We live today in a rich and varied culture. Every moral, social, political, and cultural question we face demands the broadest consideration we can give it, drawing from the multiplicity of methods and perspectives nurtured and cultivated in the many disciplines of a great university.

The Master of Liberal Arts provides the chance to practice the methods of interdisciplinary inquiry that are the hallmark of a rigorous liberal arts education. As a student in the program, one can explore questions of identity through art, literature, and religion; analyze the politics of race in fiction, historical documents, the visual arts, and music; debate ethical choices presented by fiction writers, jurists, philosophers, and scientists from antiquity through the present.

Students examine literary, artistic, and cinematic masterpieces; historic moments of discovery and change; traditions of thought; cultural differences; and civic responsibilities. They sharpen their thinking about contemporary values and choices through courses that ask them to reflect on an individual's relation to society; on technology and the spread of ideas; on challenges to freedom; and on inspiration and creativity.
Contact:Harriet Stone
Phone:314-935-5175
Email:hastone@wustl.edu
Website:http://ucollege.wustl.edu/programs/graduate/masters-liberal-arts

Master of Liberal Arts

The program offers interdisciplinary courses, planned and taught by full-time Washington University faculty, that engage a variety of subjects, including literary and historical studies; philosophy, religion, and ethical studies; visual culture, arts, and media studies; and science, technology, and contemporary culture.

Most core seminars are held one evening a week during the fall and spring semesters and twice a week during the summer term. Some students take all 30 hours of the degree in the seminars that are designed specifically for the MLA program; others augment a particular interest by taking related courses drawn from different departments. At the end of the program, every student does an independent project mentored by a faculty.

Visit https://courses.wustl.edu to view semester offerings for U98 MLA.


U98 MLA 354 Abnormal Psychology: The Major Mental Disorders

This is an introductory course in psychopathology or the scientific study of mental health disorders. The course will include definitions, theories, and classification of abnormal behavior. Content will focus on symptoms, classification, prevalence, etiology and treatment of mental health disorders, including mood, anxiety, eating, schizophrenia spectrum, substance use, and personality disorders. Prerequisite: Psych 100B.
Same as L33 Psych 354

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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U98 MLA 4172 Roman Remains


Same as L93 IPH 4171

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM


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U98 MLA 420 Rembrandt van Rijn

This seminar explores the connections between the life and work of Rembrandt. The biography of this 17th-century Dutch artist will serve as a foundation to explore the breadth of Rembrandt's activity as a painter, printmaker and draftsman. Special attention will be paid to original artworks by Rembrandt and his contemporaries in St. Louis collections. Prerequisite: Consult Course Listings.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 421 Selected English and American Writers: American Fiction and Poetry, 1880-Present

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 422 Byzantine Empire

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 445 Seminar: Reality Theater

Rotating upper-level seminar. Senior seminar normally offered each semester and meant to satisfy the 400-level requirement for the drama major.
Same as L15 Drama 445

Credit 3 units. A&S IQ: HUM


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U98 MLA 4471 Archeology of the St. Louis Region

This course introduces students to archaeology of the St. Louis region and explores the cultures of its early inhabitants, from 12,000 years ago through the 19th century. We study a number of very important archaeological sites in the region, including Mastodon State Park, where artifacts of human manufacture were found in direct association with extinct mastodons dating to about 12,000 years ago, and Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site (a World Heritage Site) in Illinois, dating to the Mississippian period AD 1050-1350. We also examine methods and theories used by archaeologists to understand archaeological remains.
Same as U69 Anthro 3471

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 448 Talking Back to Your TV


Same as U48 Comm 343

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 4522 In Syknesse and in Healthe: History of Medicine in the Middle Ages

What do we mean by medicine in the Middle Ages? How did medieval societies structure health care? How did they react to disease and health? How did different kinds of patients get treated differently by different kinds of practitioners? What relationship does medieval medicine have to modern medicine? By looking at institutions shaped in the Middle Ages, like the university and the hospital, at illnesses like the plague and leprosy, and at groups of patients and care givers like women and surgeons, we will explore medieval medicine as it developed from late Antiquity to the late Renaissance. Seminar class. Prerequisite: Western Civilization.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 4625 Venice

A seminar focusing on the art of Venice, in particular on Bellini, Giorgione, and Titian. Special attention to the international reputations of these three artists and to problems of patronage, connoisseurship, and interpretation. Prerequisite: Art-Arch 361 or 362, or permission of the instructor.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 4625

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH A&S IQ: HUM Art: AH


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U98 MLA 465 South Asian Societies: Politics and Culture


Same as U25 PolSci 464

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 4671 Michaelangelo: Painter, Sculptor, Architect

An examination of his life, his work, and his time. A consideration of the artist's painting, sculpture, and architecture in relation to his contemporaries and to the broad historical, political, and artistic currents of his day. Prerequisite: Art-Arch L01 361 or Art-Arch L01 362.
Same as L01 Art-Arch 3671

Credit 3 units. A&S: TH Art: AH BU: HUM


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U98 MLA 468 History of American Journalism

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 469 Television and American Culture: 1950-1970

Since its widespread debut in the 1950s, television has become the primary medium for the circulation of information and stroytelling in American society. This course takes a thorough look at the introduction of this art form and explores its contributions to the American cultural imagination its first 20 years. We will view and analyze series from the 1950s and 1960s, and consider the representation of nation, family, gender, ethnicity, and other issues debated in norms and policies of this era. We will also examine the introduction of television into the home, exploring how an appliance could affect notions of community and family. Students will leave the class with an understanding of the complicated and contested role television played in the establishment of the post-WWII economy and as a mainstream arbiter of 1960s social movements. Prerequisite: Consult Course Listings.
Same as U89 AMCS 469

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 4703 Hegel and Hegelianism


Same as U66 RelSt 4703

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 472 Social Theory and Anthropology

A seminar on social theory and its ethnographic implications. Course combines major works of modern social theory, including Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, with current work by contemporary anthropologists, such as Clifford Geertz, Eric Wolf, Marshall Sahlins, and Fredrik Barth, and ethnographers from related disciplines, such as Pierre Bourdieu and Paul Willis. Prerequisite: previous anthropology course work or permission of instructor.
Same as L48 Anthro 472

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Art: SSC


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U98 MLA 4721 American Art and Culture, 1945-1960

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 474 Hermeneutics: Interpretation of Sacred Texts

Traditional and contemporary methods in interpreting sacred texts. Special themes: Jewish midrash, the medieval fourfold sensus, documentary hypotheses, literary genres, form criticism, structuralism, and deconstruction. Texts draw from the Bible, the Quran, the Odes (China), and Bhagavad Gita. Authors include Augustine, Rashi, Aquinas, Luther, Wellhausen, Bultmann, Ricoeur, Schleier-Macher, Derrida, and others.
Same as U66 RelSt 474

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 480 Women's Health Care in America

This course will provide a broad historical overview of women's health care in America. We will begin with an examination of midwifery in 18th century America, then look at the increasing medicalization of childbirth and the new emphasis on women's biological difference in the 19th century, and finally study changes in the medical profession and their impact on women's health care in the early to mid-20th century. Through a wide range of material — including primary texts, such as doctor-authored tracts, diaries, letters, and fiction, as well as secondary material written by historians, feminist scholars, and medical writers — we will trace the changing perceptions and conceptions of women's bodies and health. Authors will include: Catherine Maria Sedgwick, Nathanial Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Dr. Mary Putnam Jacobi, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Louisa May Alcott, Joan Jacobs Brumberg, and Natalie Angier.
Same as U89 AMCS 480

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 4941 Milton

Major poems and prose works in relation to literary and intellectual currents of the 17th century. Prerequisite: Consult Course Listings.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 500 Independent Study

An independent research project under the supervision of a member of the faculty of the MLA program. Approved proposal must be presented at the time of registration. Open only to students admitted to the MLA program. For more information, contact the Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs at 314-935-6700.

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5002 Sounding Tudor Music

We will enter 16th-century English soundscapes, from the soaring brilliance surrounding Henry VIII (Taverner), to the determinedly earthbound tones of Edward VI's Chapel Royal, to the judicious mix of music, religion, and politics marking the beat of Elizabeth I's court (Tallis and Byrd). Exploring the wedding of notes to words, the class will study Byrd, who keeps an Englishman's head; Morley and Weelkes, who yield to Italian fashions; and Dowland, who charts a musical path that mingles British identity with a well-traveled sense of innovative international styles. We will look to (and try out) royal dance in order to experience, both rhythmically and politically, the cadences of court life. All "musically untutored" are welcome.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5010 Practical Criticism: Theorizing Buffy the Vampire Slayer


Same as U65 ELit 301

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U98 MLA 5012 Family and Community Ties

This course examines documentary and imaginary accounts of family and community, to consider how individuals shape their support systems in a changing society. We will explore how ideas about family and community differ according to economic, racial, ethnic, educational, and personal experience. Materials include memoirs such as Jesmyn Ward, The Men We Reaped, and Alexandra Styron, All the Finest Girls; testimonials from the StoryCorps project, Ties That Bind; fictive journalism in Paula Hawkins, The Girl on the Train and in Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Chronicle of a Death Foretold; Lauren Acampora's stories, The Wonder Garden; the novels, Matt Johnson, Loving Day, selections from Jonathan Franzen, The Corrections, and Carolyn Chute, Treat Us Like Dogs and We Will Become Wolves.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 502 Directed Research

An independent research project under the supervision of a member of the faculty of the MLA program. Approved proposal must be presented at the time of registration. Required for the Master of Liberal Arts. Open only to students admitted to the MLA program. For more information, contact the Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs at 314-935-6700.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 503 Master's Thesis

An independent research project under the supervision of a member of the faculty of the MLA program. Approved proposal must be presented at the time of registration. Open only to students admitted to the MLA program. For more information, contact the Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs at 314-935-6700. Prerequisite: U98 502.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 504 Directed Research Project - II

For students undertaking a 6-unit, two-part directed research project. Requires permission from dean in University College, department coordinator, and instructor.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 505 Darwin, Marx, and Wagner

This seminar studies three works completed in 1859 that profoundly influenced all western thought to the present day: Karl Marx's Treatise on Political Economy, Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species Natural Selection, and Richard Wagner's Tristan and Isolde. We will explore how these three works share remarkable and intriguing parallels: an inherent belief in evolution; materialism permeated with romanticism; faith in progress; and a similar ("dialectical") approach to understanding the dynamics of change and the application of change in all aspects of the natural and social the world. These three works will enable the class to consider aspects of 19th-century intellectual, economic, and social sociopolitical history. No special knowledge of biology, political science, or music is required.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5051 The Legacy of Greece

Poetry, tragedy, comedy, history, philosophy, mathematics — the ancient Greeks not only had a word for it (which eventually became our word for it) but they also produced works in these fields which succeeding cultures have either eyed with suspicion or idealized. The class will read several of the major Greek authors, including Homer, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Thucydides, and Plato; and also look at the various controversies regarding the usefulness of Greek culture in the first centuries of Christianity, among the Founding Fathers of the American republic, and in the contemporary argument over the so-called "canon." Prerequisites: admission to MLA program or graduate standing and permission of program coordinator in University College.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 505L Darwin, Marx, and Wagner

Three works completed in 1859 profoundly influenced all western thought to the present day: Karl Marx's Treatise on Political Economy, Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, and Richard Wagner's Tristan and Isolde. Aside from a proximity in time, these three works share a number of remarkable and intriguing parallels: an inherent belief in evolution; materialism permeated with romanticism; faith in progress; and the application of change in the world. Using these three works, this seminar explores the parallels to understand something about the various strands of 19th-century intellectual and social history. No special knowledge of biology, political science, or music is required.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5061 Literature of Catastrophe

This course will explore the reasons why and the means by which writers represent catastrophic events. We will consider how literature responds to mass violence, asking what obligations and what limitations art has in the face of traumatic memory and experience. Do we beautify and thus make intelligible what is unspeakable? We will consider whether bearing witness reveals or obscures historical truth. Works to include: Primo Levi, The Drowned and the Saved; Albert Camus, The Plague; Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front; film clips from Claude Lanzmann, Shoah; and Marguerite Duras and Alain Resnais, Hiroshima Mon Amour. We will also read studies addressing issues, both ethical and literary, related to narrating disaster, including M.W.G. Sebald, The Natural History of Disaster; Shoshana Felman, Testimony; and Saul Friedlander, Trauma, Memory, and Transference.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5071 John Dewey's Vision of American Democracy


Same as U89 AMCS 507

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5072 Humanizing Technology

In order to explore the ways that technology had changed the way we read and write, this course examines the myriad ways that technology and the humanities interact in shaping culture and identity in contemporary society. We will study the interactions between the internet and literature, examining the ways that short stories by Jorge Luis Borges and novels like Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson have first shaped the ways that we use and think about the internet. We will investigate new approaches to writing inspired by digital technology with the Bolivian novelist Edmundo Paz Soldán's novel Turing's Delirium. The class will consider the development of a technological posthuman identity in society, literature, and films through an analysis of Philip K. Dick's novel Ubik, the film The Matrix, along with the work of cultural theorists Donna Haraway ("A Cyborg Manifesto") and Katherine Hayles (How We Became Posthuman). To examine the development of digital humanities as a discipline, students will read selections from Jerome McGann, Radiant Textualities and Schreibman, Siemens, and Unsworth, A Companion to Digital Humanities.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 508 Vienna 1900

Credit variable, maximum 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5081 Looking East, Looking West: Changing Perceptions in and of China

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 508T The Idea of Rome

Ancient Rome, ironically titled "the eternal city," has fascinated poets and philosophers for millenia. The grandeur and decline of its civilization and culture have served both to guide and to warn. We will examine how over the centuries writers have meditated on the meaning and nature of Rome. Readings from Cicero, Virgil, Tacitus, Augustine, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, and Gibbon.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 509 American Thinkers and Philosophers

Examination of the works of such major philosophical writers as Emerson, Peirce, James, Santayana, and Dewey; and supplementary readings with a range of selections that emphasize the philosophic, historical, scientific, religious, or literary and artistic context in which these philosophers wrote. For example, supplementary readings may include selections from Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Hegel for philosophic background; from Darwin and Einstein for scientific context; and from Shakespeare and Whitman for literary background. Students are encouraged to examine works of art, magazines, and journals from the same period as each philosophical writer. Discussion of such philosophic topics as metaphysics, religion, art, morals, and scientific method.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5101 Nonfiction: Reading and Writing the Memoir

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5113 Western Social Thought and Contemporary Social Problems

A study of the predominant ideologies and myths within Western social thought, their historical origins (Locke, Rousseau, and Marx), and how various societies and countries confront the modern dilemmas of our civilization: e.g., religious, racial, and national tolerance/intolerance; the welfare state and the market; technology and globalization; liberalism and individual rights; social stratification and inequality; work and/or unemployment; immigration; and the role of women.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5114 Seminar: The Middle Ages: Languages and Histories of Desire


Same as L14 E Lit 511

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5115 Psychology of Personality

Review of basic theoretical orientations to the understanding of personality and complex human behavior. Overview of related techniques, procedures, and findings of personality assessment and personality research. Discussion of critical issues in evaluation of personality theories. Prerequisite: Psych 100B.
Same as L33 Psych 353

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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U98 MLA 5121 The First Amendment: Free Speech and Free Press

We will consider First Amendment history and theory with attention to current events. In the war against terrorism, how should the Supreme Court balance the demands of free speech and national security? Should the Supreme Court interpret the First Amendment to permit the government to punish "hate speech" about members of minority racial and religious groups? Are computer-generated images of children perfoming sexual acts protected by the First Amendment? Can government make speech denying the Holocaust a crime? Although most of the materials are Supreme Court decisions, analysis of First Amendment issues is not the exclusive province of lawyers and judges.
Same as U89 AMCS 512

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5132 The Sociological Imagination

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5134 The Rhetoric of Law in American Society

This course will introduce students to the classical rhetorical tradition (with which virtually all of the Founding Fathers were familiar), and will then examine a variety of American legal (and other) materials in order to determine what role the rhetorical tradition generally, and the rhetoric of law specifically, have played in shaping American legal and political culture. Course requirements include a series of weekly writing assignments.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5135 American Social Character: Individualism and Community

An exploration of the American social character from its earliest beginnings to the present day. The class will seek the sources of American values, and the political, economic, and social forces that have changed these values over the centuries with an emphasis on the conflict between individualism and the need for community. Readings begin with two key sources of American values from British political thought: Hobbes and Locke. Tocqueville will then teach us about the American social character in the 1830s, a set of values that is still with us but under attack in the present day. We will see these values expressed in practical terms by Emerson, Thoreau, Lincoln, and Martin Luther King. Henry Adams will give us a picture of the corruption of America's earlier values in the period after the Civil War. We will also read from three analytical works on changes in American social character.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5143 From Bodghaya to Boston: The Buddhist Path

An exploration of the historical and doctrinal developments of Buddhism from its inception in fifth century BC India to its transformations in East and Southeast Asia and finally its coming to the West. The emphasis will be on the ways in which Buddhism arose, expanded, modified, and continues to change in response to varying historical contexts, cultural horizons, and existential needs. Readings will include selections in translation from a variety of Buddhist religious texts, as well as poetry, autobiographies, and other types of readings. Some background in Buddhism or Asian history and thought helpful but not required.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5144 Creation and Cosmology

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5145 Religion in American Culture: Narratives in Personal Spirituality


Same as U89 AMCS 530

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5146 Judaism in the Time of Jesus

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5147 The Scriptures of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

Among the objectives of this course will be: to enquire into the nature of religious language and texts; to ask in this connection what scriptures are, how they are formed historically, and why they come to be accepted as authoritative by certain communities; to become familiar with the most important methodologies used to interpret scriptural texts; to apply approaches from the discipline of comparative religion in order to gain an understanding of how the three monotheistic faiths, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, differ and what they have in common.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5150 Hollywood on Hollywood


Same as U89 AMCS 5151

Credit 3 units. UColl: ACF


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U98 MLA 5151 Discovering the Heartland

The central regions of the United States, most especially the prairies, were slow to find their place in America's sense of itself. Called the "Great American Desert" on many early 19th-century maps, the interior grassland — with time and cultivation — proved able to feed a vast nation. What travelers dismissed as a "waste" and described as a kind of inland sea separating east from west came to epitomize America, became its heartland. This course will examine literary, political, and historical texts that mark our passage through this transition of thought and place. Readings will include exploration narratives, scientific reports, political speeches, and historical commentary (as well as — of course — novels and poems).

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5161 Utopia and Literature

Various classical texts describe ideal "utopian" societies, descriptions which form a kind of "utopian discourse," a way of talking about reality as something different from what it actually is. This seminar seeks to provide the proper conceptual background for a better understanding of how certain modern writers have used these utopian patterns of discourse to characterize an alien society. Beginning with Plato's Republic, Augustine's City of God, and Sir Thomas More's Utopia, students will isolate several important features of utopian discourse and study how these traits and ideas reappear in more recent works by writers from "outside" the societies they write about, e.g., the United States (Tocqueville, Democracy in America, and Baudrillard, America) and Japan (Barthes, Empire of Signs). Two papers required: one at midterm on classic utopian texts; the second at the end of the semester, in which students are invited to apply what they have learned to any of a number of modern works.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5162 The Western Canon: Pros and Cons

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5163 Lewis and Clark — Exploration, Encounter, and Culture


Same as U89 AMCS 516

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5171 Augustine's Major Writings: Humanity's Place in the Universe

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5173 The Origins of Political Thought in Classical Antiquity

In order to understand the origins and development of politics and political ideas in Greco-Roman antiquity, we examine several of the most influential imaginative and philosophical texts of this period, including selections from the works of Homer, Thucydides, Sophocles, Plato, Cicero, Virgil, and Augustine. What is the nature of politics altogether and in its historically distinctive expressions in the ancient Mediterranean? What is the relationship between political ideas and the development of democratic, republican, and monarchic constitutions? Why is an understanding of ancient politics significant for citizens of modern democratic nation-states? To answer such questions, we concentrate on ancient ideas about virtue and vice, political education, citizenship, and the distribution of power and wealth.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 518 Religion, Culture, and Society

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5182 Reality Fiction: Autobiography in the Arts

This seminar explores the complex relation between autobiography and truth. Focusing on the issue of authenticity in art, we investigate how authors' depictions of their lives alternately mirror and distort the events they lived. Our examination of "confessional" works, including Shakespeare's Tempest, Ibsen's Master Builder, Lawrence's Sons and Lovers, Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night, Williams's Glass Menagerie, Plath's Bell Jar and Shepard's Buried Child, allow us to consider not only evidence of the authors' own lives but also how novels and dramas interrogate personal history to create meaning in art.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5191 Exploring America's Musical Landscape

Through recorded examples and archival video footage, students will investigate the rich and diverse character of America's musical landscape with particular emphasis on understanding American music and musical practice within the larger context of American culture. Music studied will include the traditional folk and religious music of the Appalachian Mountains and Mississippi Delta, jazz, blues, country music, popular music, and America's distinctive contributions in the realm of classical music. No previous musical background required.
Same as U89 AMCS 519

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5200 Visions and Re-Visions: 19th-Century Arts and Society

In this multidisciplinary course we will examine how 19th-century literature, painting, and music reflected, as well as affected, contemporary Western life, both in Europe and the United States. We will consider how different writers and artists attempt first to represent and then to modify, either directly or indirectly, several important sociopolitical and economic situations of their time, such as the institution of marriage; increased urbanization and industrialization; and the spread of nationalism. Included among the literary works to be studied are Romantic,Transcendentalist, and utopian texts by Balzac (Père Goriot), Sand (The Country Waif), Thoreau (Walden), Hugo (Last Day of a Condemned Man), Baudelaire ("The Painter of Modern Life"), and Robert Owen (A New View of Society). In the field of art history we will analyze the social impact of paintings from the Realist and Barbizon schools. In the areas of theater and opera we will study works by Ibsen (A Doll's House), Maeterlinck (Pelleas and Melisande), and Wagner ("Opera and Drama" and examples of his Ring Cycle).

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5203 America: Through a Glass Darkly

This course studies depictions of America by non-Americans. We will examine the social, political, and economic aspects of their accounts and their influence on America's beliefs, policies, and international reputation. The class will consider fundamental values as well as ethnic and gender-based differences. Comparing historical periods from both western and eastern perspectives, students will read texts written during the past three centuries from England, France, Germany, Cuba, and China. For the colonial/Revolutionary War period, we will study Charlevoix, History & Description of New France and Crèvecoeur, "Letters from an American Farmer." Nineteenth-century readings include Tocqueville, Democracy in America; Frances Trollope, Views of Society and Manners in America; Dickens, American Notes; Francis Lieber, The Stranger in America; and newspaper articles by José Martí. Our discussions of the 20th century will focus on Kafka, Amerika; Francis Hsu, Americans and Chinese; Beauvoir, America: Day to Day; and Baudrillard, America.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5204 Patterns of Thought

Exploring how patterns shape our understanding, this seminar will focus on recurring motifs in literature and art. Our study of patterns will refer to thematic elements as well as to repeated figures, structures, and designs. We will examine the function of mirrors in paintings by van Eyck, Velazquez, and works of the Italian Renaissance, as well as the "mirror function" of paintings within paintings in works by Dutch Golden Age painters Vermeer and his contemporaries. We will also study the importance of mirroring in short stories by Borges and novels about novel writing ("metafiction"), including Krauss, History of Love; Auster, The City of Glass; and Knausgard's autobiographical novel My Struggle. The class will analyze the distinctive narrative structures of Lafayette, The Princesse de Clèves and Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, novels in which art figures prominently. We will contrast these works with Flaubert's Madame Bovary, where art is eclipsed by consumerism, and Nolan's film Memento, which plays with chronological sequencing. We will further consider the patterns of urban landscapes evident in Abelardo Morell's camera obscura images of world capitals and Andreas Gursky's crowds and large-scale images, contrasting these contemporary works of photography with breaks in associative patterns in the surrealist paintings of Magritte.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5212 Crow on Withered Branch: The World(s) of Japanese Poetry

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5213 Celtic Literature and Religion: Ancient Druids to Modern Ireland

The Celts from ancient to modern times, with an emphasis on the greatest works of medieval Celtic literature. Major themes of the course include the Celts as a part of the classical world, Celtic religion, the Druids, the role of women in Celtic culture, the Arthurian Tradition, and the influence of the Celts on later literature and poetry, including that of Yeats and Heaney.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5214 Voices of Latin American Literature

A study of the masterpieces of Latin American literature from the Conquest to the present. Themes include the Conquest from the perspective of the conquerors as well as the conquered; the challenge to religious authority from Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz in the 17th century; the crisis of national identity and the racial question in the 19th century; political turmoil during the period of "the Dirty War." Readings include selections from Columbus, Cortes, Leon Portilla, Sor Juana, Echeverria, Marti, Rodo, Paz, Fuentes, Vallejo, Neruda, Borges, Garcia Marques, Ferre, Gambaro, Dragun, and Menchu.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5216 Magical Realism in Latin American Literature and Film

We will explore some of the most intriguing and original works of the 20th century by major Latin American writers such as Jorge Luis Borges, Isabel Allende, and Nobel Prize winner Gabriel Garcia Marquez. As North America's exotic Other — geographically and culturally — Latin America is often depicted in terms of "magical realism," a style that combines fantastic, mythical, and dreamlike themes with artistic imagination. Our discussions will concentrate on magical realism in literary texts, but we will also draw from pertinent background materials, including a selection of feature and documentary films from Cuba, Mexico, and Argentina. Prerequisite: Consult Course Listings.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5217 Paint it Black: Understanding American Film Noir

A product of highly diverse influences and traditions, film noir is known for its stylized visual aesthetic, crackling dialogue, moral ambivalence, and existential paranoia. Its style and language continue to inform filmmakers in Hollywood and worldwide. This seminar positions the aesthetic shapes and traumatic narratives of film noir within the context of American culture and film history during the war and post-war years. As importantly, it explores film noir as a test case in order to probe notions of film history, genre, and authorship, of cultural and intermedial transfer and the popular. Required screenings will take place during the second half of each week's class. Films will likely include many of the following: The Maltese Falcon, Phantom Lady, Double Indemnity, Laura, Gun Crazy, Somewhere in the Night, The Glass Key, The Blue Gardenia, and Chinatown. Prerequisite: Consult Course Listings.

Credit 3 units. UColl: ACF


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U98 MLA 5218 European Cinema Today: The Films of Krzysztof Kieslowski, Lars von Trier, and Tom Tykwer

This seminar is designed to explore and compare the work of three major European directors: Kieslowski (Poland), von Trier (Denmark), and Tykwer (Germany). Kieslowski's Dekalog, The Double Life of Veronique, and Red, White, Blue; von Trier's Zentropa, Breaking the Waves, The Idiots, Dancer in the Dark, Dogville; and Tykwer's Winter Sleepers, Run Lola Run, The Princess and the Warrior, and Heaven have fundamentally reshaped the landscape of European cinema since the early 1990s. Although they differ significantly in terms of their style and narrative focus, their films all raise intriguing questions about the nature of time and history; the role of chance and identity; and the process of filmmaking itself. Moreover, the work of all three directors urges us to rethink the role of European cinema in an era of international co-productions and transnational orientations. Students will have the option of viewing the films on Monday evenings or of borrowing them from the library to view before class.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5223 The Dysfunctional Family in American Drama

One can say without fear of exaggeration that American drama is family drama. In countless plays from O'Neill to Tennessee Williams to Wendy Wasserstein and Sam Shepard, the family and its complex series of love-hate relations has been seen by our best playwrights as a microcosm of America itself, and its dreams and illusions. This course will examine the theme of family relations on the American stage from 1920 to the present day. Along with a close study of individual plays we will also research the psychological and social underpinnings of the family in America, asking ourselves about its meanings, myths and functions. Plays include: O'Neill, A Long Day's Journey into Night; Williams, The Glass Menagerie; Miller, Death of a Salesman; Albee, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?; Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun; Fierstein, The Torch Song Trilogy; Norman, 'night Mother; Wasserstein, The Sisters Rosenzweig; and Shepard, Buried Child. A large number of these plays have been made into films, and we will take advantage of these to supplement our analyses of the playscripts.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5232 Appreciation of Poetry

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 524 The American Dream: Myth and Reality

This course will examine the origins and history of "The American Dream." What do we mean when we use this term? How does it resonate and influence our politics, advertising, and especially the arts? We will discuss the experience of immigration and assimilation, how foreigners with different cultural backgrounds enter American society. Beginning with the implications of America's image as a "brave new world" in European thought and philosophy (including Shakespeare's The Tempest), and the prescient view of our culture by de Tocqueville and others, we will examine how the dream of success and wealth has been depicted and employed in theater, fiction, cinema, and the visual arts. Texts include: Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Williams's The Glass Menagerie, Miller's Death of a Salesman, West's Day of the Locust, Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun, Albee's "The Zoo Story" and "The American Dream," and John Guare's The House of Blue Leaves. We will consider modern painters whose work offers a commentary on the dream, such as Edward Hopper and Andy Warhol. We will also study cinematic innovators from Charlie Chaplin to Orson Welles and Francis Ford Coppola who have used "The American Dream" as significant elements in their work.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5242 The Literary 1960s: Years of Hope/Years of Rage

Taking its subtitle from the one used by Todd Gitlin for his monumental sociological study of the 1960s, this seminar will focus on the diverse and exciting literature of this often chaotic, always fascinating period. Readings will include popular and influential books by Jack Kerouac, Ken Keasy, Tom Wolfe, Germaine Greer, Eldridge Cleaver, and Joan Didion. Attention will be paid not only to important new artistic, political, and social movements, as seen by these writers, but also to films and music of the time.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5243 American Voices

Certain major novelists and poets exhibit a complexity of vision and voice that seems distinctively American. Emphasis will be on the personal and cultural sources and shaping of literary voice, its power to render and even create our experience, and its characteristic American registers: Romantic, metaphysical, discursive, lyrical, and colloquial. Selections may include Melville (Moby Dick), Henry James, Faulkner, Hemingway, Frost, Stevens, Bellow, Ellison, Gass, and DeLillo.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5252 Minority Experience and the American Novel

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 526 Film and Psychoanalysis

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5260 Bridges to/from Cuba: Art, Literature, and Social Change

We explore Cuba as a fascinating and much-misunderstood country, wrought by the rise and fall of plantation economy, capitalism, and socialist utopia. Using a combination of texts and documentary materials gathered by the instructor during her research trips to Cuba, we learn how longstanding patterns regarding race, national identity, class, and gender relations have evolved in(to) the socialist, and now the "post-socialist," context. The class explores the intertwined histories of the United States and Cuba, on one hand, and the legacy of the sugar-and-slavery complex (the Black Atlantic), on the other. Topics include ethnic and gender identities, the myth of Che Guevara, "revolutionary" forms of artistic experimentation, African-Cuban religions, popular music, political oppression and dissent, and the Cuban-American counterpoint of migration and diaspora. Texts by Antonio Benítez Rojo, Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Alejo Carpentier, Antonio José Ponte, Marilyn Bobes, Ana Méndez, and Achy Obejas, Nancy Morejón, Reina María Rodríguez, and Excilia Saldaña, as well as selected essays and political speeches. Films, to be viewed outside of class, include Strawberry and Chocolate, Guantanamera, and The New Art of Making Ruins. Screenings will take place on campus, or students may use ARES to view them on their own.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5261 Romance

Romances tell how lovers learn about the world and themselves by loving, suffering, and developing (perhaps) as individuals. An exploration of the genre over time, space, and culture, including examples from elite and popular literatures. Primary readings may include ancient Greek novels, the tales of the Arabian Nights, European medieval works (Chretien de Troyes's Perceval or Yvain, Gottfried von Strassburg's Tristan, or Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde), Persian and Chinese romances, European modern classics (Abbe Prevost's Manon Lescaut or E. Bronte's Wuthering Heights), and contemporary sizzlers from the local supermarket. Several films will also be assigned and discussed, as will selected secondary readings.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5262 Love in the Novel/Love of the Novel

The focus in this course will be our own pleasure in reading. How do we assure that this pleasure survives into the next century now that the visual, the sound bite, the video clip permeate our lives? We will attempt to answer this question by rediscovering one of the great love stories of all times, Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina. Daniel Pennac's Reads Like a Novel, a recent work about the pleasures of reading for pleasure, will guide us as we isolate elements of Tolstoy's story that compel us, that teach us about our own needs and desires as readers. We will explore how the pleasure of reading is inseparable from the power of texts to influence us. The class will consider novels whose love stories are molded by the characters' own reading and writing: Austen's Northanger Abbey, Flaubert's Madame Bovary; Proust's Combray; Skßrmeta's The Postman; Bernhard Schlink's The Reader, and Peter Greenaway's film The Pillow Book. Far from being immune to or eclipsed by history and politics, the pleasure of reading will be shown to reflect the reader's appreciation of the larger fabric of society, where passion is set against war, prostitution and economic constraints, mental illness, adultery, and prejudice.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5263 The City in American and European Modernism

The city has played an ambiguous role in the modern European and American imaginations. For some, the city offers personal freedom in an environment of social diversity and experimentation, while for others the city is a place of isolation, alienation, and fragmentation. We will consider these and other conceptions of the city, with particular attention to the relationship between the city and modernist aesthetics. The course will examine literature, theory, and film, including James Joyce's Dubliners, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead, William Gibson's Neuromancer, Lang's Metropolis, and Ridley Scott's Bladerunner.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5264 Literature of Affliction

This course examines the prevalent themes of sickness and healing in literature. Writers have long represented illness of the wound both as an individual catastrophe and/or as a symptom of more widespread social ills. As a corollary there has emerged the figure of the healer, whose status reflects the urgency societies feel in the face of death. In addition to studying this fundamental tension between the malady and the cure, we look at how writers use the theme of affliction as a vehicle to examine other aspects of the human condition: what sickness means; how we heal; how standing at the precipice of death can sharpen our perception of life. Readings include Sophocle's tragedy Philoctetes; The Book of Job; Charlotte Perkins Gillman's "The Yellow Wallpaper"; Freud's Dora; Thomas Mann's "Death in Venice"; William Styron's Darkness Visible; Paul Monette's AIDS memoir, Borrowed Time; and a variety of short accounts of addiction by such authors as Edgar Allan Poe, Leo Tolstoy, and Dorothy Parker.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5267 City Limits

City limits are the physical boundaries that delineate a center of population, commerce, and culture. Whether the labyrinthine streets of an actual city, the confines of a royal court, or the highly ritualized space of the convent, the circumscribed space that we explore offers itself up as a map to human experience that is at once alienating and exhilarating. We examine ways in which the city breeds anonymity, struggle, power, and pleasure in texts and images from the Middle Ages through the present. Works to include Christine de Pizan's Book of the City of Ladies, Mme de Lafayette's Princesse de Clèves, paintings by Johannes Vermeer and his contemporaries, Denis Diderot's Nun, Nikolai Gogol's Petersburg Tales, Saul Bellow's Adventures of Augie March, Michel Butor's Passing Time, Italo Cavino's Imaginary Cities, Amos Gitai's film House in Jerusalem, and contemporary photographs by Andreas Gursky and Abelardo Morell.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5272 Art, Society, and Culture in America's Gilded Age

The relationship of artistic and literary representation to the historical transformations of American society from the end of the Civil War to the turn of the century. The course material is arranged thematically around such social and cultural issues as city and country, contesting visions of culture, ethnicity, gender, imperial identity, gilded age utopias, technology, and the frontier. Readings focus on primary sources: essays, novels, and short stories by such authors as Whitman, Veblen, Howells, Twain, Bellamy, Chopin, and Jewett. Artists, architects, and sculptors include Eakins, Sargent, Homer, Remington, Sullivan, Saint-Gaudens, and others. Prerequisite: admission to Master of Liberal Arts or MA in American Culture Studies program.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5273 Land and Place in Modern Literature

Modern life divides us between belonging and rootlessness, attachment and mobility, pastoralism and urbanism, nationalism and the "global village." These poles define each other in tension: attachment to local place, for example, is deepened by the experience of placelessness, while the drive toward internationalism prompts the turn toward region and native soil. Literature of the past hundred years reflects and defines these issues though story, setting, and character. Readings include works by Tolstoy, James, Proust, Lawrence, Forster, and Lampedusa. Weekly writing assignments.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5280 Rembrandt, Vermeer, and The Golden Age of Holland

This course will study the originality of Rembrandt van Rijn and Jan Vermeer, the two principal artists of the Dutch Golden Age. We will study why paintings like Rembrandt's Nightwatch, his many self-portraits and biblical scenes, prints and drawings allow his work to have an enduring appeal. We will also examine Vermeer's elegant scenes of contemporary life, such as the Girl with the Pearl Earring and Woman Holding a Balance, in conjunction with works by Frans Hals, Judith Leyster, Gerard Terborch, Jan Steen, and others. These artists will help us to appreciate how, amidst a war for independence, conflict over religious freedom, and lucrative overseas trading, the Dutch Republic saw the first modern economy, a new cosmopolitanism, and advances in science and industry.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5282 Shakespeare's Tragedies

In this course we will closely read some of the greatest works of art: Shakespeare's major tragedies — Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear — with some attention to earlier tragedies and a late romance, The Winter's Tale, as it recapitulates and transforms tragic structures and themes. With a working assumption that Shakespeare is both "of an age" and "for all time," our perspective will be dual. On the one hand, we will consider some of the historical, cultural, and literary conditions that make Shakespeare a Renaissance writer. On the other hand, we will contemplate and appreciate the astonishing resonance that these dramatic poems carry across time, as meditations about evil, suffering, dignity, and transformation.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5290 Exploring Medieval Literature

This course will read widely in medieval literature, from Britain and Western Europe. We will investigate how authors depict battle (Beowulf, the Song of Roland), love (troubadour poetry and romance), travel, and quest (Mandeville's Travels, the Book of Margery Kempe). In addition, we shall study work by some of the most important writers in the emerging vernacular literatures of medieval Europe: Marie de France, Jean de Meun (Romance of the Rose), Dante, Boccaccio, Machaut, Chaucer, and the anonymous poet of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Texts will be studied in translation, sometimes in full and sometimes in extract, and will be placed in their historical and cultural contexts.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5292 The Age of Victoria

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5293 Literature & Culture of the Later Middle Ages

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5294 Images of Empire

The course will examine a variety of ways in which the immense and expanding British Empire centrally informed the literature and popular culture of the late 19th and early 20th century in Britain. We will examine accounts of explorers like Mary Kingsley, David Livingstone, and Henry Stanley as they trekked through Africa and the Near East to spread the gospel, seize territory, trade, discover, praise, and deplore. We will study the literature produced by Anglo-Indians like Rudyard Kipling, Englishmen born in India negotiating the complicated terrain of native and cultural "homes." We will examine the writings of those who went to the East to govern, such as George Orwell and Leonard Woolf. In addition, the class will explore adventure fiction by authors such as H. Rider Haggard, A. Conan Doyle, and Wilkie Collins, for whom the Empire was primarily a fertile ground for projected fantasy, desire, and terror. We will also look at some images of empire, including political cartoons, advertising, and motion pictures.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5295 Love and the Exploration of the Self in Medieval Literature

Love was a source of fascination and anxiety for many medieval writers. The class will examine the ways the greatest writers of the Middle Ages thought of love, considering it in its spiritual, sexual, parental, filial, human, and divine forms. Through exploring love in all of its forms, medieval writers developed many of the tools for understanding the self that we continue to use today. Readings begin with the Confessions, Augustine's great spiritual autobiography, and proceed through French troubadour poetry, Marie do France's Lais, Chretien de Troyes's Erec and Enide, Dante's Inferno, Boccaccio's Decameron, the anonymous Pearl, and selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5300 Modernism

This course will explore modernism's search for new ways to narrate experience in a radically changed world. Traveling across time and space, from East to West, and into modern cities and uncharted locations, we will explore how writers and filmmakers in the 20th and 21st centuries experiment with innovative forms of artistic expression in response to the growing influence of foreign cultures; technological changes and developments in science; the globalization of world markets; and issues of identity, gender, race, and ethnicity. The class will analyze modernism as a rejection of social and political norms, a crisis of identities, and the fragmentation of life. Works to include Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis; James Joyce, Dubliners; Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Amos Tutuola, My Life in the Bush of Ghosts; Italo Calvino, If on a Winter's Night a Traveler; Jorge Luis Borges, Fictions; Alejo Carpentier, The Kingdom of This World; Salman Rushdie, East, West: Stories; and Don DeLillo, The Body Artist, as well as films by Christopher Nolan (Memento); Akira Kurosawa (Rashomon), and Michelangelo Antonioni (Blow-Up).

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5301 Against the Grain: Transgression and Controversy in Modern Art

We examine the public controversies that surround the development of modern art over the last 150 years, to probe the question of the social functions of transgressive art. After reviewing key theories of the avant-garde, we analyze both the persona of the modern artist (Van Gogh, Picasso, Pollock) and the place of women artists in the revolutions of modernism (Bonheur, Cassatt, Kahlo). We next consider modernism's testing of limits in asking what is (and is not) art (Duchamp and Brancusi). We study the most controversial exhibitions (from the First Impressionist Exhibition of 1874 to the Nazi Degenerate Art shows), and the challenges raised by modern artists' treatment of the body and of politics. We end with debates waged over public art in St. Louis, and with recent controversies over public funding of contemporary art. No prior knowledge of art history required.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5310 Mind-Brain and the Arts

This course considers ways that recent research in cognitive science might shed light on four traditional topics in the philosophy of the arts. Each topic will focus on a certain type of art (although not exclusively) and on one or more mental faculties: How do pictures represent? How do we understand stories and what roles do they play in the life of the mind? What do we like in the arts and why, according to psychological theories based on brain research? What is style in the arts and can there be a scientific explanation of its history? A parallel concern is with how distinctive features of the arts might shed special light on the nature of the mind. Readings will include essays by prominent art historians, philosophers, psychologists, and scientists.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5321 Abnormal Psychology: The Major Mental Disorders

This is an introductory course in psychopathology or the scientific study of mental health disorders. The course will include definitions, theories, and classification of abnormal behavior. Content will focus on symptoms, classification, prevalence, etiology and treatment of mental health disorders, including mood, anxiety, eating, schizophrenia spectrum, substance use, and personality disorders. Prerequisite: Psych 100B.
Same as L33 Psych 354

Credit 3 units. A&S: SS A&S IQ: SSC Arch: SSC Art: SSC BU: BA


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U98 MLA 5341 Relativity and Quantum Ideas

Two major advances in physics have revolutionized our thinking in this century: relativity and quantum theory. These theories represent departures from intuitive physics which had been largely based on everyday phenomena and experimentation of modest scale. Many of the central ideas of relativity and quantum theory can be reviewed without any more mathematics than high school algebra. There will be introductory and complementary material such as Newtonian mechanics as the prelude to relativity, and classical ideas about the nature of light and waves before introducing quantum ideas.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5351 Mark Twain - Humor and Politics in 19th-Century America

Mark Twain's unique status as a writer who has become a cultural icon cannot be explained merely in terms of literary gifts and aesthetic achievement. He is America's best-known author in large part because of his engagement with issues central to our institutions and political practice. The "southwestern" humorists who profoundly influenced his work used humor as a basis for political commentary and cultural criticism, a tradition to which Twain's own satirical treatment of everything from Congress to juries belongs. This course examines both the literary achievement of Mark Twain and the ways in which his writings provide a critique — built over a lifetime — of American culture, probing the central issues of our politics (domestic and international), and our complicated relationships to one another.
Same as U89 AMCS 535

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5353 Cultural Geography: Mapping Paris

This course will study how, over centuries and across national borders, Paris remains central to our sense of culture. Our focus on Paris will extend from the 16th century to the present via pairings that join the French capital with other European cities. We will study King Francis I's expansion of the Louvre in Paris in conjunction with the proliferation of castles in the Loire Valley, the court's patronage of Italian artists, and the arrival of Leonardo da Vinci in Amboise. The class will examine the 17th-century court of Versailles as it casts a shadow over Paris, and we will compare the art of the French monarchy with that of Vermeer and his contemporaries in Delft and Amsterdam. We will analyze views of Paris and London the 18th century that show new architectural features and home decor, contrasting paintings of Boucher, Fragonard, and Watteau in France with those of Hogarth and Gainsborough in England. We will follow middle class desire in the 19th century as it radiates through Paris in Flaubert's Madame Bovary and into Vienna via Freud's Dora. We will consider how Butor's Change of Heart experiments with Paris and Rome in ways that Auster's New York Trilogy extends into an illusionistic game. These studies will be complemented by a look at modern photographs of Paris and New York by Cartier-Bresson, Doisneau, Stieglitz, and others.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5361 Darwin and Evolutionary Controversies, Past and Present

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5363 Evolution and Society

This course will examine the Darwinian theory of evolution by natural selection in both its original form (Darwin's 1859 edition of On the Origin of Species) and its fuller development up through the evolutionary synthesis of the 1930s through the 1950s. The class will also explore the impact of Darwin's theory on concepts of human society and human beings' place in nature. Readings, which will be mostly from primary sources, include writings by Darwin and his contemporaries as well as by subsequent generations of social thinkers who tried to apply Darwinian theory to society (including social Darwinism, eugenics, sociobiology, and evolutionary psychology). The course will end with a discussion of evolution and religion, from Bishop Wilberforce through the Scopes Trial to contemporary "scientific" creationism.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 537 Physics and Controversy

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 538 Desire and the Marketplace

We will explore how authors depict the impact of the economy on amorous relations, paying close attention to how market forces constrain the role of women. We will examine the striking similarity of women's roles in various societies as commercial relations take hold in a market economy and give rise to an increasingly visible bourgeoisie. Discussion will focus on how economic relations influence social relations; the role of individuals within this market; the pressures on women and marginal groups; the commodification of society; the role of the mother, the virgin, and the prostitute. Readings include Saikaku, The Life of an Amorous Woman; Defoe, Moll Flanders; Balzac, Eugenie Grandet; Flaubert, Madame Bovary; Ba, So Long a Letter; Emecheta, The Joys of Motherhood; and Borges, "Meeting in August."

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5381 Art in St. Louis History


Same as U89 AMCS 538

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5399 Jewish, Muslim, and Christian Scriptures: The Formation of Community

Reading the sacred texts of the Abrahamic religions, we will examine how Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions use cultural symbols to create community. Since Christianity arises from and in opposition to Judaism, and since Islam both extends and also breaks with Judaism and Christianity, we will explore how the development of "difference" contributes to perceptions of religious identity. Noting that one of the important functions of cultural symbols is to counter threats of chaos and meaninglessness, we will further consider how Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities use symbols to construct a humanly meaningful sense of "world" and of "history," concepts that are essential for maintaining group cohesiveness.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 540 Islamic Movements of Reform, Revival, and Revolution

The continuous reassessment of Islam, as a religion and as a social, intellectual, and political movement since its inception 14 centuries ago and an examination of contemporary Islamic movements as only the latest manifestation of long-term trends.
Same as U85 IA 493

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5401 Islam and Modernity

During the past three decades, the rise of political Islam in countries with Muslim majority populations has brought the Islamic tradition into the public limelight. Previously unknown Islamic terms such as "jihad" and "fatwa" have entered the English language, and media coverage of various aspects of Islam have become routine. This course offers a framework for understanding the place of Islam in the modern world by considering its global presence in social and cultural life, as evident in literature, art, religious practice, and politics. We consider the recent history of Muslims worldwide, the legacy of colonialism, political Islam, religious reform and modernism, gender, spirituality, literacy and artistic expression, as well as religious and cultural pluralism. We also study the question of Islamic identity as informed by contemporary Muslim figures of diverse leanings, such as Sayyid Qutb, Alija Izetbegovic, Shabbir Akhtar, Fatima Mernissi, Abdulkarim Soroush, Osama bin Laden, and Fethullah Gulen.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5402 The Ball is Round: The Global Culture of Soccer


Same as U85 IA 440

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5403 Midlife Questing in the Odyssey and Don Quixote: The Long Road Home or Breaking Loose

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5411 In Search of Love: From the Court to the City

This course examines the politics of love as it dominates social life from the Italian Renaissance, when lack of dowries sent many women to convents, through present-day relationships shaped by race, religion, and class. Reading Sarah Dunant's Birth of Venus, which chronicles a young woman in Florence under the Medici, and Mme de Lafayette's Princesse de Cleves, which recounts a young woman's struggles at the French court, we will study the institution of marriage as it conflicts with lovers' passion. Interiors by artists Pieter de Hooch, Johannes Vermeer, Emanuel de Witte, Gainsborough, Boucher, Fragonard, and others enable us consider the domestic sphere and women's roles in the early modern period as they extend from the decorous to the thinly veiled erotic object of male desire. Novels set in Paris (Emile Zola, Nana), London (Hanif Kareshi, The Buddha of Suburbia) and Dakar (Mariama Bâ, So Long a Letter), and films set in Los Angeles (Paul Haggis, Crash) and Mexico City (Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Amores Perros [Love's a Bitch]) expose the tensions of modern relationships as they play out against the backdrop of fast-paced capital cities. Films to be viewed outside of class.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5413 Vietnam and America

Examination of the impact of the Vietnam War on the United States

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5416 Urbis & Civitas: Florence Beyond the Tourist's Gaze

This course explores the urban history of Florence, Italy, from its origins as a small Roman town at the edge of an Etruscan settlement to its contemporary position as the industrial, commercial, and cultural center of a sprawling metropolitan area along the Arno river valley. We will study Florence's long history as it comprises periods of rapid development, symbolic and intellectual pre-eminence, and political influence, on the one hand, and economic stagnation, internal conflicts, depopulation, and subjection to external control, on the other. Our focus on both the urbis (the built environment, the physical realm) and the civitas (the social constituency, the civic sphere) will reveal Florence to be a complex artifact that is constantly shaped and reshaped by human action and social imagination. In order to look beyond the tourist image of Florence that we have inherited from the late 19th century, we will examine what defines our experiences and conceptions of a city. This investigation will include comparisons of Florence with other urban centers and discussion about the meanings of urban memory, culture, and citizenship. Readings will address the study of the urban history of Florence as well as urbanization, urbanism, and the public sphere, including works such as An Outline of Urban History by Silvano Fei, Grazia Gobbi Sica, and Paolo Sica; A Brief History of Florence by Franco Cardini; and Florence: Architecture, City, and Landscape edited by Marco Bardeschi.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5420 History of American Architecture

"The perennial architectural debate has always been, and will continue to be, about art versus use, visions versus pragmatism, aesthetics versus social responsibility. In the end, these unavoidable conflicts provide architecture's essential and productive tensions; the tragedy is that so little of it rises above the level imposed by compromise, and that this is the only work most of us see and know." —Ada Louise Huxtable. This course examines the ideological, political, economic and social determinants that have shaped the look of American architecture. Starting with a thorough survey of the historic development of American architecture pursued in a chronological reading of styles, forms, and major architects, the course examines key tensions in the development of American architecture. Students will undertake readings, site visits, and discussions that probe whether there is a distinctly American mode of creating architecture, and what contingencies illuminate or obscure that mode. The central questions of this course: What are the definitive characteristics of American architecture? Does the American practice of architecture espouse an exceptionalism, or does it emulate international precedents (or both)? Do the characteristics of American architecture reveal the social, economic, and political structures of its production? Ultimately, can we read an American building to reveal sense of national identity, individual political agency, the evolution of gender roles, the assertion of disciplinary and economic power, and the evolution of the American artistic sensibility? This course fulfills the Humanities and Fine Arts distribution requirement for the AMCS MA program.
Same as U89 AMCS 420

Credit 3 units. UColl: ACF, ACH


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U98 MLA 5422 White House Bound: Presidential Elections Past and Present

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5423 Conservatism and the American Right in the United States


Same as U89 AMCS 4881

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5432 Religion in a Global Context


Same as U85 IA 543

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5441 The Spanish Civil War: Literature and History

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5442 The Spanish Symbiosis: Christians, Moors, and Jews

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 545 The Origins of Political Virtue


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U98 MLA 5450 Global Cinema: A Love Story

Focusing on the ubiquity of love stories in cinema, this seminar will explore connections between romance, anxieties, and aspirations in contemporary society. Studying celebrated films from the United States (When Harry Met Sally, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind), Latin America (Love in the Time of Hysteria), Europe (Amelie, Café au Lait), South Asia (The Lunchbox), and East Asia (2046, Happy Together), among others, we will consider how love functions as a symptom of what ails society. The class will examine not only personal relationships but also social structures, economic systems, and political conflicts. Topics will cover issues of class, gender, and race; the construction of economic identities; and the formal structures and aesthetics of film. Students will be required to watch two films per week as well as to complete selected short readings.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5454 Medicine and Morality in Global Perspective

What does it mean to be sick? What does it mean to be a patient, or a healer? Is it possible to imagine a universal morality in which our understanding of medical ethics is shared among peoples worldwide? What are some of the ethical dilemmas associated with genetic testing, organ transplants, and global disparities in health? Framed by these questions, our class will examine how culture shapes our concepts of disease and our expectations for treatment. Similarly, we will consider how social class, race, and ethnicity influence both health and access to health care worldwide. Our readings will focus on medical history and the evolution of diagnosis and treatment of disease; health disparities; the varying relations of patients and healers in different cultures; African health crises; public health controversies; folk illness in Latin America; medical technologies and ethical conflicts; and other issues of medical anthropology pertaining to the prevention and treatment of illness and the healing process around the globe. We will also discuss three documentaries: Frontline: Sickness Around the World; Donka: X-Ray of an African Hospital (Doctors Without Borders); and Dan Rather Reports: Kidney Pirates (with anthropologist Nancy Scheper-Hughes).

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5461 The Rise of Civilization in the New World

This course examines the Inca empire in Peru and the Maya and Aztec empires in Mexico through inquiry into the roots, development, form, and evolutionary history of pre-Columbian civilization in each region from its earliest times to the rise of the classic kingdoms. We will discuss selected artistic accomplishments. Students wishing to take U69-310 for graduate credit should register for U69-546.
Same as U69 Anthro 310

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U98 MLA 5477 Optimal Plans

"Optimal plans" refers to an ideal functioning, a "best-case scenario" for literary, artistic, and political projects. Between the initial conceptualization of a plan and its actualization, however, much can go awry. We will also be concerned with the implications of failed plans for those in power and for their subjects, as well as for us as readers and viewers. The course will take students from the Renaissance through the present and back again in order to highlight the goals and the actual flow of ideas that have shaped our thinking. In the first week, we will present the classic treatise about political planning, Machiavelli's Prince, followed by The Mandrake, in which Machiavelli comically demonstrates key aspects of his political theories. In the second week the class will test Machiavelli's theories by applying them to Tomasi di Lampedusa's brilliant historical novel, The Leopard, which traces the decline of the Sicilian aristocracy at the time of Italian unification. Leonardo Sciascia's novel, The Day of the Owl, will then allow the class to consider what happens when two sets of orders, state and mafia, vie for supremacy. In week three Harriet Stone will explore the art of celebrated 17th-century Dutch artist Vermeer, taking into account both the painterly perfection of his intimate scenes and the ambiguous moral message conveyed by his paintings. The class will compare the use of perspective in Vermeer's works to the brilliant strategies executed by the nefarious heroes of Laclos's Dangerous Liaisons. The following week students will examine the tragic complexities of birthright, inheritance, and family structure in Maupassant's Pierre and Jean and in Coetzee's Disgrace. During the final week of the course, we will identify strategic goals, both personal and political, underlying the great exploration of Christopher Columbus. Reading his diary and letters, the class will measure what Columbus (as inspired by Marco Polo) hoped to find in the New World against what he did in fact find there in order to consider the explorer's ultimate legacy and how, from our modern perspective, we reassess his accomplishments.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5481 The Court of Louis XIV

The court of Louis XIV represents the apogee of monarchic rule in France. The class willl study the king's role in the court and the elaborate system of court etiquette devised to support it as well as the architecture of Versailles and its spectacular gardens to see how the court's patronage of the arts reflects its political ambitions. Readings in the literature of the period including some of France's greatest writers of comedy (Moliere), tragedy (Racine), the psychological novel (Lafayette), and philosophy (Descartes and Pascal) express how the monarchy fashioned an ideal of itself that substituted for the real, mortal man who was king. All readings in English.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5482 Wanderlust: An Exploration of Travel


Same as U89 AMCS 548

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5491 Terrorism and Terrorists

An analysis of the use of terror as a political weapon, both historically and through its contemporary forms. The course explores the many forms terrorism takes; the mind, personality, and intentions of those involved in it; and the problems of dealing with terrorism and terrorists, including counter-terror, official interdiction, security measures, negotiation, and legislation.
Same as U85 IA 5491

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5492 Law and International Politics

Study of international law in the context of the politics of international norm-making and conflict resolution. Current problems in international law such as human rights norms, immigration and refugee issues, the law of the sea, expropriation, and the international liability of multinational corporations.
Same as U85 IA 415

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5497 Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

Though we often read Shakespeare in isolation, he developed his art in the vibrant theatrical culture of late 16th- and early 17th-century London, whose audiences discovered his distinctive qualities in comparison with other playwrights. In this course, we will read plays both by Shakespeare and by some of his most interesting contemporaries — including Kydd, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Beaumont, and Fletcher — and consider why some plays are "of an age" and others "for all time." This course will count toward the major in English literature for day students.
Same as U65 ELit 497

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENE


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U98 MLA 550 Politics and Film


Same as U89 AMCS 550

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5501 Combating Cruelty

This seminar focuses on large-scale acts of violence such as war, torture, and genocide as they are expressed through "ordinary" acts of cruelty that degrade, isolate, exploit, and terrorize individuals. The class will analyze individual instances of envy, greed, anger, and brutality in novels depicting the early modern through the present, including Dunant, Birth of Venus; Racine, Phèdre; Laclos, Dangerous Liaisons; Zola, Thérèse Raquin; Faulkner, Sound and the Fury; Schlink, The Reader; Coetzee, Disgrace; and Barnes, Sense of an Ending, as well as examples of contemporary cinema by Kassovitz (Hate) and Haneke (The White Ribbon). Our goal is to consider the causes and effect of violence in order to appreciate aesthetic and ethical responses that combat the destructive effects of cruelty. Students enrolled in the DLA program should register for U98 581.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 551 Philosophy of the Environment

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5510 Environmental Ethics

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 552 Great Economists and Their Times

Exploring the importance of economic ideas not only to the world of work and money but also to our must fundamental notions of politics, society, and ethics, we will examine texts by Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Mandeville, Adam Smith, Malthus, Mill, Marx, Veblen, Keynes, Galbraith, and others. We will consider the central problem these writers sought to resolve, their assumptions as connected to the historic and cultural milieu in which they wrote, the moral issues they address, and the influence of their ideas on successive generations.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 553 Vermeer and His World

The enveloping light and dappled reflections, the sureness of touch coupled with painterly flourish, the richness of color, the serenity of mood, the conspicuous structure of composition, and the nuances of gesture, expression, and psychology make Vermeer a favorite of nearly everyone who encounters his work. This course examines recent developments in the study of the celebrated 17th-century Dutch painter's technique, subject matter, and artistic and social milieu.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 554 Paris and New York

Cultural icons, Paris and New York represent brilliant successes in art, theater, film, and urban design. We will study how the French and Americans define themselves through their premiere cities, notably in the works of leading writers, artists, and architects. The themes of innovation and tradition, order and disorder, integration and isolation as represented by Emile Zola, Marcel Proust, Baron G.-E. Haussmann, Edouard Vuillard, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alfred Stieglitz, Henry James, Jackson Pollock, Adam Gopnik, Woody Allen, and others will guide our examination of the powerful hold Paris and New York have on our imagination. We will study history as reflected in public spaces (monuments, museums, and the streets themselves), exploring how each city functions as a locus of collective memory even as it fashions the future.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 555 Environmentalism and the Wild

This course will examine a series of reactions against the traditional teaching that the natural world exists for our (human) use. On the one hand, this anthropocentric (human-centered) tradition has lead to the widespread destruction of the natural world, and many philosophers have called for a biocentric (life-centered) or ecocentric (environment-centered) ethic. At the same time, we have seen a shift from viewing the unsettled world as a "howling wilderness" — a wasteland to be redeemed by human development and domestication — to a widespread sense that human life needs contact with the wildness of the natural world in order to be truly free. Readings will start with Thoreau and move up through contemporary environmental ethics and theories of the wild, including the poles of conservation vs. preservation.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5550 Truth, Law, and Fiction

This course considers whether, in real life as in fiction, where enormous energy is devoted to finding the perpetrators of crime and bringing them to justice, justice is always served by the law. As part of our investigation into how we convince others of what is right, we will examine a wide range of texts, focusing on the role of storytelling for the sake of justice in both fiction and historical judicial records. We will explore interactions between literature and law in East Asia, the U.S., and elsewhere, using the art of narrative construction as a means to understand the establishment of truth claims and the creation of persuasive arguments. Readings to include crime reports from 18th-century China and "crime case" (gong'an) fiction from that period; films such as Rashomon and modern crime fiction from Japan; recent legal musings by U.S. Judge Richard Posner; Truman Capote's novel In Cold Blood; plays about justice by German playwright Friedrich Dürrenmatt; explorations of justice and revenge in Ariel Dorfman's Death and the Maiden; and reports from truth and reconciliation projects in several countries. Our critical and theoretical readings will range from Peter Brooks's Troubling Confessions to selected articles from the Critical Legal Studies debates, sections from Michael Riffaterre's Fictional Truth, and others.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 556 Rembrandt van Rijn

This seminar explores the connections between the life and work of Rembrandt. The biography of this 17th-century artist serves as a foundation to explore the breadth of Rembrandt's activity as a painter, printmaker, and draftsman. Special attention is paid to original artworks by Rembrandt and his contemporaries in St. Louis collections. Same as U98 MLA 420.


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U98 MLA 5565 From Mikado to Makudo: A Literary View of Japan

This course will survey Japan's social and cultural history through selected literary works that span the seventh century (Mikado) to the present day (Makudo). Our readings — including fiction, poetry, drama, and personal writings — will serve as guides to key historical epochs: the aristocratic culture of the Heian era (Tale of Genji), the warrior society of the medieval era (Tale of the Heike), and the insular Tokugawa period (Basho's haiku). Novels by Soseki, Tanizaki, Mishima, and Oe will expose the complexities of modern Japan. Students will gain an appreciation of Japan's unique heritage, social complexity, and place in East Asia and the world today.

Credit 3 units. UColl: NW


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U98 MLA 558 On Account of Illness: Stories on Affliction and Recovery

This course will examine the fundamental tension between the malady and the cure. We will look at how writers use the theme of affliction as a vehicle for examining other aspects of the human condition: what sickness means; how we heal; how standing at the precipice of death can clarify our understanding of life. We will consider the difference between texts that focus uniquely on the malady (e.g., Greek tragedy) and those that posit the possibility of recovery (e.g., the story of Christ healing the leper, the raising of Lazarus, Christ's own resurrection). Studying a variety of materials, we will observe how attitudes toward illness and healing have evolved over time, particularly with the advent of modern medicine. We will also consider how literary narratives of illness and recovery relate to other narratives concerning illness, including those of patients to doctors; memoirs; and reporting by journalists. Our study of the narrative of illness will enable us better to listen to stories of suffering, whether those of friends, relatives, or patients. Works studied include Old and New Testament narratives; Sophocles' Philoctetes, Thomas Mann's Death in Venice, William Styron's Darkness Visible, and Joan Didion's Year of Magical Thinking, and others.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 559 How the Earth Works

This course will reveal the remarkable, intricate, complex, and sometimes violent processes that have formed and continue to shape our planet. We will study how geologic events, largely through climate change, have dramatically shaped the course of human history and civilization. In our investigation of these transformations, we will trace earth's history, from its spectacular formation through our projections of its future. The class will explore how the earth's surface is a battleground between the dueling forces of plate tectonics (making mountains) and erosion (tearing them down), and we examine how humans have become the single greatest agent of geologic change on earth.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5590 Metamorphoses: Ancient Myth and Modern Drama

Taking as our focus modern Western theater's adaptations of ancient Greek myths and histories, we will consider why modern dramatists choose to reenact such powerful stories as Orestes's matricide, King Oedipus's incest, and Medea's revenge. Reading O'Neill's Desire Under the Elms, Eliot's Family Reunion, Sartre's Flies, Williams's Orpheus Descending, and Shaffer's Equus, among other works, we will examine the power of myth to convey essential truths about human experience. Our interpretations will be informed through an appreciation of the original Greek sources as well as through critical theories that emphasize mythic and archetypal representations of literature. A final project involves the PAD's production of Mary Zimmerman's Metamorphoses (based on Ovid) in Edison Theater.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 560 A Survey of Allegory in Italian Art

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5600 Latin American Fiction: The Boom and its Aftershocks

Focusing on what makes the 20th-century Latin American novel rival the great European novels of the 19th century (works by James, Flaubert, Tolstoy), this course will focus on the great "boom" years of the 1960s, when the productivity and influence of Latin American literature spiked. We will consider the origins and continuing influence of this Boom both culturally and artistically, beginning with three of the most important novels of the period: Carlos Fuentes's Death of Artemio Cruz, Julio Cortázar's Hopscotch, and Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude. We will trace a series of literary reactions both in favor of and against the Boom, examining novels and short stories by Isabel Allende (The House of the Spirits), Laura Esquivel (Like Water for Chocolate), Alberto Fuguet (Shorts), and Edmundo Paz Soldán (Turing's Delirium), with an eye to topics such as magical realism, women's roles in society, love and adultery, violence, and the role of art and popular culture in contemporary society.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 561 Two Art Histories: Artemisia Gentileschi in Text and Exhibition

A study of renowned 17th-century painter Artemisia Gentileschi based on historical documents, her paintings, and scholarly writings that focuses on both on her art and its legacy as celebrated in a recent exhibition in Rome, New York, and St. Louis. Though marginalized in earlier art historical accounts of her period, Artemisia has received much critical attention as a figure of enormous determination and ambition who became an exceptional artist. Casting aside some of the expectations for 17th-century women, she created an oeuvre of great originality that had not been properly appreciated until very recently. She offers an exciting case study for our examination of how museum exhibitions shape artistic identity. Visits to the Saint Louis Art Museum and critiques of other exhibitions will enable students to acquire hands-on experience of the various facets of museum work, including the collection, care, and display of paintings, the production of an exhibition catalog, and the educational interpretation of works of art.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5611 Visions and Revisions: 19th-Century Arts and Society

In this multidisciplinary course we will examine how 19th-century literature, painting, and music reflected, as well as affected, contemporary Western life, both in Europe and the United States. We will consider how different artists attempt first to represent and then to modify, either directly or indirectly, several important sociopolitical and economic situations of their time. Included among the literary works to be studied are Romantic, Transcendentalist, and utopian texts by Balzac, Sand, Thoreau, Hugo, Baudelaire, and Owen. In the field of art history we will analyze the social impact of various paintings from the Realist and Barbizon schools and, in the areas of theater and opera, works by Ibsen, Maeterlinck, and Wagner.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5621 Culture and Politics of India


Same as U85 IA 562

Credit 3 units. UColl: IAA


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U98 MLA 563 Shakespeare

Shakespeare's sometime friend and rival Ben Jonson described him and his works as "not for an age but for all time." Subsequent history has extended and broadened this idea, with Shakespeare having proven to be the most portable of writers across not only time but also place and culture as well. We will read representative plays from every period and genre of Shakespeare's career — comedy, history, tragedy, romance — asking which elements (political, social, religious, theatrical, literary) are indeed "for an age" and which seem to transcend it. Plays will include Midsummer Night's Dream, Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, Antony & Cleopatra, Winter's Tale, and The Tempest.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 564 You Are What You Eat: Animal Rights to Hunting

This course will explore how who we are and who we aspire to be is determined in part by what we eat. We will investigate what motivates philosophers and scholars of religion to consider where food comes from; whether we eat communally or alone; whether we eat with gratitude, mindfully or thoughtlessly, quickly and/or with pleasure. Our class will consider the ethical foundations of what we eat, including contemporary animal rights philosophy, and aspects of the philosophy of hunting. Readings will include Tristram Stuart's Bloodless Revolution: A Cultural History of Vegetarianism; Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma; Matthew Scully's Dominion: The Power of Man, The Suffering of Animals, and The Call to Mercy; Peter Singer, Animal Liberation; Tom Regan, The Case for Animal Rights; Jose Ortega y Gasset's Reflections on Hunting, and other works.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 567 Translating Worlds

This course studies different forms of cultural translation, that is, the communication of knowledge, behavior, and language from one culture to another. We will examine how an author reworks earlier and foreign traditions, adapting ideas and practices for which there may be no direct equivalent in the author's own culture. In the new cultural setting, do the roles of men and women shift? Do questions of ethnicity, class, religion, and sexuality become more pronounced, or do they fade away? These questions will frame our study of historic cultural encounters, colonialism, exile, and other processes that shape modernity. Students will explore two dramatic points of cultural intersection: Tolkien's modern reworking of Sir Orfeo, a medieval version of the classical myth of the musician Orpheus and his wife Eurydice; and Goethe's Italian Journey, the journal of the German writer's experiences with the people, art, and history that he encountered during his travels. We will see how diaspora and migration shape perceptions in works by Alejo Carpentier (The Kingdom of this World), Salman Rushdie (East/West), and Jhumpa Lahiri (Interpreter of Maladies). The class will also learn how different scholarly and artistic fields address the concept of cultural translation, including cultural anthropology (James Clifford), film adaptation (Louis Malle's Vanya on 42nd Street, inspired by Chekhov's play), and colonial history (Vicente Rafael). In addition, we will discuss how digital technology affects cultural translation today (Google Translate, and projects using geographic information system [GIS] technology). Students will consider challenges facing the humanities and the sciences as these technologies advance. Will it be possible to make all knowledge, and all culturally-specific information, universally accessible? No foreign language experience required.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 568 Race and Ethnic Relations in the United States


Same as U89 AMCS 568

Credit 3 units. UColl: ACS


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U98 MLA 570 The Body in Pain

This course explores a range of discourses about pain, including theoretical and technical ones.
Same as U65 ELit 370

Credit 3 units. UColl: ENL


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U98 MLA 5700 Freud Then and Now

Our class will trace how, from its classical beginnings in the late 19th century through the present, psychoanalysis has played a major role in science and medicine, in the academy, and in our everyday lives. We will study how Freud's ideas continue to inform our culture and how they continue to influence research in the humanities. Through close readings of Freud's major works, such as The Ego and the Id; The Interpretation of Dreams (excerpts); Civilization and Its Discontents; and Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality, we study the broader social and cultural implications of psychoanalytic theory. We examine the influence of these texts on a century-long interrogation of the unconscious that includes Lacan, who reworked Freud´s ideas; feminists such as Luce Irigaray and Judith Butler, who challenged Freud's teachings, and, more recently, Slavoj Zizek, who engages Freud's theories in a critical analysis of culture. Students will consider not only the importance of dreams and desires but also how the unconscious shapes gender relations, cultural production, and even politics.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5701 The Making of the Modern Catholic Church

This course will look at three church councils that put their stamp on the Catholic Church at key moments in its history, making it what it is today. The first section will be dedicated to the Fourth Lateran Council (1215), which defined the high medieval church as an all-encompassing papal monarchy with broad powers over the lives of all Europeans Christian and non-Christian alike. In the second section, we will turn our attention to the Council of Trent (1545-1563), which responded to the threat posed by the Protestant Reformation by reforming the Catholic church, improving clerical education, tightening ecclesiastical discipline, and defining and defending Catholic doctrine. We will conclude with a consideration of the largest church council ever, Vatican II (1962-1965), which reformed the liturgy and redefined the church to meet the challenges of the modern, multicultural, postcolonial world.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 571 Eros Unveiled: Sexuality in Western Culture

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 572 Genre Cinema: The Art of Variation

This seminar explores the role of genre as a powerful means of mainstream cinema to tell compelling stories and structure the viewer's identification. Even though genres such as the melodrama, the western, the romantic comedy, the musical, the science fiction film, the horror film, or the thriller are often seen as quite predictable staples of dominant filmmaking, they also inspire and allow for considerable formal experimentation and thematic departure. This seminar examines the logic of some of the most important genres of Hollywood filmmaking while at the same time emphasizing the creative possibilities of working with certain genre expectations. We discuss such classic representatives of certain genres as Imitation of Life, Stagecoach, His Girl Friday, The Day the Earth Stood Still, 42nd Street, and North By Northwest, and then juxtapose these paradigmatic examples with more contemporary films reworking or pushing the limits of the classical genre system such as Far from Heaven, Lone Star, Blade Runner, Dancer in the Dark, and Breathless.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 573 Questions of the Soul in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

We will explore how all three western monotheistic traditions have subjected the topics of personal identity, human individuality, and selfhood to intense scrutiny in their theological, philosophical, and spiritual writings. Consistent with deliberations by major thinkers on the notion of the soul that lies at the heart of these concerns, we will explore whether the soul has a beginning and an end, or is instead eternal; how and why the soul is connected to the body; how souls relate to other souls; and the nature of the relation between human souls and God. Readings to include seminal works by Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Tertullian, Augustine, Saadia Gaon, Ghazali, Avicenna, Maimonides, and Aquinas.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5741 Studies In American Cultural Identity: The Civil War to The Jazz Age

In his "Letters From An American Farmer," J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur wasn't the first nor will he be the last to encounter the complex issues revealed by an exploration of American identity. We will do so together in this course by studying selected post-Civil War literature, music, visual art, and popular culture to see how cultural patterns of the past provide a benchmark for understanding complexities today. This underscores the central theme of the course: how visual, written, and performed art is rarely produced in cultural isolation, but rather from a matrix of social, geographic, psychological, political, historic, spiritual, economic, scientific, and accidental developments. This is a course about the cultural bridges which span divisions of time and place, and how we sharpen our understanding of both. This course fulfills the Humanities distribution requirement for the AMCS MA program.
Same as U89 AMCS 474

Credit 3 units. UColl: ACF, ACH


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U98 MLA 577 Love, Sex, and Marriage in the Christian Tradition


Same as U66 RelSt 477

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5801 Staging Atrocity: Theatre of the Holocaust


Same as U21 Drama 480

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 581 DLA Interdisciplinary Proseminar

This gateway course to the DLA program provides training in analytic thinking and writing through critical examination, discussion, research, and progressive writing on interdisciplinary topics such as historical narrative, text and image, the life of the mind, the creative impulse, the good life, and other major themes that have guided scholarly investigation and research in many fields. Students will analyze works from at least four disciplines (e.g., literature, art history, film, history, philosophy, women and gender studies, religion, political science, anthropology, history of science) and write a progressive research paper, submitted and reviewed incrementally, that demonstrates comparative, analytic, and critical thinking.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 590 Critical Passages

Intellectual history is punctuated with moments of theoretical and artistic brilliance after which nothing is ever the same. We will study a selection of some of the most dramatic of these events as they mark the fields of art, literature, history, science, philosophy, and architecture: the use of linear perspective (Alberti, Leonardo di Vinci); the invention of the printing press (Gutenberg Bible); the Inquisition (Galileo); the theorizing of the rational subject (Descartes); the influence of capitalism and the rise of the middle class (Balzac); the impact of psychoanalysis (Freud, Duras); the advent of photography (Adams, Cunningham, Gursky) and film (Tykwer's Run Lola Run); and the survival of the skyscraper in a post-9/11 world.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 591 Old Europe: The Quality of Life

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5941 Milton

This course analyzes the world of John Milton, arguably the greatest of English poets and also among the greatest of polymaths. The class will examine how, for Milton, extensive learning rhymed with magnificent poetry. Having read every significant book published up until his time in an attempt to educate himself "to perform justly, skillfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war," Milton produced an epic poem of such scope and power that "the world would not willingly let it die." We will closely read that poem, Paradise Lost, as well as his other major poems (Paradise Regained; Samson Agonistes), adding lesser poems and prose works to illuminate his development as a writer and thinker, and his relation to theological, literary, intellectual, and political currents of the 17th century.

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 5971 Adult Learning Strategies and Practices


Same as U08 Educ 597

Credit 3 units.


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U98 MLA 883 Continuing Master's Research

Required for Master of Arts students with incomplete work. Must be taken as Audit only.


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