment.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5082 Compassion Cultivation Training

A compassionate attitude can greatly reduce stress and become a profound personal adaptive resource. Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) is designed to help students cultivate compassion, strengthen their resilience, feel more connected to others, and improve their overall sense of well-being. CCT combines traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and scientific research to help students live a more compassionate life. The program involves instruction in a series of meditation practices which build upon each other, starting with mindfulness-based meditation and progressing toward the active generation of compassion for oneself and others. The course includes classroom instruction, daily meditation practice, mindfulness, and in-class interactions through which students can strengthen their qualities of compassion, empathy and kindness.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5083 Integrated Mental & Behavioral Healthcare

New professional roles are open to social workers, given Innovative policy and practice models in which mental health care is integrated, coordinated or co-located with medical care and social services. This course prepares students to shape and deliver integrated behavioral and mental health services. Students will learn the benefits of integrated care; different models of integrated care; skills for client engagement, care coordination, and professional collaboration; and understanding of the data and infrastructure requirements to ensure effective and efficient care.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5085 Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Skill Lab

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an evidence-based behavioral treatment for depression, anxiety, substance abuse, psychosis, and numerous other psychological problems and stressors. It teaches people to accept difficult thoughts, feelings, sensations and memories, build mindfulness skills, identify core personal values, and commit to behaviors that are consistent with those values. Participants will learn about the model of psychological flexibility, upon which ACT is based, and engage in basic skill development in the implementation of ACT.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5086 ASIST: Applied Suicide Intervention Training

ASIST is a two-day curriculum that will train students to carry out life-saving interventions for people at risk of suicide or suicidal behavior. Students will identify their attitudes about suicide and learn how to approach the topic with those at-risk without judgment. Students learn the stages of a suicide intervention and engage in simulations and role plays that will apply their knowledge.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5140 Skill Lab: Managing and Leading Teams & People

This course will provide the basic skills and best practices in managing people and leading teams. It will focus on task supervision include designing jobs and job descriptions, selecting and orienting job applicants, motivating and supporting employees, and measuring work performance. It will provide best practices in building effective, empowered, engaged teams. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5141 Skill Lab: Performance Management and Continuous Quality Improvement

This course will provide skills in selecting and applying widely used tools and best practices to yield effective and efficient organizational performance and continuous learning and quality improvement. These skills are applicable to diverse functions and settings areas such as intake and case management, clinic operations and volunteer management. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management. Same as S55 MPH 5141.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5142 Skill Lab: Program and Project Management

This course focuses on key program and project management competencies and principles that are critical to executing successful projects. Students will learn about planning, scheduling, organizing, and controlling projects and will apply these concepts using case studies and small-group projects. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5143 Skill Lab: Volunteer Management

This course will provide skills in recruiting and retaining volunteers for a wide variety of organizational roles. It will provide training on the basic tasks of the volunteer manager, and volunteer supervision within a cycle of management from job design to evaluation. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5144 Skill Lab: Fundraising Design and Management

This course will provide skills in developing and implementing a strategic fundraising program, including setting goals, choosing fundraising techniques, interfacing with staff and volunteers, data management and evaluating results. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5145 Skill Lab: Budget Management

This course will provide skills in budgeting, budget management and reporting, using commonly available software. It will include both line item and program budgeting models, and the basics of grant reporting. It will connect budgeting to the overall process of financial management. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management. Same as S55 MPH 5145.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5147 Effective Meeting Management & Group Facilitation

For organizations and communities, meetings large and small are a way of life. Making these meetings as productive, effective and efficient as possible increases organizational productivity, improves decision making and enhances community development. This course provides the basic theories and techniques for meeting planning and implementation and facilitation practice. The skills and practice methods are applicable in multiple settings and relevant to management and organizing arenas used in stakeholder input, community organizing, strategic planning, project evaluation, staff retreats and policy development. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management. Same as S55 MPH 5147.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5177 Skill Lab: Strategic Planning and Execution

This course will help students gain knowledge and basic skills in strategic planning and execution. The course will include an examination of models of strategic planning; assessing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats; developing a vision, goals, and strategies for mission achievement and then translating them into action plans, dashboards, staff and board responsibilities. This course fulfills 1 credit in Leadership/Management. Same as S55 MPH 5177.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5190 Exploring the Therapeutic Model of Policing

This course will explore the history/culture of policing; training and socialization process; community Ferguson/St. Louis (demands/expectations/responses); contemporary police operations and management (Ferguson/St. Louis City); and the characteristics of a Therapeutic Model of Policing.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5191 Community Development: The Public/Private Partnership

Students interested in community development, in running community housing nonprofits, or in affordable housing development in general, will benefit from taking the course. They will learn the fundamentals for attracting increasingly scarce, mixed-income funding sources, the development of mixed-income housing through a long-term partnership between public and private housing stakeholders, and the role of mixed-income housing development in spurring further social and physical development in a particular community. The course will address the fundamentals of a mixed-income housing deal from conception to completion, with an emphasis on the development of a successful public/private partnership, the roles of the various public and private stakeholders typically involved in such partnerships and the reasons for their involvement. Specifically, the course will study the acquisition, conceptualization, funding and construction of a theoretical mixed-income housing development.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5192 Community Engagement and Mobilizing in Low Income Communities

This course will review the strategic process of community engagement and organizing in low-income urban communities as well as the difference between the two. Students will study frameworks, the different levels of engagement and the role of both engagement and organizing in building community. Additionally, students will study specific events throughout history and ways in which communities organized to respond to these events. Students will leave the class with an understanding of basic engagement skills and techniques, successful community engagement efforts, community engagement and organizing concepts, as well as an understanding of community engagement as an important tool to building relationships and moving communities toward change.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5193 Skill Lab: Helping Low-Income Clients Navigate Household Finances

Low-income families increasingly face complex financial decisions that require specialized knowledge and skills when managing personal finances. Social workers often identify financial vulnerability in the context of confounding situations such as unemployment, divorce, bankruptcy, drug abuse, domestic violence and others. Using case examples, students will learn how to: 1) help clients address their immediate financial problems and build financial security, 2) identify when to refer clients to other financial professionals for in-depth assistance, and 3) work in collaboration with others to generate policy and program solutions for financially vulnerable populations.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5501 System Dynamics Skill Lab I

Permission of instructor required. This course will help students learn how to engage organizations and communities using system dynamics with specific attention to stakeholder analysis, problem structuring, identifying and assessing data sources, conducting key informant interviews, and selecting the appropriate strategy for group model building (S65-5660), and strengthen their skills using system dynamics for community development and practice. Specific attention will be given to applying a strength-based, resource-based view of families, organizations and communities and developing an integrated community prevention framework that addresses structural social and public health inequalities and disparities. Prerequisite: S65-5050.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5502 System Dynamics Skill Lab II

Permission of instructor required. This course will help students learn how to formulate equations and build confidence in system dynamics simulation models for policy analysis, program design, and strategic planning. The course is designed for those who have completed an introductory course in system dynamics (S65-5660) and System Dynamics Skill Lab I (S81-5501) and wish to strengthen their skills in model building and computer simulation. Students will learn and gain experience by building models using table functions, arrays, confidence building tests, parameter estimation, and model calibration. Prerequisite: S65-5660 and S81-5501.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5503 System Dynamics Skill Lab III

Permission of instructor required. This course will help students learn and apply techniques for model analysis and policy design. The course is designed for those who have completed System Dynamics Skill Lab II (S81-5502) and wish to strengthen their skills in using system dynamics to identify and implement high-leverage solutions. Specific attention will be on using model analysis to develop empirically testable objectives for program and policy monitoring, evaluation, and impact assessment. Prerequisite: S81-5502.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5960 Skill Lab: Statistical Analysis: SAS

This course will provide an introduction to the SAS statistical package in a Windows environment. Students will learn the basics of data management and manipulation through hands-on tutorials. Topic will include importing/exporting data, merging datasets, recoding variables, simple statistical analyses and troubleshooting. At the end of the course, students will have the skills necessary to use SAS for advanced biostatistics and epidemiology courses. Prerequisites for the course are the completion of S55-5003 Foundations of Public Health: Biostatistics and S55-5000 Research Methods. This course is strongly recommended for students taking S55-5011 Epidemiology Methods.
Same as S55 MPH 5960

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5961 Skill Lab: Statistical Analysis: Stata

This skill lab will introduce students to the Stata statistical software package. Students will learn data concepts such as opening/importing/exporting data, applying formats, using syntax, creating variables, graphs and more. Statistical analysis techniques will be covered for both continuous and categorical outcome variables, including chi-square, t-tests, regression and survey weights. Students will demonstrate acquired skills during a final project working with data and running a statistical analysis and interpretation.
Same as S55 MPH 5961

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5962 Skill Lab: Statistical Analysis: R

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of the R language and RStudio environment. The first session will cover how to obtain and install R and RStudio, import data, create descriptive statistics, and plot simple graphics. The second session will delve into data structures and classes, data manipulation and management, and common data analyses (t-tests, ANOVAs, correlations, regressions, etc.). Students will explore R's graphics capabilities and some of the publishing tools built into RStudio during the third session. Students are expected to have taken at least one introductory statistics course, but need no prior computer programming experience.
Same as S55 MPH 5962

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5963 Skill Lab: Data Management

This skill lab will introduce students to the basic aspects of data management, starting with planning their database, moving to collecting, entering and cleaning data. Other topics will include data types, creating and recoding variables, formats and value labels, data dictionaries, missing data, and merging data. Students will learn to use descriptive statistics to quickly assess data integrity. Course will be hands-on, primarily using Stata with other software where relevant. A majority of time spent working with data involves cleaning, manipulating, and preparing for analysis. This workshop will focus on these skills.
Same as S55 MPH 5963

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5966 Skill Lab: Introduction to GIS and Spatial Mapping

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a system for collecting, storing, displaying, and analyzing geographic information. This 1-credit course will serve as an introduction to applications of GIS and spatial mapping for social work and public health topics. Students will be introduced to the visual storytelling and data analysis power of creating maps. This course is intended to be a fundamental lab that provides hands-on experience in basic GIS skills. Methods for applying GIS techniques and other spatial mapping tools for data visualization will be introduced, and several examples of GIS in environmental and social domains will be analyzed. Students will learn about mapping terminology and skills to produce and analyze digital data maps. Students are not permitted to take this lab concurrently with the 3-credit GIS course.
Same as S55 MPH 5966

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5967 Skill Lab: Conducting Systematic Reviews

Students will learn a step-by-step method for conducting systematic reviews, in Academic Search Complete, and synthesizing findings. Students will also learn how to organize studies and use the write and cite feature in the free reference manager, Mendeley.
Same as S55 MPH 5967

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5968 Skill Lab: Communication: Core Skills

This course will help students enhance their skills and effectiveness when communicating ideas and information to professional and public audiences. Students will learn and apply specific strategies to achieve simplicity, clarity, engagement and impact. Skills learned in this class can be broadly applied across a range of media and communication-centric activities like presenting, grant writing and teaching to achieve goals in public health, social work and other professions.
Same as S55 MPH 5968

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5969 Skill Lab: Practical Consideration in Developing Health Policy

This course will look at real-world applications of public health principles as they apply to developing and proposing new health policy. The course will review basic public health principles as they apply to policy development and will provide students with an opportunity to work through the health policy development and proposal process. Possible guest lecturers.
Same as S55 MPH 5969

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5970 Skill Lab: Effective Teams

Effective Teams will help students understand the key attributes and behaviors needed for successful team collaboration when partnered with diverse styles and personalities. Who leads and how is power balanced? How can team members have equal responsibility when skill sets vary? How can communication gaps be closed? How can less-engaged team members be motivated?
Same as S55 MPH 5970

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S81 SWIP 5973 Skill Lab: Advanced Data Management

This skill lab will cover intermediate and advanced aspects of data management using Stata, however all concepts covered are transferable to similar software packages. Topics will include missing data, finding duplicate observations, repeated measures data, programming loops and data transformations such as merge, append, collapse, conversion from long to wide, etc. Prerequisite: successful completion of a previous Stata Skill Lab or by permission of the instructor.
Same as S55 MPH 5973

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S90 SWDT (Doctoral)

Visit online course listings to view semester offerings for S90 SWDT.


S90 SWDT 5001 Foundations of Data Analysis

This course provides some of the mathematical and conceptual tools essential to data analysis in social science research. A wide range of statistics are covered. The focus of the course is principally upon the development of arithmetic and conceptual tools needed for advanced work in research design, model development, model fitting and estimation, hypothesis testing, and interpretation of data. The course revolves around the systematic establishment of scientifically meaningful comparisons and relationships. The course will evolve from simple bivariate to more complete multivariate forms of data analysis. Basic principles are illustrated through exercises.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 5008 Computer Applications for Data Analysis

This course is designed to provide the basic skills needed to input, manipulate, analyze, and interpret quantitative research data using the PC-SAS system. Emphasis is on the application of analysis tools and techniques to real-world data.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 5009 Advanced Computer Applications for Data Analysis

This course provides the skills needed to program data for multivariate analysis, and interpret output.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 5010 Social Network Analysis

Social Network Analysis is an advanced graduate seminar covering social network analysis methods, with an emphasis on using network analysis tools to model social and health science relational and systems data. Network analysis techniques have become more widely used in recent years to study important areas such as the spread of infectious diseases (e.g., AIDS), the structure of the internet and other complex information systems, the organization of terrorist networks, peer and family influences on smoking and obesity, referral patterns in social service systems, the diffusion of innovations, and the structure of governmental policy systems. The class will cover the historical and conceptual foundations of network analysis, but will emphasize a hands-on approach to exploring network data and learning to use professional network analysis tools. Specific topics include background and history of network analysis; network theories; network data collection and management; network visualization; network measures of centrality, cohesion, and structural equivalence; statistical modeling of networks; and longitudinal network analysis.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 5101 Foundations of Data Management

This course focuses on the practical skills of data management that the PhD student will need to complete their dissertation and early career research. The course will cover techniques in importing data from commonly used platforms into statistical packages, data manipulation, variable creation, and documentation. This didactic course includes syntax-based learning and the analysis of "case study examples" of actual data management challenges.

Credit 2 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 5102 Foundations of Data Management II

This sequenced course builds on the practical skills learned in Foundations of Data Management I, delving deeper into the core steps for ensuring the quality of the data at each point of the research process, from collection to final deposit with an archive. The course will cover complex situations and syntax logic, data monitoring, data cleaning, codebook creation, documentation (audit trails), consort diagrams and sharing data via data archive. Continuation of a real data project from Foundations of Data Management I will give students the start-to-finish experience of data management for a longitudinal study. Writing and managing dissertations and grants will be enhanced by experience with every component of research project data management.

Credit 2 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 5500 Theoretical Orientations in Public Health Sciences

The primary goal of Theoretical Orientations in Public Health Sciences is to provide an in-depth exploration of the major theoretical traditions and approaches used in the public health sciences. The class will cover the historical development of important public health theories, as well as current theoretical developments and challenges. Students will also engage with a number of class exercises and assignments that will introduce them to how theories are developed, applied, and tested in public health research contexts. The theoretical coverage emphasizes a "cells-to-society" approach, and will include assessments of biological, medical, epidemiologic, behavioral, environmental, policy, organizational, and systems theories.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6550 Introduction to Advanced Research

This course provides an introduction to the basic and central concepts in social scientific research. It also addresses the skills needed to conceptualize and plan a research project. The research process is presented as a means to scientifically and systematically advance social work and social science knowledge. This course also examines some of the current issues concerning scientific research. Students prepare a framework for a critical review of research in a selected area and prepare a full research proposal, suitable for submission to external funders.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6552 Intro to Social Measurement & Research

This seminar examines measurement in the social sciences. The topics covered include reliability, validity, scaling models, use of different data sources, assessment of change, and procedures for developing measures. The objectives of the course are to understand the purposes of measurement in research and knowledge development; to know how to evaluate the worth of a measure; to sharpen one's ability to evaluate the findings and conclusions of social science research; to produce a paper reporting the state of knowledge development in an area of measurement, or to produce a paper in a substantive area with a measurement theme.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6555 Conceptual Foundations of Social Science Research

This is an introduction to the conceptual and philosophical foundations of social science research. Through readings and in-class exercises, students will explore a diversity of topics integral to doctoral-level scholarship, including reliability and validity, causal inference, research epistemology, the nature of social phenomena, the role of agency, rationality and its consequences, and other assumptions inherent in the conceptualization of, and study of, social phenomena.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6561 Practicum in Research I

Credit variable, maximum 2 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6572 Practicum in Research II

Credit variable, maximum 2 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6583 Practicum in Research III

Credit variable, maximum 2 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6591 Practicum in Teaching 1

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6592 Practicum in Teaching 2

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6593 Practicum in Teaching 3

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6600 Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling

This course is an advanced statistics seminar intended for graduate students in social work, public health, health or social sciences. This course covers hierarchical linear modeling techniques that are used to build and test multilevel and longitudinal statistical models. This course will be of interest to anybody who wants to know how to analyze contextual, ecological, and longitudinal data. The course will review both the conceptual issues and methodological issues in using hierarchical linear modeling by working with several real public health and social science data sets. Topics include: fitting and testing two-level and three-level models; evaluating model fit; generalizing multilevel models to binary and other special data; building simple longitudinal models; advanced error covariance structures. Prerequisite: completion of a graduate-level regression or general linear modeling class.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6815 Professional Development Seminar 1

Open only to PhD students in Social Work.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6816 Professional Development Seminar 2

Open only to PhD students in Social Work.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6820 Seminar in Social Work Theory & Knowledge

Properties of theories, other knowledge formulations, and strategies for knowledge development are considered in relation to their role in informing accountable practice and generating practice-relevant research. These same criteria are used in review of epistemological and methodological debates in our profession. Relationships between formal properties of knowledge statements, practice-relevant research, accountability criteria, and utilization of knowledge in practice will be explored.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6875 Qualitative Research Methods

This course is a doctoral-level introduction to the theories, methods and practices of qualitative inquiry and research. It will provide an opportunity for students to consider how qualitative approaches might be integrated into their doctoral research proposals and to get hands-on experience with a selection of qualitative methods. A laboratory component will be a key feature of the course, enabling students to become acquainted with NVIVO. The course discusses the rationales for qualitative inquiry. It then discusses a range of qualitative methods including field observation, interviewing, archival research, and phenomenological methods.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6887 Issues and Directions in Intervention Research

Addresses substantive, theoretical, and methodological issues in conducting and evaluating intervention research with social work populations. Emphasis will be on evaluating evidence-based interventions and methodological rigor in a specific area of practice. Critical review of practice and intervention theories, and ethical issues inherent in conducting intervention research will be examined.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6893 Seminar in Mental Health & Addictions Services Research

This seminar focuses on methodological issues in mental health services research. This semester, the seminar focuses on components of a quality research proposal.

Credit 1 unit.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6895 Mental Health Services Research

This course will cover the history and trends in public and private mental health services, seminal studies in mental health service, and such methodological issues as measurement of services, operationalization and measurement of mental health service intervention, and alternative data sources. Particular attention will be directed to methodological issues and knowledge needs with regard to service needs of special populations, including the elderly, children, adolescents, the poor, and ethnic minorities. Research methods for investigating the organization and financing of mental health services will also be addressed. Course reading will include published studies and government documents addressing methodological issues.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6900 Applied Linear Regression Analysis

This course is a seminar in multiple regression (MR) analysis. There is an emphasis on both conceptual and procedural aspects of MR. Conceptually, multiple regression is approached as a general model with extensive applications in social work research and knowledge building. The procedures of multiple regression are understood as extensions of simple regression and correlation. Statistical formulas for various facets of multiple regression are presented; examples from the literature are critiqued; and experience in working with multiple regression is gained through computer exercises.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6901 Structural Equation Modeling

This course introduces the analysis of general structural equations. Topics include causal models and path analysis structural equation models with observed variables, confirmatory factory analysis, consequences of measurement error, the relation between latent and observed variables, and combined latent variable and measurement models. LISREL software will be learned.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6905 Propensity Score Analysis

Propensity score analysis is a relatively new and innovative class of statistical methods that has proven useful for evaluating the effects of treatments or interventions when using nonexperimental or observational data. This PhD course focuses on three closely related, but technically distinct propensity score methods: (1) Propensity score matching and related methods, including greedy matching, optimal matching, propensity score subclassification, and propensity score weighting using Stata psmatch2, pweights and R optmatch; (2) Matching estimators using Stata nnmatch; and (3) Propensity score analysis with nonparametric regression using Stata psmatch2 and lowess. The examination of these methods will be guided by two conceptual frameworks: the Neyman-Rubin counterfactual framework and the Heckman scientific model of causality. The course also covers Heckman's sample selection model and Rosenbaum's approaches of sensitivity analysis to discern bias produced by hidden selections. The course uses Stata software to demonstrate the implementation of propensity score analysis. PhD students enrolled should be familiar with descriptive and inferential statistics. Students not meeting this prerequisite should contact the instructor to determine their eligibility to enroll in this course.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6910 Generalized Linear Models

Generalized linear models are a collection of statistical methods used to analyze categorical and limited dependent variables. In this course, students will learn fundamental concepts and skills to conduct generalized linear models, and know how to apply these techniques to social, behavioral, and health research. The course covers the following topics: the Nelder and Wedderburn framework of generalized linear models and the key concept of "link function," maximum likelihood estimator, a review of logistic and probit models, multinomial logit model, ordered logistic regression, Poisson regression, negative binomial regression, quasi-likelihood functions, and model fit/validation. Students taking this course are assumed to have taken statistics courses on inferential statistics and regression analysis, particularly Applied Linear Regression Analysis S90-6900. This course is designed to fulfill part of the core quantitative methods requirements for doctoral students at the Brown School. It will typically be the second quantitative methods course taken for all PHS students, and some SW students.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 6972 Area Specialization Seminar

This seminar is devoted to preparation and critical evaluation of area statements by PhD students. Strong emphasis is placed upon the integration of advanced theoretical and methodological knowledge regarding a selected area of social work.

Credit 3 units.


View Sections

S90 SWDT 8840 Doctoral Continuing Student Status

Used for residency.


View Sections